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October 2017 TCNN

October 2017

VOLUME 18 EDITION 10 Comanche Nation Public Information Office, Lawton, OK www.comanchenation.com October 2017 Courtesy Photo LaDonna Harris Receives Woody Guthrie Center’s 2017 Changing World Award Americans for Indian Opportunity Press Release A world-renowned activist for Native American Rights, LaDonna Harris, accepted the third annual Oklahoma Changing World Prize on September 24 at the Woody Guthrie Center in downtown Tulsa. The Oklahoma Changing World Prize is given annually by the Woody Guthrie Center, presented in 2017 by the Chickasaw Nation. “The Woody Guthrie Center is proud to recognize the work of LaDonna Harris with the Oklahoma Changing World Prize,” said Woody Guthrie Center Executive Director Deana McCloud. “As an advocate for equality, peace, and social justice, Ms. Harris follows in the footsteps of Woody Gurthrie as a guiding force for positive change in our world.” Harris, a citizen of the Comanche Nation, is a human rights activist and civil rights leader. As president and founder of American for Indian Opportunity, Harris brought Native American issues to a national stage. She has been active in the environment, world peace, and women’s rights movements. Harris recently served as an Honorary Co-Chair for the Women’s March on Washington in January. Born in Cotton County, Okla., Harris was raised by her maternal grandparents. After helping to integrate the town of Lawton, Okla., Harris founded the first statewide Indian organization - Oklahomans for Indian Opportunity. While married to U.S. Sen. Fred Harris (D-OK 1964-73), she became the first senator’s wife to testify before a congressional committee. Throughout her career, Harris served on many national boards, like the Girl Scouts, National Organization of Women, Independent Sector, and five U.S. Representative to UNESCO. She has influenced the struggle for social justice nationally and internationally, and her work changed the country’s perception of contemporary Native peoples, providing an influence in See, HARRIS 2017 AWARD, Page 2 HALLOWEEN FUN CHILDREN FROM THE COMANCHE NATION YOUTH PROGRAM TRY ON MASKS FOR SOME HALLOWEEN GIGGLES. CAN YOU GUESS WHO THEY ARE? Nacona Caddo, Lee Komsetaddle From left- Arlene Schonchin, Lulu Tahdooahnippah, Anthony Monoessy Jr. Secretarial Election Passes by Over 240 Votes Raises the number of signatures needed for the Recall Process By Jolene Schonchin/News Staff Absentee ballots were counted the afternoon of September 8 by members of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Southern Plains Regional Office to determine the future process of Comanche Nation recall petitions. The Certificate of Results of Election- Secretarial Election was released with the following, “Pursuant to a Secretarial Election authorized by Tim LaPointe, Acting Regional Director on July 10, 2017, the attached Amendment A to the Constitution of the Comanche Nation was submitted to the qualified voters of the Comanche Nation on September 8, and was ratified by a vote of 787 for and 541 against with 6 cast ballots found separated or mutilated, in an election witch at least thirty percent (30%) of the 1,988 entitled to vote cast their ballots in accordance with Article XIII of the Constitution of the Comanche Nation. “ The voting results for Amendment B to the Constitution of the Comanche Nation was also released through a Certificate of Results of Election- Secretarial Election. “Pursuant to a Secretarial Election authorized by Tim LaPointe, From left- Lee Komsetaddle, Modesto Schonchin, Hunter Holsted Acting Regional Director on July 10, 2017, the attached Amendment B to the Constitution of the Comanche Nation was submitted to the qualified voters of the Comanche Nation on September 8, and was ratified by a vote of 808 for and 548 against with 6 cast ballots found separated or mutilated, in an election witch at least thirty percent (30%) of the 1,988 entitled to vote cast their ballots in accordance with Article XIII of the Constitution of the Comanche Nation.” Both Certificates of Results of Election- Secretarial Election were signed by members of the Comanche Nation Secretarial Election Board, Sherry Lovin-Chairperson, Vivian Holder- Board Member, Adele Mihesuah – Board Member, and Willie Pekah – Board Member. “Stability is needed,” said Comanche Nation Chairman, William Nelson. “Stability is needed so the Comanche Nation can move forward in a positive direction.” Article 8, Section 2 of the Comanche Nation Constitution will now read, “The Comanche Tribal Council may at a meeting duly called specifically for the purpose, recall any officer or committeemen for neglect From left front- Nacona Caddo, Lee Komsetaddle. Back, from left- Modesto Schonchin, Hunter Holsted of duty or conduct that has brought disrepute upon the tribe. Such a meeting shall not be unless a petition signed by 10% of the Tribal Council requesting recall is submitted to the Tribal Chairman. The Tribal Council shall consist of all members of the Comanche Nation who are eighteen (18) years of age or older. The recall of only one officer or committeemen may be initiated per meeting called for this purpose.” Article 5, Section 3(c) will now read, “When he is so requested by a petition signed by 10 % of the Tribal Council setting forth the purpose of the meeting consistent with the constitution. The Tribal Council shall consist of all members of the Comanche Nation who are eighteen (18) years of age or older.” Some tribal members complained about not receiving a request to receive a voting ballot, and others complained about the Comanche Nation Complex making registration packets available. Other tribal members applauded the passing of the election, saying money was wasted on previous recalls, and it was long overdue. Pewewardy Takes Initiative Towards a Charter School Stacey Heminokeky/News Staff Tribal member and educator, Cornel Pewewardy, is at the beginning stages of opening doors to a Charter school located in the community. Charter schools are public schools that have flexibility to meet students’ unique needs, while being held accountable for advancing student achievement. According to National Alliance for Public charter schools, there are more than 6,900 charter schools across the country. NACA (Native American Community Academy) is one of many charter schools that was founded one year ago through multiple years of community conversations about how to better serve native students in Albuquerque. The school is located at 1000 Indian School Rd, NW Albuquerque, NM 87104. NACA’s mission is to engage students, educators, families, and community in creating a school that will prepare their students to grow from adolescence to adulthood and begin strengthening communities by developing strong leaders who are academically prepared, secure in their identity and healthy. Kirsten Wright and Colleague Phil Gover are assisting Pewewardy with this project. They work with NISN (NACA Inspired Schools Network). Wright said, “Once per month, we all gather together for content of learning including; best practices and things to avoid in facilities. One of the biggest issues for a charter school is land. The land has to be in current or previous trust land in order for a school to be authorized by a tribe.” Pewewardy held a two day gathering about charter schools Sept. 13-14 at the Comanche Nation Complex. He said “I’m starting out by asking the community, What would you like to have in a community school? What options do you have for Lawton? Walters? Cache? Indiahoma? We have alternative besides these public schools. I’m here to help us create better ways to make alternatives and improve the education of our people. I also would like to thank the tribal leaders and the Comanche Nation as a whole for hosting our NISN fellows. Know that all of our fellows are appreciative of the times you came into the Patriot Room to say hello and give us support for our work. We will need the continued support in the years to come as we all build out our respective charter schools in Oklahoma.” Pewewardy is a retired Professor and Director of Indigenous Nations Studies at Portland State University. His research explores Native American mascots in schools and media, recruiting/retention of Native students in higher education, Indigenous teaching practices, Indigenous urban and reservation-based teacher education, tribal colleges/universities, transformational Indigenous schools, Indigenous identity (de)construction, Indigenous community-based participatory research methods, and ethnomusicology (digitizing tribal music). Dr. Pewewardy developed courses that emphasize and explores a pedagogy of resistance that can be See CHARTER SCHOOL, Page 2