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Taste of Schenectady and Beyond FALL 2017

People are fascinated with African culture and cuisine—as well as the West Indies. African culture and dress has become popular around the world, and at Breakthrough African Market you will find a plethora of Dashikis, Laces (materials for making African clothing), hard to find spices, palm oils and coconut oils, dried poultry and smoked catfish and other smoked and dried fish, and smoke-dried poultry, and bones for soups and stews, frozen fish: poultry, and fresh-frozen goat meat, goat meat with skin, tripe, cow foot, meaty oxtails, dried fish flakes and dried West African various leaves, etc., etc. This issue is dedicated to the world of African and Caribbean cooking that has never been featured at length in any of the magazines and newspapers in our region. Check out the recipes and panoply of dishes that you can make to savor the flavor of this ancient and rich cuisine that has shaped civilizations, empires, culture, home cooking, and the world's palate for all things food.

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26 tasteofschenectady.com • Vol. 3 • No. 1 HAND MADE DASHIKIS & AFRICAN CLOTHES A plethora of Dashakis, Laces (materials for making African clothing). If you are not into sewing and do not have a seamstress in the family, Breakthrough African Market takes orders for custom made African clothing made to your size and selection of laces. Breakthrough African Mkt. 309 Central Ave • Albany, NY, 12206 • 518.426.1363 • 9am-9pm Despite the wide variety of cultures in West Africa, from Nigeria through to Senegal, there are similarities in dress, cuisine & music. America’s rich culinary history is a melting pot of peoples, spice, flavors and cuisine, which all came together as a result of the exploration of sea travel from the African and Caribbean coasts culminating in the 17th and mid-18th century. The colonists who met at City Tavern in Philadelphia traded in spices, and molasses for rum with sea merchants in NYC—America’s first capital. Fast forward, Nana and Kwasi Addo-Baffour were the pioneers who introduced African specialty imported foods to the Capital District when they opened Breakthrough African Market on Central Ave, Quail St. Station section of Albany, NY. Kwasi Addo-Baffour came to America from Ghana, West Africa, in 1996, and found no African markets to shop at in the region. He immediately when back to West Africa and returned to Albany with his wife, Nana. Together the couple opened Breakthrough African Market, originally at 284 Central Avenue in 2010. The Addo-Baffours did so well with their African specialty foods market at their previous location, that in November 2015, they expanded to a much larger location, at 309 Central Avenue.

27 tasteofschenectady.com • Vol. 3 • No. 1 Yams are cultivated for the consumption of their starchy tubers. Cassava is the thirdlargest source of food carbohydrates in the tropics, after rice and maize, and Nigeria is the world’s largest producer of cassava. Egusi is the name for the protein-rich seeds of certain squash, melons, or gourds, which after being dried and ground are used as a major ingredient in West African cuisine. Celebrating 8 years, and a new location, Breakthrough African Market is proud to offer its wide selection of hard to find West Africa, Central Africa, East African, and West Indies specialty foods. Breakthrough African Market’s biggest sellers are; yams, fufu, fresh and canned eggplant, and other hard to find African vegetables—as well as African and West Indies imported sauces, jams, cooking oils, coconut and African palm oils (the reddish pulp of the fruit of the oil palms), hard to find spices, cassava leaves, spinach leaves, sour sour, okra powder, African peanut butter and crushed peanut powder, egusi (African melon seeds—grounded, whole, and powder), dried poultry, frozen fish, smoked fish, dried fish, goat meat, lamb, oxtails, tripe, cow foot, cow skin, poultry, and of course a panoply of flour, corn meal, grains, beans, and specialty rice in large sacks to smaller packages—to include Basmati, Jasmine, and other short and large grain rice, etc. Americans, British, French and Germans are fascinated with African culture and cuisine— as well as the West Indies. African culture and dress has become popular around the world, and at Breakthrough African Market you will find a plethora of Dashikis, Laces (materials for making African clothing). If you are not into sewing and do not have a seamstress in the family or amongst your friends, Breakthrough African Market takes orders for custom made African clothing made to your size. As a former executive chef, what I like best about shopping at Breakthrough African Market is that I can start (continued on page 26) www.BreakthroughAfricanMarket.com