The World Online Digital Edition - October 11th 2017

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The World Online DigitalEdition - October 11th, 2017

Montpelier is the place to be in

OCTOBER

WE GET RESULTS!

SEE PAGE 17

IN THIS WEEK’S WORLD

CENTRAL VERMONT’S FAVORITE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

Vol. 46, No. 23 403 US RTE 302 - BERLIN, BARRE, VT 05641 • 479-2582 OR 1-800-639-9753 • Fax (802) 479-7916 October 11, 2017

On the Web: www.vt-world.com Email: sales@vt-world.com

2017 Community Service

Recognition Awards

page 2-3

Green Mountain United

Way Receives Grants to

Expand Working Bridges

page 4

First Annual

Fall Fitness

Festival Set

November 4

page 7

HALLOWEEN

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See page 23











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page 2 The WORLD October 11, 2017

2017 Community Service Recognition Awards

This is the 36th annual Community

Service Awards put on by the Joint

Service Clubs - Kiwanis, Barre,

and Rotary, along with other community

representatives. Each year,

the clubs come together to honor community

service and volunteerism in the Barre area.

Whether the honoree is well-known or a quiet,

behind-the-scenes type, this wonderful event

not only acknowledges their gifts of time to

the community, but also highlights opportunities

for service. The recognition dinner celebrating

these deserving community heroes

will take place on Wednesday, October 11 at

6PM at the Canadian Club. Tickets should be

reserved in advance by calling the Aldrich

Library at 476-7550

Carol Day

Carol was born in

Massachusetts and grew

up in Bellows Falls. She

graduated from Bellows

Falls High School and

went on to graduate from

UVM as a Dental

Hygienist. She married

Basil Day, then a traveling

shoe salesman, and they moved around a

bit before settling in Barre with their two

daughters, Melissa and Leslie, in 1972. In

1974, Carol decided to bring the Hospital

Auxiary Follies, a local song and dance show,

to Barre – using local “talent” but produced

by a New York company. It was very memorable

and a great success! In 1979, Carol and

Basil bought what was formerly Rogers Boot

Shop on Main St. & opened “Day’s Shoe

Tree,” which they ran until retiring in 1999.

During those years, Carol was very active in

the Barre Merchants Bureau, serving as secretary,

chairing fundraising promotions, and

helping with downtown events. Eventually

the BMB became the Barre Partnership, where

she also served as secretary for 3 years. In

1980 she joined the Barre Altrusa Club and

served on many events until it was disbanded

in 2013. Carol will always fondly remember

her fun evenings “in the kitchen” with Tony

Campos on the set of CVTV.

Carol has always enjoyed committee service

work and all the people involved. She

jokes that she can’t say “no” and she can’t sit

still! She and Basil are proud of their 7 grandchildren

and 2 great grandchildren and are

happy to have lived here in Barre for the last

45 years.

NATIONAL

BUSINESS

WOMEN’S

WEEK

Our October 18 issue is your chance to

unite with all the women in

Central Vermont during

National Business Women’s Week.

This special section will

feature participating women’s

“business cards”...including a

picture and promotion of

your business for only $55.

If you would like to be a part

of this event please call

The WORLD sales staff

and reserve your space.

Deadline is Wednesday,

October 11.

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Name, title

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Email

ad size = 3.1 inches x 2 inches

Kris Pavek

After a long career as a

midwife in Texas, Kris

and her family moved to

Vermont in 2000. She

worked in the Barre

school system for thirteen

years in the field of

behavior management,

which allowed her to

make deep personal connections with individual

students.

It was those connections that she missed

most upon leaving her last assignment. When

the opportunity arose to come back to the

school as a full-time volunteer in the school

garden, she was delighted to accept the challenge.

Over the course of four years, Kris took

a plot of land that was “weeds and a dream”

on the grounds of the Barre City Elementary

and Middle School and turned it into a beautiful,

productive vegetable and flower garden.

During the growing season she can be found

there almost daily, coordinating volunteers,

parents, school staff, and students in every

aspect of the planning, planting, and garden

design development. Thanks to Kris’s efforts

children in both schools have the experience

of planting, caring for, and harvesting their

own food for use in the cafeteria’s lunch program.

In 2016, the BCEMS garden’s yield

was 197 pounds of produce! Kris works with

teachers to align what kids learn in the garden

with classroom practices and curricula. She is

currently working on a “Pathways to

Accessibility” fundraiser that will make the

BCEMS garden fully accessible to those with

disabilities.

When she is not chasing pumpkin stealing

woodchucks, shoveling compost or persuading

southern vegetables to grow in the Vermont

climate, Kris likes to camp with her daughter,

attend her field hockey games and act as her

chauffeur.

Tim Boltin

Tim is a veteran of the

US Air Force, where he

met his wife. After retiring

from the military and

earning several degrees,

he moved to Vermont

with his family to start his

“retirement career” in the

culinary arts. He’s been

the chef and owner at Delicate Decadence

continued on next page

www.webaddress.com

Central Vermont’s

Newspaper

403 U.S. Rte. 302

Barre, VT 05641

www.vt-world.com

PH: 802-479-2582

TF: 800-639-9753

FX: 802-479-7916


2017 Community Service Recognition Awards

continued from previous page

since 2014, where he uses the bakery as a

platform for community connections and

youth mentorship. Tim goes out of his way to

hire struggling young people and train them in

life skills, culinary arts, and how to be responsible

adults in their community. He is adamant

that every person working for him, no matter

how young or inexperienced, have access to

vacation leave, sick time, and matched IRA

contributions. Tim takes in interns from the

Department of Labor and the Central Vermont

Career Center as well as young people straight

off the streets. The mentoring often spills over

out of the workplace, with employees truly

becoming part of Tim’s family and learning

from experience what impact their actions can

have on their lives. He and his family have

even opened their home to employees without

a place of their own. Those he’s mentored

have gone on to successfully graduate high

school, serve in Americorps, join the National

Guard, and find steady work both in and out

of the culinary world.

Tim is involved in supporting Barre businesses

through the Barre Partnership and

Crossroads BNI. He serves on the board of

Spaulding High School. He and his wife are

the proud parents of two daughters whose

classrooms are often the recipients of yummy

donations from the bakery!

Gary Hass and Deb Phillips

Deborah Phillips and Gary Hass have

owned and operated The WORLD newspaper

for over 43 years. As a community newspaper,

they work closely with non-profits and special

fundraisers to promote their events with

advertising, articles, and photos. One of the

World’s long-time events is World Santa

where they work with Salvation Army and the

Central Vermont Rotary to provide coats,

boots, hats and gloves to needy children in

central Vermont.

Their nomination noted that “all it takes is

an email or a phone call and they will attend

an event to take pictures or write an article.”

When Cally Clifton held a “Be the Match”

bone marrow drive, not only did they advertise

it for four weeks, but Gary also showed up

at the event and took a follow-up picture,

always with a smile on his face.

Gary is a long-time member and past president

of the Central Vermont Rotary Club. He

is a past board member and current committee

volunteer for the Central Vermont Chamber of

Commerce. Deborah is a long-time Corporator

for the Northfield Savings Bank, past president

of the Independent Free Papers of

America, and Community Papers of New

England, and currently treasurer of both organizations.

She is also treasurer of the Vermont

Press Association.

Marilyn Blake

The breadth and depth

of Marilyn’s contributions

to the Barre community

are dizzying. She

started work in the deli of

Howard’s Market before

moving to Merchants

Bank, first as a teller,

then head teller, then

Barre Branch President for 26 years. As

branch president, Marilyn was instrumental in

procuring the bank sponsorship for the season

opening race at Thunder Road, which has now

been a tradition for 16 years. Upon her retirement,

then-Mayor of Barre Peter Anthony

declared April 25, 2004 to be “Marilyn Blake

Day” in Barre.

Marilyn was treasurer for the Barre Town

Fire District and part of the Fire Department

Auxiliary, providing coffee and food for the

crew at major fires. She was involved with the

March of Dimes Walk-a-thons, served as treasurer

of the Altrusa Club, and chaired Altrusa’s

cookbook committee. That committee collected

175 pages of recipes from friends and

members in a very successful fundraiser, creating

a heritage keepsake cookbook still

beloved and used by home chefs all around

town. She served on the Board of Trustees for

the Aldrich Public Library, was on the Budget

Committee for the Town of Barre, and has

been an amazing treasurer for the Friends of

the Library for many years. She is always

happy to support a good cause with her considerable

talents in the kitchen, from baking

for raffles and pie sales to providing refreshments

for Senior Day Programs or “The Gals”

fundraiser craft shows.

Marilyn quietly and cheerfully volunteers

wherever help is needed and is trulyan unsung

her of community service in Barre. She and

her husband Wendell live in Barre Town.They

have one daughter, two songs, and seven

grandchildren.

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October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 3


Green Mountain United Way Receives Grants to Expand Working Bridges

Green Mountain United Way recently received two competitive

grants to support the expansion of the Working Bridges program

in Central and Northeastern Vermont. A 3-year grant totaling

over $191,000 was granted by the Northern Border Regional

Commission and will support expansion to employers in the three

counties of the Northeast Kingdom served by Green Mountain

United Way, Caledonia, Essex, and Orleans counties. The

Northern Border Regional Commission (NBRC) is a Federal-

State partnership created to enhance and improve economic and

community development in northern Maine, New Hampshire,

Vermont, and New York with the help of Vermont’s congressional

delegation led by Senator Patrick Leahy, Senator Bernie Sanders,

and Representative Peter Welch. Each year, the NBRC provides

Federal funds for critical economic and community development

projects throughout the northeast. Their mission is to catalyze

regional, collaborative, and transformative community economic

development approaches that alleviate economic distress and

position the region for economic growth. This year, 10 grants

were awarded to Vermont projects through the NBRC grant program.

More information is available at www.nbrc.gov.

The Vermont Community Foundation granted Green Mountain

United Way a $15,000 Innovations and Collaborations Grant to

help further Green Mountain United Way’s mission by expanding

access to resources for working Vermonters by using the workplace

as a platform for human services through the Working

Bridges Program. This grant will be used to hire a dedicated

Resource Coordinator on staff at Green Mountain United Way to

expand access to the program and bring businesses and nonprofits

together to help address the unique challenges faced by employees

and businesses in Central and Northeastern Vermont. The

Innovations and Collaborations grant program at the Vermont

Community Foundation supports nonprofits to collaborate across

issues and sectors to find new ways of working and to develop

common solutions to community needs. This year, grants were

awarded to 17 projects through the Innovations and Collaborations

grant program. More information is at www.vermontcf.org.

“Expanding this framework to the Northeast Kingdom and

Central Vermont poses a unique opportunity for us to explore

Thanks to everyone who helped make our

2017 Charity Golf Classic a great success!

EAGLE SPONSORS

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Benoit Electric

C2 Competitive Computing

Don & Lynne Carpenter

Connor Contracting, Inc.

E. F. Wall & Associates

Fiduciary Investment Advisors

Kinney Pike Insurance

Marcam Associates

People's United Bank

Union Mutual

BIRDIE SPONSORS

Blue Cross and Blue Shield

of Vermont

Dubois & King

Mountain Grove Coffee

Quick Response

Sprinkler Systems

TEE/GREEN SPONSORS

The Arbors at Shelburne

Capitol Plaza Hotel

E4H Environments for

Health Architecture

Handy’s Service Center

Maplewood Convenience

Stores

Transamerica Retirement

Solutions

page 4 The WORLD October 11, 2017

We raised over $19,000 for Branches of Hope –

CVMC’s Cancer Patient Fund.

UVMHealth.org/CVMC/cancer

HOLE-IN-ONE SPONSOR

Cody Chevrolet

INDIVIDUAL/PAR SPONSORS

Barre Tile Morrison Clark

Bourne’s Energy

New England Retirement

Consultants

Kathy & Albie Borne

Philip Brown, DO

David Christiansen

Lorne Church

Daniel Fram, MD

Kevin Guild

Charles & Jody Handy

Donna Lord

Nancy Lothian

Penny Lowery

Dixie Mercier

Richard Morley

Robert Patterson

David Turner

how Working Bridges can have the greatest impact on rural communities.

The needs of rural Vermonters are very different than

those of urban area. We hope to work with our business and nonprofit

partners to effectively use this collaborative process to find

the best ways to transform the economic future of our rural

region’s employees and businesses.” said Tawnya Kristen,

Executive Director of Green Mountain United Way.

Working Bridges is a United Way led Employer Collaborative

that was founded 10 years ago by the United Way of Northwest

Vermont and a group of forward-thinking employers. A network

of employers works together through the United Way to develop

and test innovative HR practices using the workplace as a platform

for services designed to help workers minimize work disruptions,

decrease absenteeism, improve financial stability and

ultimately increase employee retention and advancement. The

United Way employs Resource Coordinators who provide

employees with education and training, on-site resource assistance,

access to Income Advance Loans for employees, and

Mobile Volunteer Tax Preparation Program and works with a

group of employers on innovations through the Employer

Collaborative.

These grants will allow us to hire the staff we need to serve

more employees in our area and to hear from more employers

who believe their workforce could benefit from the support

offered by Working Bridges. We help employees solve those

challenges that make it hard for them to be present and stay

focused on the job, from basic needs like food insecurity to issues

of elder care or childcare. With the support of these businesses,

we can connect those employees to the resources they need in

order to not just survive, but to thrive.” Says Pam Bailey, Director

of Operations and Working Bridges Resource Coordinator at

Green Mountain United Way.

Businesses who are interested in Caledonia, Essex, Orange,

Orleans or Washington counties who are interested in learning

more about how Working Bridges could benefit their employees

or their business should contact Pam Bailey at Green Mountain

United Way by email at pbailey@gmuniteway.org or by phone at

802-613-3989.

PRIZE DONORS

Angeleno's Pizza

Basin Harbor Club

Blush Hill Country Club

Carriage House Salon

Cornerstone Pub & Kitchen

Country Club of Barre

Country Club of Vermont

K's Korner

Maple Valley Café

Montague Golf Club

Montpelier Elks Country Club

Northfield Country Club

Positive Pie

The Quarry Kitchen & Spirits

Sarducci’s Restaurant

Simply Delicious

The Skinny Pancake

Sugarbush Mountain Resort

Symquest

West Bolton Golf Club

REFRESHMENT DONORS

Black River Produce

Pepsico

Reinhart Foodservice

US Foods

Woodchuck Hard Cider employees picked more than 2,000 pounds

of apples to donate to the Vermont Foodbank through Pick For Your

Neighbor

Vermont Foodbank invites you to

Pick For Your Neighbor

Now that apple season is at its peak, the Vermont Foodbank’s

Pick for Your Neighbor program is in full swing at 16 participating

orchards throughout Vermont, with support from

Woodchuck Hard Cider and Front Porch Forum.

During apple harvest season, the Vermont Foodbank encourages

individuals, families, civic groups and companies to visit

participating apple orchards to pick and purchase extra apples

for donation to the Vermont Foodbank. The Vermont Foodbank

then distributes these fresh apples to food shelves and meal

sites throughout the state to help feed Vermonters struggling

with hunger.

Pick For Your Neighbor sponsor Woodchuck Hard Cider is

once more supporting the cause by underwriting the program

as well as sending their staff our to Champlain Orchards to

pick and purchase apples. Woodchuck Hard Cider employees

picked and purchased more than 2000 pounds of apples that

will help feed Vermonters in need.

“Pick For Your Neighbor helps ensure that all Vermonters

can celebrate the bounty of the harvest season,” said John

Sayles, Vermont Foodbank CEO. “Whether you rally a group

of coworkers to pick thousands of pounds of apples like

Woodchuck, or stop by your local orchard with your family,

you can make a real difference for our neighbors facing hunger.

Accessing healthy, fresh food is a challenge for Vermonters

facing hunger and together we are working to ensure everyone

has the healthy food we need to thrive.”

Since its inception, Pick for Your Neighbor has brought

more than 50,000 pounds of fresh, local apples to Vermonters

facing hunger. To learn more and to see a list of participating

orchards, visit: www.vtfoodbank.org/PFYN.

• • •

Capstone Celebrates National

Women’s Small Business Month

with Free Workshops

Capstone Community Action’s Micro Business Development

Program announces a five week workshop series called

Business Building Blocks Networking Workshops for those

interested in starting or expanding a business. Workshops will

be held October 12th to November 9th from 6PM to 8PM at

20 Gable Place in Barre. All are welcome to attend the workshops

funded in part by a grant from the Wells Fargo

Foundation.

Micro businesses, which employ less than five employees,

represent more than 60 percent of all private enterprises in the

state. Last year, Capstone helped individuals launch or expand

18 new businesses in central Vermont, creating 34 Full Time

jobs and accessing over $853,000 in financing from local

financial institutions and credit unions.

Capstone works with over 200 individuals, providing oneon-one

business counseling and training. This includes helping

individuals develop a business plan, learn how to track

income and expenses, understand recordkeeping, as well as

pricing and profit, create marketing plans and access financing.

“Micro business development is proven to be an effective

and cost-efficient job creator that supports the community’s

economic vitality,” states Dan H. Hoxworth, Capstone’s

Executive Director. “Workshops such as these are derived

from Capstone’s mission of alleviating the suffering caused

by poverty by building sustainable households and communities.

The micro business development program helps improve

the economic futures of all employers and their employees

like our newest micro business Blooming Treasures in

Randolph. We’re excited to witness the success of the new

owner, Tina Brady. We want to continue to support the dreams

of new entrepreneurs.”

To learn more about Capstone Community Action’s Micro

Business Development Program, contact Margaret Ferguson

at (802) 477-5214, via email mferguson@capstonevt.org or

visit the Capstone Community Action website at www.capstonevt.org.

Capstone Community Action was founded in 1965 and

works to alleviate the suffering caused by poverty and to create

economic opportunity for people and communities.

Capstone’s programs include emergency food and heating

assistance, housing counseling including homelessness intervention,

transportation assistance, savings and credit coaching,

workforce development, home weatherization, and child

and family development programs in Early Head Start/Head

Start. We serve over 15,000 people through these programs

each year.


(L-R) Lyndsey Farrar, e-Services Supervisor, Kevin DeRosa, Operations Manager, Julie Corliss,

Branch Manager Springfield and Jodi Pecor, Branch Manager South Barre.

One Credit Union Wins 2017 CUNA Excellence Award

Brett Smith, President and CEO of One

Credit Union announced that the CUNA

Operations & Member Experience Council

presented One Credit Union its 2017

Excellence Award. This award recognizes a

noteworthy achievement that demonstrates a

new, innovative solution to a common challenge.

One Credit Union’s winning entry was

Building Member Trust. “I’m incredibly

proud of the One CU team. This achievement

would not have happened without the collaborative

work between all the departments,

VBM Recognizes Vermont’s

Rising Stars Class of 2017

Vermont Business Magazine is proud to announce the winners

of its Rising Stars recognition award. The list is comprised

of 40 winners under the age of 40. Award recipients

were selected by a panel of judges for their commitment to

business growth, professional excellence and involvement in

their communities.

“We are thrilled by the response to this initiative to recognize

these up-and-coming leaders,” said VBM Publisher John

Boutin. “We received over 150 outstanding nominations this

year. The seven judges had a difficult time picking the top 40.

These young professionals have chosen to make Vermont

home. For these young professionals it’s not just about business.

It’s about them making a difference in their communities,”

Boutin said.

Vermont Business Magazine will honor Vermont’s most

accomplished young leaders at the Rising Stars dinner on

November 9th. The dinner will be held at the DoubleTree

Hotel in South Burlington. The honorees will also be featured

in the November issue of Vermont Business Magazine.

FAST FACTS: Of the 40 honorees, there are 13 men and 27

women. There are 16 from Chittenden County, 9 from Rutland

County, 5 from Washington County, 3 from Franklin County ,

2 from Windsor County, 1 from Grand Isle County, 1 from

Windham County, 1 from Addison County and 1 from

Bennington County. The average age of the winners is 31

years old. The oldest is 39 and the youngest is 23 years old.

Rising Stars of Central Vermont:

Daniel Barlow: VT Businesses for Social Responsibility,

Barre

Myra Flynn: Self-employed , West Brookfield

Daniel Franklin: Phoenix Diagnostic Labs, Barre

Faye Longo: Vermont Community Loan Fund, Montpelier

Lindsay Lord: Norwich University, Montpelier

Becca White: SunCommon, Waterbury

2017 Rising Stars Award Ceremony:

Join Vermont Business Magazine to honor 40 of Vermont’s

most accomplished young leaders at the Rising Stars

Ceremony. Award recipients were selected by a panel of

judges for their commitment to business growth, professional

excellence and their communities. The awards ceremony will

be held November 9 at The DoubleTree Hotel, South

Burlington, VT. 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm Cocktails, 6:30 pm - 8:30

pm Dinner & Awards, Vegetarian meals are available. For

more information please go to the official Rising Stars web

page or contact Vermont Business Magazine at (802) 863-

8038.

• • •

• • •

CVEDC to Hold

40th Annual Meeting

The Central Vermont Economic Development Corporation

(CVEDC) will hold our 40th Annual Meeting on Tuesday,

October 17th at the Capitol Plaza in Montpelier from 4:30 –

7:30 PM, with registration from 4:30 – 5:00PM.

Don’t miss the business networking opportunity from 5:00-

5:45PM with a cash bar and hors d’oeuvres. A buffet dinner

is scheduled to follow, along with official business of the

organization.

The highlight of the evening will be the community recognition

awards. CVEDC will be presenting its Member of the

Year Award to Northfield Savings Bank. The Small Business

of the Year Award will be presented to Dessureau Machine

and the Community Service Award will be presented to

Sugarbush Resort. The Chair’s Award will go to Montpelier’s

Chief of Police, Anthony Facos. CVEDC’s Director Award

will be presented to Benoit Electric.

Seats are $35 or $260.00 for a table of eight. To register,

please send attendees names and a check made payable to

CVEDC to PO Box 1439, Montpelier, VT 05601. E-mail Jen

Surat at jsurat@cvedc.org or call 802-223-4654 with any

questions.

CVEDC is one of twelve Statewide non-profit regional

development corporations with a mission of furthering economic

prosperity to increase quality employment opportunities

in the State of Vermont. For more information, visit their

website at www.cvedc.org.

along with our unwavering commitment to

member service. Together, we are One.”

The award was presented by the CUNA

Operations & Member Experience Council, a

national network comprised of more than

1,041 credit union operations and member

experience professionals across the United

States. The award was presented at the CUNA

Operations & Member Experience Council’s

20th annual conference held October 1-4 in

Phoenix, AZ.

28th Annual

Karen Kitzmiller

Memorial

Winter Coat

Drive

The Need is Great.

The Time is Now.

Help a Neighbor…

Donate a Coat.

Needed! Clean good quality winter coats, snowpants,

boots, hats, and mittens. All sizes-Adult & Children.

Also collecting quilts, comforters and blankets.

Donations are being accepted now:

Community National Bank

95 State Street, Montpelier

Now through October 27, 2017

During office hours

All items being distributed are FREE!

Distribution will take place on Saturday, October 28, 2017

Community National Bank

316 North Main St., Barre

Saturday, October 28, 2017

9:00 am - until Noon

In Loving

Memory

Montpelier

is the place to be in

OCTOBER

SEE PAGE 17 IN THIS WEEK’S WORLD

Community National Bank

316 North Main St., Barre

Now through October 27, 2017

During office hours

Montpelier City Hall

Saturday, October 28, 2017

9:00 am - 2:00 pm

Community National Bank is proud to partner with the

Karen Kitzmiller Memorial Winter Coat Drive.

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 5


18th Annual

Seasons of Life

FASHION SHOW | DINNER | LIVE AUCTION

Thank You Sponsors

We want to recognize our top sponsors

for their support of Seasons of Life.

Venue Sponsors

The Capitol Plaza Hotel &

Conference Center

Gardner Insurance Services

Spotlight Sponsors

Carmen Beck

Cody Chevrolet-Cadillac

National Life

Runway Sponsor


Media Sponsors

The World

WDEV

WNCS and WSKI

Learn More about Seasons of Life at

www.cvhhh.org/SOL2017

Central Vermont

Home Health & Hospice

600 Granger Road, Barre VT 05641

Noyle W. Johnson Group

Renters Insurance 101

When disaster strikes, it doesn’t care if you rent or own your

home. Renters face the same risks as homeowners. Your

landlord or condo association may have insurance, but it

only protects the building structure, not your personal items.

Renters Insurance will pay to replace

your personal belongings such as furniture,

clothing, electronics etc. Many people do

not realize the cost that it would take to replace

everything that they own, especially

when you are trying to replace them all at

one time.

Most companies also give you a discount

on their Auto Insurance when you add a

renter’s policy to it, and in most cases it

nearly pays for the Renter’s policy.

Personal Property Coverage:

Think of everything you own. The

value of your belongings can quickly add

up. Personal property coverage, a typical

component of renters insurance, may help

cover the cost of replacing your stuff if

it’s unexpectedly damaged or ruined such

as fire and theft. So, if your computer

and television are stolen, or your furniture

and clothing are destroyed by a fire, this

coverage may help you pay for the cost of

replacing them. When purchasing a renters

insurance policy, you may face a few different

choices. For instance:

David L. Coletti

Noyle W. Johnson Group

119 River Street

Montpelier, VT 05602

802-223-9660

dcoletti@nwjinsurance.com

• You’ll want to set coverage limits that

are appropriate for your situation. Creating

a home inventory can help you assess the

value of your belongings and help you decide

how much personal property coverage

is right for you.

• Liability coverage is another protection

offered in a renter’s insurance policy. This

coverage may help protect you from paying

out of pocket for certain costs if you are

found legally responsible for injuries to

other people or damage to their property.

• You probably don’t expect an accident

to occur, but if, for instance, your child

throws a ball through a neighbor’s window,

or you’re held responsible for medical bills

after a guest trips and falls over something

in your home or apartment, liability coverage

may help cover the costs.

• As with other coverages, limits apply

to the amount a policy will pay out after

a covered loss. Read your policy to brush

up on how much coverage it provides and

make sure it fits your needs. Your insurance

agent can help you adjust the limits if you

decide you may benefit from additional

coverage.

For further discussion on this topic or any other,

please feel free to call me anytime.

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page 6 The WORLD October 11, 2017


First Annual Fall Fitness Festival Set November 4

Fall has arrived on the calendar, and the

People’s Health & Wellness Clinic is marking

the occasion with its first Annual Fall Fitness

Festival on Saturday, November 4, 9:00 am to

12:00 noon at the U-32 High School gym.

The event will feature dance fitness with

well-known local Zumba and Jazzercise

instructors.

The Festival is a fundraising event for the

clinic, furthering its mission of health and

wellness. Participants can register for either

Zumba or Jazzercise sessions for $20 each, or

both at a discounted rate of $35. But don’t

stop there! For each $10 participants raise

above their registration fee, they earn a raffle

ticket for great prizes, including day ski

passes, a Bluetooth, restaurant gift certificates,

exercise class passes, and more. Raise

$100 – get 10 chances to win; raise $200 – get

20 chances, etc. You get the picture.

Pre-registration is encouraged, but not necessary.

All funds raised may be turned in at

the door.

Businesses who would like to sponsor the

event may do so at the $500 Gold Level and

have their banner on display, or $250 Silver

Level and have materials on our display table.

All will be acknowledged on our website.

Call the Clinic at 479-1229, or download

the registration and sponsor forms on the

Clinic website: www.phwcvt.org.

“We hope the Fall Fitness Festival will

become our annual fall fundraising event,”

said Clinic Executive Director Peter

Youngbaer. “These are very uncertain times

for health care, and the need for our safety net

program is growing. It’s a great opportunity

for people to go out, promote community

awareness, and raise money to help provide

needed health care to those who can’t afford

it,” he added. “Plus, it’s a great way to stay in

shape and have a lot of fun!”

The People’s Health & Wellness Clinic is

in its 24th year of providing free primary

health care and wellness education to uninsured

and underinsured community members

of central Vermont who cannot otherwise

afford these services. PHWC serves all of

Washington County and neighboring towns in

Orange, Caledonia, and Lamoille Counties.

Medical care, mental health, body work, and

the Clinic’s newest service – oral health – are

just some of the offerings available.

Berlin Elementary School Renovations Completed

The Berlin Elementary School Board and

the Washington Central Supervisory Union

are pleased to announce the successful completion

of much needed renovations to the

school. The project was designed by Black

River Design Architects and managed by

Neagley and Chase Construction Company.

The project included work to address failing

systems and replace them with more efficient

ones. Some of the major improvement

areas were: plumbing and heating, asbestos

removal, security, fire safety, energy efficiency

upgrades, ADA and other building

code compliance for the almost fifty year old

facility. Because of asbestos in the floors and

ceilings, nearly every square foot of the building

was under construction at some point,

making it a real challenge to finish the project

in one short summer.

Chris Winters was the School Board representative

on the project and attended meetings

throughout the summer to help make

decisions and monitor the progress. “I’ve

been so impressed by the work of the renovation

team. They were all very experienced

and professional. From design to project

management, the job got done on budget and

on time without sacrificing quality. I think as

a community, we got good value for our tax

dollars on this.”

WCSU Superintendent Bill Kimball also

helped lead the team, bringing his experience

with previous school renovation projects in

• • •

Middlesex and East Montpelier to the table.

“I am so pleased and thankful that the community

supported this investment in the

school,” said Kimball. “More importantly,

this is an investment in our children and the

future.”

Carol Amos is the Principal at Berlin

Elementary School and is thrilled with the

results. “Better light, fresher air and so many

small improvements that have made a big difference.

There was a lot of chaos for the first

few weeks of school, but it has been worth it.

It’s a wonderful learning environment.”

The Berlin Elementary School Renovation

was carefully crafted after a thorough analysis

and a realistic prioritization of needs. The

project reflects the input of many residents

and what Berlin voters believe is good stewardship

of the building and the learning environment,

with a responsible budget addressing

the most pressing needs and investing in

Berlin’s future.

School Board Member Chris Winters

added, “This is something we all can be very

proud of. Our student population has grown

in recent years and we hope to see that continue

with a beautifully updated school and

our same talented and dedicated staff. Berlin

is a great place to live.”

We hope all Berlin residents and neighbors

will join us on Thursday, October 12 at 5:30

for the ribbon cutting ceremony and tours of

the building.

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COUNTRY CLUB OF BARRE

Bridal Show & Company Event Expo

Sunday, October 15th | 12PM - 2PM

DISCOVER our newly renovated banquet room and function space.

CONNECT with local vendors including, caterers, bridal shops,

tux rentals, DJ’s, photographers, jewelers, bakers & florists.

WIN fantastic door prizes!

SPECIAL! Book a wedding reception

or company event on October 15th

at the show and get 20% off your

event rental fee.

CCofBARRE.COM | 142 DRAKE RD., BARRE, VT | 802.476.7658

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 7


Ainsworth

Public Library

Williamstown

2:00 to 6:00pm Monday and Thursday

9:00 to 6:00pm Wednesday

2:00 to 7:00 pm Tuesday and Friday

9:00 to 1:00pm Saturday

Look for us on Facebook: Ainsworth Public Library

802-433-5887

library@williamstownvt.org

www.ainsworthpubliclibrary.org

Fall Cleanup/ Fall planting:Want to learn about perennials?

Local gardener David Mesera will show us the best ways to

put them in. Have extra perennials? Bring them to plant. Join

us to deep clean the library inside too. We have a weekly

cleaner, but we have some nooks and crannies that we want

to sparkle. Light dusting, sweeping the ceilings, cleaning the

inside windows will be some of our fun tasks. Sunday, Oct 15

from 2-4 pm We supply all the materials. Snacks and drinks

will be provided.

Thank You Friends! The library just received a mini fridge

from the Friends of the Library. We are pleased to be able to

have cool drinks, keep snacks for kids, and offer freeze pops

in the summer.

Board of Trustees Meeting:Thursday, October 12 at 6pm.

Let us know if you want to add any items to the agenda. Open

to everyone.

Storytime Changes for the Fall: For the fall and winter

months, Storytime will be at 3:30 pm on Thursdays. Join us

weekly for stories, songs, a craft and a great place to meet

friends. All ages are welcome but the program is geared for

birth to 6 years. You do not need to be a resident to attend.

Storytime is a wonderful way for children to begin to experience

learning, to participate with other children, and to

become introduced to the wonderful world of books.

Route 5, Lyndonville, VT

Mon. thru Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3, Sun. Closed

1-800-439-5996

296 Meadow St., Littleton, NH

4584 U.S. Rte. 5, Newport, VT

PUZZLES ON PAGE 24-25

CRYPTO QUIP

STICKLERS

SNOWFLAKES

SUDOKU

KAKURO

EVEN

EXCHANGE

GO FIGURE

MAGIC MAZE

FEAR KNOT

SUPER CROSSWORD

page 8 The WORLD October 11, 2017

Aldrich Library

Vermont Reads Book Discussion:

Brown Girl Dreaming, by Jacqueline

Woodson

Tuesday October 17 at 6PM. Board

Room. This beautiful memoir of the

author’s childhood, written in verse, tells

the story of a young person finding her

voice and examining the strength of

family bonds. It was chosen as a Newbery Honor book and

won the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature.

Copies are available at all Barre schools and at the library.

PUZZLES ON

PAGE 24

Vermont Reads Film

Festival

Tuesday October 24 at

6PM. Milne Room.

This 2014 Best Picture

nominee recreates the 1965

Selma to Montgomery

voter right marches led by

Martin Luther King, Jr.

and John Lewis.

Introduction of the film

and discussion afterwards

led by Savoy Theater

founder Rick Winston.

Free popcorn, screening,

and stimulating discussion!

Part of our Vermont

Reads/Barre Writes celebration throughout fall focused on

this year’s book, Brown Girl Dreaming.

Vermont Reads/Barre Writes: 20th Annual Greater Barre

Community Writing Contest – “Memoir: Writing From

the Heart”

Everyone has a story: where their name or family comes

from, the experiences that shape you. Write a story, poem, or

essay about your experiences, personal/family history, memories,

or discovering who you are or where you come from.

Grab an entry form from the Barre schools, the Aldrich Public

Library, or online at aldrichpubliclibrary.org. Two winners

from each age group (including adults and seniors!) will

receive gift cards to Next Chapter Bookstore and will be

invited to read their piece aloud at our winners’ reception

November 15. Entries due October 31.

Celtic Halloween Story Time

Saturday October 21 at 1:30PM. Milne Room

For those who missed the Vermont Fairy Tale Festival, here’s

your chance to dance to bagpipe music and hear the Scottish

fairy tale of Tam Linn, presented by Ian from Aldrich Library

and Nicole from Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Craft & snacks to

follow.

Waterbury Library

a place to connect,

insprire and learn

28 N Main St.

Waterbury, Vt 05676

(802) 244-7036

Mon, Tues & Wed

10am - 8 Pm

Thurs, Fri: 10am - 5pm

Sat: 9am-2pm

Fall/Winter

Status Of Vermont Forest

Birds

“What’s up with the

birds?” Steve Faccio,

Conservation Biologist

with the Vermont Center for Ecostudies will be sharing results

from a quarter century of monitoring Vermont Forest Birds at

the Waterbury Public Library, on Wednesday, October 11th

from 6:30-7:30 in the SAL room. A 25-year study has documented

over 14 percent overall decline in some of Vermont’s

iconic forest birds, including warblers and woodpeckers, and

in some cases up to 45 percent in aerial insectivores. Faccio,

the author of this report urges us not to ignore this trend, as

not only will we lose the bird population, but the vitality of

our forests as well. Pesticide use, acid rain, climate change,

forest fragmentation and parcelization, and non-native invasive

species are all contributors. Come hear Faccio present

this fascinating report and find out what you can do to help

change the course of this disturbing trend.

Winter Preparation for Your Vehicle

Winter is tough on vehicles and knowing what preventative

measures you can take will give you peace of mind when the

weather hits. Albert Caron from Waterbury Service Center

will be offering another workshop in his series “Car Care

Aware” on Winter Preparation for your Vehicle, Saturday,

• • •

• • •

The Health Care Movie: Screening and Discussion

Wednesday October 25 at 6PM. Milne Room.

This documentary, narrated by Kiefer Sutherland, tells the

story of how the health care systems in Canada and the US

evolved to be so different when at one point they were essentially

the same. It examines the continuing struggle in the

United States between the fear of government intervention

and the right to quality healthcare for all people. Sponsored

by the VT League of Women Voters and VT Physicians for a

National Health Program. Dr. Marvin Malek, MD will lead a

discussion afterwards. Dr. Malek was Medical Director of the

Barre Health Center for eight years and is a vocal advocate for

a more accessible and affordable health care system.

“Anything Goes” Poetry Slam

Friday October 27 at 6:30PM. Milne Room

This “Anything Goes!” slam features a 5-minute limit for

poets, solo and group performers, and musicians. “Covers”

okay if noted as such. As an all-ages event, discretion is

required. Can the single voice of an impassioned poet outscore

a harp solo? Find out! Come early and enjoy free pizza

at 6!

Harry Potter Halloween Party

Saturday October 28 at 1:00PM. Milne Room

Teens and kids alike are invited to wizardly activities, games,

crafts, glow-in-the-dark slime, enchanting snacks, and a reading

from the Harry Potter books.

Film Debut: “The Green Horse”

Monday October 30 at 6PM. Milne Room.

Agnes Archer seems to love Halloween, despite the fact that

her daughter was killed by a hit-and-run driver on that night

ten years ago. Lance, her boarder, is not so sure that she’s

recovered from that tragedy despite appearances. Beneath her

calm and gracious facade she harbors a strong urge for

revenge, and to this day she celebrates the holiday hoping that

driver will finally return - so she can kill him! This Barremade

short (30 min.) thriller has its world debut here at the

Aldrich, with refreshments provided by Positive Pie. Come

meet the filmmakers and stars!

Tech Help Tutor

Every Thursday and Friday From 12-1:20PM. Reading

Rooms. Get help with everything from too-smart-for-theirown-good

phones to Facebook and email setup. Our intern

will work with you one-on-one to help you become a technowiz

too!

Note: The library will be closed on Monday, October 23 for

staff development.

October 28th from 10-noon at the Waterbury Public Library.

It’s not too early to think about your vehicle and planning for

the colder weather ahead. Topics include: starter, alternator

and battery; suspension, traction, steering and stability; winter

tires versus all season; studying versus non-studding tires;

coolant and thermostats; and underlying all of this is safety.

Come to the workshop and get a better handle on being prepared

for whatever the weather. Refreshments and free giveaways

will be offered. To register, call the library at 244-

7036.

The Depths of The Deep with Alvin

If you’ve ever wondered what life is like 4,000 feet down

on the depths of the ocean floor, come to the Waterbury Public

Library on Wednesday, November 1st from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and

hear from an expert and see pictures of his experiences.

Local Waterbury resident, Patrick Hickey, semi-retired

pilot, expedition leader and group manager with the Woods

Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole, Massachusetts

will be giving a talk, sharing his experiences and showing

slides of his many years of working with US Navy submarine

“Alvin”.

What is a typical day at sea? What kind of science gets

done? What lives in the depths of the deep? How deep can

Alvin dive and how long can you stay down? Come to the

library to find the answers to these questions and more.

Hickey will be sharing the various iterations of Alvin from its

conception in 1964 to the present, showing us the amazing

technologies of HOVs (Human Occupied Vehicles) ROVs

(Remotely Occupied Vehicles) and AOVs (Autonomous

Vehicles), and giving us an underwater view of the amazing

creatures who live in the depths and their environment.

If this field interests you or your kids, this is a perfect

opportunity to learn more about piloting, programming, science,

sea life, nature and ecology.


Barre Area Senior Center

131 S. Main St. #4, Barre • 479-9512

Have you been wondering how you can help the victims of

Hurricane Maria? BASC is reaching out to the community of

our members. Please consider supporting Hope for Puerto

Rico, a local group providing disaster relief for families.We

will have a box here at the center for good condition clothing,

food (canned goods, meat, vegetables, peanut butter, crackers)

and toiletries. Thank you for your kind consideration of our

neighbors to the south!!

ATTENTION SQUARE DANCERS We must have 16 participants

by Monday, Oct. 16 to continue this program! Spread

the word! Come on out, get some exercise, and have some

fun! Caller Steve Desrosiers will teach you all the steps! No

partner needed!

By donation!

SPECIAL NOTE: Line Dancing with Cheryl Wednesdays at

3:30 is currently on hold due to instructor injury. Feel better

soon, Cheryl!

Volunteer News

If you have volunteered at BASC in the past year, you are

invited to a special Volunteer Recognition Luncheon

Wednesday, Oct. 18 At 1PM. Please rsvp at the registration

desk here at the center.

Seniors in Motion Mondays and Wednesdays at 9:30.

Chair Yoga with Katie Mondays at 11 a.m. by donation.

Pitch Mondays at 1 p.m.

Digital Photography Mondays at 1 p.m.

Bone Builders Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 a.m.

Spanish conversation: join John Murray Tuesdays at 10 a.m

Young at Heart Singers, in the house, Tuesdays at 1PM; no

rehearsal here Oct. 3

• • •

Montpelier Senior Activity Center

The Montpelier Senior Activity

Center is your home for healthy aging

and lifelong learning. We are an active

community, and there’s always something

to do, no matter your interest. If

you’re 50 or older, we’d love to welcome

you as a member of the Montpelier

Senior Activity Center! If you’d like to

learn more, call us at 223-2518 or stop by at 58 Barre Street

in Montpelier.

Pumpkin Carving for Enchanted Forest

Thursday, October 12, 1:30-3:30pm

Come help prepare jack-o’-lanterns for the October 14

Enchanted Forest event in Hubbard Park! Feel free to bring

your own tools and/or pumpkins, and materials will also be

provided.

Enchanted Forest

Saturday, October 14, 4-8pm

Hubbard Park, Montpelier, 223-7335

Tickets: $5 children/$10 adults/$25 (early bird: $4 children/$8

adults/$20 families) The “Enchanted Forest” is Montpelier’s

night time community celebration of Autumn. Located in

historic Hubbard Park, hay wagon rides bring groups of people

deep into the park where they are led by guides through

candle-lit paths to stages of storytelling, music, fire, and

enchantment. It is also the one time of the year park goers get

to see Hubbard Park’s 50-foot tower illuminated by fire!

Proceeds benefit the Montpelier Parks! Advance tickets available

at the City Clerk’s office and guarantee admission for a

specific time. Day-of tickets are available at the New Shelter

in the park. Walk-ins may encounter long waits. Advance

tickets are STRONGLY recommended.

Art History: American Artists and the Civil War

Thursday, October 19, 1:30-3pm

Twin Valley Senior Center

Chinese Art Class Hosted By

Jan Danziger

The course will be for 6 weeks,

3-5pm, starting October 6th, $35

and all proceeds benefit the

Twin Valley Senior Center 4583

US Rt 2 E. Montpelier. Painting

nature, Exploring Calligraphy,

Painting a Mountain Landscape Scroll and more. Art supplies

provided. For more information contact Susan Crampton @

223-6954 or Twin Valley Senior Center @ 223-3322.

Course subjects are as follows:

October 6th Introduction, traditions, and beginning brushwork.

Five Days to Paint a Rock-Accordion Fold Book

October 13th - Exploring Calligraphy, The eight basic

strokes. The use and placement of seals. The Three Perfections

- Calligraphy, Poetry and Painting

October 20th - Painting Bamboo, leaf formations, stalks,

boned and boneless techniques.

October 27th - Continuation of the Four Gentlemen-Painting

on Tea-Stained Paper- Chrysanthemum, Orchid and Plum

Central Vermont Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Fall Series 2017

Programs take place on Wednesdays at 1:30PM (films at

12:30). $5 suggested donation per program or $40 for the

13-program series. Montpelier programs will take place at the

Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre Street, and Barre

events will take place at the Aldrich Public Library, 6

Washington Street. Films will be shown at the Savoy Theater,

26 Main Street in Montpelier. Programs will not take place

when the Montpelier schools are cancelled for weather. You

may call (802) 479-2602 to confirm. For more info, visit

• • •

• • •

Beginners Falls Prevention Tai Chi Tuesdays at 2:15

Mah Jongg Wednesdays at 10 a.m.

Jazzercise Thursdays at 9:20

Game Day Thursdays at 1 p.m.

Intermediate Tai Chi Thursdays at 2

Intermediate Falls Prevention Tai Chi Saturdays at 10

Many thanks to those who are current on their dues. We are

updating our records. Please check in with Sandy by Nov. 15.

She will be happy to assist! AND THANK YOU!!

Art Gallery At Basc

This month we hang a new exhibit by two Barre artists,

both members of the paletters. We hope you will join us for a

reception Tuesday, Oct. 24 at 10AM. For a special exhibit by

Bob Murphy and Bobbie Geyselaers when the artists will be

on hand to answer questions and share information. Many of

you know Bob, of Barre Town, who has taught Genealogy

Roundtable here at BASC. He began painting while in college,

but did not picked it up again until he retired from the

Vermont Agency of Transportation and joined the Paletteers

(he’s currently the treasurer). Bob paints in oils and acrylics,

and has dabbled in watercolor and pen & ink, too! He prefers

landscapes as subject matter, with an occasional still life and

is inspired by travels, throughout the U.S. and Europe.

Bobbie, lives in West Berlin, with previous stops in New

York and Connecticut. Like Bob, she’s has traveled, with her

husband, quite a bit. Bobbie started painting 40 years ago--in

the 70’s, focusing on watercolors; she also works in pen and

ink, creating unique gift cards, flower arranging and gardening.

Also a member of the Paletteers, Bobbie’s ideas come from

her globetrotting and from Vermont landscapes. Bobbie

belongs to the Artists Resource Association and Paine

Mountain Arts and The Art of Creative Aging as well. She has

exhibited widely at venues in Vermont. Bobbie is the mother

of three, grandmother of six and great-grandmother of three

boys. Please join us for this delightful exhibit. Light refreshments

served.

EAST BARRE

ANTIQUE MALL

133 MILL STREET, EAST BARRE, VT 05649 • 479-5190

WINTER HOURS:

Closed October 30 thru May 1

OCTOBER

STOREWIDE SALE

Tuesday - Sunday 10-5, Closed Mondays

www.eastbarreantiquemall.com

Art historian Debby Tait examines American Artists and the

Civil War. Artists expressed anxiety at the gathering storm of

war (Martin Johnson Heade, Eastman Johnson). They served ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SPAULDING​ ​HIGH​ ​SCHOOL ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

as reporters for the war (Winslow Homer), and the photographers

gave the public an “eye witness” view (Brady, ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SPAULDING​ ​HIGH​ ​SCHOOL ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​S

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SPAULDING​ ​HIGH​ ​SCHOOL ​ ​ ​ ​

O’Sullivan). Above all, they interpreted the issues and war’s

aftermath (Johnson, Homer). Free and open ​ to ​ the ​ ​ public. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​TRAVEL​ ​AUCTION

​ ​ ​ ​ ​

Flu Vaccine Clinic

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​TRAVEL​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​TRAVEL​ ​AUCTION

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

Monday, October 23, 11:30am-1:30pm

Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre Street, Montpelier, ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SATURDAY​ ​NOVEMBER​ ​4th ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SATURDAY​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​NOVEMBER​ ​4th ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

223-2518

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ SPAULDING​ ​HIGH​ ​SCHOOL​

SPAULDING​ ​HIGH​ ​CAFETERIA

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

​4th

Public flu shot clinic led by Central Vermont Home Health

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ SPAULDING​ ​155​ ​Ayers​ ​St.​ ​HIGH​ ​ ​Barre,​ ​SCHOOL​ ​Vermont ​CAFETERIA

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

and Hospice (CVHHH). First come-first served. No appointment

needed. Medicare, BlueCross, and MVP accepted.

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​155​ ​Ayers​ ​St.​ ​ ​Barre,​ ​Vermont

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ SPAULDING​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​155​ ​Ayers​ ​St.​ ​HIGH​ ​ ​Barre,​ ​Vermont ​SCHOOL​ ​CAFETERIA ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

CVHHH will bill your insurance carrier directly. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Item​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Viewing​ ​Item​ ​Viewing​ ​at​ ​9:30​ ​at​ ​9:30​ ​a.m.

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

​ ​ ​ ​ If ​ ​ you ​ ​ ​ ​ do ​ ​ ​ ​ not ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​155​ ​Ayers​ ​St.​ ​ ​Barre,​ ​Vermont

have insurance, shots are $15. For info on other area clinics, ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Item​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Auction​ ​Viewing​ ​begins​ ​at​ ​at​ ​9:30​ ​10:00​ ​a.m. ​am​ ​until

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Auc

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SPAULDING​ ​HIGH​ ​SCHOOL

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Auction​ ​begins​ ​at​ ​10:00​ ​am​ ​until

​ ​ ​ ​ ​

call 224-2299.

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Auction​ all​ ​items​ ​are​ ​sold

all​ ​items​ ​begins​ ​are​ ​at​ ​sold ​10:00​ ​am​ ​until

​ ​ ​ ​

Being Mortal Film Screening

all​ ​items​ ​are​ ​sold

Tuesday, October 24, 6:30-8pm

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Item​ LOTS​ ​Viewing​ ​OF​ ​GIFT​ ​CERTIFICATES ​at​ ​9:30​ ​a.m.

LOTS

Join health care providers and fellow community members as LOTS​ ​ ​OF​ ​donations​ ​GIFT​ ​from​ ​CERTIFICATES

​local​ ​businesses

​ ​dona

we gather to screen “Being Mortal,” a PBS Frontline ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ production

inspired by Dr. Atul Gawande’s book of the same title. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​donations​ ​Ski​ certificates,​ ​granite​ ​items​ ​ ​and​ ​much​ ​more!

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Auction​ LOTS​ ​ ​donations​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​OF​ ​ ​Ski​ ​begins​ ​and​ ​GIFT​ ​from​ ​golf​ ​local​ ​CERTIFICATES

​passes,​ ​at​ ​businesses ​10:00​ ​Four​ ​Disney​ ​am​ ​passes,​ ​until ​restaurant​ ​gift ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Ski​ ​a

all​

​and​

​items​

​golf​ ​from​ ​passes,​ ​local​

​are​ ​sold

​Four​ ​businesses ​Disney​ ​passes,​ ​restaurant​ ​gift ​ ​ ​

For Gawande, a New Yorker writer and a renowned surgeon ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Ski​ ​and​ Handicap​ ​Accessible

certificates,​ ​golf​ ​passes,​ ​granite​ ​Four​ ​items​ ​Disney​ ​ ​and​ ​passes,​ ​much​ ​more! ​restaurant​ ​gift ​ ​

at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Dana-

Food​ ​concession

certificates,​ Handicap​ ​granite​ ​Accessible ​items​ ​ ​and​ ​much​ ​more!

Farber Cancer Institute, too many questions are going unasked. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​For​ ​information​ ​call​ ​476-4811​ ​or​ ​email​ ​kmarishs@u61.net ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​For​ ​inf

Questions like: What are your priorities if your time LOTS​ is limited?

Free and open to the public.

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​For​ ​information​ ​call​ ​476-4811​ Food​ ​concession ​or​ ​email​ ​kmarishs@u61.net ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​F

​OF​ ​https://sites.google.com/site/shstravelauction/

​GIFT​ ​CERTIFICATES

Handicap​ Food​ ​concession ​Accessible

​https://s

(for​ ​a​ ​complete​ ​list​ ​of​ ​items)

Volunteers Needed

​ ​donations​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​For​ ​information​ ​from​ ​call​ ​local​ ​476-4811​ ​businesses

​https://sites.google.com/site/shstravelauction/

​or​ ​email​ ​kmarishs@u61.net

​http

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​F

We are seeking individuals to volunteer in our office, helping

our members register for classes, answer the


phone,

​ ​ ​ ​ ​Ski​ ​https://sites.google.com/site/shstravelauction/

and

​and​ ​ ​ ​ ​golf​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SPAULDING​ ​passes,​ (for​ ​a​ ​complete​ ​Four​ ​list​ ​HIGH​ ​of​ ​Disney​ ​items) ​SCHOOL ​passes,​ ​restaura ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​http ​ ​ ​ ​S

assisting with other administrative tasks. Our office volunteers

are key members of our team, and your help is greatly

(for​ ​a​ ​complete​ ​list​ ​of​ ​items)

certificates,​ ​granite​ ​items​ ​ ​and​ ​much​ ​more!

appreciated! If you would like to volunteer, contact Becky

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ CARPET ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SPAULDING​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​TRAVEL​ ​HIGH​ ​AUCTION ​SCHOOL ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SPAULDING​

Handicap​ REMNANTS

​HIGH​

​Accessible

Johnston at 223-8694.

​SCHOOL ​ ​ ​ ​

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SATURDAY​ Food​ ​concession

​NOVEMBER​ ​4th ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​TRAVEL​ SPAULDING​ ​HIGH​ ​AUCTION

​SCHOOL​ ​CAFETERIA ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​For​ ​information​ ​call​ ​476-4811​ ​or​ ​email​ ​kmarishs@u6

FROM $ 49

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​TRAVEL​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​155​ ​Ayers​ ​St.​ ​ ​Barre,​ ​AUCTION

​Vermont

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

Blossoms.

​https://sites.google.com/site/shstravelau

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SATURDAY​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Item​ ​Viewing​ ​at​ ​NOVEMBER​ ​9:30​ ​a.m. ​4th ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

November 3rd - Painting Pine-Branches, Needle Clusters

and Pine Cones. Willow and Cypress Trees, Trunks, Roots ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SATURDAY​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ SPAULDING​ ​Auction​ ​begins​ ​HIGH​ ​at​ ​10:00​ ​am​ ​until​ ​all

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Au

(for​ ​a​ ​complete​

​NOVEMBER​ ​SCHOOL​ ​CAFETERIA

​list​ ​of​ ​items)

​4th ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

and Leaves

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ items​ ​are​ ​sold

SPAULDING​ ​155​ ​Ayers​ ​St.​ ​HIGH​ ​ ​Barre,​ ​SCHOOL​ ​Vermont ​CAFETERIA

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

November 10th - Painting a Mountain Landscape Scroll. ​ ​ ​ A ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​

LOTS​

​ ​ ​ ​155​

​OF​

​Ayers​

​GIFT​

​St.​

​CERTIFICATES

​ ​Barre,​ ​Vermont

LOTS

​ ​ ​ ​ ​

Chinese mountain landscape contains mountains, paths, trees,

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​donations​ ​ ​Item​ ​Viewing​ ​from​ ​local​ ​at​ ​9:30​ ​businesses ​a.m.

rocks, small plants and always water. The water can be a

​ ​dona

waterfall, river, and or lake in the form of mist ​ ​ ​ clouds ​ ​ ​ ​ or ​ ​ fog ​ ​ ​ ​SPAULDING​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Auction​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Ski​ ​Item​ ​begins​ ​and​ ​Viewing​ ​golf​ ​at​ ​passes,​ ​10:00​ ​at​ ​9:30​ ​Four​ ​am​ ​a.m. ​Disney​ ​until​ ​HIGH​ ​all ​passes,​ ​restaurant​ ​SCHOOL

​gift ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Ski​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​a

to cause atmospheric effects in contrast to clean access. ​ ​ ​ A ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Auction​ items​ ​begins​ certificates,​ ​are​ ​at​ ​sold ​10:00​ ​granite​ ​am​ ​items​ ​until​ ​ ​and​ ​all ​much​ ​more!

​ ​ ​ ​ ​

painting may also include birds, boats, buildings, pavilions,

Handicap​ ​Accessible

bridges and people to suggest scale and lofty sky. Composition items​ ​are​ ​sold

Food​ ​concession

and point of view. (last class)

LOTS​ ​OF​ ​GIFT​ ​CERTIFICATES

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​For​ ​information​ ​call​ ​476-4811​ ​or​ ​email​ ​kmarishs@u61.net ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​For​ ​inf

Twin Valley Seniors Harvest Dinner- October ​ ​ ​ 12th, ​ ​ ​ ​ 4pm ​ ​ ​ – ​ LOTS​ ​ ​donations​ ​ ​https://sites.google.com/site/shstravelauction/

​ ​ ​TRAVEL​ ​OF​ ​GIFT​ ​from​ ​local​ ​CERTIFICATES

​businesses ​AUCTION ​https://s

7pm. New England Boiled Dinner w/baked Ham, dessert, and ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​donations​ ​Ski​ ​and​ ​golf​ ​from​ ​passes,​

(for​ ​local​ ​Four​

​a​ ​complete​ ​businesses ​Disney​ ​passes,​ ​restaurant​ ​gift ​ ​ ​

​list​ ​of​ ​items)

Apple Cider, Coffee or Tea. 50/50 raffle. Groups of six or

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Ski​ ​and​ certificates,​ ​golf​ ​passes,​ ​granite​ ​Four​ ​items​ ​Disney​ ​ ​and​ ​passes,​ ​much​ ​more!

more, reservations appreciated.

​restaurant​ ​gift ​ ​

Free Blood Pressure Checks: Monday October 16, 10am to certificates,​ Many Handicap​ ​granite​ To Choose ​Accessible ​items​ ​ ​and​ ​much​ From! ​more!

1pm The SASH (Senior Assisted Services at Home) program

Handicap​ Food​ ​concession ​Accessible

is at the Center to do free blood pressure checks and health ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​For​ ​information​ ​call​ ​476-4811​

SPAULDING​

Food​

​HIGH​

​concession ​or​ ​email​ ​kmarishs@u61.net ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​F

consultations. For more information contact Twin Valley

​SCHOOL​ ​CAFETERIA

Senior Center 4583 US Rt 2 E. Montpelier, 802- 223-3322. ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​For​ ​information​ ​call​ ​476-4811​ ​or​ ​email​ ​kmarishs@u61.net ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​F

www.learn.uvm.edu/osher.

October 11 - Montpelier

Kathy Fox, Professor of Sociology

The Role of Civic Engagement in Prisoner Integration

Vermont uses Circles of Support and Accountability (CoSA)

as an innovative approach to helping prisoners reenter their

communities. Professor Fox will discuss her research relative

to the success of this program.

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​SATURDAY​ ​NOVEMBER​ ​4th

TRUE

COLORS

​https://sites.google.com/site/shstravelauction/

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​155​ ​Ayers​ ​St.​ ​ ​Barre,​ ​Vermont

​https://sites.google.com/site/shstravelauction/

(for​ ​a​ ​complete​ ​list​ ​of​ ​items)

(for​ ​a​ ​complete​ ​list​ ​of​ ​items)

BL I N D S & DE S I G N S

"Let us measure so you don't have to"

Professional Installation Available

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Item​ ​Viewing​ ​at​ ​9:30​ ​a.m.

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Auction​ ​begins​ ​at​ ​10:00​ 141 River ​am​ Street ​until​ ​all

items​ ​are​ ​sold Montpelier, VT 05602

223-1616

truecolorshd@gmail.com

26

YEARS

&

COUNTING!

LOTS​ ​OF​ PROFESSIONAL ​GIFT​ ​CERTIFICATES

INSTALLATION AVAILABLE

​ ​donations​ ​from​ ​local​ ​businesses

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 9

​http

​http

​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​Ski​ ​and​ ​golf​ ​passes,​ ​Four​ ​Disney​ ​passes,​ ​restaura

certificates,​ ​granite​ ​items​ ​ ​and​ ​much​ ​more!


Patricia (Longe) Alger

NORTHFIELD, VT- Patricia (Longe) Alger, 88, died peacefully

at home the early hours of October 4 surrounded by her

family. Born in Franklin, VT, on March 4, 1929, she was the

daughter of George and Cora (LeCuyer) Longe. Pat was the

wife of Earl Alger who passed away April 20, 2007. They

were married April 19, 1945 and resided in Montpelier most

of their married life. Pat was a member of the Trinity United

Methodist Church for over 60 years and was a former member

of Eastern Star. Survivors include her daughters, Elaine

Douglass of Hudson, FL, Susan White and her husband

Norman of Montpelier, and Kathryn Reed and her husband

Kevin of Northfield. She is also survived by five grandchildren,

Lisa Lee and Michele Gallison, both of Florida, Chad

Douglass of Morrisville, Brent Leclerc and Kevin White, both

of Barre Town. Pat also leaves nine great grandchildren and

nine great-great grandchildren. She is predeceased by three

brothers and one sister, Lawrence Longe, Eleanor Gray, and

twin brothers Wesley and Lesley Longe. Arrangements are by

Guare & Sons of Montpelier. A memorial service will be held

Sunday, October 8 at 1:00 at the Trinity United Methodist

Church in Montpelier. There are no calling hours. In lieu of

flowers contributions in Pat’s memory may be made to the

Trinity United Methodist Church, 137 Main Street.

John A. Ashford (Sonny)

March 6, 1934-Sept. 25, 2017

BARRE - John Andrew Ashford of 745

W Corinth Rd., Washington, VT, died

Monday, September 25th at the Berlin

Health & Rehab in Berlin, VT with his

immediate family comforting him. John

was born in Barre, VT, March 6, 1934,

son of Forrest & Stella Ashford. He

attended Barre and Montpelier schools,

eventually graduating Montpelier High.

He started working at a very young age

doing everything from candle pin set up to working garbage

routes, he worked on the railroad at 17, then started working

in the trades doing everything from mason tending to construction.

Which became his passion. John was a good carpenter

and a great worker. He was tireless no matter what the job.

John’s interested included hunting and fishing, horseshoes

and cribbage, he also loved to read westerns and put together

puzzles. John is survived by his children Linda Yonkers and

husband Jim, David Ashford and wife Janice and a step

daughter, Brenda Carey and husband Dennis, 7 grand-children,

and several great grandchildren. He is also survived by

3 sisters, Stella Lafountaine, Isabelle Evarts, and Dorothy

Ashford. He was predeceased by his wife Geraldine Ashford,

and Mary Martin, sisters Lila Pouleu, Elizabeth Plunket, and

Virginia Somers, Brothers Robert Ashford, Forrest Ashford,

Edward Ashford, and Erban Ashford. He will be missed. No

Calling Hours. No Services. Memorial Contributions may be

made to local animal shelters.

Michael R. Tirone

Northfield, VT – Michael R.

Tirone, 56, died Monday

October 2, 2017 at Dartmouth-Hitchcock

Medical Center in Lebanon, NH. He was

born February 3, 1961 in Flemington, NJ

Locally Family Owned & Operated Since 1908

Traditional Funeral

and Cremation

Services.

Thoughtful Service in Accordance

with Your Wishes

Arrangements Coordinated Anywhere

Prearranged & Prepaid Services

and Trust Agreements



Funeral & Cremation Services



802-476-3203

a son of John P. Tirone Jr. and June E.

(Russo) Tirone. As a child Michael

moved with his family from Connecticut

to Middlesex, VT. He graduated from

U-32 High School in Montpelier before


802-476-3233 Fax 802-476-4310


hwfhinvt@charter.net


802-476-3251 Fax 802-479-0250



whitcombsinvt@charter.net


802-476-3243 Fax 802-476-4310

hwfhinvt@charter.net

page 10 The WORLD October 11, 2017

enlisting in the US Air Force, serving for three years as a

mechanic. After being honorably discharged from the air

force, Michael moved to Florida where he learned his trade

as a carpenter. After a time he returned north and has lived in

Central Vermont since. Michael loved the solace of spending

time in the woods and worked as a logger for a while but

returned to his true talent of carpentry until becoming too ill

to work. He is survived by his parents, John and June Tirone

of Largo, FL and Old Saybrook, CT; a brother John P. Tirone

III of East Haddam, CT and sisters Lisa King of Rockville

Center, NY and Kathleen Witherow of Warrenton, VA.

Interment will take place in the Vermont Veteran’s Memorial

Cemetery in Randolph Center, VT Condolences to Michael’s

family may be made to in an online guestbook at www.

knightfuneralhomes.com . Contributions in his memory may be made to Mike

Tirone, care of Rose Audet at the Community Bank of

Northfield. All donations to this fund will go to the Vermont

Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation in Mike’s name.

Donations can also be made in Memory of Michael Tirone to

Dartmouth Hitchcock ICU at: https://dhmcalumdev.hitchcock.org/icu_fund.

BYRON EUGENE CARPENTER

“CARP”, 89 of West Berlin, died in

his home on Sept. 27, 2017. Born on Jan. 6,

1928, in Hartford, CT, he was the son of Ralph

and Myra (Lord) Carpenter. Byron graduated

from high school in Hartford and then went into

the Army. He served in Hawaii during World

War II and attained the rank of Sergeant. Byron worked for

over 45 years in the automotive business and eventually

retired as the service manager for Thomas Cadillac in

Hartford. Byron married Helen Radziewics of New Britain.

They were married for over 45 years. They made their home

in Avon, CT, raising their two children, David and Karen.

After Helen’s passing in April 1998, Byron moved to VT.

Byron then married long-time family friend Eunice (Partlow)

Haskins in September 2000. Byron was an avid outdoorsman

and loved to hunt with his son David and friends. Byron is

survived by his wife Eunice; his son David Carpenter and his

wife Deb of Burlington, CT; his daughter Karen Burgess of

Bristol, CT; his step-children Margaret Williams, Mary

Jennett and her husband David, and Delbert Haskins all of

West Berlin, and his brother Merrill “Eddie” Carpenter of

Canton, CT. Byron also leaves behind seven grandchildren.

He also has many loving nieces and nephews and numerous

great grandchildren and great-great grandchildren.

NEAL COOK passed away on Sept.

27, 2017, at Lakeland (Florida)

Regional Hospital, after a short illness. Neal

was the son of Arthur and Bessie Cook, born in

Montpelier, VT, on May 2, 1929. He graduated

from Montpelier High School in 1947. He was

in the Army from 1950 to 1951 and later, held

positions in several hotels and the state of VT. He transferred

to the U.S. Dept. of Labor in 1973 and retired in 1994. Neal

married Katherine Crawford in Montpelier in 1955 and raised

three children, Stephen, Barbara and James. Neal is survived

by his wife, three children and their spouses Stephen and Pam

Cook, Barbara and Charles Riley and James and Lisa Cook.

He was also proud of his five grandchildren. He is also survived

by a sister, Elisabeth Blodgett.

ALLA MAE DEWEY, 78, died

Sept. 27, 2017, at her home on

Freeman Road. She was born in Dew, Georgia,

on Dec. 15, 1938, the daughter of John and Effie

(Stewart) Free. She was a graduate of Maryville

High School in Maryville, TN, class of 1958.

On April 14, 1961, she married Gordon “Duke”

Dewey in Fort Bragg, NC, where they were both serving in

the United States Army. Alla Mae was a sergeant in the United

States Army and served in Vermont Army National Guard, as

well. Alla Mae worked for Bernard’s Military Alteration

Service at Fort Bragg, Black & Decker Co. in Fayetteville,

NC, Norwich University Mess Hall as a secretary, and owned

and operated Dewey’s Personal Services at Norwich

University. She loved traveling and spending time with her

family. Survivors include her husband, “Duke,” of Northfield;

two children, John Dewey and his wife, Brandi, of Northfield,

and Tishia Dewey Goddard and her husband, Jeffrey, of Barre

Town; three siblings, Charles Free, of North Carolina, John

Calvin Free, of Georgia, Helen Wheeler, of North Carolina;

six grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews.

CHARLES RICHARD HICKS, 57, died Oct.

2, 2017, in his sleep. He was born April 24,

1960, in Bennington, the son of Donald and

Frances (Bishop) Hicks. He graduated from

Montpelier High School in 1977 and Union

College in 1981. Mr. Hicks retired from the U.S.

Postal Service after 30 years, serving in

Bennington, Dorset and Rutland. He was an avid reader and

enjoyed music. Survived include his mother, of Bennington; a

sister, Martha Hicks-Robinson, Nashville, Tennessee; nieces,

a great-aunt and many cousins.

CAREY A. (VENNER) JOHNSTON passed

away in her home, at the young age of 43, on

Wednesday, September 13, 2017. Carey was

born November 8, 1973 at Central Vermont

Hospital, in Berlin, to John and Paula (Bashaw)

Venner. Carey made her home in Montpelier, Vt.

She was primarily a stay at home mom who

devoted her life to her children and family. She was also a

loving friend who will be deeply missed by many. Carey is

survived by her six children, Shawn Venner (companion

Aedan Scriven), Alexis Cote, Anisa Venner-Johnston, Aaron

Venner-Johnston, John and Jackson Sargent, her granddaughter,

Zelda, her father, John Venner and wife, Donna Gacetta,

her sister Lia Campagnari Venner (companion Lee Cota), her

brother, Nicholas Venner, husband John Sargent and her many

aunts, uncles and cousins. She is preceded in death by her

mother, Paula Venner of Barre. She was truly loved, and will

be missed by all. A funeral will not be held, following Carey’s

wishes. Her memory will live on in the hearts of all of us. She

will rest with her mother and grandmother in the family plot

in Hope Cemetery.

LILLIAN G. RAYMOND, 89, a longtime resident

of Waterbury Center, passed away peacefully

at Birchwood Terrace in Burlington, on

Sept. 30, 2017. Born in Waterbury on May 13,

1928, she was the daughter of the late Joseph F.

and Emma E. (Dalton) Rushford. On Oct. 14,

1946, she married X. Henry Raymond in

Waterbury Center. Henry predeceased Lillian on Jan. 29,

1976. Lillian grew up in Waterbury where she attended

schools and then, following her wedding, was happy and busy

raising her family and helping her husband on the family dairy

farm. With Henry’s passing, Lillian went to work in food

service at the Vermont State Hospital cafeteria in Waterbury,

a vocation she enjoyed along with her many co-workers. In

her leisure time, Lillian enjoyed cooking for her large and

loving family and many friends, sewing, cross-stitch, playing

cards, singing, dancing and music. Lillian is loved and mourned

by her daughter, Linda Presson, and her husband, Rick, of

Colchester; her daughter-in-law, Sharon Raymond, of

Waterbury Center; three grandchildren Matthew Raymond

and his wife, Faith, of Waterbury Center, Holly Anderson and

her husband, Todd, of Barre, Heather Thompson and her husband,

Tim, of Williston; nine great-grandchildren and one

great-great-grandson; as well as nieces, nephews and extended

family.

LAWRENCE WESLEY “LARRY”

ROBERTS, 80, of Wetumpka,

Alabama, formerly of Barre, passed away on

Sept. 27, 2017, at his home. Larry was born in

East Barre on Dec. 28, 1936, to Wesley and

Mabel Roberts, the second of seven sons. He

attended school in East Barre and graduated

from Spaulding High School in 1954. After his graduation, he

joined the Army, making that his career and he retired with the

rank of Major in 1976. On Feb. 13, 1956, Larry married

Helene Bienvenu in Barre. Since Larry was in the service,

they lived in several locations, finally settling in Montgomery,

Alabama, after his retirement. Helene passed away on Sept.

23, 1997. In 1979, he and his wife opened their own business,

The House of Frames, which ran successfully until selling it

and retiring. Even after retiring, Larry continued making

frames part time for Hobby Lobby. He is survived by his wife,

Carolyn S. Roberts; son, Robin A. Roberts (Lisa), of Titus,

Alabama; daughter, Renee Baker (Ray), of San Antonio,

Texas; several grandchildren. He is also survived by brothers,

Dennis (Linda), of Montpelier, Eugene (Sherry), of Sellersville,

Pennsylvania, and Kelly (Joanne), of Barre.

SANDRA “SANDI” (TREFREN) ARONSON

SPOONER passed away unexpectedly at her

Marshfield, VT, home on Sept. 25, 2017. Sandi

was born to George and Theda (Chamberlain)

Trefren, of Lyndonville, on Jan. 25, 1940. Sandi

graduated from Lyndon Institute in Lyndonville

and went on to earn her degree from the Vermont

College of Cosmetology. On July 7, 1974, she married

Douglas Aronson. They blended their families to raise a family

of nine before having one child together. In 1975, after

running a family dairy farm in Berlin, Sandi and Doug bought

the Woodbury Country Store and moved to Woodbury, VT.

For years, their store thrived and diversified as an authentic

general store. After selling the store, Sandi held various jobs

and enjoyed positions in which she interacted with the public.

On June 17, 2017, Sandi married Mervin Spooner, of

Marshfield. Though their time together was brief, Sandi and

Merv were inseparable.They enjoyed dancing, spending time

at the Twin Valley Senior Center, attending church, taking

their beloved dog, Jackie, for creamees, and doing chores

together at their Marshfield home. Even more important to her

was accepting people for who they were and supporting them

in her quiet way. This was evident, by her helping others in

need anonymously. Sandi made a common practice of leaving

things that people needed when they were not home, as it was

important to her that people not feel indebted to her or

ashamed of their circumstances. Being little in stature, those

close to her know her heart was the largest part of her. Sandi

is survived by her only sister and brother in-law, Pauline and

Ronald Drew, of Lyndonville. Sandi was a cherished mother

to Ann and Mike Cookson, of Cabot, Diana Gomez, of

Bridgeport, CT, Carlos Gomez, of Kingman, AZ, and Merilyn

and Bill Ready, of Terryville, CT. Stepchildren include Dug

and Maria Aronson, Carl and Marina Aronson, Scott and

Tammy Aronson, all of Randolph, Vermont; Tammy Aronson,

of Fort Myers, Florida; Karen Lilley, of Williamstown,

Vermont; Kim Aronson, of Wilmington, Vermont; David

Spooner, of Marshfield, Vermont; and Alison and Dan Ricker,

of Sharon, Vermont. Sandi is survived by 25 grandchildren,

12 great-grandchildren and five great-great-grandchildren.

DAVID A. STONE, 49, of Barre, died Sept. 27,

2017, at his home. He was born Oct. 14, 1967,

in Lebanon, New Hampshire, the son of Robert

N. and Marie (Grace) Stone. He attended school

in Lebanon before beginning work as a cook at

local restaurants. Later, he was employed at a

Middlesex wrecking yard and most recently at

Village Cannery in Barre. Mr. Stone enjoyed fishing, auto racing

and watching professional wrestling. Survivors include

his mother, of Hartford; three children, Jessica and Levi

Stone, both of Barre, David “DJ” Stone, of Williamstown; a

granddaughter; a brother, Wayne Stone, of Hartford; several

uncles, aunts, nieces, nephews and cousins.

ROBERT E. THOMPSON, 87, of

Dade City, Florida, and formerly of

Williamstown, VT, passed away Sept. 24, 2017,

at his home with his family at his bedside. Born

in Barre, Vermont, on Dec. 27, 1929, he was the

son of the late Clyde and Katherine (Sullivan)

continued on next page

HWF_World2colx5.indd 6

11/20/10 10:03:13 AM


Guest Opinion

Vermont Is Not Wavering on Clean Water

By Julie Moore

Secretary, Vermont Agency of Natural Resources

Despite the Scott Administration’s commitment to restoring

Vermont’s waterways and funding clean water initiatives,

recent news stories have contained inaccurate information and

given the false impression that we’re decelerating our efforts.

This is simply not the case.

The Agency of Natural Resources, and all the partners

engaged in this work – including sister state agencies, Vermont

municipalities, regional planning commissions, conservation

districts, non-profit and watershed organizations, and private

landowners from farms to real estate companies – are moving

ahead as quickly as possible to develop, design, fund, and

implement clean water projects.

The lack of care in these stories can be seen in the facts they

get wrong. For instance, they neglect to inform readers that it

was always anticipated that less would be spent in the early

years on certain types of projects – such as retrofitting existing

developments with stormwater controls – as regulatory drivers

are put in place, and more would be spent in later years. More

importantly is the fact that neither I, nor the Governor, nor

anyone in his administration, have called for spending less

money on clean water. Further, the articles ignore that the

actual spending on clean water is increasing year-over-year,

not decreasing – there was a full 70% increase in clean water

funding between FY17 and FY18.

We do have an obligation to put funding to work with

appropriate management and oversight. Taxpayers expect, and

rightly so, that their money will be invested in our water environment

as quickly as possible, but also in a way that ensures

it is spent effectively and with accountability. That is our great

challenge.

Vermonters may remember President Obama’s American

Guest Opinion

Recovery and Reinvestment Act, or ARRA, and the search for

“shovel-ready” projects to fund. We face a similar challenge

in lining up projects which are ready to go to construction.

Although we understand where many of the water quality

needs lie across our landscape, it takes time to develop the

expertise and resources in both public and private sectors

necessary to implement projects in accountable ways and to

ensure we will be measuring what we get for our money. That

is what I have been, and am, advocating for – a realistic, practical

and effective long-term strategy – and what was unfortunately

misrepresented as a desire to slow down spending on

the cleanup of Lake Champlain and other waters.

Together, through the course of decades, even centuries, of

living, building and farming on Vermont’s landscape, we created

the problems in our waters. And it will take time – measured

in years, not weeks or months – to correct those problems.

Ensuring that we are laying the proper foundation is

essential. We will, and we are, getting it right. That is a

strength, not a weakness.

Unfortunately, the incorrect narrative has taken on a life of

its own. I have heard from many involved in the great effort

to restore our waterways – including those who sometimes

disagree with us over the best way to achieve our mutual goals

– about how frustrated they are by this mischaracterization.

More worrisome is that these inaccurate stories may be weakening

Vermonters’ resolve to take on this monumental task.

I will not let that happen. So, I urge those readers who are

concerned to get involved, and learn the real story of what we

are doing, how we are doing it, and why. Come to a public

hearing on the issue, or look at the documents we have gathered

related to clean water funding here: http://anr.vermont.

gov/about/special-topics/act-73-clean-water-funding. See for

yourselves what progress we are making, and what work lies

ahead.

Senator Dick McCormack and Representative

Mary Sullivan Have a Message

“As Co-Chairs of the Climate Solutions Caucus in the legislature

we are hoping to work with Gov. Phil Scott on ways

to reduce our carbon footprint. Doing this will transform our

economy to a post-carbon future that greatly benefits the

economy of Vermont, creating jobs, improving the health of

our citizens and protecting our environment as a whole.

His statement ‘Imposing a carbon tax on our workforce

would be detrimental for Vermonters and our state’s economy’

neglects to mention that any carbon pricing legislation would

include cuts to other taxes and fees to counter any negative

impacts on working Vermonters. Indeed, many Vermonters

come out ahead.

The governor neglects to point out that studies have shown

that carbon pricing is a way to strengthen our economy so that

it grows in the 21st century. Calls for a carbon pricing policy

come not only from environmental activists but from economically

conservative Republicans like George Shultz and

James Baker. Vermont does not produce any fossil fuel, and

continued from previous page

Thompson. Robert attended elementary school in Graniteville

and Spaulding High School in Barre. After his schooling, he

served his country in the U.S. Army during the Korean War.

After his honorable discharge, he returned to Barre where he

was employed as a machinist for the Rock of Ages Corp.

where he retired in 1994 after 49 years of employment. He

was first married to Pauline Calcagni in St. Monica Catholic

Church in Barre. She passed away. In December 1967, he

married Wilma Rivers in St. Sylvester Catholic Church in

Graniteville, Vermont. The couple made their home in

Williamstown. In 2000, they moved to Florida where they

made their home. Robert was an avid hunter who enjoyed

playing horseshoes and bowling - but most of all, he enjoyed

spending precious time with his family and wintering in

Florida. He was a former member of St. Edward Catholic

Church of Williamstown, St. Rita Catholic Church in Florida

and the American Legion Post #10 of Barre. Survivors include

his wife of 49 years of marriage, Wilma Thompson, of Dade

City, Florida; three daughters, Cindy Gregoire, of

Williamstown, Vermont, Kelly Thompson, of Pocatello,

• • •

• • •

eighty cents of every dollar we spend on fossil fuel leaves our

state. This is an economic drain on our economy. When we

reduce fossil fuel usage we keep these dollars home and they

recirculate locally.

The governor ignores the prohibitive expense of humancaused

global warming. This year alone the economic impact

of global warming is measured in billions upon billions of

dollars.

The governor to his credit has called citizens together to

study climate issues, including holding public hearings.

Throughout our state Vermonters have called for a strong

meaningful response to global warming. Many have requested

carbon pricing in Vermont as the best way to move forward.

Having asked the people for their ideas the governor would do

well to listen.”

-Senator Dick McCormack and Representative Mary

Sullivan

Christina Goodwin Joins Snelling Center for

Government’s Vermont Leadership Institute Class of 2018

The Snelling Center for Government is pleased to announce

that Christina Goodwin of Worcester has been accepted into

the Vermont Leadership Institute Class of 2018. Goodwin is

currently the Executive Director at Home Share Now in

Barre. Goodwin joins 22 other leaders from across the state in

an intensive program that attracts participants from the public,

private and non-profit sectors. The Class of 2018 embarked

on their leadership journey in September and will meet for a

total of nineteen seminar days between now and June 2018.

Associates will engage in intensive assessment and selfreflection,

study ethics and systems thinking and become

immersed in some of the most important issues facing

Vermont. Through this experience, associates are inspired to

participate in public service, take thoughtful action within the

• • •

public sector, and work effectively with other Vermont citizens

to bring about positive change. This year marks the 23rd

year of the Vermont Leadership Institute, and Goodwin will

join more than 500 graduates who are making a difference in

Vermont: leading innovative businesses, creating award-winning

non-profits, serving in the legislature and state government,

and volunteering in their communities.

To learn more about the Vermont Leadership Institute and

the Snelling Center’s other professional development programs,

please visit www.snellingcenter.org or attend the

upcoming Open House on Wednesday, October 11th from

5:30 – 7:30pm at the Catamount Arts Gallery in St. Johnsbury.

Contact Suzanne Trahey at suzanne@snellingcenter.org for

more details.

Idaho, and Traci Haas-Thompson, of Knightdale, North

Carolina.

RICHARD BUTLER WILLIAMS, of Barre,

died Oct. 2, 2017, at the age of 54, of complications

from cancer. Born March 30, 1963, he was

the son of the late Dr. M. Henry Williams Jr. and

Mary Butler Williams. He grew up in Scarsdale,

New York, graduating from Scarsdale High

School, class of 1981. He lived for many years

in Putnam Lake, New York, and worked for Carl Zeiss Inc. in

Thornwood, New York, later taking other jobs in manufacturing

and landscaping. In 2005, he moved to Barre at the same

time his parents moved to Montpelier. His hobbies were scuba

diving and flying, and he was a familiar face around Barre and

Montpelier for the past 12 years. He attended Bethany United

Church of Christ in Montpelier and volunteered at Bethany

Church and the Montpelier Senior Center. He was predeceased

by his parents and by a sister, Frances Williams. He is

survived by his brother, Dr. Stuart E. Williams, and wife,

Sarah, of Montpelier; his sister, Patricia Williams, of

Colchester; his brother, Marshall B. Williams, and wife,

Marguerite “Meg” Gousie, of Pawtucket, Rhode Island; one

niece, six nephews, two great-nieces and two great-nephews.

Practice areas include:

• commercial and real estate

transactions

• business formation

• buy/sell arrangements

• stock purchase agreements

• asset sales

• leasing

Andrea L.

Gallitano, P.C.

Attorney At Law

301 North Main Street, Suite 2

Barre, VT 05641

(802) 622-8230

• tenant disputes

• employment, insurance,

collections, and permitting

issues

• wills/trusts

• probate administration and

litigation

• guardianships

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RESIDENTS OF MONTPELIER

Commencing Monday, October 2, 2017, and

continuing until Friday, November 3, 2017, the City of

Montpelier Public Works Department will be picking up

bagged leaves left at the curbside. Bags should contain

leaves only: No brush, garden debris or flower stalks

will be accepted. Leaves raked into the street MUST be

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schedule is as follows:

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Street, Court Street, Meadow areas.

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U.S. Sen. Bernard Sanders

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IN RE THE ESTATE OF:

DOREEN S. WELCH

LATE OF:

Graniteville, Vermont

Notice To Creditors

To the creditors of the Estate

of Doreen S. Welch, late of

Graniteville, Vermont.

I have been appointed a personal

representative of the above-named

estate. All creditors having claims

against the estate must present their

claims in writing within four (4)

months of the date of publication

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presented to me at the address

listed below with a copy filed with

the register of the Probate Court.

The claim will be forever barred

if it is not presented as described

above within the four (4) month

deadline.

Dated: 10/3/17

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Name of Publication: The WORLD

Publication Date: October 11, 2017

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page 12 The WORLD October 11, 2017

The WORLD welcomes Letters to the Editor concerning public issues.

Letters should be 400 words or less and may be subject to editing due to space

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I Was Appalled

Dear Editor:

I was appalled at the column Max’s View in the October 4

edition of The World. He called all who are opposed to

breathing someone else’s cigarette smoke “propagandists,”

based upon what seems to be his own personal beliefs. He did

not reference or quote any studies to prove his position that

“second hand smoke isn’t deadly” and that no non -smoker

who worked in smoke-filled houses in the 70s and 80s developed

cancer or emphysema. I look forward to no longer seeing

his column.

Fred Cheyette

Sense, Nonsense & Sensibility

Dear Editor,

Who would have thought that a serious playwright would

do a take on Jane Austen’s Sense & Sensibility that calls for a

circus ensemble? The Lost Nation Theater production runs

from October 5th to 22nd at the Montpelier City Hall and

regular LNT attenders may be in for a few surprises.

After speaking with Director Kathleen Keenan, I’m anxiously

awaiting this Vermont premier. If Keenan’s energetic

description is any indication, the show will be manic and

emotional, creative, sweet and thought-provoking.

Keenan says that the script as written by Kate Hamill lends

itself to very physical theater, in the spirit of legendary directors

Jerzy Grotowski and Andre Gregory, demanding great

energy, creativity and versatility from a “circus-like ensemble”

of actors. “It is a celebration of what we can do on a stage

with only a table and a chair. It is a melding of the elegant

with Quick Change Comedy and of Regency with

Vaudeville.”

While the two lead roles, Elinor and Marianne, are played

by one actor each (Annie Evans and Katelyn Manfre, respectively),

the rest of the parts, including a “Chorus” of Gossips,

the Well-to-Do, animals and even pieces of furniture are portrayed

by actors who have to juggle multiple roles and functions.

The Gossips,” says Keernan, “evoke the idea that everybody

is watching. This can be dangerous and downright

damaging.”

I asked her why she chose this show. “I’ve long been a fan

of Jane Austen. She has such a way with words, such wit, a

forward sense of humor. She has an uncanny ability to understand

human nature. She utilizes a heightened sense of language

that is so rich and poetic.”

Sense & Sensibility was written during an historical blip,

when English life was changing from a primarily rural and

agricultural sensibility to a more urban, industrial one.

Women’s roles were also changing. It was a crisis, creating

both danger and opportunity. Elinor tended to play by the

My Great Air Conditioner Ritual

By G. E. Shuman

Our lives are filled with rituals. I’ve

come to the conclusion that that’s

just the way it is. Some of these

rituals are intentional and cherished ones,

like holiday traditions and church attendance,

although church attendance should mean more than

that. Some of our rituals, or oft-repeated happenings that

become rituals, are much less lofty things than holidays and

church-going. (Look at me. I used the word ‘oft’.) Some, like

taking daily medication, making the morning coffee, or even

washing the flea-bitten dog are simply parts of our repeated

routine, but soon become rituals. I have actually walked from

the kitchen, after making that morning coffee, and listened for

the sounds of the coffee maker, to be sure I had just made

the morning coffee. That’s how ingrained into my routine that

ritual has become. Be honest, you have done things like that,

too.

One ritual I always perform happens less frequently than

coffee-making, but two times as frequently as a holiday. These

times are my twice-yearly encounters with our three upstairs

window air conditioners. We bought the necessary but bothersome

things four or five years ago. My wife pointed to the

ones in the store that she thought we should get, and from that

moment on they have been my sole responsibility. It’s funny

how some things seem to work out that way. Each spring I

take those air conditioners, one at a time, out of Andrew’s,

Emily’s, and our bedroom closets, and proceed to mount them

in their respective bedroom windows. Each fall I reverse the

entire process, returning them to their winter resting places on

those same closet floors.

• • •

rules but her younger sister, Marianne, fell under the spell of

the new Romanticism, leading to romance, drama, intrigue

and a bit of scandal. How was a woman to find balance? As

the tagline goes: “When reputation is everything, how do you

follow your heart?”

But what is the relevance to today? “Look at social media

and cyber-bullying,” says Keernan. “We all fall in love, sometimes

with the wrong person. Sometimes circumstances get in

the way. Sometimes the rules are there for a reason.”

Sometimes people should mind their own business.

Lost Nation’s entire theater has been reconfigured into a

theater-in-the-round in order to accommodate this demanding

production. “The audience will be watching itself as well as

the show. There are upwards of 45 scenes in a little over 2

hours, lots of changes,” she said. “It challenging but it’s in our

wheelhouse, it’s our kind of show.”

Bob Fisher

“God Provides, but We Decide!”

Dear Editor:

Do consumers want REAL, natural milk, cheese, and dairy

products? Or do they want industrial, processed, and manufactured

so-called “milk,” “cheese,” “yogurt,” and so forth?

Cheeses with patents, some even cheese-less “cheeses” and

other food products made with milk protein concentrate

(MPC), ultrafiltered (UF) milk, and other highly processed

milk-derived “ingredients” are being increasingly marketed

and passed off as the “real” thing, when, in fact, they are causing

us all harm-dairy farmers and consumers alike.

The issue of MPC and UF milk needs to be investigated by

appropriate federal authorities and corrected IMMEDIATELY.

The rampant use of industrially processed milk protein powders

and other additives that extend the cheese yields creates

a milk “surplus” for which the dairy farmer is blamed, under

charges of “overproduction,” when, in fact, it is the dairy

processing “Industry,” including the dairy co-operatives,

formed under the unsupervised federal Capper-Volstead law,

that are causing these problems. It is these same “special

interests” that are benefiting financially at the expense of

dairy farmers and consumers alike, with the farmers actually

going out of business because of the low farm milk prices that

result when these industrialized “ingredients” replace traditional,

REAL milk in the manufacturing of dairy products.

Imagine a cartoon drawing of a little guy stirring a cheese

vat, making REAL, NATURAL, HEALTHY cheese from

REAL milk. Along comes a giant, who grabs Milk Protein

Concentrate (MPC) powder, a “mish-mash” of whatever from

wherever and throws it in the vat!

So, the little cheesemaker doesn’t get about 10 pounds of

GREAT cheese. Instead, the giant hauls away about 14 to 18

pounds of “Moo Glue” cheese to sell to uninformed consumers.

Adding MPC, pea starch, cellulose, sodium gluconate,

etc., plus altering the process, retaining more moisture,

increase “cheese” yields.

The pile of MPC keeps getting bigger! The US is the leading

cheese producer in the world, with 12.076 billion pounds

continued on next page

Right from day one I have tried to care for those precious

little devils. (The air conditioners, not my kids, although I

do also care for my kids and almost never refer to them as

little devils.) Our units came with remote controls, as does

everything but toasters and toilets these days. (I am waiting

for those developments.) Every spring I remove each remote

from the little zip lock bag I taped to the top of the machine

the previous fall, and reinstall the also-bagged batteries. I then

prop our tired old wooden windows open, and, after gathering

my strength and courage, wrestle each AC into its place, with

most of its boxy body hanging precariously, in mid-air, outside

of the second floor of our home. I do this quickly, hoping

I can screw the window down and into place, before the AC

obeys the law of gravity and plunges to its small-appliance

doom, embedding itself into our lawn some fifteen feet below.

So far, (Knock on old wooden window frame,) I have done

this successfully.

Then, in the late-fall, reverse-half of the ritual, I have also,

so far, successfully pulled each unit back into the house, and

nearly hear each one sigh in relief as I rescue its little metallic

body from the precipice. Perhaps, and more likely, the sigh

comes from me, although I’m not sure.

The time for this second, routine, and necessary AC event

of the year is once again upon me. Sometime within the next

few evenings I will climb the stairs, hammer and power screwdriver

in hand, and perform my de-air conditioning ritual once

more. Please wish me luck. I do hope that none of the boxy

little things fall to mechanical demise, although that would

make the job one-third easier for me next spring.

• • •


continued from previous page

in 2016. In 2015, Wisconsin produced 3.07 billion pounds

of cheese! If Wisconsin were a country, it would rank 4th in

the world! Wisconsin produces 25.4% of US cheese!

At least one third of milk in the US is used to produce

cheese! Huge cheese production, using MPC, creates a huge

surplus of fluid milk that is not needed because of that 4 to 8

pounds of extra cheese yielded due to MPC use, etc.

Decades ago, MPC was imported for glue, adhesives, and

industrial uses. But, Kraft, Dairy Farmers of America (DFA),

and others decided to use it illegally in cheese and thousands

of our foods and beverages.

Because of DFA, Fonterra, and others, we now have a giant

MPC industry that I believe is #1 in the world, and the MPC

produced possibly displaces 30% to 40%, maybe even more,

of US raw farm milk, which effectively creates a HUGE raw

farm milk “surplus,” giving the perception of dairy farmer

“overproduction,” because of the cheese yield increase! Both

dairy farmers and consumers suffer.

More MPC use, plus other powdered dairy ingredients,

such as “Milk Protein Isolate” (MPI), Whey Protein

Concentrate (WPC), Whey Protein Isolate (WPI), etc., used in

thousands of our foods and beverages, create an unknown

additional displacement of raw farm milk.

Most consumers don’t know this is a huge concern because,

after all, Milk Protein Concentrate sounds OK!

When consumers learn how raw milk is filtered, ultrafiltered,

diafiltrated, heated, fractionated, after removing this or

adding that, in order to manufacture MPC and powdered

ingredients, they want no part of all these, so-called, “new”

and “innovative” dairy ingredients.

Dairy farmers’ forced advertising money was used to help

research, develop, promote, and advertise MPC, adulterated

cheese, etc. instead of being used to promote fluid milk use!

According to the USDA National Report (Friday, 9/1/17),

the “Percentage of Total Conventional Ads by Commodity”

shows cheese at 26%; cream cheese at 8%; cottage cheese at

6%, for a total of 40% versus 1% for Milk! Advertising

money is misused!

Why? Again! Money! Cheese equals more profits for the

“Dairy & Food Industries” but rock bottom, bankrupting, raw,

farm milk prices for farmers. Ironically, dairy farmers are

blamed for the surplus created because of the MPC increasing

cheese yields!

The latest Food and Drug Administration (FDA) “Guidance

for Industry” regarding “Ultrafiltered Milk in the Production

of Standardized Cheeses and Related Cheese Products” needs

comments from consumers, including dairy farmers. For more

information, call FDA at 240-402-2373.

Proper, adequate labeling, I believe, is a real problem and

should be re-addressed by pressuring FDA in regards to all the

Pat McDonald and Ben Kinsley are co-hosts

of the show “Vote for Vermont.” Joining them

on a recent show was Michael Snyder, Commissioner

of Vermont’s Department of Forest, Parks

and Recreation (FPR). Michael has been a longtime

forester, serving for 14 years as head Chittenden

County forestry in addition to 12 years of

teaching forestry at UVM. He was appointed by

Commissioner by Governor Shumlin and reappointed

Commissioner by Governor Phil Scott in

January.

Governor Scott signed an Executive Order

on June 15, 2017 creating the Vermont Outdoor Recreation

Economic Collaborative (VOREC) to “promote prudent stewardship

of State recreation assets and marketing the outdoor

recreation values and attributes of Vermont to effectively foster

economic growth.” The Collaborative, with Michael as its

chair, is comprised primarily of private sector members and

non-profit leaders. Michael explained that the group provides

a needed platform to support our natural, built, and cultural

assets and to maintain, expand, and leverage the quality of our

recreational offerings. Information on VOREC is located on

FPR website along with information on meetings which are

open to the public.

Michael explained there are five regional offices including

FPR headquarters in Montpelier. It has four sub-departments:

Administration, Forestry, State Lands Administration, and

State Parks and Outdoor Recreation.

Forestry helps oversee the 350,000 acres of public lands.

They are the stewards of the land and collaborate other State

entities and private landowners as required. They are also responsible

for urban and community forests that tie the public

and private forests together.

There are 55 developed state parks which are open to the

public for camping and recreating. There are other heavily

forested parks like Camels Hump State Park that are not developed.

It is estimated that 1M visitors use the services of the

Vermont’s parks each year.

The list of outdoor activities is long and fast growing. For

instance: backcountry skiing, mountain biking, camping, hiking,

snowmobiling, snowshoeing, fishing, hunting, etc. The

impact that outdoor recreation has on Vermont’s economy is

reflected in its over 34,000 jobs and $2.6M in revenue.

Michael talked about the importance of “managing the

woods”. He explained that forests, if left alone, would do just

fine. But Vermont needs its forests and demands a lot from

them. The Department can offer individuals advice on managing

their woods based on their interest. For example specific

vegetation could be used to attract turkeys for hunters, or song

birds for enthusiasts, all while keeping the forest healthy and

sustainable.

Last year Bill Sayre was interviewed about the crisis in

the wood products industry. Michael confirmed that Vermont

is indeed facing a crisis in our low quality wood business.

These woods were sold in quantity outside the state, primarily

Maine, where they would be processed into pulp and used

for making paper. With the use of computers, the need for

• • •

ultrafiltered fluid milk and all the dry concentrated powders,

such as MPC, MPI, WPC, WPI, etc.

Putting “Derived from a milk source” on labels, to satisfy

allergen labeling requirements, is totally inadequate! This is

deceptive and does not give the consumer the truth about what

is in the product. NO infant food or formula should contain

any of these industrialized protein ingredients.

Consumers, please help! Losing dairy farmers also puts

your current and future food supply in jeopardy. With only

about 40,000 licensed dairies left in the whole US, we are in

crisis mode! Every country should have “Food Sovereignty.”

The right and ability to have a safe, secure, and adequate food

supply are vital! After all, “Any Nation That Cannot Feed

Itself Is Not Free!” And that is where we are headed!

“God provides, but we decide!”

Donna Hall

Retired Lycoming County Dairy Farmer

I’m Afraid I’ll Lose My Health Care

Dear Editor:

I work as an after school teacher and a personal care assistant

in the city of Burlington. I love my jobs - I spend my time

caring for people and making their lives easier. Unfortunately,

this care work is not paid well and I do not receive benefits. If

I didn’t have Medicaid, I would not have health insurance.

I’m young and healthy - I eat vegetables, don’t smoke, and get

lots of exercise. When I started getting heart palpitations a few

months ago, I was terrified. Luckily it turned out to be nothing,

but it was a chilling reminder that I won’t be young forever,

and my good health and therefore my ability to work and

support myself could vanish in an instant.

Healthcare isn’t just a moral imperative, but an economic

one. If one of my heart palpitations had turned out to be a

symptom of something more serious, and I had racked up

medical bills or been out of work, I would not have been able

to pay rent. I would have become destitute, which aside from

being a state no human should have to experience, would have

cost the state of Vermont money. No one wins when people

get too sick to work. Universal healthcare is economically,

morally, and logically superior to the patchwork system we

have now. Everyone should get the same access to quality

healthcare regardless of income or pre-existing conditions.

This is why I am a member of the Healthcare is a Human

Right campaign. We are not strong as a nation until we are

caring for every American.

Thank you for the opportunity to let my voice be heard. I

appreciate the work you do in spreading the stories of real

Americans.

Best,

Wiley Reading

Marketing And Managing Vermont’s

Natural Resources And Forests

paper has dwindled dramatically. Maine

has closed its mills resulting in a loss in

Vermont’s marketplace. Vermont’s high

quality wood, which is used for Vermont

value added products, continues to be in

demand.

In order to resolve the problem the State

needs to find other uses for low-grade

wood. For example, 30% of Vermont

schools burn wood.

Another problem is the high cost of

Workers Compensation (WC). Michael

has been working on getting an adjustment to the WC rates

to assist loggers who have been negatively impacted. The

Legislature has recognized the problems facing the industry

and allowed for a sales tax exemption for capital equipment.

The Legislature also provided

addition funds for the Department

to acquire portable

skidder bridges to allow skidders

to cross over rivers and

streams to keep the waters

clean.

For several years Vermont

has focused on the importance

of the “working Landscape.”

Michael advised that

this support continues with

the purpose of ensuring economic

viability of agricultural

and forestry based businesses

and putting agriculture and

forestry on the same investment

platform.

Forestry was added to the

House Agriculture (and Forestry)

Committee. This puts

agriculture and forestry on

the same investment platform

and gives the Department of

Forest, Park and Recreation

a “home base” committee

although they are called in

to testify on related issues in

other committees.

Note: The comments reflected

in this article are

opinions stated by our guests.

Any rebuttals are welcome

and can be expressed on

the websites and Facebook

pages of VFV and CFV. If

you would like to see the

show please go to vote802.

com for a complete listing

of Vote for Vermont shows

or our YouTube channel.

SUPERIOR COURT

WASHINGTON UNIT

BERLIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Snow Plowing - Request for Proposals

The Berlin Elementary School requests proposals for

snow plowing of the school’s driveway, parking lot and

bus loop. Plowing is to be completed in a neat and

responsible manner by 6:30 a.m. on school days and

7:30 a.m. on non-school days. This contract is for the

entire 2017-2018 snow season. Sanding capabilities

are required as well. Please include in your proposal

what the charge will be for sanding, per event, separate

from the plowing. Please send a letter of interest that

includes the total proposed contract amount, proof of

liability insurance, as well as three current references to:

Louis Paquet, Custodial/Maintenance Supervisor, Berlin

Elementary School, 372 Paine Turnpike North, Berlin,

Vermont 05602. Application deadline is 2:00 p.m. on

Friday, October 20, 2017.

Construction Update

Montpelier Transportation Projects

Project Location: State Street, Main Street, and VT 12 – Elm Street - Work

to include milling, paving, manhole and drainage structure adjustments and

extensive sidewalk improvements. VT 12-Northfi eld Street - new water,

sewer, storm water improvements, sidewalks and a stabilized road base.

ELM STREET TRAFFIC DELAYS – Final paving will continue Monday

(10/9) on Elm Street. Expect traffic delays all week.

Day Work – (7:00 am to 9:00 pm, M-F)

VT 12/Elm Street: FINAL PAVING - EXPECT DELAYS!

All work is weather dependent, if it rains, work will be rescheduled.

• Final Paving – Crews will continue fi nal paving from Spring/Elm Street

progressing north, weather permitting.

• Crews may install gravel shoulders and perform general clean-up

towards the end of the week.

Elm Street parking will be closed off in active work areas this week.

Parking will re-open as the work is completed.

Traffic - Travel will be reduced to one lane with alternating one-way traffi c

maintained by fl aggers. Motorists can expect traffi c delays all week.

Northfield Street Update

Following the completion of the roadway reconstruction work early in the

week, crews will be fi ne grading Northfi eld Street in preparation for base

paving.

Crews will continue setting new curbing in various areas between Memorial

Drive and Derby Drive. Please note: Sidewalks that cross driveways will be

prepared one-half at a time, when possible, in an effort to maintain access.

Granite retaining walls will be constructed on each side of #29 Northfi eld

Street.

There are no road closures or water service interruptions planned for this

week.

Traffic – Alternating one-way traffi c is anticipated all week between Memorial

Drive and Derby Drive. Motorists are strongly encouraged to seek

alternative routes using Derby Drive or Dog River Road during construction.

Traffi c delays of up to 10 minutes can be expected on Northfi eld Street.

It is illegal in VT to use any handheld portable electronic devices while

driving. The law carries fines of up to $200 with points assessed if the

violation occurs in a work zone.

Contact Francine Perkins, Project Outreach Coordinator, FRP Enterprises,

LLC with any questions or concerns with regards to the project at 802-

479-6994. Construction updates will be posted on http://www.roadworkupdates.com,

The City of Montpelier’s Front Porch Forum and Facebook

Pages, Montpelier Alive’s Facebook Page and Makeover Montpelier’s

Facebook Page.

STATE OF VERMONT

2col x 6.5”

CIVIL DIVISION

Docket Number 196-4-16 Wncv

COMMERCE BANK & TRUST COMPANY,

Plaintiff

v.

WENDY J. BARNETT,

WAYNE L. BARNETT AND

MIDLAND FUNDING, LLC

Defendants

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

By virtue of the Judgment and Decree of Foreclosure by Judicial Sale (“Foreclosure Judgment”) fi led February 23, 2017 and the Power of Sale contained

in certain mortgages granted by Wendy J. Barnett and Wayne L. Barnett (“Mortgagors”), to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for

Nation One Mortgage Company, Inc. dated April 5, 2007 and recorded in Book 68 at Page 610-623 of the Town of Cabot Land Records and dated April

5, 2007 recorded in Book 68 at Pages 624-629 of the Town of Cabot Land Records, of which mortgages Commerce Bank & Trust Company is the present

holder under Assignments dated August 22, 2007 and of record in Book 69 at Page 664 of the Town of Cabot Land Records and dated August 22, 2007 and

of record in Book 69 at Page 663 of the Town of Cabot Land Records, for breach of the conditions of the mortgages and for the purpose of foreclosing the

same, the undersigned will cause to be sold at public auction (“Sale”) at 3:00 PM on October 24, 2017, the lands and premises known as 606 West Hill

Pond Road, Cabot (mailing address Marshfield), Vermont (“Mortgaged Property”) more particularly described as follows:

Being all and the same land and premises conveyed to Wayne L. Barnett and Wendy J. Barnett by Warranty Deed of Eunice M. Bashaw and Henry S.

Bashaw dated September 24, 1982 of record in Book 40 at Page 197 of the Town of Cabot Land Records.

Reference may be made to the following exchange of quitclaim deeds by means of which a common boundary line was established:

Quit Claim Deed of Wayne L. Barnett and Wendy J. Barnett to Helen A. Wheeler dated October 7, 1996 of record in Book 50, Page 187 of said Land

Records; and

Quit Claim Deed of Helen A. Wheeler to Wayne L. Barnett and Wendy J. Barnett dated October 7, 1996 of record in Book 50, Page 189 of said Land

Records

Being those lands and premises more commonly known and designated 606 West Hill Pond Road in the Town of Cabot, County of Washington and

State of Vermont.

This conveyance is subject to and with the benefi t of any utility easements, spring rights, easements for ingress and egress, and rights incidental to

each of the same as may appear of record, provided that this paragraph shall not reinstate any such encumbrances previously extinguished by the

Marketable Record Title Act, Chapter 5, Subchapter 7, Title 27, Vermont Statutes Annotated.

TERMS OF SALE: The Sale will be held at the Mortgaged Property. The Mortgaged Property will be sold “AS IS, WHERE IS, WITH ALL FAULTS, WITH NO

REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND”, subject to easements, rights of way, covenants, permits, reservations and restrictions of record,

superior liens, if any, encumbrances that are not extinguished by the sale, title defects, environmental hazards, unpaid real estate taxes (delinquent and

current, including penalty and interest), and municipal liens, to the highest bidder.

The successful bidder shall pay a deposit of at least $10,000 of the purchase price in cash or bank treasurer’s/cashier’s check at the time of Sale. The

balance of the purchase price shall be paid within ten days after entry of a confi rmation order. The successful bidder will be required to sign a purchase

and sale contract with NO CONTINGENCIES except confi rmation of the sale by the court. Title will be transferred by Confi rmation Order. The Sale may be

postponed one or more times for a total time of up to thirty (30) days, by announcing the new sale date to those present at each adjournment or by posting

notice at a conspicuous location at the place of the Sale. Notice of the new sale date shall also be sent by fi rst class mail, postage prepaid, to the mortgagor

at the mortgagor’s last known address at least fi ve days before the new sale date.

Other terms to be announced at the Sale or contact the Thomas Hirchak Company at 1-800-634-7653 or www.thcauction.com.

The Mortgagors, or their personal representatives or assigns, may redeem the Mortgaged Property at any time prior to the Sale by paying the full amount

due under the mortgage, including post-judgment expenses and the costs and expenses of sale.

Dated at Cabot, Vermont, this 17th day of September, 2017.

Commerce Bank & Trust Company

By: Steckel Law Offi ce

By:/s/ Susan J. Steckel

By: Susan J. Steckel, Esq.

P. O. Box 247

Marshfi eld, Vermont 05658-0247

802-563-4400

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 13


CARD SHOWER

for

Romaine Houghton

Happy 90 th Birthday

October 17

Love, Your Family

Send Cards &

Greetings To:

10 Heaton St., #43

Montpelier, VT 05602

BIRTH

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The following birth announcements were submitted by Central Vermont Medical Center

on October 4, 2017. Any questions or concerns should be addressed directly to CVMC.

Central Vermont Medical Center

Card Shower for

A son, Lancer Lloyd McGuffin, was born Sept. 26 to

Ashley Brown and Steven McGuffi n of Rochester.

A son, Brayden Matthew Perry Barnett, was born

Sept. 27 to Kristen Perry and Jordan Barnett of

Waterbury.

cvmc

2 x 3

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Dupras

Celebrating

98 Years!

October 17, 2017

send cards to:

3460 Steele Hill Rd.

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Happy

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Blossom Cottage Florist and The WORLD would like to help you wish a

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Blossom

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BLOSSOM COTTAGE FLORIST

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COTTAGE FLORIST ON THE BARRE-MONTPELIER RD. No obligation, nothing to

buy. Entries must be mailed two (2) weeks prior to anniversary date. Telephone calls

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NAMES___________________________________

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PHONE___________________________________

page 14 The WORLD October 11, 2017

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Happy Birthday!

FROM

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Price Chopper (Berlin, VT) and The WORLD would like to help you wish someone

special a Happy Birthday. Just send their name, address & birthdate. We’ll publish the

names in this space each week. Plus, we’ll draw one (1) winner each week for a FREE

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JSC Professor Jensen Beach

Wins Vermont Book Award

Jensen Beach, an assistant professor of writing and literature

at Johnson State College, has won the 2017 Vermont

Book Award for his 2016 short story collection “Swallowed

by the Cold.”

Beach was one of eight finalists for the $5,000 award,

established in 2014 by Vermont College of Fine Arts. He and

finalist Elizabeth Powell, JSC associate professor of writing

and literature, teach in VCFA’s Master of Fine Arts writing

and publishing program.

Powell, who directs JSC’s Bachelor of Fine Arts program,

was nominated for the award for her book of poems “Willy

Loman’s Reckless Daughter: Living Truthfully under

Imaginary Circumstances.” She is editor of the college’s

“Green Mountains Review” literary journal.

“I’m thrilled to win this award,” says Beach, fiction editor

of “Green Mountains Review.” “It was such an honor to be

among this year’s finalists. The books were all wonderful.

Vermont is my adopted home, and it’s especially rewarding to

get this honor here at home.”

Beach now is working on a novel and collection of stories.

“My teaching influences my writing very directly. It’s a part

of my daily thinking about literature, art, stories and all of it.

Teaching and writing are inseparable for me,” he says.

“Swallowed by the Cold,” published by Graywolf Press, is

set in Sweden.

“In Jensen’s book, the judges found a world so exquisitely

created they could close their eyes and immediately return in

their minds. They praised the coherence of the book’s interconnected

stories, as well as the moral complexity of the

characters,” says Miciah Bay Gault, Vermont Book Award

coordinator and director of VCFA’s writing and publishing

program. “All of this year’s finalists were beautifully written

exemplars of literary merit, so the judges’ criteria really

needed to get at whatever ineffable qualities lie beyond excellence.”

For the award, a committee of independent Vermont booksellers

nominates books in four categories: children’s literature,

creative nonfiction, fiction and poetry. Publishers also

may submit nominations. A panel of judges chooses finalists

in each genre and then selects the winner.

ARIES (March 21 to April

19) You might feel compelled

to get involved on the

“right side” of a seemingly

unfair fight. But appearances

can be deceptive. Get the

facts before going forth into the fray.

Don’t TAURUS forget... (April 20 to May 20) Barre Bullying others into agreeing

with your position could cause resentment. Instead,

10-18 persuade Kay Santamore, them to join you 5-6 by Gary making Villa, Washington your case on a logical

point-by-point Plainfield basis. 5-6 Jim Elliott, 51, Barre

5-14 Snook Downing, Chelsea

11-15 GEMINI Jessup (May Max Lefcourt, 21 to 4, June 5-22 20) Ruth Resist Madigan pushing P., 74, for a workplace

Rindge, decision NH you might feel is Bethel long overdue. Your impatience

Bob could Spaulding, backfire. Minot, Meanwhile, 5-27 Candy McLeon, focus 71, on that still-

11-15

ME

Hardwick

11-19 unsettled Henry Kasulka, personal 13, situation.

E.

CANCER Mplr (June 21 to July 6-322) Joey, Your Wby Ctr, aspects 40 favor doing

11-23 something Jason Lowe, different. 28, Wby You might 6-5 Rob decide Salvas, 56, to Barre redecorate your

11-28 home, Neil, or 28, take Waterbury a trip somewhere 6-6 Heather you’ve Holmes, 50, never been, or

Woodbury

12-3 even Peter change Lefcourt, your 44, Barre hairstyle.

12-3 LEO DOT! (July 64, Calais 23 to August 7-11 22) Joslyn You Richardson, might want 30, to take a

12-25 break Jenna from Companion, your busy 19, schedule Waterbury, to restore VT your energy

Waterbury Ctr.

7-7 Marti Elliott, Barre

12-31 levels. Chelsea Use Phillips, this less-hectic 29, 7-9 time Pierce to Salvas, also reassess 33, Barre your plans

and make Manassas, needed VA changes. 7-11 Marcus Hass, 29,

VIRGO (August 23 to September Bennington 22) What you like to

1-4 think Betsy of Cody, as determination 61, Barre might 7-12 Emily be Rappold, seen by Plainfield others as nothing

more Puerto than Rico stubbornness. 7-22 Try Jennifer to be "Jen" more Roberts flexible if you

1-15 Peggy Zurla, 54, Mayaez, 7-18 Mike Jacques, So. Barre

1-15 hope Shawn to get Kasulka, things E.Mplr resolved. Geller, 40, Baltimore,

1-19 LIBRA Kevn Sare, (September 36, Cabot 23 to October MD 22) Watch that you

(no “i”)

1-27 don’t Caitlyn unwittingly Couture, 26, reveal work-related 8-2 David Santamore, information 66, to the

wrong Barre person. Best to say nothing Plainfield until you get official

1-31 clearance Joyce LaMountain to open (The up. 8-8 Gary

SCORPIO Plant Lady), (October 85, 23 to 8-8 November Shirley Combs, 21) Randolph With things settling

Linda down Couture, at work Barreor at home, 8-16 Charlotte you can Edwards, now take Barre on a new

Adamant

8-9 Bob Evans, 64, Woodstock

1-31

1-31 challenge Wayne Michaud, without 70, fear of distraction. Town Be open to helpful

suggestions Santa Rosa, from CA colleagues. 8-20 Rachel Salvas, Barre

8-21 Chriiis

2-1 SAGITTARIUS Nancy Prescott, Barre (November 8-24 Terry 22 to Spaulding, December 21) Your

2-6 creativity Bob Edwards, can 75help resolve an Lewiston, emotional ME situation that

2-8 might Warren otherwise Lanigan get out of 8-29 hand. Connie Continue Spaulding, to Minot, be your usual

2-12 caring, Joe Richardson, sensitive self.

ME

Waterbury

2-13 CAPRICORN Sandy Salvas, Barre (December 9-8 22 Arlo to Benjamin January Lefcourt, 19) You 8 could

2-14 impress Laura Rappold, a lot E. of influential 9-15 Deborah people Phillips with the way you

untangle Montpelier a few knotty problems. 9-26 Aeletha Meanwhile, Kelly, Barre a colleague

2-16 Aaron Retherford

9-28 Jessica McLeon, 29,

2-23 is set Pauline to share Nelson, some welcome news. Hardwick

AQUARIUS Waterbury (January 20 to February 18) Aspects favor

2-25 recharging Meah & Mya your Couture, social 9, life 10-5 and Lisa meeting Companion, new people. It’s

also a Barre good time to renew friendships Waterburythat might be stagnating

Rebecca due Pressman to neglect on both sides.

3-5

3-19 PISCES Ruth Weeks, (February Barre 19 to March 20) Congratulations. Your

3-22 talent Nicholas for working Salvas, 25 out a highly technical problem earns

4-19 you Elliott well-deserved Ackerman, 30, praise. The weekend could bring news

about Barre a friend or relative.

4-20 BORN Jessie THIS Phillips, WEEK: 26, E. Your sense of justice makes you a

strong Mplr. advocate for the rights of people and animals

4-30 Lillian Kasulka, 8, E.

alike. Montpelier

4-30 Darlene Callahan, 56,

(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.


Taking The Right Stuff – Dr. Mike’s Fab 9 Supplements

In an ideal world, the food you eat would

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body. But research shows that when it comes

to the recommended dietary allowance of

nutrients -- that’s the minimum you should get

-- well, 99.9 percent of American folks fail to

take in 100 percent of what’s recommended,

and only 7 percent get more than 20 percent.

The Power of the Fab 9 Supplements

Because many folks don’t get the needed

nutrients, taking supplements is an important way to fight

deficiencies. The Fab 9 Supplements help protect your gut

biome and fight off infection and chronic illnesses, such as

cardiovascular disease, diabetes and depression. These nutrition

boosters should be routine for most men 35 and older and

women 45 and older; they’re low- or no-risk or the benefits

outstrip the risks.

No. 1 Vitamin D-3: Between 67 and 93 percent of

Americans are vitamin-D deficient, with a blood level below

30 ng/ml. A blood level of 35 ng/ml protects you against

cancer, helps protect arteries from the effects of aging,

reverses diabetes and protects against erectile dysfunction. So

get a blood test annually to find out what supplementation

you need to boost your level to 50-80 ng/ml. Until then, start

taking 1,000 IU daily.

No. 2 Multivitamin: Split a multi; take half in the morning,

half at night (keeps nutrient blood levels constant). Stick with

a multi that has nutrient doses close to their RDA -- superspiking

one nutrient can throw off the working relationship

between nutrients and do more harm than good. And there is

good! For example, taking a multivitamin for 20 years

decreases cancer rates --18 percent for non-prostate cancers

in men over 70 -- and decreases cardiovascular disease by

over 25 percent.

No. 3 and No. 4 Calcium citrate and magnesium: Calcium

protects your health in many ways, including building bone

strength. Generally, folks get about half the daily calcium

they need (around 1,200 mg), so take a 600 mg supplement.

Taking 300 mg magnesium daily helps counteract the constipation

associated with taking calcium. It also helps regulate

muscle and nerve function, blood sugar levels, blood pressure

and is important in making protein, bone and healthy DNA.

Gifford Receives $129K in HRSA Quality Improvement Awards

• • •

No. 5 DHA omega-3: DHA is the part of

fish oil that’s brain food and is one of five elements

that protect your eyes from macular

degeneration. The carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin;

avoiding secondhand smoke; and

wearing sunglasses are the other four! Take

900 mg daily or eat 12 ounces of salmon/sea

trout weekly.

No. 6 Low-dose aspirin (81 mg): Taking

two 81 mg aspirin (not enteric/coated) daily

-- one in the morning, one at night -- protects

against nine cancers, including breast, prostate and colon, as

well as heart- and artery-related conditions such as stroke,

impotence and deep-vein thrombosis. Benefits exceed risks

for the typical man over 35 and woman over 45 -- but gastro

upset and bleeding can happen, so check with your doc before

taking. If you do take aspirin, have a half glass of warm water

before and after each dose. Take aspirin consistently; if you

forget it for two days, there’s a risk of rebound clotting.

No. 7 Omega-7s: These fatty acids seem to decrease

inflammation and insulin resistance. We suggest 420 mg of

purified omega-7 daily.

No. 8 Probiotics: Probiotics (good-for-you bacteria in cultured

yogurt) help metabolize the youth- and energy-giving

benefits in foods. Eating over four ounces of red meat or six

ounces of pork weekly changes the bacterial makeup in your

gut and produces chemicals that contribute to arterial aging,

heart attack and stroke. Take a daily probiotic (lactobacillus

or spore form) containing 4 billion colony-forming units.

No. 9 Coenzyme Q10: This coenzyme decreases the side

effects of LDL-lowering statins and may reduce your risk of

diabetes and hypertension. It seems to work by helping

restore vigor to your mitochondria -- the energy centers of

each cell in your body. We recommend 200 mg daily.

Bonus: NAD+ is a coenzyme essential for delivering nutrients

to cells, but we’ll explore its benefits another time!

* * *

Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Mike

Roizen, M.D. is Chief Wellness Officer and Chair of Wellness

Institute at Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, tune into

The Dr. Oz Show” or visit www.sharecare.com.

(c) 2017 Michael Roizen, M.D. and Mehmet Oz, M.D.

Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Gifford Health Care has received three top awards from the

Department of Health Resources & Services Administration

(HRSA) for quality Primary Care services. One of only 11

Vermont Health Centers to receive the grants, Gifford was the

only FQHC in the state to receive the National Quality Leader

Award.

“Gifford is proud of the care and compassion demonstrated

everyday in our practices,” said Chief Operating Officer

Barbara Quealy. “We appreciate the talent, hard work, and

commitment to quality that makes Gifford special.”

HRSA presents Quality Awards based upon high levels of

performance in one or more of five categories. Gifford

received three Fiscal Year 2017 Quality Grant Awards:

Clinical Quality Award (notable quality improvement

2015-2016) Health Center Quality Leaders Award (best overall

clinical performance among all health centers)

National Quality Leaders Award (exceeded national clinical

quality benchmarks, including chronic disease management,

preventative care, and perinatal/prenatal care)—the

only FQHC in Vermont to receive this award.

The combined award funding received was $129,722, more

than twice the amount Gifford received last year and the highest

amount received by any Vermont FQHC in Fiscal Year

2017. The funding is to support continued improvement in the

quality, efficiency, and effectiveness of health care services.

Gifford offers Primary Care at six convenient clinics in

Central Vermont (White River Junction, Rochester, Chelsea,

Belin, Bethel, and Randolph). Services include prenatal and

pediatric care, women’s

health, family and internal

medicine, chronic disease

management, and behavioral

health. For more information

visit giffordhealthcare.org

Don’t Get the Flu this Year

Join Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice at one of our


DATE LOCATION TIME

10/3 Evergreen Place

10:00am – 11:00am

10/4

Don’t Don’t

Barre

Get

Senior

Get the

Center

the Flu Flu

10:00am

this this


Year

11:30am

Year

10/5 Join Central Join United Central Vermont Federated Vermont Home Home Health Church Health & Hospice 11:00am & Hospice at one – 12:00pm at of one our of our



of Williamstown

DATE 10/6 DATELOCATION Twin Valley LOCATION Senior Center 9:30am TIME TIME – 10:30am

10/3 10/1110/3 Evergreen Waterbury Evergreen Place Senior Place Center

10/4 10/1710/4 Barre CVHHH Senior Barre Senior Center Center

10:00am 10:30am 10:00am – 11:00am 12:00pm – 11:00am

10:00am 5:00pm 10:00am – 11:30am 6:00pm – 11:30am

10/5 10/1810/5 United Worcester United Federated Town Federated Hall Church Church 11:00am 11:30am 11:00am – 12:00pm 1:00pm – 12:00pm

10/23 of Montpelier Williamstown of Williamstown

Senior Center 11:30am – 1:30pm

10/6 11/4 10/6 CVHHH Twin Valley Twin Valley Senior Senior Center Center 9:30am 10:00am 9:30am

– 11:00am 10:30am – 10:30am

10/11 Clinic 10/11 Details Waterbury Waterbury Senior Senior Center Center 10:30am 10:30am – 12:00pm – 12:00pm

10/17 Vaccinations 10/17 CVHHH are CVHHH available for anyone 18 5:00pm years 5:00pm and – older. 6:00pm – 6:00pm

10/18 All vaccines 10/18 Worcester are Worcester administered Town Hall Town by Hall a licensed 11:30am nurse. 11:30am – 1:00pm – 1:00pm

10/23 We’re 10/23 offering Montpelier Quadrivalent Montpelier Senior Senior flu Center vaccine Center 11:30am 11:30am – 1:30pm – 1:30pm

11/4 Cost 11/4 to you: CVHHH Please CVHHH bring your insurance 10:00am card. 10:00am We – accept 11:00am – 11:00am

Medicare, BlueCross BlueShield, and MVP. Grant funding

Clinic from Clinic BCBS Details VT Details is available for those without insurance.

Vaccinations Vaccinations are available are available for anyone for anyone 18 years 18 and years older. and older.

Call Jodi Demell, LPN, for Flu Clinic Questions: 224-2250

All vaccines All vaccines are administered are administered by a licensed by a licensed nurse. nurse.

We’re We’re offering offering Quadrivalent Quadrivalent flu vaccine flu vaccine

Cost to you: Please bring your Visit insurance us:

Cost to you: Please bring your insurance card. facebook

We card. accept We accept

Medicare, Medicare, BlueCross BlueCross BlueShield, BlueShield, and MVP. and Grant MVP. funding Grant funding

from BCBS from VT BCBS is available VT is available for Online those for without those at www.cvhhh.org

without insurance. insurance.

or call 802-223-1878

Call Jodi Call Demell, Jodi Demell, LPN, for LPN, Flu for Clinic Flu Clinic Questions: Questions: 224-2250 224-2250

Visit us: Visit us:

facebook

DOWNLOAD OUR APP!

Online Online at at www.cvhhh.org

or call or call 802-223-1878

World Publications

FREE

★★★★★

• • •

Helping a Child Cope with Divorce

One of the more concerning

questions I am asked

about is how to help a child

deal with a divorce or separation.

Rather than take sides

on this question, let me provide

some information from

the American Academy of

Pediatrics that may help families

cope with divorce.

Divorce affects more than 1 million children each year. No

matter what you do, most children will still experience anger,

confusion and pain with this life change. The best thing to do

is be honest and tell the truth, making sure that you emphasize

over and over again that a divorce has nothing to do with your

children or how they behaved. Even when you do this, your

children will still think they did something wrong. You need

to keep reinforcing the fact that this is not true.

It is best if both of you can explain the separation together

while emphasizing that you love your children and will continue

to spend time with them. Talk openly about painful feelings.

Books and support groups can help.

Try to remain positive about aspects of the other parent in

front of your children. Don’t unload negative feelings on them

or ask a child to take sides. Accept your child’s love for the

other parent, unless of course that parent has been abusive to

your children.

Maintain the normal rules, especially if your children will

be spending time in more than one home. Don’t neglect rituals,

routines, and/or limit setting.

And please constantly reinforce your love for them. Your

children will need to hear “I love you” even more often during

and after a divorce.

If you sense your children are overly disturbed, please consider

some form of counseling to help them and you.

Hopefully tips like these will allow a separated or divorced

family to work together and not split their differences when it

comes to helping a

child deal with a separation

or divorce.

Lewis First, MD, is

chief of Pediatrics at

The University of

Vermont Children’s

Hospital and chair of

the Department of

Pediatrics at the

Robert Larner, M.D. College

of Medicine at the University

of Vermont. You can also

catch “First with Kids”

weekly on WOKO 98.9FM

and MyNBC 5, or visit the

“First with Kids” video

archives at www.UVMHealth.

org/MedCenterFirstWithKids.

Live vibrant. Live local. Live here.

Open House

Interested in learning more about central

Vermont’s new and exciting independent

living opportunity? Stop by to learn more

about our apartments, services and amenities,

and of course, tour our new building.

Date: Saturday, Oct. 14

Time: 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Location: Strode Independent Living

89 Tom Wicker Lane, Randolph Ctr.

www.facebook.com/vtworld.news

(802) 728-7888 | www.MorganOrchards.com

Randolph Center, Vermont

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 15


Barre

479-0629

DRIVE

UP

B-M Road-Berlin

622-0250

DRIVE

UP

Montpelier

223-0928

DRIVE

UP

All calendar submissions should be sent to

editor@vt-world.com or mailed to The

WORLD, Attn: Calendar, 403 U.S. Route 302,

Barre, Vt. 05641. The deadline is 5:00 p.m.,

Thursday preceding publication. The Ongoing

section is for free/low cost community events,

which should be verified monthly. We are no

longer able to include ongoing classes.

Ongoing Events

BARRE - Central VT Adult Basic Education.

Free classes. Pre-GED and high school diploma

prep classes at Barre Learning Center, 46

Washington St. Info./pre-register 476-4588.

PAWS. Support for those grieving the loss of a

beloved pet. Universalist Church. 1st Thursday

of month. 7 p.m. Info. beyondthedog97@

gmail.com

Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, an

adult LGBTQ group, bowls at Twin City Lanes

on Sunday afternoons twice a month. For dates

and times: RUCVTAdmin@PrideCenterVT.org

Central Vermont Woodcarving Group. Free

instruction projects for all abilities. Barre

Congregational Church, Mondays 1-4 p.m.

479-9563

Rock & Soul Chorus. 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the

Church of the Good Shepherd on 39 Washington

St. Sing songs from the Sixties and beyond.

Ability to read music is not required. No audition,

but singers should be able to accurately sing back

what’s been sung to them. All ages are welcome.

Children under 13 should come with a parent.

Heart of Vermont Quilt Guild. Meets on third

Tuesday of the month at First Presbyterian

Church on Seminary Street from 5:30-7:30

p.m.

Step ‘n’ Time Line Dancers of Central

Vermont. Thursdays at The Old Labor Hall, 46

Granite St. 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Playgroup. Aldrich Children’s Library, Every

Wednesday 9:30-11AM (*Only during school

year.). Sponsored by The Family Center of

Washington County. www.fcwcvt.org

Additional Recyclables Collection Center.

Open for collection Mon., Wed., Friday noon –

6 p.m., 3rd Saturdays 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 540 N. Main

St., Barre. Visit www.cvswmd.org for list of

acceptable items.

Jabbok Christian Center Prayer Meeting. 8

Daniel Dr. 6:30-8 p.m. 1st & 3rd Thursdays.

Info: 479-0302

Medicare and You. New to Medicare? Have

questions? We have answers. Central Vermont

Council on Aging, 59 N. Main St., Suite 200,

2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month. Call 479-

0531 to register.

Celebrate Recovery. Recovery for all your

hurts/habits/hang-ups. Christ Community

Church, 43 Berlin St. across from R&L Archery,

Monday, 6-8 p.m. 476-3221.

Wheelchair Basketball. Barre Evangelical Free

Church, 17 So. Main St., Every other Tuesday,

5:30-7 p.m. Info 498-3030 (David) or 249-7931

(Sandy).

Aldrich Public Library Activities. 6

Washington St., 476-7550. Story Hour,

Mondays & Tuesdays starting 9/22, 10:30 a.m.

Reading Circle Book Club, 3rd Wednesdays,

6:30 p.m. Living & Learning Series, 1st

Sundays, 1 p.m. Senior Day, 1st Wednesdays,

1 p.m.

Central Vermont Business Builders.

Community National Bank, 1st & 3rd Tuesdays,

8-9 a.m. Info. 777-5419.

Weekly Storytime. Next Chapter Bookstore,

158 North Main St., Saturdays, 10:30 a.m. Info.

476-3114.

Overeaters Anonymous. Barre Episcopal

Church of the Good Shepherd, 39 Washington

St. Saturdays 8:30-9:30 a.m. Use side entrance,

go upstairs, and to the right. Info: Valerie, 279-

0385.

Greater Barre Democrats. Town & City residents

welcome. Aldrich Public Library, last

Wednesdays, 5:15-6:15 p.m. Info 476-4185.

Play Group. St. Monica’s Church, lower level,

Thursdays during school year, 9:30-11 a.m.

American Legion Auxiliary Unit 10. Meets at

the post, first Thursday of each month (not

July), 6:30 p.m.

Vermont Modelers Club. Building & flying

model airplanes year-round, visitors welcome.

Info. 485-7144.

continued on page 18

LNT: Born

1977

“One of the Best Regional Theaters

in america”

- NYC Drama League

by Kate Hamill

From the novel by Jane Austen

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 9AM TO 2PM

Ski Skate

&

Sale

BRING ITEMS TO SELL ON FRIDAY FROM 9AM TO 7PM

MONTPELIERREC.ORG/SKISKATE

AT MONTPELIER

HIGH SCHOOL

Real Maple Creemees, Sundaes

& other Cool Treats!

Sense &

Sensibility

When Reputation Is Everything,

How do you Follow Your Heart?

TICKETS:

(802) 229-0492

lostnationtheater.org

page 16 The WORLD October 11, 2017

Oct 5 – 22

montpelier city hall arts center

Pumpkins & Mums Galore!

Local Apples

Manghi’s Bread

Grass Fed Beef

Open daily 9 am - 6 pm after Labor Day | (802) 223-2740

1168 County Road, Montpelier, Vermont 05602

Just 2.7 miles from downtown Montpelier

www.morsefarm.com


World’s Best

Maple & Chocolate

Creemees,

Shakes &

Sundaes

We Ship

Anywhere

“A

Quality

Family

Farm

Shop”

802-223-5757

NOW OPEN

EVERY DAY

8:30AM to

6:00PM

Served Everyday

8:30AM to 6:00PM

Just gotta

have one!

Vermont

Handcrafts

Gifts

Vermont

Cheese

Maple Farm

Tour

Maple

Products

1 mile north of E. Montpelier Village on Rt. 14N

(follow signs) 802-223-5757

VE R M O N T ’S

TR U C K ST O R E

Montpelier

is the place to be in

OCTOBER

WE'VE GO T TH E PERFECT

SI LV E R A D O FO R YO U!

Cadillac

BARRE-MONTPELIER RD 802-223-6337

Farm & Yard

19 Barre St., Montpelier

229-0567

Monday-Friday 8-6 Saturday 8-5

Sunday 10-2

www.guysfarmandyard.com

Your Mums,

Pumpkins, Apples

& Squash

Headquarters

MONTPELIER

Friday, October 20

Montpelier’s

Moonlight

Madness

5:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Downtown Montpelier’s

Annual Sale Extravaganza.

Saturday, October 28

Children’s Halloween

Party

1:00–2:30 p.m.

MHS Cafeteria | Free

Enjoy an afternoon of fun, games, and

refreshments. Special surprise guest from

2-2:30p.m.! This event is being co-sponsored

through the combined efforts of Montpelier

Recreation Dept., Police Dept., Fire Dept. and the

VFW.

Saturday, October 21

Montpelier Recreation Department’s

Ski & Skate Sale

9:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Montpelier High School Gym

If you are looking to buy or sell equipment, you must consider this

sale.

Bring items to sell on Friday, October 20 from 9a.m.-7:00p.m. The

Montpelier Recreation Department reserves the right to refuse any

equipment. Pick-up for items not sold will be from 4:30-6p.m. after

the sale. Volunteers will be needed for this event. If interested,

please call the Montpelier Recreation Dept. at 225-8699. Volunteers

may shop Fri. evening from 8-10p.m.

Tuesday, October 31

Halloween Fun

4:00–5:30 p.m.

Bring your kids to downtown

Montpelier for safe and fun

trick-or-treating.

190 E. Montpelier Rd.

Montpelier•229-9187

The

area’s

original

Real

Maple

Creemees

OPEN EVERY DAY

9AM to 6PM

802-223-2740

www.morsefarm.com

1168 County Rd., Montpelier

www.NationalLife.com

Guy

Boucher,

Owner

Affordable Hair

Styling for Men

and Children

223-7361

100 State St., Montpelier

at The Master’s Edge

NEW HOURS

Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri. starting at 7AM

(Closed Wednesdays)

BEAR NAKED

Noyle W. Johnson Insurance

119 River St.

Montpelier, VT

802-223-7735

Sawyer and Ritchie Agency

198 Route 2 W.

Danville, VT

802-684-3411

www.nwjinsurance.com

Saturday, October 14

Enchanted Forest

4-8pm | Hubbard Park

$5 children/$10 adults/$25 families

(early bird: $4 children/$8 adults/$20 families)

The “Enchanted Forest” is Montpelier’s night time community celebration of Autumn.

Located in historic Hubbard Park, hay wagon rides bring groups of people deep into the

park where they are led by guides through candle-lit paths to stages of storytelling, music,

fire, and enchantment. It is also the one time of the year park goers get to see Hubbard

Park’s 50-foot tower illuminated by fire!

Advance tickets are available at the City Clerk’s office. Day-of tickets are available at the

New Shelter in the park.

Karen Kitzmiller Memorial

WINTER COAT DRIVE

DONATION LOCATIONS:

Community National Bank

95 State Street, Montpelier

Now through October 27, 2017

8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Community National Bank

316 North Main St., Barre

Now through October 27, 2017

8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

DISTRIBUTION

LOCATIONS:

Community National Bank

316 N. Main, Barre

Saturday, October 28, 2017

9:00 a.m. until Noon

Montpelier City Hall

Saturday, October 28, 2017

9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

ALL ITEMS BEING DISTRIBUTED ARE FREE!

44 TAPS

of Beer, Wine & Cider

18

GROWLER

LINES

PLUS

Retail

Sales

186 River St.

Montpelier

OPEN

11-9 Sun. thru Thurs.

and 10pm Fri. & Sat.

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 17


continued from page 16

Community Breakfast. First Presbyterian Church, 78 Summer

St., 3rd Sunday of month, FREE, 7:30-9 a.m. 476-3966.

Grandparents Raising Their Children’s Children. Support

group. 23 Summer St., 1st & 3rd Weds., 10 a.m.-noon. 476-

1480.

Friends of Aldrich Public Library. Aldrich Library, 2nd floor

boardroom, 4th Tuesday of month, 6:30 p.m. Info. 476-7550.

Circle of Parents. Confidential support group for parents and

caregivers. Meets Tuesday evenings. Info. 229-5724 or

1-800-CHILDREN.

Mothers of Preschoolers. Monthly get-togethers for crafts,

refreshments, etc. Christian Alliance Church, 476-3221.

Alcoholics Anonymous. Meetings in Barre, daily; call 802-

229-5100 for latest times & locations; www.aavt.org.

Hedding United Methodist Activities & Meetings. 40

Washington Street, 476-8156. Choir, Thursdays 7 p.m; Free

Community Supper, Fridays 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Community

Service & Food Shelf Hours: Weds & Thurs. 3-5 p.m.

Turning Point Recovery Center. 489 N. Main St., Barre. Safe &

supportive place for individuals/families in or seeking substance

abuse recovery. Recovery coaching and other support programs;

recreational facilities (pool, ping pong, games). Open Mon.-Wed.

10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thurs. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri. 10 a.m.-11 p.m., Sat.

6-11 p.m. Making Recovery Easier, Tuesdays at 6 p.m.; Wit’s

End parent support group, Wednesdays at 6 p.m.; All Recovery

support group Fridays at 6 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous: “Sane

& Sober” group, Saturdays at 7:30 a.m.; “Living Sober” group,

Sundays at 8:30 a.m. Narcotics Anonymous: “When Enough is

Enough” group, Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. & Sundays at 5:30 p.m.

Al-Anon: “Courage to Change” group, Saturdays at 5 p.m.

(childcare provided). For help, or Info on special programs, call

479-7373.

Green Mountain Spirit Chapter. National women bikers club.

2nd Wed. of month; info grnmtnspirit@hotmail.com.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group 1 at the Central Vermont

Home Health & Hospice office, 600 Granger Road. This group is

open to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one. 2nd

and 4th Wednesdays of the month, 10:00AM to 11:30AM. Free.

Call Diana Moore at (802) 223-1878 with any questions.

Grief & Bereavement Support Group 2 at the Central Vermont

Home Health & Hospice office, 600 Granger Road. This group is

open to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one. 2nd

and 4th Monday of the month, 6:00PM to 7:30PM. Free. Call

Diana Moore at (802) 223-1878 with any questions.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Barre City Police, 15

Fourth St., 476-6613. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local

permanent safe disposal sites.

BERLIN - Drop-in Meditation Sitting Group. W/Sherry

Rhynard. CVMC, conf. room #2, Thursdays, 6-7 p.m. sherry@

easeofflow.com or 272-2736.

Barre Tones Women’s A Capella Chorus. Capital City Grange

6612 Rt 12. Mondays, 6:30-9 p.m. www.barretonesvt.com 223-

2039.

Survivors of Suicide Loss Support. For family and friends

who lost someone to suicide. CVMC, conf. room #1, 3rd

Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m. Info. 223-0924.

Bereavement/Grief Support Group. CVHHH Conference

Center, 600 Granger Rd. Open to anyone who has experienced the

death of a loved one. No fee. Group 1: 10-11:30 a.m. every other

Wednesday starting May 10. Group 2: 6-7:30 p.m. every other

Monday starting May 15. Info: Diana Moore at 802-223-1878

NAMI-VT Connection Recovery Support Group. Central

Vermont Medical Center Boardroom, 130 Fisher Rd. Second

Thursdays, 4:00 p.m. Free, 90-minute recovery support groups

for people living with mental illness.

Cancer Support Group. With potluck. Second Wednesday of

each month, 6 p.m. Info. 229-5931.

Living w/ Advanced or Metastatic Cancer: Lunch provided,

2nd Tuesday of month, noon-1 p.m. Writing to Enrich Your

Life: For anyone touched by cancer, 3rd Tuesday of each month,

noon-1 p.m. Both held at CVMC Cancer Center resource room.

Info. 225-5449.

Central Vermont Rotary Club. Visitors & potential members

welcome. Steakhouse Restaurant, Mondays, 6:15 p.m. 229-

0235.

Parkinsons Support Group. Woodbridge Nursing Home, 142

Woodridge Rd, third Thursdays, 10 a.m. Info. 439-5554.

Diabetes Support Program. CVMC, conf. rooms, first

Thursday of month, 7-8 p.m., free. Info. 371-4152.

Civil Air Patrol. At the airport (blue hangar), Tuesdays, 6-8:30

p.m. Info at 229-5193.

Pregnancy & Newborn Loss Support Group. CVMC conference

room #3, 4th Monday of month, 6:30-8:30 p.m. 371-4304

or -4376.

Partners for Prevention-Alcohol & Drug Abuse Coalition.

CVH, 2nd Weds. of month, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Info 479-

4250.

Savvy Speakers Toastmasters Club. BC/BS conf. room,

Industrial Ln., 1st & 3rd Tuesdays, 5:30-7 p.m. Info. (802) 476-

0908 or mlferguson2002@yahoo.com.

Birthing Center Open House. For parents, sibs, grandparents,

etc. CVMC, 1st Wed. of month, 5:30-7 p.m. RSVP/Info. 371-

4613.

Total Joint Replacement Class. CVMC. Conference Rms 1 &

2, free, first and third Thursdays of every month, 2-3. Info: 371-

4357

Breastfeeding Support Group. CVMC Garden Path Birthing

Center, 1st Monday of month, 5:30-7 p.m. Info. 371-4415.

Infant & Child Car Seat Inspections. Berlin Fire Station, free,

first Friday of month, 12-4 p.m. Appointments required, 371-

4198.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Berlin Police, 108 Shed

Rd., 223-4401. Get rid of old or unused meds at these local permanent

safe disposal sites.

BETHEL - YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program starts

continued on next page

AUTUMN OUTINGS

FALL 2017

AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY UNIT #10

320 NORTH MAIN ST., BARRE, VT

CHICKEN &

BISCUIT SUPPER

SAT., OCT 14 TH

6:00 P.M.

$10 PER PERSON

Chicken & Biscuit, mashed potoatoes,

buttered carrots, coleslaw and dessert

FOR INFORMATION, CALL THE POST AT 479-9058

SPEAKING OUT | The WORLD

What’s your favorite

fall event/activity?

Chicken Pie Supper

Where: Hedding United Methodist Church

140 Washington St., Barre

When: Saturday, October 21

Servings at: 5:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

Cost: $12 adults • $6 children

Menu: Chicken Pie, Mashed Potatoes w/Gravy,

Coleslaw, Squash, Beet Relish,

Cranberry Sauce, Pickles,

Dessert & Coffee

For Reservations, call 476-8946

Scott - Groton

Hunting

Aprille - Hardwick

Apple Picking

Limlaw Family

MAPLE FARM

Country

Breakfast Buffet

SERVING SUNDAYS

Now through OCT. 29

8:00AM to 1:00PM

~BUFFET ONLY~

Reservations Suggested

802-439-6880 OR

802-439-5995

246 VT Route 25• West Topsham, VT 05086

Single Gate Farm Market held their Grand Opening and ribbon cutting on Saturday,

October 7. They have your Fall Decorating needs covered! Hay Bales,

Corn Stalks, Mums, Gourds, Pumpkins, Fall Wreaths. Other Local Products

including Maple, Honey, Beef, Baked Goods, Late Produce and more. Single

Gate Farm Market has over 1500 Pumpkins to choose from. Hours are for

the New Market, Route 302 by the East Barre VFW, and for the Farm at 109

West Cobble Hill Road are Mon.-Sat.10- 5:30, Sunday 11-5 or visit anytime at

www.singlegatefarm.com. Pictured from Left to right: Jean Burrell, Sandra

Ackerman, Bella Romeo, Matson Romeo, David Strong, Therese Ackerman,

Scott Ackerman, Elliot Ackerman, Amanda Peyerl.

Michelle - Waitsfield

Act Like A Tourist

Gary - Middlesex

Photography

Keith - Barre

Patriots Football

Jack - Barre

College Football

page 18 The WORLD October 11, 2017


CAPITOL MONTPELIER 229-0343

PARAMOUNT BARRE 479-9621

24-Hr Movie Line 229-0343

or www.fgbtheaters.com

BUY

TICKETS

ONLINE

CALL OR LOG ON FOR CURRENT SHOW TIMES AND LOCATIONS!

SAMBEL’S! SAMBEL’S!

Book Your Get-togethers, BBQ’s,

Weddings, Anniversaries, etc.

Sambel’s Catering 249-7758

Fall

Hours

OPEN THURSDAY TO SUNDAY

The Fall Craft Fair season is underway! The Ladies of Saint Anne, of St. Edwards Catholic Church were well represented at the

Williamstown Fall Craft Festival. Jean Piekarski, Judy Barney, and Jeannine Murphy (L to R) were busy selling all kinds of yummy home

baked goods. (The photographer can attest to the “yummyness” of the goodies). Photo by Bill Croney

Thursday, October 6, from 11 a.m. to noon at the United Church

of Bethel on Church Street. People at risk for developing type-2

diabetes can take steps to reduce their risk and prevent diabetes.

This free program offers education and support for 25 sessions

throughout the year. Info/register: Megan at 802-728-7714.

BRADFORD - Rockinghorse Circle of Support. For young

women with or w/o kids, childcare & transportation available.

Wednesdays, 1-2:30 p.m., Grace Methodist Church.

Info 479-1086.

New Hope II Support Group. Grace United Methodist, every

Mon., 7-9 p.m. Info. at 1-800-564-2106.

BROOKFIELD - MOPS - Mothers of Preschoolers. Moms of

kids birth through kindergarten welcome. Meal & childcare

provided. New Covenant Church, 2252 Ridge Rd., 3rd Fridays,

6 p.m. 276-3022.

Health-focused Group. Learn to cope w/ life’s passages. Weds,

7-8 p.m.; Info 276-3142; Dr. Alice Kempe.

Brookfield Community Singers Rehearsals. Pond Village

Church. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Four-part choral group rehearses

Wednesdays for June concert. If interested in joining, e-mail

Director Kathy Rotondi, at kmrr1@yahoo.com.

CABOT - Fiddle Lessons with Katie Trautz: Monday afternoons,

call 279-2236; Dungeons & Dragons, Fridays 3-5:30

p.m. All at Cabot Library, 563-2721.

CALAIS - Men’s and Women’s Bible Study Groups. County

Road, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. 485-7577 or www.thefishermenministry.org.

Open Mic every Wednesday at the Whammy Bar, 41 W. County

Rd. Call 229-4329 for more info.

CHELSEA - Story Time. Songs, stories & crafts for children

birth to 5 years. Chelsea Public Library, Wednesdays, 1:15 p.m.

685-2188.

TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly. Nonprofit support grp. United

Church of Chelsea, North Common, Wednesdays, 5:45 p.m. 685-

2271/685-4429.

Gifford’s Chronic Conditions Support Group. Join a discussion

and educational group for people with chronic illnesses on

Fridays 8:30-11 a.m. at the Chelsea Senior Center (in the United

Church of Chelsea, 13 North Common. Free. Info/register: Megan

at 802-728-7714.

Chelsea Historical Society House/Museum. Open 3rd

Saturdays May-October, FREE, 10 a.m.-noon. 685-4447.

EAST BARRE - Story Hour. Aldrich Library York Branch,

Tuesdays, ages 0-3 10 a.m., ages 3-5 10:30 a.m. Info. 476-5118.

EAST HARDWICK - Touch of Grace Assembly of God

Church, corner Rts. 15 &16, Pastor Matt Preston, 472-5550.

Sunday a.m. worship 10:00 (incl. 11:20 children’s church); adult

Sunday School 9:00 (Sep. thru June). Tue. evening Bible study

(call for info). Wed. youth group: 5:00 dinner, 6:00 activity.

EAST MONTPELIER - Crossroads Christian Church. Men’s

Ministry: For Men Only group. Monday nights 7-9 p.m. Men’s

Breakfast, 2nd Sat., 8 a.m. 272-7185. Sunday Service 9:30-11

a.m. Pastor Thorsten Evans 476-8536. Church Office hours Tues

& Fri 9 a.m. to noon. 476-4843

Twin Valley Senior Center. 4583 U.S. Rte 2. Open Mon., Weds.,

Fri., 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sign up for Meal-on-Wheels Program or join

us for an On-site meal at 12:15 p.m. Seniors/$5, under 60/$6.

Nobody turned away. Free bus service for seniors & disabled in

six towns served. Many classes offered from bone strengthening

to art. Donations welcomed. Info: 802-223-3322 or email info.

twinvalleyseniors@myfairpoint.net

Bone Builders Classes: Osteoporosis exercise and prevention

class at Twin Valley Senior Center every Monday, Wednesday and

Friday starting at 7:30 a.m. Extra 9 a.m. class on Monday and

Wednesday. All ages welcome. Free of charge. Donations welcomed.

Tai Chi Classes: Advanced Class Mondays and Fridays 1-2 p.m.

Beginner Class Tuesdays and Thursdays 10-11 a.m. All ages welcome.

Free of charge.

Death Cafe. 1st Friday of the month 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Discussions of events past, present, and future. All are welcome

and discussions are confidential.

GROTON - YA Book Club: 3rd Mondays, 6:30 p.m.; Book

• • •

Discussion Group: 4th Mondays, 7 p.m.; Crafts & Conversation,

Wednesdays, 1-3 p.m. Round Robin Storytime, for kids age 0-5

& their caregivers: Tuesdays, 10 a.m. All at Groton Public

Library, 584-3358.

HARDWICK - Caregiver Support Group. Agency on Aging,

rear entrance Merchants Bank, 2nd Thurs of month. 229-0308

x306.

Peace and Justice Coalition. G.R.A.C.E. Arts bldg (old firehouse),

Tues., 7 p.m. Info. Robin 533-2296.

Nurturing Fathers Program. Light supper included. Thurs.,

6-8:30 p.m. Registration/info 472-5229.

MARSHFIELD - Playgroup. Twinfield Preschool, Mondays, 11

a.m.-12:30 p.m. (except when school not in session).

Jaquith Public Library Activities. Old Schoolhouse Common,

426-3581. Story & Play Group, Wednesdays, 10-11:30 a.m.

Book Group for Adults, stop by for copy of the book, 4th

Mondays, 7 p.m.

MIDDLESEX - Food Shelf. United Methodist Church, Saturdays,

9-10:30 a.m.

MONTPELIER - Sunday School. For children (up to 20) to

study the Bible and teachings of Jesus. Christian Science Church,

145 State St., Sundays, 10:30 a.m.

Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup. North Branch Nature Center.

Mondays 9:30-11:30 a.m. March 13-June 5. Fee: By donation.

Outdoor playgroup for parents, caregivers, and children ages 0 - 5.

Join us for 2 hours of spontaneous play, exploration, discovery,

song, nature inspired crafts, and oral story telling. Come learn

about the benefits of nature connection and enjoy the community

experience of time immersed in nature with your young ones.

Montpelier Kiwanis Club. Tuesdays, 6 p.m. at The Steak House.

All are welcome. Info: Elliott Curtin at 229-6973.

Vermont Association for the Blind PALS Group meets on 2nd

and 4th Weds. at Division for the Blind Conference room at the

Capital Plaza Hotel. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The PALS Group is a program

for visually impaired Vermonters to support their independence

within home, families, and communities. Info: Harriet Hall at 323-

3055 or Vermont Association of the Blind office at 505-4006

Onion River Exchange Tool Library. Over 85 tools including:

power tools, all sorts of hand tools including wrench kits, caulking

guns, sawzall, tall tree branch cutter, belt sander, wet vac, drop

cloths, have a heart traps, bulb planter, and tool boxes to be used

for easy carry. Plus safety gear. 46 Barre St. Open during office

hours: W 10-2, TH 10-2.

Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont, an adult LGBTQ

group, meets the third Tuesday evening of the month at 5:45 for a

casual dinner at a local restaurant. The gathering place is 58 Barre

St. in Montpelier. Info: RUCVTAdmin@PrideCenterVT.org

Friday Night Group. Open to all LGBTQ youth ages 13-22.

Pizza & social time, facilitated by adults from Outright VT.

Unitarian Church, 2nd & 4th Fridays, 6:30-8 p.m. 223-7035 or

Erika@OutrightVT.org

Meditation, Mondays at 1 p.m.; Intro to Yoga, Tuesdays 4 p.m.;

Consults, Fridays 11 a.m. Free classes, some limits apply. All at

Fusion Studio, 56 East State St. 272-8923 or www.fusionstudio.

org

Open Library. Open to all, books and DVDs for all ages.

Resurrection Baptist Church, open Sundays 12:30-2 p.m.

Central VT Roller Derby’s Wrecking Doll Society. Intro to

roller derby, gear supplied, bring a mouth guard. First time is free.

Montpelier Rec. Center, Barre St., Saturdays 5-6:30 p.m. www.

twincityriot.com

Celiac Support Group. Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., 2nd

Wednesdays, 4-5 p.m. Info. 598-9206.

MSAC Public Activities: FEAST Together (communal meal),

suggested donation for seniors 60+ is $5, under 60 price is $7.

FEAST Together is always available for takeout, with the same

donation and pricing. Tuesdays and Fridays from 12-1 p.m.,

RSVP 262-6288. Living Strong, group loves to sing while exercising,

Mondays 2:30-3:30 p.m. & Fridays 2-3 p.m. Crafters

Group, Wednesdays, 12-2pm. Photography Club, Thursdays,

12-1pm: Share your work, thoughts, successes and questions.

Ukulele Group, Thursdays, 6-8pm: A multigenerational group

11AM to 8PM

Dining Room & Window Service Available

2678 River Street, Bethel (2.6 mi. on VT Rt. 107)

802-234-9400 www.toziersrestaurant.com

POWDER PUFF

FOOTBALL

GAME

Help Fight Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19

6:00 PM @ Spaulding High School

Spaulding High School Key Club

$3 per person or $2 with a canned good

Annual Fall Clothing

DROP ’N SWAP

Fri., Oct. 20 and Sun., Oct. 22

Plumley Armory, Norwich University • Northfield, Vt.

SWAP:

DROP:

Fri., Oct. 20

12–6 p.m.

• Please separate clothing from rags.

• Label bags appropriately (women’s, men’s, children’s, etc.).

• No boxes or hangers, please.

• Shoes, bags, costumes and coats are also accepted!

Sun., Oct. 22

12–4 p.m.

$1 Entrance Fee

For All The Clothes You Want!

ENGAGE. SERVE. LEAD.

For questions or more information: WCC 230 • (802) 485-2889

4achange@norwich.edu • getconnected.norwich.edu

Held in partnership with the Salvation Army of Barre, Vt.

Center for Civic Engagement

at NORWICH UNIVERSITY

continued on next page

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 19


Vermont Philharmonic Presents Annual

Opera Gala with Lou Kosma, Conductor

October brings to Central

Vermont a brilliant display of

Fall colors and the glorious

sounds of operatic arias. The

Vermont Philharmonic with

Music Director Lou Kosma

will be presenting its annual

Opera Gala in conjunction

with the renowned Bel Canto

Institute. Performances will

take place on Saturday,

October 14th at 8:00 pm at

the Spruce Peak Performing

Arts Center in Stowe and on

Sunday, October 15th at 2:00

pm at the Barre Opera House.

This year’s performances will Letitia Quante

feature operatic music by Verdi, Puccini,

Donizetti, plus the Fountains of Rome by

Respighi and Vivaldi’s Violin Concerto in A

Minor. Featured soloists include the Vermont

Philharmonic’s new concertmaster, Letitia

Quante, violin, and Helle Gössler Christensen,

soprano - winner of the 2017 Bel Canto

Institute Performance Award. Tickets for

Stowe are $20 in advance at www.sprucepeakarts.org

or $25 at the door. Tickets for

Barre are $20 ($15 for senior and $5 for students)

and can be purchased either in advance

from barreoperahouse.org or at the door.

Violinist Letitia Quante has been appointed

as the new concertmaster of the Vermont

Philharmonic. She is formerly a principal

player with the Mid-Atlantic Symphony and

assistant concertmaster to the Lancaster

Symphony. Quante moved to Northern

Vermont, where she plays with Vermont

Symphony Orchestra, Burlington Chamber

page 20 The WORLD October 11, 2017

Orchestra, ME2 String

Orchestra, Burlington

Ensemble, the Vermont

Virtuosi. She has been on a

number of tours, most recently

throughout Mexico and the

United States, and has worked

with such diverse musicians

as Sarah Chang, Bajofondo,

Kanye West, The Sketches

and Natlia Lafourcade. In

2010 she recorded a double

CD set for Sony Classical

with the Philharmonic

Orchestra of the Americas in

New York City and toured

China with the Baltimore

Chamber Orchestra.

Danish soprano Helle Gössler Christensen

received her Bachelor’s Degree from the

Royal Danish Academy of Music in

Copenhagen where she is now pursuing her

Master’s Degree. Ms. Christensen has sung in

concerts and oratorios in Europe, Asia and the

United States. She has also performed on

Danish Radio as well as for the Queen of

Denmark and the Danish Prime Minister.

The Vermont Philharmonic is Vermont’s

oldest community orchestra, founded in 1959

by John Borowicz, emeritus professor of

music at Norwich University. The orchestra

found a permanent home in the Barre Opera

House in 1993, when the opera house

reopened after extensive renovations. Lou

Kosma has been the Music Director of the

Philharmonic since 1999. The orchestra has

more than 60 musicians and presents 11 concerts

per year.

Pump & Pantry

★SPECIALS GOOD THROUGH SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15★

OPEN AT 5:00AM WEEKDAYS AND 6:00AM SATURDAY & SUNDAY

Now carrying the Burlington Free Press 7 days a week

New at

Pump &

Pantry

Grocery Specials Good All Week!

GREAT PRICE! Lance Crackers

8 pks assorted fl avors ............. 2 for $5.00

WOW! Tide Liquid 100 oz assorted $10.99

Pepsi & Mtn Dew 12 pk cans

assorted ....................................... $4.99+dep

Nestle Pure Life Water

Case 24 ct 16.9 oz ................................$4.99

Dunkin Donuts K-Cups 24 Ct ......... $16.99

NOW IN STOCK! Hood Golden Egg Nog &

VT’s Cold Hollow Cider half gallons & gallons!

Lays, Doritos or Smartfood

Family Size 1 @ reg price or .. 2 for $6.00

GREAT PRICE! Green Mountain Coffee

K-Cups 24 ct all fl avors ..................... $14.99

Check out our new

selection of

Marinated

Meats!

Black Diamond Steaks,

Chicken Breasts,

Pork Loins and Turkey

Breasts all ready to toss

on the grill for dinner

tonight!

“Check out our

Fresh Meats &

Produce”

EBT/SNAP

Cards Welcome

West Meadow Apiary Honey (Tunbridge, VT)

assorted honey sizes, honey comb and lip balm too!

LegenDairy Maple Syrup (Orange, VT

quarts, half gallons, and gallons in stock at a great price!

ORDER BEEF OR VEAL FLY AWAY BIRDS TODAY!

Meat Dept.

Manager

Mike Ziter

Serving

Central VT

for 50 Years

PROUD TO SELL VP RACING

FUELS GASOLINE

Our 91 Octane Premium at the

pump is non-ethanol.

We also have specialty fuels

available in 5-gallon cans.

Stop by and check our great selection

of VP Merchandise!

OPEN EVERYDAY: Mon.-Thurs. 5a-9p, Fri. 5a-10p, Sat. 6a-10p, Sun. 6a-9p

Rt. 14, Williamstown • 802-433-1038

Most Cards Accepted

LAST CHANCE! Gatorade

32 oz Assorted ....................... 5 for $5.00

Shurfine English Muffins, Hot Dog,

Hamburger Rolls &

White Bread (14 oz) .............. 2 for $3.00

Shurfine Milk Skim, 1%,2% gallon ......$2.99

Coca Cola Family

24 pk Cans 12 oz ......................... $6.99+dep

Hood Ice Cream

assorted fl avors 48z ........................$3.39/ea

NOW OFFERING Manghis’ Bread!

Baked locally and delivered fresh to

Pump & Pantry! Grab some today!

We now have a great selection of fine cheeses located next to our fresh produce!

Fresh Mozzarella, Parmesan, Blue Cheese & more. Grab some to enhance your salad or meal today!

NOW OFFERING A

$99 FREEZER BUY

An Excellent Value and an Easy

Way to shop. Stop by and pick

up an order sheet today!

Rana Five Cheese or Chicken Mozz Tortellini Family Sz .......$7.99/20z pkg

Beef Ground Chuck Family Pk .........................................................$3.99/lb

GREAT VALUE! Chicken Drumsticks Family Pk ............................... $.99/lb

Pork Chops or Spare Ribs Boneless Family Pk...............................$2.99/lb

Beef NY Strip Steak .........................................................................$9.99/lb

Chicken Tenders Family Pk ................................................................$2.99/lb

Mckenzie Natural Casing Franks 2.5lb Box.......................................$14.98

BEST BUY! Bacon 1lb pkg .....................................................................$3.99

Pork Loins Whole Premium ..............................................................$2.39/lb

DEBIT

continued from previous page

gathers to play together. Walks with Joan,

Tuesdays, 10-11am: Join us for an easy-moderate

hour-long walk around town. Italian Group,

Tuesdays, 1:15-2:45pm: A fun-loving group

meets to converse in Italian. Trash Tramps,

Tuesdays, 2-3pm: Join us to walk around town

picking up litter and making Montpelier beautiful.

All at Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58

Barre St., 223-2518.

A Course In Miracles study group. Everyone

is welcome and there is no charge. Christ

Church, Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Info. 229-5253.

Parent’s Group and Meet-Up. Connect with

local parents to share advice & information, kids

welcome. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Rm,

first Mondays, 10-11:30 a.m. Info: mamasayszine@gmail.com

Families Anonymous. For families or friends of

those who have issues with addiction, alcohol

and/or mental illness. Bethany Church, 2nd

floor youth room, Mondays, 7-8 p.m. 229-

6219.

Freeride Montpelier Open Shop Nights. Need

help w/a bike repair? Come to the volunteer-run

community bike shop. 89 Barre St., Wednesdays

4-6 p.m., other days seasonal, donations. Info:

freeridemontpelier.org

Free Community Meals. Mondays: Unitarian

Church, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Tuesdays: Bethany

Church, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Wednesdays: Christ

Church, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Thursdays: Trinity

Church, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Fridays: St.

Augustine Church, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Last

Sundays, Bethany Church, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Grandparents Raising Their Children’s

Children. Support group, childcare provided.

Resurrection Baptist Church, 144 Elm St., 2nd

Thursday of the month, 6-8 p.m. Info. 476-

1480.

Calico County Quilters. All skill levels welcome.

Call to confirm location: 802-244-7001,

2nd Saturday of month (Sept. through June), 1-3

p.m.

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA). Bethany

Church basement, Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. Info.

229-9036.

The Vermont Association for Mental Health

& Addiction Recovery Advocates Weekly

Breakfast. We are inviting a small group of

advocates to join us each Tuesday morning from

8:30-9:30 a.m. during the legislative session.

Capitol Plaza Hotel Conference Room 232.

Coffee, Tea, Scones, Fruit, and more! RSVP

encouraged to info@vamhar.org but never

required. Just drop-in!

Kellogg-Hubbard Library Activities. 135

Main St., 223-3338. Story Time: Tues/Fri,

10:30 a.m.; Sit N Knit: for young knitters age 6

& up, Mondays, 3:30-4 p.m.; Read to Coco:

Wednesdays, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; Origami Club:

Thursdays, 3-4 p.m.; Read with Arlo: Thursdays

4-5 p.m.

CHADD ADHD Parent Support Group.

Childcare not available, please make plans for

your child. Woodbury College, second Tuesday

of month, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info. 498-5928.

Resurrection Baptist Church Weekly Events.

144 Elm St. Sunday, 9:45 a.m. Bible Study for

all Ages; 11 a.m. Worship Service; Wednesday,

7 p.m. Prayer Meeting.

Good Beginnings of Central VT. 174 River St.

595-7953. Drop-In Hours at the Nest. 1st floor

Weds, Thurs, Fri 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Babywearers

of Central Vermont meet up. Upstairs 4th

Monday 5:45-7:45 p.m. and 2nd Thursdays

9:30-11:30 a.m. Check Facebook for last-minute

schedule changes. La Leche League Meetup.

Breastfeeding info and support. 3rd Thursdays,

9:30- 11:30 a.m. Info: 802-879-3000. Nursing

Beyond a Year Meetup. 3rd Fridays, 9:30-

11:30 a.m. Info: 802-879-3000. Come join other

nursing parents in a warm, supportive environment

to discuss the joys and challenges of an

older nursling.

Al-Anon. Trinity Methodist Church, Main St.,

Sun., 6:15-7:30 p.m. Info. 1-866-972-5266.

Al-Anon. Bethany Church basement, 115 Main

St., Tuesdays & Thursdays noon-1 p.m.,

Wednesdays 7-8 p.m. Info. 1-866-972-5266.

SL AA. 12-step recovery group for sex/relationship

problems. Bethany Church, Wed., 5 p.m.

Info. 802-249-6825.

Survivors of Incest Anonymous. Bethany

Church parlor, 115 Main St., Mondays, 5 p.m.

Please call first: 229-9036 or 454-8402.

Brain Injury Support Group. Unitarian

Church, third Thursday of the month, 1:30-2:30

p.m. Info. 1-877-856-1772

Playgroups: Dads & Kids Playgroup,

Thursdays, 6-7:30 p.m. and Playgroup,

Saturdays, 9:30-11 a.m., both at Family Center

of Washington County. All held during school

year only.

Kindred Connections Peer to Peer Cancer

Support for Patients and Caregivers. Info 1-800-

652-5064 email info@vcsn.net

Christian Meditation. Christ Church, Mondays,

12-1 p.m.

Mood Disorders Support Group. “Mooditude”

is a support group that is open to anyone coping

with a mood disorder such as depression, bipolar

disorder, seasonal affective disorder, postpartum

depression, dysthymia, etc. This is a

professional & peer-led support group, not a

therapy group. Meets every Wednesday from

4-5PM at Bethany Church, 115 Main St. downstairs

at end of hallway, blue door. Free

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs.

Montpelier Police, 1 Pitkin Court, 223-3445 &

Washington County Sheriff, 10 Elm St., 223-

3001. Get rid of old or unused meds at these

local permanent safe disposal sites.

MEMORY CAFE ( www.montpeliermemorycafe.net

) meets the second Saturday of each

month, from 10 AM to 11:30 AM, at Montpelier

Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre Street in

Montpelier. The Cafe is a social gathering where

people in early to mid-stage memory loss disorders,

and their care partners, can come together

to connect and support one another in a relaxed,

non-judgmental atmosphere.

Community Song Circle: a community singalong

open to ALL ages and musical abilities.

The first Sunday of each month (except July &

Aug), at the Center for Arts and Learning at 46

Barre St, Montpelier. We use the popular songbooks

Rise Up Singing and Rise Again. Bring

your copies if you have them; books will also be

available to borrow or purchase. Donations

appreciated, but this is event is free to all.

6-8pm. More info at www.cal-vt.org or email:

vtcommunitysing@gmail.com.

MARSHFIELD - Story Time and Playgroup.

Jaquith Public Library. Wednesdays from 10 to

11:30 a.m. Join Sylvia Smith for story time, and

follow up with playgroup with Cassie Bickford.

For children birth to age six and their grownups.

We do not hold the program the days

Twinfield Union is closed.

MORETOWN - Mad River Chorale. New

singers welcome. Rehearsals at Harwood Union

H.S., Mondays, 7-9 p.m. 496-2048.

MORRISVILLE - Overeaters Anonymous.

First Congregational Church, 85 Upper Main

St., Fridays at noon. Info. 888-2356.

Photo Co-op Drop-in at River Arts every third

Thursday, 6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

Poetry Clinic Drop-in at River Arts every1st &

3rd Tuesday, 6PM-8PM. $5 suggested donation.

NORTHFIELD - Civil Air Patrol Cadet

Program. For ages 12-18. Readiness & Regional

Technology Center, Norwich campus, Tuesdays,

6-8:30 p.m. Info. capitalcomposite@yahoo.com

Clogging & Irish Step Lessons. W/Green

Mountain Cloggers, ages 8-78, donations.

Sundays 5-8 p.m. 522-2935.

Playgroup. United Church of Northfield,

Wednesdays, 9:30-11 a.m. Held only when school

is in session. Info. 262-3292 x113.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Northfield

Police, 110 Wall St., 485-9181. Get rid of old or

unused meds at these local permanent safe disposal

sites.

ORANGE - Sunday morning service at Christ

Community Alliance Church at 10:30 a.m. off

Route 302 near the Elementary School in

Orange.

PEACHAM - Peacham Farmers Market. On

the Academy Green. 4-7 p.m. In conjunction

with the Peacham Cafe which will be serving

dinner until 7 p.m. Open through September 7.

PLAINFIELD - Cardio Funk Class every

other Friday beginning Oct. 6 at the Community

Center. 5PM-6PM. $8/person For more info,

email shannonkellymovement@gmail.com.

Cutler Memorial Library Activities: Classic

Book Club: 1st Mondays, 6 p.m; Story Time

for Tots, infants through pre-K. Thursdays

through Aug 24, 10:30 a.m. “Read to Me” &

Creativity, grades K-3, Sundays 1-2 p.m.

through Aug. 20. Tuesday Night Knitters,

every Tuesday except first Tues. of the month.

Diabetes Discussion & Support Group.

Everyone welcome. The Health Center conf.

room, 3rd Thursdays, 1:30 p.m. Info. 322-

6600.

Plainfield Farmers Market. Locally raised

produce and meats; baked goods; maple syrup;

crafts; Japanese tea tasting. 4-7 p.m., Mill Street

Park. Through October 6.

RANDOLPH - Ongoing Health Support

Groups at Gifford - Quit in Person Group.

Gifford’s Tobacco Cessation Program regularly

offers four-week “Quit in Person” group sessions

in the Maple Leaf Room at Gifford

Medical Center and Kingwood Health Center.

Free gum, patches and lozenges are available for

participants. Call 802-728-7714, to learn more

or to sign up for the next series of classes.

Diabetes Management Program. Thursdays

from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Kingwood Health

Center (lower level Conference Room), 1422

VT Route 66. This free six week program for

people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes offers

support to help them better manage their diabetes

and prevent more serious health problems.

Info/register: Megan at 802-728-7714.

New Business Forum. Vermont Tech Enterprise

Center, 1540 VT Rte 66, 2nd Wednesdays, 11:30

a.m.-1 p.m. 728-9101.

Yoga Classes. All ages & levels, donations benefit

Safeline. VTC Campus Center, last Sunday

of month, 2-3:30 p.m.

Step ‘n’ Time Line Dancers of Central

Vermont. Fall Session: Wednesdays at Chandler

Center. 6:45-8:45 p.m.

Randolph Senior Ctr., 6 Hale Street, 728-9324.

Lift for Life Exercises, 8:30 a.m. Tu/Th and

Weds/Fri; Cribbage, 10 a.m. Mondays; Bingo,

10:30 a.m. Mondays; Bridge, 2:15 p.m. at the

continued on next page


Joslyn House Mondays; Mahjongg, 10 a.m. Tuesdays; Crafts,

10:30 a.m. Wednesdays; Knit-Wits, 10 a.m. Thursdays; Foot

Clinics, 1st Weds, call to sign up; Book Club 12:45 p.m. 1st

Wednesday of month.

Cancer Support Group. For survivors, sufferers & family.

Gifford Conference Ctr, 2nd Tuesdays, 9:30-11 a.m. 728-2270.

Storytime. Kimball Library, Wed., 11 a.m., ages 2-5; Toddlertime,

Fri., 10:30 a.m.; Gathering for hand work, 2nd & 4th Mon., 6

p.m.

WAITSFIELD - Community Acupuncture Night. Free assessment

& treatment, donations welcome. Three Moons Wellness,

859 Old County Rd., 2nd fl., last Weds., of month, 4-7 p.m. RSVP

272-3690.

Scavenger Hunt- Meals On Wheels of the Mad River Valley is

holding a scavenger hunt on Bridge Street in Waitsfield, Vermont.

Bridge Street is paved with wonderful bricks that have all kinds

of phases and fun words. There are four different lists to choose

from. Pick one up and start to find and match the phases with the

bricks on the lists. This is on your own time and any day and any

time of the day . Fun to entertain the kids and out of town guests.

You can pick them up at The Chamber Office, The Valley Arts

Office, The Waitsfield Library, The Three Mountain Café, The

Revolving Closet. This goes on until the snow covers the bricks.

Nancy 496-9416

WARREN - Knit and Play. Bring your kids and your projects.

All levels welcome. Warren Public Library, Thursdays, 9:30-

11:30 a.m.

WASHINGTON - Central VT ATV Club. Washington Fire

Station, 3rd Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. 224-6889.

Art and Adventure with April, 3rd Saturdays at 11 a.m.;

Storytime, Mondays at 11 a.m.; Tech Help Drop-In, Saturdays 10

a.m.-2 p.m. All at Calef Memorial Library. Info. 883-2343.

WATERBURY - Waterbury Public Library Preschool Story

Time Thursdays at 10 a.m. Keep your busy preschooler entertained

with picture books, interactive play, music, and crafts.

Baby & Toddler Story Time Mondays at 10 a.m. Stimulate your

baby’s developing intellect with rhymes, songs, stories, music,

and lap games, suitable for newborns through 36 months.

Waterbury Public Library Crafts Tuesday afternoons from

3-4!PM! Create crafts from rubber band bracelets and Legos to

Fairy Houses.

WATERBURY CTR - Bible Study Group. Bring your bible,

coffee provided. Waterbury Center Grange, Sundays, 5-6 p.m.

498-4565.

WEBSTERVILLE - Fire District #3, Prudential Committee.

Monthly meeting, 105 Main St., 2nd Tuesdays, 6 p.m.

Safe Disposal of Prescription Drugs. Barretown Police, 149

Websterville Rd., 479-0508. Get rid of old or unused meds at

these local permanent safe disposal sites.

WEST TOPSHAM - Bible Study. New Hope Methodist Church,

2 Gendron Rd. Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m.

WILLIAMSTOWN - Bible Study. Christian Alliance Church,

Sun., 6 p.m. Info. 476-3221.

WOODBURY - Woodbury Community Library winter hours.

1-5 p.m. Mondays & Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to noon Saturdays.

Valley Lake Road. Info: 472-5710. Knitting/Handworkers’

Circle, Saturdays, 10 a.m. to noon, all ages and abilities

WORCESTER - Knitting Night. The Wool Shed, Tuesdays,

6:30-8:30 p.m.

Wednesday, October11

BRADFORD- Meroa Shepard Benjamin Presents “Looking

for Your Roots? My Personal Experience” at the Bradford

Public Library. 6:30PM. As a self-taught, homeschooled genealogist,

she will show you how to begin and what to expect when you

start this wonderful journey into the unknown. For more info, call

Meroa at 802-222-9621.

JOHNSON- Free Community Meal at the United Church of

Johnson, 100 Main Street. 11:30AM-12:30PM. Johnson State

College will offer a free community meal. The meals are sponsored

in part by JSC Dining Services, the JSC SERVE program

and Laraway Youth & Family Services.

MARSHFIELD- Bereavement And Grief Equine Support

Group at the Rhythm of the Rein Therapeutic Riding and Driving

Program, Water Tower Farm 386 US Route 2. 6:30-7:30PM.

Contact Dianne Lashoones at (802) 426 3781 for more info.

MONTPELIER-Winter Wellness with Shona R MacDougall

Registered Herbalist (AHG) at Hunger Mountain Coop. How

can you boost your immune system during flu season? Learn

about herbs and supplements to take all year long to stay healthy!

Free. 6:00-7:30PM. For more info,email info@hungermountain.

coop.

TOPSHAM- Rummage Sale at the East Topsham Town Hall.

10AM-3PM.

WOODBURY VILLAGE- Naturalist, Photographer & Author

Mary Holland at the Woodbury Community Library. 6:30PM. This

adult and children’s author shares a multi-media presentation and

hosts a lively discussion about New England’s natural history. For

more info, call 472-5710 or woodburyvermontlibrary@gmail.com.

Thursday, October12

BARRE- How to Start a Business. Establish Achievable and

Realistic Goals that will help you Create Your Business Plan.

This event is part of the Micro Business Development Program’s

Business Building Blocks Networking Workshops. It will take

place at CAPSTONE Community Action, 20 Gable Place. For

more info, and to register, visit www.capstonevt.org.

Washington County Retired Teachers Association October

Meeting at the Aldrich Library downstairs in the Milne Room.

9:30 AM to 10:00 AM Coffee, 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM Business

Meeting, 11:00 AM to Noon Program - Good Food Good

Medicine, Noon - lunch of soups and sandwiches $10.00 per person.

Please RSVP to jpdolan23@aol.com by Tuesday, October

10.

CALAIS- Papa G Sing-a-Long at the Whammy Bar, 41 W.

County Rd. Call 229-4329 for more info.

CHELSEA- Meet the Artist at the Chelsea Public Library. 6PM.

Megan Murphy is the library’s current featured artist. Her show,

In the Garden, will be on display through October 31

E. MONTPELIER- Windows On Waldorf: An Evening Open

House. Explore the Grade 1-8 curriculum through a guided tour

with faculty. The evening will include an overview of Waldorf

through the grades along with a view of student work.

6:30PM-8PM. Preregistration required, by noon the day prior to

the Open House. Contact Cathie Ely, Enrollment Director, at

enrollment@ovws.org or call 802-456-7400 with questions and to

register.

MONTPELIER- Sense & Sensibility at Lost Nation Theater.

Jane Austen’s classic novel comes to life onstage in an exuberant,

surprising, hilarious and deeply affecting adaptation by Kate

Hamill. $25. 7:30PM. Students & seniors 65+ = $5 discount.

Youth 11 & under, $10. More info at 802-229-0492 or www.lostnationtheater.org.

Metal: Remedies for Allergies & Immunity with Baylen Slote,

L.Ac. of black turtle taoist clinical medicine at Hunger Mountain

Coop. Enjoy an engaging discussion about practical ways to alleviate

allergies and boost your immunity. Learn taoist clinical

medicine (TCM) remedies, including guidance with supplements,

food medicine, qi gong, and acupressure tools you can use at

home. Free. 6:00-7:00pm. For more info,email info@hungermountain.coop.

Appreciative Living Learning Circles at the Center for Arts and

Learning, 46 Barre Street. Here you will learn short and easy

exercises that will change the way you see the world and help you

become more positive, resilient, and joyful. Discussion based on

Jackie Kelm’s book Appreciative Living: The principles of

Appreciative Inquiry in daily life (provided). 7PM-8:30PM. Call

223-2518 to register.

First Amendment Freedom Of Assembly Conversation, hosted

by the League of Women Voters, at the Kellogg-Hubbard Library.

Moderator: David Moats, author and Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial

writer at the Rutland Herald. Panelists: Chief Tony Facos,

Montpelier Police Department, James Haslam, Founder and

Executive Director of Rights & Democracy, Chloé White, Policy

Director, ACLU of Vermont.

Vermont White Cane Safety Awareness Day Celebration at the

State House on the lawn at 1:00 PM. State and local officials will

be in attendance. All will walk to the Savoy Theater. Light

refreshments will be served.

TOPSHAM- Rummage Sale at the East Topsham Town Hall.

10AM-3PM.

Friday, October 13

CALAIS- Marc Delgado (Original singer/songwriter) at the

Whammy Bar, 41 W. County Rd. Call 229-4329 for more info.

NO

TICKET

#

MONTPELIER- Sense & Sensibility at Lost Nation Theater.

Jane Austen’s classic novel comes to life onstage in an exuberant,

surprising, hilarious and deeply affecting adaptation by Kate

Hamill. $30. 7:30PM. Students & seniors 65+ = $5 discount.

Youth 11 & under, $10. More info at 802-229-0492 or www.lostnationtheater.org.

VORCZA at Positive Pie, 22 State Street. Originating as an informal

jazz trio, vorcza has advanced to writing “adventurous yet

accessible original material that marries jazz and funk with worldinfluenced

rhythms.” (Times Argus). $5, 10PM.

TOPSHAM- Rummage Sale at the East Topsham Town Hall.

10AM-3PM.

Saturday, October14

BARRE- Fur Fest to benefit Central Vermont Humane Society.

5-8PM at the Vermont Granite Museum, 7 Jones Brothers Way.

Hearty hors d’oeuvres, delicious desserts, cash bar, live and silent

auction and heartwarming stories of saving animal lives. Tickets

$35 per person available at www.centralvermonthumane.org or

call (802) 476-3811 x 110.All proceeds will help save homeless

animals and enrich human lives in our local community.

Chicken & Biscuit Dinner at the American Legion Auxiliary

Unit #10. 6PM. $10/person. Chicken, biscuits, mashed potatoes,

buttered carrots, coleslaw, desserts.

BETHOL- Catholic Daughters Chicken Pot Pie Supper at the

St, Anthony’s Parish Hall (the Little Brown Church). 5PM. $10/

person. No reseations needed. For more info, call 234-5605.

CABOT- Cabot Historical Society’s 18th Annual Apple Pie

Festival at the Cabot School Gym. 9AM-3PM. Activities include

pie judging, craft show, lunch, pies sold, & raffle! For more info,

contact Bonnie at 802-563-3396.

CALAIS- The Laddies f/ Bob Sassaman at the Whammy Bar,

41 W. County Rd. Call 229-4329 for more info.

CHELSEA- Chicken Pie Supper at the United Church of

Chelsea. Seatings at 5PM & 6:15PM. Homemade pies!

Reservations & Take-Out: 685-3161. $11/Adults, $6/Under 12.

E. BETHEL- Annual Chicken Pie Supper at the East Bethel

Grange Hall, 78 Store Hill. Menu includes chicken pie, mashed

potato, gravy, squash, rolls and homemade pie for dessert. All you

New!

can eat, adults $10, kids $5, under age 5 is free. 5pm.

E. MONTPELIER- Orchard Valley ON THE LAND at the E.

Montpelier Main Campus, 2290 VT Route 14N. Join OVWS

faculty for this inspiring morning ON THE LAND. This event is

for anyone interested in learning about this program and the campus.

10AM to 12:30PM. Preregistration requested. Children welcome

to take part along with their parents! Contact Cathie Ely at

enrollment@ovws.org or at 802-456-7400 for more information,

answers to your questions, and to register!

MONTPELIER- Enchanted Forest. 4PM-8PM. Montpelier’s

night time community celebration of autumn in Hubbard Park •

Tickets at City Clerk’s Office.

Sense & Sensibility at Lost Nation Theater. Jane Austen’s classic

novel comes to life onstage in an exuberant, surprising, hilarious

WANTED TO BUY

Older Items & Antiques

Call before you have a tag sale!

We Buy: Older Mixing Bowls, Pottery, China, Glass, Vases,

Candlesticks, Sterling, Coins, Costume Jewelry, Toys, Jugs,

Crocks, Canning Jars & Bottles, Lamps, Prints, Paintings,

Knick-Knacks, Holiday Decorations, etc., etc.

Full House - Attic/Basement Contents - Estate Liquidations

802-563-2204 • 802-595-3632 C E L L

Rich Aronson

CANADIAN CLUB

BINGO

•Flash Ball 1: $500.

•Flash Ball 2: $650.

•Mini Jackpot: $3,100.

•Jackpot: $2,100.

Thursday Night

•Doors •Premies Open at 4:00 PM

Closed at 6:00 PM for Renovations

•Regular The Games CVMC at Auxiliary 7:00 PM Bene-Fit Shop will be closed

CANADIAN October CLUB 29th through November 6th.

ROUTE 14 • 479-9090

Just outside of Barre

SAINT MONICA’S SUPER BINGO

79 SUMMER STREET, BARRE

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 29 ■ 1:00PM

DOORS OPEN AT 10:00AM ■ EARLY BIRDS AT 11:30AM

OVER $10,000 IN CASH & PRIZES

$25 FOR 12 CARDS • EXTRA CARDS 3 FOR $5

Meals, Snacks & Beverages Available

Electronic Flashboards, Televisions & Verifier

$20 Minimum Payoff On Regular Games

THE AMERICAN

LEGION

BARRE POST 10

320 NORTH MAIN ST.

BARRE, VT

Fri., Oct. 13 ~ 7-11 pm

Sherri Lamberton’s

KARAOKE SHOW

$3 Cover

Sat., Oct. 14 ~ 7-11 pm

Enjoy The Band

Classic Rewind

$5 Cover

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

21 & OVER

For information, call

the Post at 479-9058

SAVE The ALL Benefit THESE Shop LOGO

ADD 15 Cottage AS St., NECESSARY!

Barre 479-4309

COPY AND PASTE INTO A

continued on next page

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us!

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Your Ad Is

Even Easier!

sales@vt-world.com

Please include

contact person

& payment info

THIS WEEK'S

SPECIAL

ROAST

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We will reopen Wednesday, November 7th with new shop hours:

Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm

Saturday 9am-2pm.

Come check out our new look and shop for the holidays!

We look forward to seeing you soon, and thank you for

your patronage.

NEW ITEMS

DAILY~SHOP OFTEN!

15 Cottage St., Barre • 479-4309

Shop Hours:

Wednesday through Friday 10am-4pm

Saturday 9am-1pm

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NOTICE

Saturdays 9am-1pm

Now Accepting Winter Items

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~ THIS AD SPONSORED BY~

VERMONT MUTUAL

INSURANCE GROUP

89 State St., Montpelier

For Reservations call 223-6623 or 476-5015 (8am-4pm)

All Proceeds To Benefit St. Monica-St. Michael School

O

72

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 21

B

12


ART EXHIBITS

BARRE- Rock Solid XVII in Studio Place Arts’ Main Floor Gallery.

This outstanding exhibit, run annually since 2000, showcases stone

sculptures and assemblages by area artists. In addition, take the Art Stroll

around downtown, historic Barre and view a variety of sculptures created

from granite. (For info, go to [studioplacearts.com] and click on

“visit”).

Amended in Studio Place Arts’ Second Floor Gallery– Stitched collages

by Athena Petra Tasiopoulos, recipient of the 2016-17 SPA Studio

Residency.

We’re All Fine Here in Studio Place Arts’ Third Floor Gallery –

Contemporary papercut artwork by Molly Bosley. Exhibit Dates:

September 19 – November 4, 2017. Studio Place Arts also presents: New

England Stone Portraits, Paintings by René Schall: September 15 -

December 15, 2017.On display at the Morse Block Deli, 260 N. Main

St.

CHELSEA In The Garden: paintings - in watercolor and mixed

media by Megan Murphy (of Bolton and Corinth) on display September

2nd through October 31st, at the Chelsea Public Library, 685-2188.

JOHNSON - “Coastal Excavation,” artwork by Johnson State

College Master of Fine Arts student Melissa Fairgrieve, will be displayed

Oct. 2-20 in the Julian Scott Memorial Gallery at the Dibden

Center for the Arts on campus. The thesis exhibit will feature large,

multiple-piece works in oil and graphite on paper by the Middletown,

Rhode Island, artist. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday through

Friday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. For more information, visit jsc.edu/

Dibden or call 635-1469.

MARSHFIELD- Artists Marge Pulaski & Helen Rabin will be on display

at the Jacquith Public Library, 122 School St., Marshfield,

September 9 to November 3. For more info, visit www.jaquithpubliclibrary.org

MIDDLESEX- The HiVE FALL PORTAL Show. Nikki Eddy,

Vermont artist, works from her original photographs to paint bold

abstract expressionistic works of art capturing sweeping movement using

minimal color palettes. August 25 – November 15. The HiVE (next to the

Red Hen Baking Co.), 961 Route 2, Middlesex, VT. Call (802)595-4866

or visit www.thehivevt.com for more info.

MONTPELIER - Sculpture Exhibit. Featuring contemporary sculpture

created by Vermont artists. Vermont Arts Council Sculpture Garden,

ongoing.

SHOW 21 at the The Front Gallery. The exhibition will showcase the

latest works of the gallery’s membership of Vermont-based contemporary

artists. In addition, the Front will present work by guest artist Alisa

Dworsky whose creative work includes drawing, printmaking, sculpture,

installation and architecture. In her installation work, Alisa explores how

force and rhythm are communicated in the human body and in human

built structures. The show runs from October 6 - November 18, 2017.

The Paleteers of Vermont Member Show and Sketches in Perfection:

a special exhibit of paintings and sketches by Thomas Waterman

Wood at the T. W. Wood Gallery, 46 Barre St. Both exhibits run from

September 12th through October 27th with an opening reception on

Thursday September 14th, from 5:00-7:00 pm. The reception is free and

will offer an opportunity to meet many of the artists, enjoy refreshments,

learn more about T.W. Woods art and purchase local art at affordable

prices. For more info, contact Ginny Callan at (802) 262-6035.

MORRISVILLE- 3rd Annual River Works Group Exhibit River

Arts, 74 Pleasant St. August 24 - October 20. Reception Thursday,

September 14, Shout 5-7PM. Out Louds A range of mediums and styles comprise this

show celebrating Sun, water’s Nov 5 @ 8:00pm power Higher to Ground inspire - South artists. Exhibiting Artists:

Robert Brunelle Burlington, - Renee VT Greenlee - Phil Herbison - Jen Hubbard - Jean

O’Conor - John Yonder Sargent Mountain - Kent String Shaw Band - Rett Sturman - Homer Wells.

Fri, Nov 10 @ 8:00pm Higher Ground - South

A Stitch in Time: Burlington, 18th VT& 19th Century Textiles. August 24 - October

20. River Arts and Shawn the Colvin Noyes House Museum have partnered together to

present a collection Sat, Nov of 11quilts, samplers and embroidery work created by

@ 4:00pm Lebanon Opera House - Lebanon, NH

women in the 18th and 19th century. Examining these works allow us to

Carbon Leaf

decipher and contextualize Sat, Nov 11 @ 8:00pm the Higher untold Ground stories Ballroom of - South women’s lives in the

past.

Burlington, VT

RANDOLPH- The “From Little Mermaid Green to Fall: Celebrating Creativity in

Wed, Nov 15 - Sun, Jan 7 Barrette Center for the Arts at

Mental Health, Northern Wellness Stage | White and River Recovery.” Junction, VT The exhibit will run from

September 15 – The November Lone Bellow 5, 2017 at the Chandler Art Gallery. Opening

reception on Friday, Thu, Nov September 16 @ 8:00pm Higher 29, 2017 Ground from Ballroom 4-7pm. - South For more information

and submission Natalie MacMaster requirements & Donnell visit Leahy: www.claramartin.org

A Celtic Family

Burlington, VT

ROCHESTER- Christmas SEE THE Fri, Dec WOODS 1 @ 8:00pm Flynn FOR Theater THE - TREES, Joan Kahn at

BigTown Gallery Burlington, Rochester, VT 99 N. Main, September 13 - October 14.

Enter The Haggis Sun, Dec 3 @ 7:00pm Higher Ground

Opening Reception - South Burlington, & Artist VT Talk is Saturday, September 16. 5PM.

Reception to follow. The Victor Wooten Trio Mon, Dec 11 @ 7:30pm Higher

Ground - South Burlington, VT

WAITSFIELD- Kat Wright SEASONS: Sat, Dec 30 @ Threadpainting 9:00pm Higher Ground - by Pamela Druhen.

Fridays through South Sundays, Burlington, Sept VT 29-Oct 15; Monday, October 9, Noon-5

pm or by appointment. Kat Wright Sun, Artist Dec 31 Talk @ 8:30pm & Opening Higher Ground Reception: - September 30,

3:30 – 4:30PM. South Pam Burlington, uses a VT mixture of techniques from machine piecing

Only Yesterday Wed, Jan 31 - Sun, Feb 18 Barrette

to dye painting Center and fusing for the Arts to at create Northern her Stage “threadpainted” | White River work. Waitsfield

United Church Junction, of Christ, VT 4355 Main St.

Disgraced Wed, Feb 28 - Sun, Mar 18 Barrette Center

for the Arts at Northern Stage | White River Junction, VT

Altan Sat, Mar 17 @ 8:00pm Flynn Theater - Burlington,

VT

page 22 The WORLD October 11, 2017

and deeply affecting adaptation by Kate Hamill. $30. 7:30PM.

Students & seniors 65+ = $5 discount. Youth 11 & under, $10.

More info at 802-229-0492 or www.lostnationtheater.org.

Memory Café at Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre

Street. 10AM-11:30AM. Memory Cafe is a social place where

people living with memory loss, and their care partners, meet in a

relaxed and supportive environment. Admission is free. Donations

welcome. Call Liz Dodd at 229-9630 for more information.

Open Studio Weekend at the Center for Arts and Learning, 46

Barre Street. This is your chance to see some of our resident artists

on their home turf. 12PM-5PM with Liz Le Serviget, David

Melech Hat Company and Susan Aranoff. Follow signs when you

arrive to visit them all. For more info, visit www.cal-vt.org.

Celebrate Art Fall Gala at the T. W. Wood Gallery, 46 Barre

Street. 5:30PM- 10:00PM. $50 a person will support all Gallery

programs! Tickets can be purchased by contacting the Gallery at

twwoodgallery@gmail.com, calling 262-6035 or going to eventbrite!

NORWICH- Revels Traditions & Community Dance at Tracy

Hall. Revels Teens, Singers & Band of Fools, 12:30-5:30PM;

Potluck & Dance, 5:30-7:30PM.

W. FAIRLEE- 14th Annual Harvest Supper! 954 rt.113 West

Fairlee Church. Continuous Serving 5:00PM to 7:00 PM. “Chef

Steve’s” (Famous Home Cured Corned Beef) Baked Ham (Red

Flannel Hash) “Home Baked Beans.” Adults $13.00 Kids 5 - 12

$6.00 kids under 5 eat free. Reservations Strongly Recommended!!

Everyone Welcome. For more info call Steve Garrow at 802-685-

3141or garrowstephen@gmail.com.

ST. JOHNSBURY- Sense & Sensibility at Fuller Hal, St.

Johnsbury Academy. Aquila Theatrereturnsto perform

JaneAUsten’s classicromantic comedy. Tickets: $42, $34, $15,

students free. 7PM.

STOWE- Vermont Philharmonic Presents Annual Opera

Gala with Lou Kosma, at the Spruce Peak Performing Arts

Center. 8PM. The performance will feature operatic music by

Verdi, Puccini, Donizetti, plus the Fountains of Rome by Respighi

and Vivaldi’s Violin Concerto in A Minor. Featured soloists

include the Vermont Philharmonic’s concertmaster, Letitia Quante,

violin, and Helle Gössler Christensen, soprano - winner of the

2017 Bel Canto Institute Performance Award. Tickets: $20 in

Sam Bush

Fri, Oct 13 @ 8:00pm Barre Opera House - Barre

The Wailers

Sun, Oct 15 @ 6:00pm Lebanon Opera House -

Lebanon, NH

CHaD Hero Half Marathon

Sun, Oct 22 @ 12:00am Dartmouth Green -

Hanover, NH

Rusted Root

Sun, Oct 22 @ 6:00pm Lebanon Opera House -

Lebanon, NH

Start Making Sense: Talking Heads

Tribute Fri, Oct 27 @ 8:00pm Higher Ground -

South Burlington, VT

Davy Knowles

Fri, Nov 3 @ 7:30pm Higher Ground - South

Burlington, VT

The Chris Robinson Brotherhood

Sun, Nov 5 @ 7:00pm Higher Ground - South

Burlington, VT

Shout Out Louds

Sun, Nov 5 @ 8:00pm Higher Ground - South

Burlington, VT

Yonder Mountain String Band

Fri, Nov 10 @ 8:00pm Higher Ground - South

Burlington, VT

oncert

Connections

Shawn Colvin

Sat, Nov 11 @ 4:00pm Lebanon Opera House -

Lebanon, NH

Carbon Leaf

Sat, Nov 11 @ 8:00pm Higher Ground Ballroom -

South Burlington, VT

The Little Mermaid

Wed, Nov 15 - Sun, Jan 7 Barrette Center for the

Arts at Northern Stage | White River Junction, VT

The Lone Bellow

Thu, Nov 16 @ 8:00pm Higher Ground Ballroom -

South Burlington, VT

Natalie MacMaster & Donnell Leahy: A Celtic

Family Christmas

Fri, Dec 1 @ 8:00pm Flynn Theater - Burlington, VT

Enter The Haggis

Sun, Dec 3 @ 7:00pm Higher Ground - South

Burlington, VT

The Victor Wooten Trio

Mon, Dec 11 @ 7:30pm Higher Ground - South

Burlington, VT

Kat Wright

Sat, Dec 30 @ 9:00pm Higher Ground - South

Burlington, VT

Kat Wright

Sun, Dec 31 @ 8:30pm Higher Ground - South

Burlington, VT

For venue phone numbers, call

The Point at 223-2396 9:00 to 5:00

Mon.-Fri., or visit our web site at pointfm.com

ONION Noises RIVER Off Wed, Apr 11 - Sun, COMMUNITY May 13 Barrette Center ACCESS MEDIA CHANNELS 15, 16, 17

• Bethel • Braintree

for the Arts


at

Montpelier

Northern Stage | White

• Randolph

River Junction,


VT

Rochester • U-32 District Towns • Waterbury Schedules subject to change without notice.

ORCA Media Channel 15 Series

Monday, October 16

4:00p Berlin School Board

Public Access

12:00p Brunch With Bernie

6:00a Senior Moments

7:00p Montpelier School Board

Weekly Program Schedule 1:00p The Thom Hartmann Program 8:00a Democracy Now!

Thursday, October 12

2:00p Abled and on Air

Wednesday, October 11

9:00a Vote for Vermont

12:00p Orange Southwest Supervisory

2:30p Yoga for You

6:00a Celluloid Mirror

10:00a Bear Pond Books Events Union

3:00p Democracy Now!

6:30a Endangered Alphabets

11:30a Talking About Movies

4:00p Berlin School Board

4:00p Gay USA

8:00a Democracy Now!

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program 8:00p Bethel School Board

5:00p Senior Moments

9:00a Local Solutions to End Homelessness

1:00p Endangered Alphabets

6:30p Calais Town Hall – Our Town

Friday, October 13

2:30p Celluloid Mirror

9:00p Gay USA

12:00p Washington Central Supervisory

11:00a Bill Doyle on VT Issues

3:00p Democracy Now!

10:00p Circus Smirkus

Union

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

4:00p Local Solutions to End Homelessness

6:00p U-32 School Board

3:00p Calais Elementary School Board

1:00p Bear Pond Books Events Saturday, October 14

2:30p SPA - Rock Solid XVII

6:00a Meditation on Human Evil 6:00p The Artful Word

10:00p Game of the Week

3:00p Democracy Now!

7:30a Calais Town Hall – Our Town 8:00p Talking About Movies

4:00p You and Your Health

10:00a Vermont Treasures

8:30p Abled and on Air

Saturday, October 14

4:30p Moccasin Tracks

10:30a SPA - Rock Solid XVII

9:00p Extempo

12:00p East Montpelier School Board

6:00p Vermont Historical Society

11:00a VT Digger – Teflon Town 10:00p Meditation on Human Evil

4:30p Washington Central Supervisor

7:30p Bear Pond Books Events

11:30a Kellogg Hubbard Library 11:30p The Struggle

Union

9:00p Senior Moments

1:30p Old West Church

8:30p U-32 School Board

Tuesday, October 17

10:00p Local Solutions to End

3:00p Growing Up in Brookfield VT 6:00a Vermont Historical Society

Sunday, October 15

4:30p Roman Catholic Mass

Homelessness

8:00a Democracy Now!

12:00p OSHER Lifelong Learning

5:00p Washington Baptist Church

Thursday, October 12

9:00a Kellogg Hubbard Library

Institute

6:00p CCCA Summer Concert Series

6:00a Yoga for You

11:00a You and Your Health

3:00p East Montpelier School Board

7:30p Spark of Humanity

6:30a Growing Up in Brookfield VT

11:30a Spark of Humanity

5:30p Authors at the Aldrich

8:00p All Things LGBTQ

8:00a Democracy Now!

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

7:00p Montpelier School Board

9:30p Moccasin Tracks

9:00a Moccasin Tracks

1:00p All Things LGBTQ

Monday, October 16

10:30p Endangered Alphabets

10:30a Abled On Air

2:00p Worcester Historical Society 12:00p Rumney Memorial School

Sunday, October 15

11:00a Extempo

3:00p Democracy Now!

3:00p Authors at the Aldrich

6:00a Washington Baptist Church

12:00p The Thom Hartmann Program

4:00p Positively Vermont

4:00p VT State Board of Education

7:00a Gay USA

1:00p The Ecology & Geology of Vermont

4:30p Vermont Treasures

Tuesday, October 17

8:00a Old West Church

2:00p Spark of Humanity

5:00p Extempo

12:00p Calais Elementary School Board

10:30a Roman Catholic Mass

2:30p Keep Talking

6:00p Hunger Mountain Coop Workshop 3:00p OSHER Lifelong Learning Institute

11:00a Eckankar

3:00p Democracy Now!

Series

5:00p Orange Southwest Supervisory

11:30a The Ecology & Geology of

4:00p Bill Doyle on VT Issues

7:30p Bill Doyle on VT Issues

Union

Vermont

5:00p Southern Vermont Idol

8:30p Old West Church

8:00p Rumney Memorial School

12:30p Meditation on Human Evil

7:30p Celluloid Mirror

10:00p The Ecology & Geology of

2:00p The Struggle

8:00p Vote for Vermont

Vermont

3:00p Circus Smirkus

9:00p Kellogg Hubbard Library

11:00p Vermont Voices

5:00p Vote for Vermont

ORCA Media Channel 17

10:30p Vermont Historical Society 6:00p VT Digger – Teflon Town

Government Access

Friday, October 13

6:30p Talking About Movies

Weekly Program Schedule

6:00a Circus Smirkus

7:00p Gay USA

ORCA Media Channel 16 Wed, Oct. 11

8:00a Democracy Now!

8:00p You and Your Health

Education Access 7:00a Nuclear Decommissioning

9:00a Vermont Voices

8:30p SPA - Rock Solid XVII

Weekly Program Schedule 9:00a Green Mountain Care Board

10:00a All Things LGBTQ

9:00p Calais Town Hall – Our Town Wednesday, October 11 3:00p Waterbury Trustees

11:00a Montpelier Brown Bag Concert 11:30p Keep Talking

12:00p Bethel School Board

6:00p Montpelier City Council LIVE

Community Media (802) 224-9901 Check out our Web page at www.orcamedia.net

Thu, Oct. 12

7:00a Randolph Selectboard

11:30a Nuclear Waste

2:00p Winning Health Care

4:00p Vermont State House

7:00p Waterbury Selectboard

Fri, Oct. 13

7:00a Bethel Selectboard

11:00a Moretown Selectboard

4:00p Berlin Selectboard

8:00p Montpelier Planning Commission

Sat, Oct. 14

7:00a Central Vermont Regional Planning

Commission

8:00a Montpelier Historic Preservation

Commission

11:00a Randolph Selectboard

4:00p Calais Selectboard

7:00p Green Mountain Care Board

Sun, Oct. 15

7:00a Waterbury Trustees

10:30a Waterbury Selectboard

1:00p Montpelier Historic Preservation

Commission

3:00p Montpelier Development Review

Board

6:00p Montpelier Design Review

Committee

8:00p Montpelier City Council

Mon, Oct. 16

7:00a Moretown Selectboard

11:00a Bethel Selectboard

2:00p Berlin Selectboard

5:30p Montpelier Design Review Committee

LIVE

7:00p Montpelier Development Review

Board LIVE

Tue, Oct. 17

7:00a Calais Selectboard

12:00p Central Vermont Regional Planning

Commission

1:30p Nuclear Decommissioning

5:30p Montpelier Planning Commission

advance at www.sprucepeakarts.org or $25 at the door.

TOPSHAM- Bag Day at the East Topsham Town Hall.

8:30AM-1PM. To benefit Topsham United Presbterian Church.

WORCESTER- Vermont Open Studio: Marina Epstein at the

Hermitage Gallery, 365 Eagle Ledge Road. For more info, call

229-6297 or visit www.hermitage-gallery.com.

Sunday, October15

BARRE- Vermont Philharmonic Presents Annual Opera Gala

with Lou Kosma, at the Barre Opera House. 2PM. The performance

will feature operatic music by Verdi, Puccini, Donizetti,

plus the Fountains of Rome by Respighi and Vivaldi’s Violin

Concerto in A Minor. Tickets: $20 ($15 for senior and $5 for

students) and can be purchased either in advance from barreoperahouse.org

or at the door. For more info, visit www.vermontphilharmonic.org.

MONTPELIER- Sense & Sensibility at Lost Nation Theater.

Jane Austen’s classic novel comes to life onstage in an exuberant,

surprising, hilarious and deeply affecting adaptation by Kate

Hamill. $25. 2PM. Students & seniors 65+ = $5 discount. Youth

11 & under, $10. More info at 802-229-0492 or www.lostnationtheater.org.

Open Studio Weekend at the Center for Arts and Learning, 46

Barre Street. This is your chance to see some of our resident artists

on their home turf. 12PM-5PM with Liz Le Serviget, David

Melech Hat Company and Susan Aranoff. Follow signs when you

arrive to visit them all. For more info, visit www.cal-vt.org.

WORCESTER- Vermont Open Studio: Marina Epstein at the

Hermitage Gallery, 365 Eagle Ledge Road. For more info, call

229-6297 or visit www.hermitage-gallery.com.

Monday, October16

E. MONTPELIER- E. Montpelier Historical Society Presents

a Potluck Dinner & Presentation by Manuel Garcia and Paul

Heller on Jacob Davis, Montpelier’s First Settler at the Old

Brick Church. 6PM. All are welcome, bring a dish to share and

your own place setting. For more info, call 454-7328 or 223-

6466.

JEFFERSONVILLE- Creative Thinking for Dynamic

Paintings: A Three Day Workshop with Mark Tougias at the

Bryan Memorial Gallery, 180 Main Street. Day 1: 8:30AM –

3:30PM. There is a charge for this workshop and advance registration

is required. Register on line at www.bryangallery.org or

call 802-644-5100 for more information.

Tuesday, October17

JEFFERSONVILLE- Creative Thinking for Dynamic

Paintings: A Three Day Workshop with Mark Tougias at the

Bryan Memorial Gallery, 180 Main Street. Day 2: 8:30AM –

3:30PM.There is a charge for this workshop and advance registration

is required. Register on line at www.bryangallery.org or call

802-644-5100 for more information.

continued on page 24

CVTV CHANNEL 194

Wednesday

Community Bulletin Board 1a

Barre City Council 9a,12p,3p

Democracy Now 6p

Williamstown Select 7p, 10p

Thursday

Community Bulletin Board 1a

Williamstown Select 6a, 9a, 12p

Democracy Now 6p

Barre Supervisory Union 3p,7p,10p

Friday

Community Bulletin Board 1a

Barre Supervisory Union 6a,9a,12p

Democracy Now 6p

Barre Town Select 3p,7p,10p

Saturday

Community Bulletin Board 1a

Barre Town Select 6a, 9a, 12p

4 PM Washington Baptist Church

5 PM 1st Presbyterian Church

6 PM Barre Congregational Church

7:30 PM Lutheran

9 PM Calvary Life

10 PM Rice TV Mass

Sunday

Community Bulletin Board 1a

2 AM Barre Congregational Church

3:30 AM St. Monica’s Mass

4:30 AM Washington Baptist Church

6:30 AM Barre Congregational

Church

8 AM Calvary Life

9 AM Washington Baptist Church

10 AM 1st Presbyterian Church

11 AM Barre Congregational

Church

12:30 PM Rice TV Mass

1 PM St. Monica’s Mass

2 PM Barre Congregational Church

3:30 PM Washington Baptist

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also

be viewed online at cvtv723.org

4:30 PM Rice TV Mass

5 PM Calvary Life

6 PM Washington Baptist Church

7 PM Faith Community Church

8 PM Barre Congregational Church

9:30 PM Lutheran

10 PM St. Monica’s Mass

11 PM Calvary Life

Monday

Community Bulletin Board 1a

Statehouse Programming 6a,9a,12p

Democracy Now 6p

Barre Act 46 3, 7, 10p

Tuesday

Barre Act 46 6a,9a,12p

Statehouse Programming 3-5pm

Democracy Now 6p

Barre City Council “Live” 7pm

CHARTER COMMUNICATIONS OF BARRE

ALL PROGRAMING SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

CVTV Channel 192 • BARRE, VT

Wednesday

1:00 AM The Artful Word

1:30 AM Hendersons Herb Tinctures

3:00 AM Health Talk

3:30 AM New England Music Awards

5:30 AM The Better Part

6:00 AM The Better Part

6:30 AM CVTSport.net

8:00 AM Poetry Outloud - live broadcast

4:00 PM The Better Part

4:30 PM The Better Part

5:00 PM CVTSport.net

6:32 PM 1st Wednesdays

8:00 PM 30 Minutes with Bill Schmick

8:30 PM Conversations with Kay

9:00 PM Vermont Historical Society

10:00 PM The Artful Word

10:30 PM Hendersons Herb Tinctures

Thursday

2:00 AM The State of Marriage

3:00 AM Yestermorrow Lecture Series

4:00 AM Taste for Life

4:30 AM On the Waterfront

5:00 AM 2015 Cornish Fair

5:30 AM Salaam/Shalom

6:30 AM Yoga To Go

7:30 AM RagFest Concerts

8:30 AM Judge Ben

9:30 AM Ethan Allen Homestead

10:30 AM It’s News to Us

11:30 AM The Y Connection

12:00 PM Vermont Today

1:30 PM The State of Marriage

2:30 PM Yestermorrow Lecture Series

3:30 PM Taste for Life

4:00 PM On the Waterfront

4:30 PM 2015 Cornish Fair

5:00 PM Salaam/Shalom

6:00 PM Yoga To Go

7:00 PM RagFest Concerts

8:00 PM Judge Ben

9:00 PM Ethan Allen Homestead

10:00 PM It’s News to Us

11:00 PM The Y Connection

11:30 PM Vermont Today

Friday

1:00 AM Green Mountain Care Board

2:30 AM Twin St vs Granite St Derby

4:00 AM WRJ Vet Center Grand

Opening

5:00 AM Holiday Fun

5:30 AM Ghost Chronicles

6:30 AM 13 Most Haunted - MA

7:00 AM Understanding PTSD

8:30 AM Hunger Mountain Co-op

11:00 AM Issues of Aging

12:30 PM Green Mountain Care Board

3:00 PM High on the Hog

3:30 PM WRJ Vet Center Grand

Opening

4:30 PM Holiday Fun

5:00 PM Ghost Chronicles

6:00 PM 13 Most Haunted - MA

6:30 PM Understanding PTSD

8:00 PM Hunger Mountain Co-op

10:30 PM Issues of Aging

Saturday

2:30 AM Moose & Bears in NH

4:00 AM Burlington Bookfest Preview

4:30 AM Sustainable Living Series

6:00 AM Floor Hockey

7:00 AM Upper Valley Humane Society

7:30 AM SlowLiving

9:00 AM Montpelier Brown Bag Series

12:00 PM Moose & Bears in NH

1:30 PM Burlington Bookfest Preview

2:00 PM Sustainable Living Series

3:30 PM Floor Hockey

4:30 PM Upper Valley Humane Society

5:00 PM SlowLiving

6:30 PM Montpelier Brown Bag Series

9:30 PM Moose & Bears in NH

11:00 PM Burlington Bookfest Preview

11:30 PM Sustainable Living Series

Sunday

1:30 AM Lego Chat

2:00 AM Community Producers

2:30 AM Talking About Movies

3:00 AM Vaccine Mandates

3:30 AM Ghost Chronicles

4:30 AM Gory Storytime

5:00 AM Green Mountain Vets for

Peace

6:00 AM Holistically Speaking

6:30 AM Mountain Man Adventures

7:00 AM Cuban Bridge

8:31 AM Car Stories

9:00 AM Health Talk

9:30 AM Ethan Allen Homestead

10:30 AM Ragtime - All Tha Jazz

11:30 AM Talking About Movies

12:30 PM Lifelines

1:00 PM For the Animals

1:30 PM Authors at the Aldrich

2:30 PM CVTSport.net

4:02 PM Truck Pull 2015

5:00 PM Cuban Bridge

6:00 PM Conversations with Kay

6:30 PM Vermont Historical Society

7:30 PM It’s News to Us

8:30 PM The Y Connection

9:00 PM Vermont Today

10:30 PM The State of Marriage

11:30 PM Yestermorrow Lecture Series

Monday

2:00 AM Ethan Allen Homestead

3:30 AM Will the Constitution

4:30 AM Lego Chat

5:00 AM Community Producers

Up-to-date schedules for CVTV can also be viewed online at cvtv723.org

“All schedules are subject to

change, please call us

with questions - 479-1075.”

5:30 AM Talking About Movies

6:00 AM City Room with Steven

Pappas

6:30 AM Ghost Chronicles

7:30 AM Gory Storytime

8:00 AM Sidewalks Entertainment

8:30 AM Energy Conservation

10:00 AM Ethan Allen Homestead

11:30 AM Will the Constitution

12:30 PM Lego Chat

1:00 PM Community Producers

1:30 PM Talking About Movies

2:00 PM City Room with Steven

Pappas

2:30 PM Ghost Chronicles

3:30 PM Gory Storytime

4:00 PM Sidewalks Entertainment

4:30 PM Energy Conservation

6:00 PM Ethan Allen Homestead

7:30 PM Will the Constitution

8:30 PM Lego Chat

9:00 PM Community Producers

9:30 PM Talking About Movies

10:00 PM City Room with Steven

Pappas

10:30 PM Ghost Chronicles

11:30 PM Gory Storytime

Tuesday

3:00 AM Ethan Allen Homestead

4:00 AM Ragtime - All Tha Jazz

5:00 AM Talking About Movies

6:00 AM Lifelines

6:30 AM For the Animals

7:00 AM Authors at the Aldrich

8:00 AM Sidewalks Entertainment

8:30 AM Green Mountain Vets for

Peace

9:30 AM Holistically Speaking

10:00 AM Mountain Man Adventures

10:30 AM Cuban Bridge

11:00 AM Hometown Storytellers

12:00 PM Car Stories

12:30 PM Health Talk

1:00 PM Ethan Allen Homestead

2:00 PM Ragtime - All Tha Jazz

3:00 PM Talking About Movies

4:00 PM Lifelines

4:30 PM For the Animals

5:00 PM Authors at the Aldrich

6:00 PM Sidewalks Entertainment

6:30 PM Green Mountain Vets for

Peace

7:30 PM Holistically Speaking

8:00 PM Mountain Man Adventures

8:30 PM Cuban Bridge

9:00 PM Hometown Storytellers

10:00 PM Car Stories

10:30 PM Health Talk

11:00 PM Talking About Movies


Pastel Paintings by Wendy Soliday at Central Vermont Medical Center through November 18

As I Pass By… is a collection of pastel paintings by Wendy

Soliday. Many of these paintings begin as “drive-by “

moments – a flicker of light through the woods, a glimpse of

beauty in the rear view mirror, a temporary reflection on the

water – that beckon and compel Soliday to stop and paint.

“I am always ready to paint. My paints are kept in a small

back pack in my cluttered car along with bug spray, sun

screen, hand warmers, an old smock, and almonds. I’ve been

known to carry this on kayaks, bikes, skis, rafts, and have

even stopped to paint while golfing. (I let people play

through.) I paint until the cow moves, the light changes, I start

to shiver, or, most often – I paint until I’m late. It is easy to

pause and pay attention to the moment when I have my paints

with me. When I paint the world disappears. It is a process of

intense focus and I become somewhat frantic trying to pause

the unpausable. I have many unfinished paintings. There simply

isn’t enough

time to look back and there are so many more stunning

moments beckoning… As I Pass By.”

Soliday’s paintings may feel familiar to those passing

through and living in Central Vermont. They are of the world

she notices and loves.

Wendy Soliday has lived in East Montpelier for almost 35

years with her husband, Greg MacDonald, a recently retired

cardiologist from Central Vermont Medical Center. She was

• • • • • •

Mark Tougias: 3 Day Oil

Painting Workshop

Bryan Memorial Gallery presents artist Mark Tougias, former

Vermont resident now residing in Cambridge, New York, in a three

day intensive oil painting workshop: Creative Thinking for Dynamic

Paintings, Monday – Wednesday, October 16 – 18 from 8:30AM -

3:30PM daily.

This workshop will include a variety of approaches for learning

about painting and the awareness of our thought process. Though the

landscape will be the subject of choice, most of what is explored in the

workshop can be carried over to any subject matter, therefore it is not

essential that the participants be you be landscape painters to benefit

from this workshop.

Over the three days there will be short demonstrations to illustrate

a point, group exercises following the instructor’s lead, lecture, discussion,

question and answer periods and of course time to work on

individual projects. Integrated within the theme, all general aspects of

painting will be covered (i.e. composition, color, light) as the need

arises and time allows.

This workshop will be held indoors, rain or shine. The workshop

is intended to be a time of learning and gaining some new insights.

Fun and laughter are strictly allowed. There is a fee for this workshop

and more information is available at www.bryangallery.org.

Mark Tougias has been painting since childhood, earning his

degree at the University of Massachusetts in Education and Art

History. He has painted full time since 1990. The most important

elements of his work are light, tonality, atmosphere and composition.

He is most interested in the poetic and spiritual qualities of a place

rather than exact renderings of specific locations. Most of Mark’s

inspiration comes from his immediate surroundings in Vermont and

upstate New York as well as from his annual trips abroad.

Mark Tougias has exhibited in over forty galleries and had over

thirty-five one man shows. Among his many awards was the first

presentation of the annual Alden Bryan Medal, given by Bryan

Memorial Gallery in 2007.

Bryan Memorial Gallery is at 180 Main Street, Jeffersonville, VT

05464 / 802-644-5100 / www/bryangallery.org

for many years a school counselor at Berlin Elementary. She

grew up in a family of artists and never considered herself

artistic until she studied drawing in 1997. She became

obsessed, often pausing on her way to and from work for a

“drive-by” sketch. Though she loved her day job her real passion

became painting. When her youngest child left for college

she left Berlin Elementary for the fields – to paint. She

delved into various mediums, studying intensely with wonderful

teachers including those at the Art Students League in

NYC, the Putney Painters, and a vast array of talented artists

throughout the country. She continues to study with Kathy

Becker at Lake George and Jeneanne Lunn in Montpelier,

both teachers who offer wisdom and humor and tough critiques.

Wendy teaches watercolor and pastel locally and with the

Roads Scholar Program which provides multi-generational

adventures for grandparents, parents and children. She is

active in numerous professional organizations including

American Impressionist Society, the Vermont and Connecticut

Pastel Societies and the International Association of Pastel

Societies and has participated in Plein Air Magazine invitationals

and many international and national juried exhibits.

Wendy has exhibited in New York, Boston and Phoenix and

at The Wood Gallery, Mary Bryan Gallery, and Southern

Vermont Arts Center. She is represented by Green Mountain

Fine Art Gallery in Stowe.

THE GALLERY at Central Vermont Medical Center is

located in the lobby of the hospital and is open every day. For

more information on THE GALLERY at CVMC please contact

Maureen O’Connor Aurgess (802-279-6403) or moetown52@comcast.net.

Paintings by Craig Mooney Opens at the Vermont Supreme Court Gallery

This fall and early winter the

Vermont Supreme Court Gallery

will feature a solo exhibition of

landscape paintings by artist Craig

Mooney from October 4 – December

29, 2017. An opening reception as

well as Montpelier Art Walk will be

held Friday, October 6 from 4:00 –

7:00pm. This exhibit provides the

viewer with a welcome escape to

far-off environments. Here you will

travel into the artist’s expansive pastures,

cities, and seascapes that

explode with color and light. Mooney

displays similar techniques and presentation

to early Wolf Kahn and the

murky skies of J.M.W. Turner.

Mooney’s modern compositions are

between realism and abstraction.

This series of work was created

between 2016 and 2017.

“This collection is created mostly

from memory and my imagination, not from direct observation—and

while the subject matter is varied, it all comes from

the same point of departure: the moment captured, the atmospheric

condition, and the endless horizon. Maybe some part

escapism or romanticism, and another part whimsy, these

works evoke feelings of serenity, movement, and mystery. I

try leave the details out of my work, to invite the viewer in, to

fill in the empty spaces with their own narrative. Also important

is that feeling of familiarity and ambiguity.” —Craig

Mooney

Vermont State Curator David

Schutz states, “Craig Mooney’s

sublime landscapes celebrate a

state with visually stunning vistas.

Craig’s ethereal views particularly

enhance Vermont’s natural features

with a beauty that is in the

finest tradition of American landscape

painting. Come enjoy

Vermont!”

About the artist: Craig Mooney

currently lives in Stowe, VT, but

is a New York City native.

Mooney’s Midtown Manhattan

roots in art go back to his youth.

For Mooney, the city was an endless

source of inspiration at an

early age. His father, an amateur

artist, taught him how to work

with oil paint. Through the years

the artist would take academic art

courses; however, he regards this early creative exposure with

his parent as the truest form of training he has ever received.

After a brief career in the film industry, the artist moved out

of New York in the mid-nineties to rural Vermont. The open

and bucolic settings of the countryside allowed Mooney new

sources of inspiration. Since devoting himself full time to art,

his work has been featured in numerous galleries throughout

the U.S. and more recently in solo exhibitions in London,

England, and Milan, Italy.

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October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 23


continued from page 22

JOHNSON- Comedian, Financial Pro Colin Ryan Talks on

Personal Finance at Johnson State College. Ryan, who calls

himself a “comedic financial expert,” will discuss financial literacy.

4:30PM in Bentley Hall 207. His talk, “Manage Your Money,

Reach Your Dream,” is free and open to the public.

MONTPELIER- Food and Immunity with Lisa Masé,

Harmonized Cookery at Hunger Mountain Coop. The food that

we eat directly impacts our weight, energy, mood and immunity.

Learn which foods to incorporate now to promote winter health.

Explore the importance of the enteric nervous system, the gut

microbiome, and strategies to support the body’s natural ability to

maintain vibrant health. $3 members, $5 non-members. 5:00-

6:00pm. For more info,email info@hungermountain.coop.

Central Vermont Economic Development Corporation 40th

Annual Meeting at the at the Capitol Plaza. Registration

4:30PM-5PM. Networking opportunities 5-5:45PM. Cash bar and

hors d’oeuvres. A buffet dinner is scheduled to follow, along with

official business of the organization. The highlight of the evening

will be the community recognition awards. For more info and to

register, call 223-4654.

RANDOLPH- The Chronic Pain Self-management Program

workshop Starts. Gifford Health Care and Vermont Blueprint for

Health are offering Healthier Living Workshop for people who

have been living with chronic pain for more than 3 to 6 months.

Classes will meet once a week from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the

Randolph Senior Center, 6 Hale Street, Randolph Vermont. Free.

to register or for more info call 728-7714.

Wednesday, October18

BARRE- Archives Month Program: 1964: A Watershed Year

in Vermont Political and Cultural History at the Vermont

History Center. 6:30PM. In 1964, the Republican Party lost its

tight-fisted grasp on Vermont politics. Novelist Deborah Luskin

shows how this shift was more complex and more nuanced than

mere politics. Co-sponsored by the Vermont Historic Records

Advisory Board and the Vermont Humanities Council. For more

info, visit vermonthistory.org.

JEFFERSONVILLE- Creative Thinking for Dynamic

Paintings: A Three Day Workshop with Mark Tougias at the

Bryan Memorial Gallery, 180 Main Street. Day 3: 8:30AM –

3:30PM.There is a charge for this workshop and advance registration

is required. Register on line at www.bryangallery.org or call

802-644-5100 for more information.

MONTPELIER - John Lackard Blues Jam at Sweet Melissa’s,

4 Langdon Street, Montpelier VT. 7:30PM. For more info, call

(802) 225-6012.

NORWICH- Mad for Mid-Century Modern: A New

Architectural Style Comes to Norwich Public Library. 7PM.

Sarah Rooker, Director of Norwich Historical Society, will discuss

ongoing research into the mid-century modern architecture.

For more info, visit norwichvthistoricalsociety.org.

WATERBURY- Community Book Discussion: Brown Girl

Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson, as part of The Vermont

Humanities Council Statewide One-Book Community Reading

Program presents Vermont Reads. 7PM in the Waterbury Library’s

SAL room. For more info, call 244-7036.

Thursday, October 19

BARRE- Lisa Danforth, Business Coach, How to Master Your

Time Management Practice. This event is part of the Micro

Business Development Program’s Business Building Blocks

Networking Workshops. It will take place at CAPSTONE

Community Action, 20 Gable Place. For more info, and to register,

visit www.capstonevt.org.

CALAIS- Geof Hewitt Poetry Slam at the Whammy Bar, 41 W.

County Rd. Call 229-4329 for more info.

MONTPELIER- Sense & Sensibility at Lost Nation Theater.

Jane Austen’s classic novel comes to life onstage in an exuberant,

surprising, hilarious and deeply affecting adaptation by Kate

Hamill. $25. 7:30PM. Students & seniors 65+ = $5 discount.

Youth 11 & under, $10. More info at 802-229-0492 or www.lostnationtheater.org.

Reiki: A Tool for Self-Transformation with Hilary Denton at

Hunger Mountain Coop. Explore the Reiki principles and how

they enhance our mind/body connection. Free. 6:00-7:00pm. For

more info,email info@hungermountain.coop.

Friday, October 20

BARRE- Pilobolus at the Barre Opera House. 8PM. The internationally-acclaimed

troupe, known for its creative ways of using

the human body, was named one of the Dance Heritage Coalition’s

“Irreplaceable Dance Treasures. $28-49 - call the box office at

476-8188 or order tickets online at www.barreoperahouse.org.

CALAIS- Kelly Ravin and Halle Toulis at the Whammy Bar, 41

W. County Rd. Call 229-4329 for more info.

MONTPELIER- Sense & Sensibility at Lost Nation Theater.

Jane Austen’s classic novel comes to life onstage in an exuberant,

surprising, hilarious and deeply affecting adaptation by Kate

Hamill. $30. 7:30PM. Students & seniors 65+ = $5 discount.

Youth 11 & under, $10. More info at 802-229-0492 or www.lostnationtheater.org.

U-32 Music Department presents Benefit Concert featuring the

Chad Hollister Band, Francesca Blanchard, Zak Kline, and U32

High School String Orchestra in the U-32 Auditorium, 930

Gallison Hill Rd. Doors open at 6:30PM, music at 7PM. Tickets:

$20/general, $10/student. All Proceeds will benefit families in

Puerto Rico recovering from the devastating aftermath of

Hurricane Maria. Tickets are available by emailing swolf@u32.

org or at Buch Spieler Records.

Saturday, October 21

BARRE- Chicken Pie Supper at the Hedding United Methodist

Church, 140 Washington Street. Servings at 5PM & 6:30PM. $12/

adults, $6/kids. Chicken Pie, Mashed Potatoes w/ Gravy, Coleslaw,

Squash, Beet Relish, Cranberry Sauce, Pickles, Dessert & Coffee.

For Reservations, call 476-8946.

BROOKFIELD- Harvest Dinner at the Brookfield Old Town

Hall. 6PM. Come enjoy an evening of convivial conversation and

delectable dinner with neighbors and friends. Please RSVP to

Betsy Hale: bhale0723@gmail.com or 276-3488. $15/person,

with children under 12 by donation.

CALAIS- Bob Hannan and Friends at the Whammy Bar, 41 W.

County Rd. Call 229-4329 for more info.

CRAFTSBURY- The Zeichner Trio at the Music Box, 147

Creek Road. Celtic and Appalachian Music, Fiddle, banjo, penny

whistle, uilleann pipes. 7:30PM. For more info, visit www.themusicboxvt.org

or call 586-7533. E. MONTPELIER- Rani Arbo

and Greg Ryan at the Old Meeting House, 1620 Center Rd.

Brought to you by OMH Arts Ministry. Rani and Greg provide a

soulful original, traditional, and cover songs on fiddle, guitar &

gourd banjo. 7:00PM. $15.

MONTPELIER- Sense & Sensibility at Lost Nation Theater.

Jane Austen’s classic novel comes to life onstage in an exuberant,

surprising, hilarious and deeply affecting adaptation by Kate

Hamill. $30. 7:30PM. Students & seniors 65+ = $5 discount.

Youth 11 & under, $10. More info at 802-229-0492 or www.lostnationtheater.org.

Gardening in the Off Season, a day-long event at the North

Branch Nature Center. 10AM-4PM. The registration fee includes

lunch, refreshments and materials, is $75 if received by Oct. 13,

$85 after that date. For questions about the event, contact Kitty

Werner at kdwerner@uvm.edu. To learn more about the UVM

Extension Master Gardener program and future Master Gardener

courses, go to www.uvm.edu/mastergardener.

Chicken Pie Supper at the United Methodist church, 40

Washington Street., Barre. Settings at 5PM & 6:30PM. Adults:

$12, Children 5-10: $6. Under 5 free. Chicken pie, mashed potatoes,

gravy, squash, coleslaw, pickles, beet relish, cranberry sauce,

pies, beverages. Call for reservations: 476-8946.

Turkey Pie Dinner & Door Prizes at the Lighthouse Christian

Church, 3 St. Paul St. Seatings at 5PM & 6:30PM. $12/adults, $6/

kids 4-11, under 3, free. Pre-order your tickets by calling 476-

8787. All proceeds go to benefiting church restoration.

NORTHFIELD- Rock Band Night with Scared By Dolls at

Northfield’s American Legion Post 63.7 to 11PM. Open to the

public. (21 & up) $5.00 cover.

WILLIAMSTOWN- Central Vermont Moose Lodge Craft/

Vendor Fair, 110 Business Center Rd. 9AM-3PM. Vendors

include LipSense by Senegence, Scentsy, Jewelscent, LuLaroe,

continued on next page

GO FIGURE

The idea of Go Figure is to arrive at the figure given at

the bottom and right-hand columns of the diagram by

following the arithmetic signs in the order they are given

(that is, from left to right and top to bottom). Use only the

numbers below the diagram to complete its blank

squares and use each of the nine numbers only once.

page 24 The WORLD October 11, 2017

Best described as a number crossword, the task in

Kakuro is to fill all of the empty square, using numbers

1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal lock

equals the number to its left, and the sum of each

vertical block equals the number on its top. No number

may be used in the same block more than

once.


American Made

★★★1/2

There is a frightening force of evil and instability in

the world. This organization doesn’t acknowledge

borders, doesn’t respect democracy, and doesn’t

care about human life. This organization even successfully

influences foreign elections.

If only we had a leader who would stand up to them.

But no such luck. Certain presidents are actually in league

with these bullies.

Of course, the organization I am referring to is Rus…

The CIA.

The CIA isn’t one of those organizations that began

with the best intentions and slowly lost its way (like the

Department of Defense). The CIA has been committing

acts of misguided mischief from the very beginning.

In 1951, the people of Iran elected a nationalist Prime

Minister who refused to play ball with American oil companies.

The CIA decided to ignore democracy and change

history. In 1953, a CIA paid mob (led by a young Ayatollah

Ruhollah Khomeini) overthrew the regime.

The decadent American puppet Shah ruled Iran incompetently

for a generation. Finally, our old friend Khomeini

returned to lead another revolution and establish the

virulently anti-American Islamic Republic. Whoops.

In 1949, the CIA sponsored a coup that brought military

strongman Adib Shishakli to power in Syria.

Our man Shishakli proceeded to alienate his entire

country by dissolving all political parties, closing all opposition

newspapers, and arresting his political enemies.

CIA meddling backfired. In 1953, Shishakli was overthrown

in a Ba’athist military coup. The bloody Ba’athist

regime continues to rule Damascus to this day. Whoops.

Over the years, The CIA has exhibited anything but intelligence.

Having the CIA on your side has meant certain

doom.

If you think I’m anti-CIA, you ain’t seen nothing yet.

The new action film “American Made” is more anti-CIA

than “Schindler’s List” is anti-Nazi.

Tom Cruise stars as Barry Seal. When we meet him,

he’s a hotshot TWA pilot who smuggles Cuban cigars on

the side. The CIA takes notice and decides to use Barry

for his flying and smuggling skills.

“American Made” starts off fun and “Goodfellas”-

esque. Barry is a great pilot who loves adventure. He has a

terrific time zooming down in his zippy little CIA jet and

taking spy photographs of communist military bases. He

didn’t even mind flying down to Panama to make secret

drop-offs to the CIA’s friend Manuel Noriega.

Things get stressful and dangerous for Barry when the

CIA asks him to begin shipping AK-47s to the Contra rebels

in Nicaragua. Meanwhile, the Medellin Drug Cartel

begins using Barry to smuggle cocaine into the US.

“American Made” is a thoroughly entertaining adventure.

And director Doug Liman (“Swingers,” “The Bourne

Identity”) does a splendid job of balancing the crowdpleasing

action with his serious political agenda.

Liman argues that the CIA treats all its allies like pawns

in a global chess game. But the CIA stinks at chess.

The only thing more dangerous than being on the CIA’s

kill list is working for them. Liman shows that drug kingpin

Pablo Escobar was a more loyal employer to Barry

Seal than his CIA handlers.

CIA-defenders will argue that subverting democracy

and betraying its allies are the necessary evils of doing

business. “American Made” argues that subverting democracy

and betraying allies are its only business.

It’s clear that someone should shut down the CIA completely.

But it won’t happen because I don’t think there is

anyone powerful enough to do it.

I am probably unwise to even be writing this article.

If you read my name in the obituaries next week, you’ll

know who killed me. It certainly won’t be the Russians.

Magnabilities, Paparazzi, Creative Creations, Plexus, Tupperware,

Norwex, Athena’s, and Vermont handmade crafts, knitted and

sewn items, plus so much more! For more info, contact Celine

Edson 522-0163 or Cedson1980@gmail.com

Sunday, October22

MONTPELIER- Sense & Sensibility at Lost Nation Theater.

Jane Austen’s classic novel comes to life onstage in an exuberant,

surprising, hilarious and deeply affecting adaptation by Kate

Hamill. $25. 2PM. Students & seniors 65+ = $5 discount. Youth

11 & under, $10. More info at 802-229-0492 or www.lostnationtheater.org.

Appreciative Living Learning Circles at the Center for Arts and

Learning, 46 Barre Street. Here you will learn short and easy

exercises that will change the way you see the world. Discussion

based on Jackie Kelm’s book Appreciative Living: The principles

of Appreciative Inquiry in daily life (provided). 7PM-8:30PM.

Call 223-2518 to register.

NORTHFIELD- Alison Bruce Cerutti Will Perform a Solo

Concert as a Fundraiser for the United Church of Northfield. 3

PM. The program will include works by Bach, Ginastera, and

Chopin; in addition the Moonlight Sonata by Beethoven and a

world premiere of Fleeting Moments, a set of piano pieces by

Brookfield composer Erik Nielsen. All proceeds from this concert

will go to the United Church of Northfield’s Mission Fund.

Suggested donation of $20, all donations gratefully accepted. For

more info, call 485-6924 or email cerutti@trans-video.net.

Monday, October 23

MONTPELIER- Working with Sitting Practice with Robert

Kest, Ph.D at Hunger Mountain Coop. A class to cultivate a deepening

of meditation practice. Free. 6:00-7:30pm. For more

info,email info@hungermountain.coop.

Tuesday, October 24

RANDOLPH- The Chronic Pain Self-management Program

workshop Starts. Gifford Health Care and Vermont Blueprint for

Health are offering a free, six-week Healthier Living Workshop

for people who have been living with chronic pain for more than

3 to 6 months. Classes will meet once a week from 1 p.m. to 3:30

p.m. at the Randolph Senior Center, 6 Hale Street, Randolph

Vermont. Free.To register or for more information call 802-728-

7714.

TUNBRIDGE- Rural Vermont hosts 2017 Annual Meeting &

Celebration at the Tunbridge Town Hall, 227 VT Rte 110.

6PM-9PM. Join friends and neighbors for a potluck supper, board

elections, raffles featuring goodies from Johnny’s Seeds and area

farmers and brewers, plus “Digging In: What’s Next for Rural

Vermont.” This event is family-friendly, free to attend, open to all,

and BYOB. More info and Board candidate bios at www.ruralvermont.org

or (802) 223-7222.

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 25


WORLD SPORTS & OUTDOORS

Fall Fishing Action Heating Up Across Vermont

A recent mix of cool nights and unseasonably warm days

has created optimal conditions for fall fishing, and anglers

throughout Vermont are reporting that the action is beginning

to pick up for both warm and cold-water fish species.

“Summertime conditions seemed to delay the fall bite a

little bit, but cooler nights in the past few weeks have started

to lower water temperatures and jumpstart feeding activity,”

said Chris Adams, information specialist with Vermont Fish

& Wildlife. “I’ve personally experienced tremendous bass

and pike fishing in recent days, and have heard reports that the

trout bite is also heating up on both the streams and lakes.”

With the onset of fall and cooling water temperatures,

many of Vermont’s fish species begin to feed heavily. From

cold water species like trout and salmon, to warm water species

such as largemouth and smallmouth bass, northern pike,

yellow perch and walleye, fish become more active as they

feed to boost their energy reserves to sustain themselves during

the winter.

“Fall truly is an incredible time to be on the water in

Vermont, and anglers who keep their rods and tackle out a

little longer are often rewarded with some of the best fishing

action of the year,” said Adams. “Not only can the fishing be

red-hot, but angling pressure and boat traffic also declines on

Vermont waters, meaning you may have your favorite fishing

spot all to yourself.”

Vermont Fish & Wildlife is reminding anglers of key

upcoming season dates relating to fall fishing:

October 31: Trout & Salmon Season Closes (all waters

except Lake Champlain)

November 1: Trout Catch & Release Angling Opens on

Select Waters

November 30: Bass Season Closes

December 1: Bass Catch & Release Angling Opens on Select

Waters

The department has also compiled a few popular Vermont

fall fishing opportunities, including locations and tactics, that

anglers might consider.

NORTHERN VERMONT

Smallmouth Bass - Northern Lake Champlain – Target

smallmouth on rocky points and shorelines with scattered

vegetation in 2 to 15 feet of water around the areas of North

Scott Massie of Rutland holds two bass he caught and released

while fishing on Lake Champlain last week. Cooling water temperatures

across Vermont are triggering increased fish feeding activity,

bringing some of the best fishing action of the year.

Hero, Alburg, Isle La Motte, West Swanton and St. Albans.

Moving baits such as spinnerbaits, stickbaits and top-water

lures can be very productive, as can finesse presentations such

as drop-shotting plastics or dragging jigs on the bottom.

Brook Trout - Job’s Pond – Job’s Pond is home to some of

the largest brook trout in Vermont and they can be caught by

casting or trolling streamer flies, spoons or spinners in less

than 10 feet of water. Anglers should note the special size and

harvest restrictions for Job’s Pond.

Rainbow and Brown Trout - Passumpsic River – Try targeting

browns and rainbows with spoons, spinners or stickbaits

below any of the seven hydropower dams on the river. Deep,

slow pools can also be productive. The Passumpsic is home to

some true trophies, including stocked trout.

Landlocked Atlantic Salmon - Clyde River – The Clyde

River hosts a fall spawning run of landlocked Atlantic salmon

from Lake Memphremagog. Try fishing from the Clyde Street

bridge upstream to the Great Bay Hydro Station. Streamers or

small nymphs can trick some of the wiser fish in this stretch.

In October, the use of live bait is prohibited and all salmon

must be released.

CENTRAL VERMONT

Smallmouth Bass - Lake Fairlee, Lake Morey, Waterbury

Reservoir, Wrightsville Reservoir– Aggressive, feeding smallmouths

can be caught using spinnerbaits, stickbaits, crankbaits

and top-water plugs. Smallies can also be caught with

finesse presentations such as drop-shotting plastics or dragging

jigs on the bottom.

Brook Trout – The Central Vermont area features countless

tributaries above 1,000 feet in elevation which are home to

healthy populations of vibrantly-colored native brook trout

that can be a blast to pursue and delicious on the table for

those who wish to keep them.

Rainbow Trout - White River – Try fishing with spinners,

flies or bait in deep pools and slow-moving riffles.

Brown Trout - Lake Fairlee, Miller Pond, Peacham Pond and

Nelson Pond – Try fishing for brown trout by slowly trolling

a spoon or spinner 10 to 15 feet below the water’s surface.

SOUTHERN VERMONT

Brook and Brown Trout - Battenkill River and larger tributaries

including West and East Branches, Roaring Branch and

Green River – Due to significant cold groundwater input,

these streams hold up well during the summer and offer great

fishing opportunities for brook and brown trout through the

fall. A range of fly fishing and spin casting tactics can be

effective.

Bass and Panfish - Connecticut River (including setbacks),

Gale Meadows Pond, Lake Raponda, the Plymouth Lakes,

Lowell Lake and Lake Sadawga – A mix of artificial lures and

live bait presentations can trick both bass and panfish

throughout these waterbodies. Grubs, spinners, bottom jigs,

drop-shot rigs and a standard worm and bobber setup can all

be effective. Use smaller offerings for panfish, and experiment

with both smaller and larger selections for bass.

New VCE Study Reveals Population Health of Mountain Songbirds

A 16-year study of mountain forest songbirds across New

York and New England, including thrushes, warblers and

other iconic species, has documented their population changes.

Although species like Black-capped Chickadee and

Swainson’s Thrush have thrived in the mountains during

recent decades, some species that depend on the region’s

evergreen forests of spruce and fir - notably Blackpoll

Warbler - appear to have undergone substantial declines.

The State of Mountain Birds, a new report by the Vermont

Center for Ecostudies (VCE), documents the health of bird

populations using data from a unique citizen-science project

called Mountain Birdwatch (MBW). Trained volunteers have

been monitoring bird populations annually for VCE’s

Mountain Birdwatch project since 2001. Scientists at VCE

used these annual counts to create indicators of population

change for each species, revealing which species are thriving

and which may be in need of additional study and conservation.

The full State of the Mountain Birds report is available

online - www.mountainbirds.vtecostudies.org

“This report offers unique insights into population trends of

species like Bicknell’s Thrush and Blackpoll Warbler and into

the health of the mountain forests on which these birds

depend,” said Dr. John Lloyd, VCE’s Director of Science. “As

we demand more and more from our mountains - as sites to

generate renewable energy, as a source for clean water, and as

places for recreation - this kind of information will prove

increasingly important.”

During the 16 years covered by this report, widespread species

like Black-capped Chickadee and Swainson’s Thrush

showed the most obvious gains. Neither species depends on

mountain forests for habitat, but both now occur in more

places and in greater numbers than they did when Mountain

Birdwatch began. Although still quite uncommon in the

Mountain Birdwatch study area, Fox Sparrow populations

seem to be rising in western Maine and northern New

Hampshire.

Songbirds showing the strongest signals of decline were

• • •

• • •

those found only in the high country, notably Blackpoll

Warbler. Populations of Bicknell’s Thrush, icon of the mountains,

have been largely stable, with some evidence of modest

declines in recent years.

In some cases, population trends in the mountains of the

northeastern U.S. seem to reflect broader trends. Global populations

of Blackpoll Warbler, for example, have declined

substantially in the past several decades, suggesting that

regional declines documented by Mountain Birdwatch may be

related to factors operating throughout the range of the species.

Possible causes include loss of wintering or migration

habitat, or systemic effects of global climate change. In other

cases, population trends were distinct from broader trends.

Swainson’s Thrush has declined in many parts of its range,

but seems to be thriving in the mountains of the northeast. The

reasons for their population growth remain unclear, although

many climate-change models have predicted that species currently

inhabiting low- and mid-elevation forests - like

Swainson’s Thrush and Black-capped Chickadee - will

increase in abundance at higher elevations as they track a

changing climate.

“Keeping mountain ecosystems healthy and productive in

the face of climate change and increased use by humans

requires science-based solutions, and science-based solutions

require the sort of data collected under Mountain Birdwatch,”

noted Lloyd.

But the State of the Mountain Birds report isn’t just about

the science and conservation. It is also a chance to celebrate

the hundreds of citizen-scientists who each year venture out

in the predawn darkness to count birds in the high country

from the Adirondacks of New York to Maine’s Mount

Katahdin, according to VCE’s Kent McFarland, who helped

design the study. “It’s only through the hard work and dedication

of these citizen-scientists that we can gain this peek into

the lives of these amazing birds. Mountain Birdwatch is a

great example of how birders can use their passion for the

natural world to help inform conservation.”

Hunters Urged to Wear Orange

Vermont Fish & Wildlife is reminding hunters to wear

fluorescent hunter orange. “Hunting is one of the safest outdoor

activities, and it’s getting safer thanks to advances in

education as well as science,” said Nicole Meier, Vermont

Fish & Wildlife information and education specialist. “Our

volunteer hunter education instructors stress that wearing

orange during hunting season is important, and studies prove

that wearing fluorescent hunter orange keeps hunters visible

to other people in the woods, but it keeps them relatively

invisible to deer.”

“Every year we should strive to be the safest we can be by

wearing at least a hunter orange hat and vest,” she added.

Meier says hunters moving into the line of fire of other

hunters and mistaking other hunters for game are common

causes of the state’s accidents.

The time that deer are most active, during the dawn and

dusk hours, are times of especially low visibility. You can

improve your chances of being seen by other hunters by wear-

page 26 The WORLD October 11, 2017

ing hunter orange, which can be seen even in low-light situations.

“While it isn’t recommended to wear orange during waterfowl

and turkey seasons, we certainly still recommend hunter

orange when you are going to and from your blind, treestand

or calling spot,” said Meier.

Concerns that deer are scared by hunter orange are

unfounded. A deer’s vision is based on movement, patterns

and color variations. Unlike humans, deer do not have multiple

color receptors in their eyes. They can see color, but their

spectrum is limited. This means deer must rely heavily on

their ability to detect movement over the ability to interpret

color variations and patterns.

Regardless of how well deer see orange, ample anecdotal

evidence suggests they aren’t bothered by it. Remember,

hunting in Vermont is very safe and you can help keep it that

way by choosing hunter orange.

Hunt smart. Hunt safe. Wear orange.

• • •

Unseasonable Heat Reflected

in Vermont Forest Conditions

Vermont’s landscape continues to bask in lingering summerlike

weather, with bright sunshine, effectively no rain, and

well above-average temperatures continuing into October. As

a result, our forests are reflecting these unseasonable conditions,

said Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation

Commissioner Michael Snyder on Wednesday.

The early phase of fall color has passed, but the mid- to

late-season color has yet to emerge in many areas. While there

remain large volumes of green leaves that still could turn

given a few cold nights -- particularly in the Champlain Valley

and Bennington County -- there are locations especially in

northeast Vermont and parts of Orange County, with browning

and premature leaf drop, particularly on dry sites.

Vermont remains hopeful that its typically vibrant fall colors

will emerge in the days ahead, but recent record-setting

heat and ongoing warmth for this point in the year have created

atypical conditions for its forests and foliage.

• • •

Big Game Reporting

Stations in Northwest VT

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife

Department says that after 17

years of business Pauline’s Quick

Stop in Sheldon Springs closed on

August 21 and is no longer available

as a big game reporting station.

The popular country store on

Route 105 has long been a favorite

place for hunters to report their

deer, bear and turkeys and get

them weighed. Last year alone,

they reported over 1,000 big game

animals.

Fish & Wildlife says hunters

can now report big game to any of the eight other reporting

stations listed below:

Back Country Sports – St. Albans

West Enosburg Country Store – Enosburg Falls

Byam’s Quick Stop -- Franklin

Franklin General Store – Franklin

M&R Guns & Ammo – Highgate Center

4 C’s St. Marie’s Market – Swanton

Pop-A-Top Redemption – Richford

Wetherby’s Quick Stop – Richford

Hunters should also keep in mind that during the upcoming

youth weekend for deer, state wildlife biologists will be present

at both 4 C’s St. Marie’s Market and the West Enosburg

Country Store to collect biological information on the deer

herd.

Fish & Wildlife keeps an updated list of big game reporting

stations on their website (www.vtfishandwildlife.com) with a

map showing their locations. Here is a direct link to the map

and list: http://tinyurl.com/hf7dd73


WORLD SPORTS & OUTDOORS

Spaulding’s Jordan Fecher (center, #14 in white) grabs air as he heads the ball during last Monday

night’s game, against Vergennes, in Barre. Spaulding and Vergennes played to a 1-1, overtime tie.

Photo by Bill Croney

• • •

Northfield/Williamstown’s Jacob Tassie (in white) and Jake Vance, of Lamoille race to a loose ball during

last Thursday afternoon’s game, in Northfield. The N/W Boys defeated the Lancers 1-0 to win their

fourth game in a row and improve to 5-4-1. Photo by Bill Croney

• • •

Photo courtesy of Linda Salmon

Maritime Conference Championship

Vermont Ravens - 12 • Southern VT Storm – 15

The Vermont Ravens had a remarkable season

considering how it started. Back on July 15th the

Storm hosted the Ravens in the first regular season

game of 2017 and soundly defeated their Vermont

counterparts 41-13. Head Coach Pete Everett challenged

the team to come back from that defeat and

play up to the level he knew the Ravens were

capable of. And that they did reeling off 5 straight

victories and finishing the regular season with a

6-2 record and the 4th seed in the conference.

Defeating two more opponents in the play-offs

added to their win total and a trip to the

Championship game against the Southern VT

Storm. Fitting match-up as the Ravens defeated

the Storm in their third game of the season at

Norwich University 18-7. So a third game, the rubber

match for the Championship was inevitable, as

fate would have it.

The game came down to a last second heave of

a throw by longtime Raven nemesis game MVP

Storm quarterback #7 Will Cole to another longtime

Raven nemesis receiver #15 Marcus Anderson.

Anderson timed his jump perfectly and made an

outstanding catch falling backwards to the ground

in the end zone holding onto the ball securing the

win for the Storm. This combination of Cole to

Anderson has been outstanding over the years with

many great plays made against the Ravens, and

everyone else for that matter, but of course, none

more important than this one.

Cole, also the kicker and punter for the Storm,

hit a 45 yard field goal to make the score 3-0 Storm

with 8:30 left in the first quarter.

The Ravens would answer when running back

#21 Anthony LaRosa would dive into the end zone

from 1 yard out. The 2-point conversion attempt

by the Ravens was no good as the pass from Raven

quarterback #14 Clayton Torres to fullback/strong

safety #20 Roy Rose was incomplete. The score

was 6-3 Ravens with 3:41 left, first quarter.

During the second quarter Cole missed a 42

yard field goal attempt that kept the score 6-3

Ravens.

The game remained scoreless until 7:50 left in

the third when Torres, rolling right, hit Rose on an

out pattern 5 yards downfield and upon catching

the ball Rose turned it upfield sprinting the remaining

yards into the end zone untouched. The point

after attempt by #81 Sean Lamphere was wide and

the score was 12-3 Ravens. Rose, playing both

ways, also had an interception at the 6:41 mark of

the third quarter, and had 6 tackles, 2 of them

solo.

The fourth quarter was a defensive battle with

both teams coming up with big stops to keep the

score 12-3. That was until the Storm finally were

able to put the ball in the end zone with Cole finding

receiver #11 Mike Waters open over the middle.

The fleet Waters wasted no time beating all

defenders to reach the end zone for a 29-yard

touchdown reception. Raven #4 Jaren Jeffcoat

blocked Coles extra point attempt keeping the

score 12-9 with 2:08 left.

Coles onside kick attempt was covered up by

Lamphere and running back #3 Akeem Williams

securing possession for the Ravens.

The Ravens needed to get a first down to win

the game, but the Storm defense rose to the challenge

and stuffed Vermont’s running game short of

the marker. They took over with time left on the

clock, and as it turns out, enough time to win the

game and the Championship on the last second

heroics of Cole and Anderson.

Torres finished the game 10-13 for 142 yards, 1

touchdown pass and 1 run of 8 yards.

DT #93 Lloyd White had 6 tackles, 2 of them

solo.

The Ravens finished with a 8-3 record while the

Storm ended the season 10-1 and Maritime

Conference champions.

For more information visit www.vermontravens.com

or www.facebook.com/VTRavensfans

U-32’s Max Sabo (right, #7 in white) gains a step on Thetford’s Carter Blain as he heads toward the

Panther goal during last Tuesday afternoon’s game, at U-32. Thetford defeated U32, 2-1, and the Raiders

Boys slipped to 6-2. Photo by Bill Croney

PATRIOTS WIN,

YOU WIN!

87 ¢ MEDIUM HOT

+Appl.

Tax

NOT A MEMBER? Enroll at DDPerks.com

or on the Dunkin' Mobile TM App today.

OR ICED COFFEE

FOR

MEMBERS THE DAY

AFTER THE PATRIOTS WIN.

JUST PAY WITH YOUR ENROLLED DD CARD.

THAT'S LOYALTY.

Barre

479-0629

DRIVE

UP

B-M Road-Berlin

622-0250

DRIVE

UP

Montpelier

223-0928

DRIVE

UP

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 27


Para Educators

Barre City Elementary and Middle School

The Barre City Elementary and Middle School is

seeking Special Education Paraeducators to support

and assist with educational programs, working 1:1

and/or with small groups of students with special

needs. Both full and part time positions available.

For more information you contact Kathy Couture or

Stacy Anderson at BCEMS (802) 476-6541. Please

apply online at bsuvt.org

Permanent & Day

Substitute Teachers

Spaulding High School

Spaulding High School seeks individuals that are

available on an on-call or permanent basis to cover

teacher and paraeducator absences. Our substitutes

must be energetic, friendly, professional and want

to be a part of, and support our positive learning

environments.

For more information contact Linda Papineau-Barre

Supervisory Union (802) 476-5001. Please apply

online at bsuvt.org

Barre Supervisory Union is committed to maintaining a work and

learning environment free from discrimination on the basis of race,

color, religion, national origin, pregnancy, gender identity, sexual

orientation, marital/civil union status, ancestry, place of birth,

age, citizenship status, veteran status, political affiliation, genetic

information or disability, as defined and required by state and federal

laws. Additionally, we prohibit retaliation against individuals who

oppose such discrimination and harassment or who participate in an

equal opportunity investigation.

Sales/Customer Support

Super Thin Saws of Waterbury, VT, manufactures

circular sawblades and similar tooling, primarily for the

woodworking industry. We are seeking highly motivated

individuals to work in our Sales Department. Our

Customer Representatives establish rapport and confidence

with customers.

Responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

• customer interaction and support to ensure customer

needs are met

• interface with manufacturing personnel, purchasing, etc

on material and/or order status

• a certain amount of tech support

• order entry and processing,

• a certain amount of purchasing,

• Inventory management.

• working with Engineering in some tooling design,

• organizing trade show booths

• traveling to tradeshows and customer visits

• handling documentation for international shipping and

customs

Helpful qualifications include:

• customer focused professional experience

• possess proficient oral and written communications

• strong organizational skills and attention to detail

• working knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel

• comfort with working with Customer Relationship

Management software

• knowledge of sawblades and woodworking is helpful

but not necessary

• experience functioning as part of a small team

Job Type: Full-time

EOE

Please email resumes to eduggento@superthinsaws.com

or stop be to fill out an application.

www.cvabe.org

Full–time Position: Teacher/Community Coordinator based in Montpelier

Candidates must have:

Proven capacity for providing basic skills instruction - reading, writing, math,

computer literacy;

Proven capacity for providing instruction to English Language Learners and

preparation for U.S. citizenship;

Experience with developing personalized education plans;

Spirit and capacity for outreach and organizing community involvement to

support student success;

Experience with volunteers;

Familiarity with the service area (Montpelier, East Montpelier, Berlin,

Middlesex, Worcester)

CVABE, a community-based, nonprofit organization has served the residents of Washington,

Orange and Lamoille counties for 50+ years. Hundreds of central Vermonters

enroll annually to improve basic literacy skills, pursue alternative pathways to high

school completion, learn English as another language, and gain skills for work and

college.

Please submit cover letter, resume and three references by October 20 th to:

Executive Director

Central Vermont Adult Basic Education, Inc.

46 Washington Street, Suite 100

Barre, Vermont 05641

info@cvabe.org

page 28 The WORLD October 11, 2017

CLASSIFIEDS

DEADLINE: MONDAY 10:00AM • DISPLAY ADS

THURSDAY AT 5:00PM

802-479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • Fax 802-479-7916

Email: sales@vt-world.com • Web: www.vt-world.com

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

25 DRIVERS TRAINEES

NEEDED NOW! Earn $1000

per week! Paid CDL Training!!

STEVENS TRANSPORT

COVERS ALL COSTS! 1-877-

209-1309 drive4stevens.com

EXPERIENCED CARPEN-

TERS NEEDED for Work in

Central Vermont Area, 4 day

work week year round Call

Josh 249-2292 Must have

own transportation.

FECTEAU HOMES in Montpelier

is looking for a general

construction laborer or carpenter

for various residential

and light commercial construction

projects, Experience

in all facets of construction

desired, including but not limited

to framing, roofi ng, vinyl

siding, interior trim, drywall,

taping and painting. Job duties

will include assembly of

Modular and Manufactured

homes. Valid drivers license a

must. Benefi ts include retirement

plan, health insurance,

paid holidays. Email resume

to Jim@fecteauhomes.com or

mail to PO Box 703, Barre, VT

05641.

IMMEDIATE OPENING at

Off -The-Top

Hair Stylist / Boothrental

Full or Part Time

Reasonable Rate

Plenty of FREE PARKING

ask for Tom 802-479-0855

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

LINE COOK; Apply in person

at 8 South Main Street, Barre.

Excellent pay and work environment.

Experience preferred,

but will train the right

person. Call 802-883-3200 for

more information.

Part time Auto

Parts Driver needed

stop in at your local

NAPA of Barre,

44 South Main Street,

Barre, VT or

Northfield Auto Supply

117 Wall Street,

Northfield, VT

for an application

PART TIME COOK AND PCA,

PCA is every other weekend,

6-2. Cook job; nights and every

other weekend. will train,

please apply Lincoln House

120 Hill Street, Barre, VT.

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

AIRLINE

CAREERS

Get FAA approved maintenance training at campuses

coast to coast. Job placement assistance.

Financial Aid for qualifying students. Military friendly.

Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance

800-481-7894

FAX US!

Now Placing Your

Classified Or Display Ad

Is Even Easier!

Our Fax Number Is

802479-7916

Please Include Contact Person

& Payment Info

VISA, MasterCard & Discover

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

PERSONAL CARE

ASSISTANT

Seeking a woman to work as

a personal care assistant in

Williamstown for a 28 year

old woman who has Cerebral

Palsy. Qualifi ed candidates

will be energetic with a great

sense of humor, have CPR

and fi rst aid certifi cation,

be physically fi t, and have

an excellent driving record.

40 hours a week, Monday-

Friday. Please Call 433-1024

between 5:00 & 8:00 p.m.

for more information and an

interview. Pay is $15.00 per

hour without any benefi ts.

Resume and at least three

references required at interview.

A background check will

also be required.

is seeking

part-time

Tax Preparers

Will train qualified candidates.

Classes starting soon.

For more information contact

Penny @ 479-9100 or

penny.farrell@hrblock.com

TRUCK DRIVER

CDL Class B CDL Drivers —

Burlington, VT Apply online

(www.postalfl eetsvs.com) to

be considered. Class B $19.69

an hr If you value the time at

home paired with predictable

schedule and great benefi ts,

you may be the perfect candidate

for our opening as a

Class B driver. Driver Duties:

Report punctually according

to schedule Abide by USPS

rules and regulations and regulations

Report any incidents

/ damages immediately Driver

Qualifi cations: Valid CDL

Class B license Clean DOT

Pre-Employment Drug Test

Must be able to drive a manual

transmission Must be able to

push mail carts on / off the truck

Must have verifi able job history

Must be at least 23 years

old No serious of disqualifying

traffi c violations (past 3 years)

No felonies, misdemeanors or

DUI’S (past 7 years), Contact

904-559-1922 or Email; nita@

postalfl eetsvs.com

OPEN POSITIONS

At Vermont Creamery, we pride ourselves in producing the highest

quality cheeses, butter and crème fraiche while supporting and

developing family farms. We aim to exemplify sustainability by being

profitable, engaging our staff in the business, and living our mission

every day at the Creamery. Vermont Creamery is hiring for the

following positions:

PRODUCTION TEAM MEMBERS

fIRST AND SECOND ShIfT

Good starting wage based on experience. Benefit package includes

medical, dental, vision, and life insurance, a generous retirement plan,

vacations/paid holidays, training program and cheese privileges.

To apply, please call 802-479-9371 or stop by for an application at:

Vermont Creamery, 20 Pitman Road, Websterville, VT 05678 EOE

JOB

OPPORTUNITIES

TRUCK DRIVERS — Class A

Class A CDL Driver — Scarborough,

ME Apply online (www.

postalfl eetsvs.com) to be considered.

Postal Fleet Services,

Inc is seeking safe, punctual,

and courteous class A drivers

who value the security of our

postal contracts. With Postal

Fleet you can rest easy knowing

you’re working for a highly

dependable company, with a

great reputation. You’ll have

a set schedule (home daily),

medical / dental / vision insurance

offered, 401-K Plan,

and paid holidays. Here at

Postal Fleet we take pride in

the condition of our trucks. We

are dedicated to maintaining

a clean and safe fl eet. With

that said, all our trucks are

equipped with top of the line

safety equipment. If you value

the time at home paired with

a predictable schedule and

great benefi ts, you may be

the perfect candidate for our

opening as a Class A driver.

Driver Duties: Report punctually

according to schedule

Abide by USPS rules and regulations

Report any incidents

/ damages immediately Driver

Qualifi cations: Valid CDL

Class A license Clean DOT

Pre-Employment Drug Test

Have a reliable vehicle to use

to / from assignments Must be

able to drive a manual transmission

Must be able to push

mail carts on / off the truck Minimum

of 2 year tractor trailer

driving experience Must have

verifi ed job history Must be at

least 23 years old Punctual No

serious of disqualifying traffi c

violations (past 3 years) No

felonies, misdemeanors or

DUI’S (past 7 years) Must be

able to drive a manual speed

transmission.

Contact 904-559-1922, or

email;

nita@postalfl eetsvs.com

WORK AT HOME AND EARN

BIG BUCKS!

Earn up to $1,000 a week

at your leisure in your own

home? The probability of gaining

big profi ts from this and

many similar at home jobs is

slim. Promoters of these jobs

usually require a fee to teach

you useless, and unprofi table

trades, or to provide you with

futile information. TIP: If a

work-at-home program is legitimate,

your sponsor should

tell you, for free and in writing,

what is involved. If you question

a program’s legitimacy,

call the ATTORNEY GEN-

ERAL’S CONSUMER ASSIS-

TANCE PROGRAM at 1-800-

649-2424.

continued on next page

INTERESTED

IN CDL?

Classes

ongoing in Barre

Information:

476-4679

461-8089

Visit Our Website:

www.cdlschoolinvt.com


CHILDCARE

BARRE CITY Childcare. 16

years experience. 2 slots

available. 802-476-3565.

BUSINESS

OPPORTUNITIES

LOOKING TO EARN A MIL-

LION$? Watch out for business

opportunities that make

outrageous claims about

potential earnings. Don’t

get fooled into get rich quick

scams. There are legitimate

business opportunities, but

be cautious of any business

that can’t refl ect in writing

the typical earnings of previous

employees. TIP: Investigate

earning potential claims

of businesses by requesting

written information from them

before you send any money,

or by calling the ATTORNEY’S

GENERAL CONSUMER AS-

SISTANCE PROGRAM, at

1-800-649-2424.

CLASSES &

WORKSHOPS

AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAIN-

ING — Get FAA certifi cation to

work for airlines. Financial Aid

if qualifi ed. Job placement assistance.

Housing assistance.

Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance

888-686-1704

AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAIN-

ING — Get FAA certifi cation.

Approved for military benefi ts.

Financial Aid if qualifi ed. Job

placement assistance. Call

Aviation Institute of Maintenance

866-453-6204

PERSONALS

MAKE A CONNECTION. Real

People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles

right now! Call LiveLinks.

Try it FREE. Call NOW 1-877-

737-9447 18+.

MAKE A CONNECTION. Real

People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles

right now! Call LiveLinks.

Try it FREE. Call NOW 1-888-

909-9905 18+.

FREE ITEMS

$ A1-CASH PAID

UP TO $300+

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

FOR INFO, 802-522-4279.

FREE “BEWARE OF THE

VERMONT LAND TRUST”

Bumper Stickers, Call

802-454-8561

HEALTH CARE

GOT KNEE PAIN? BACK

PAIN? SHOULDER PAIN? Get

a pain-relieving brace at little

or NO cost to you. Medicare

Patients, Call Health Hotline

Now! 1-800-279-6038

LUNG CANCER? And 60

years old? If so, you and your

family may be entitled to a signifi

cant cash award. Call 800-

364-0517 to learn more. No

risk. No money out of pocket.

HEALTH CARE

LOOKING FOR A MIRACLE /

Lose 20 pounds in one week?

This is almost impossible!

Weight loss ads must refl ect

the typical experiences of the

diet users. Beware of programs

that claim you can lose

weight effortlessly. TIP: Clues

to fraudulent ads include

words like: “breakthrough,”

“effortless,” and “new discovery.”

When you see words like

these be skeptical. Before you

invest your time and money

call the ATTORNEY GEN-

ERAL’S CONSUMER ASSIS-

TANCE PROGRAM, at 1-800-

649-2424.

Prescription medications for

up to 85% off retail prices!

STOP paying so much! $15

Off for First Time Customers.

FREE Shipping. Price Match

Guarantee. CALL for FREE

Quote: 1-877-627-7239 or visits

MailMedsplus.net / discount

WANT A CURE-ALL?

Health fraud is a business

that sells false hope. Beware

of unsubstantiated claims for

health products and services.

There are no “Quick Cures”

— no matter what the ad is

claiming. TIP: DO NOT rely

on promises of a “money back

guarantee!” Watch out for key

words such as “exclusive secret,”

“amazing results,” or

“scientifi c breakthrough.” For

more information on health related

products or services, call

the ATTORNEY GENERAL’S

CONSUMER ASSISTANCE

PROGRAM at 1-800-649-

2424, or consult a health care

provider.

WANTED

$$$CASH$$$

PAID FOR

OLD NON-POWER

WOOD WORKING

TOOLS; PLANES,

AXES, CHISELS,

MACHINIST TOOLS,

RULES, 802-579-5891

ALUMINUM FUEL SADDLE

TANK NEEDED. 100 Gallon

or Larger Round Tank Off of A

Truck. Will Take One or More

Tanks. 802-883-9305

OLD LICENSE PLATES

WANTED. Pre 1920 by Serious

Collector. Cash buyer.

Conrad Hughson

Box 1, Putney, VT 05346

chughson@svcable.net

802-387-4498

WANTS TO purchase minerals

and other oil and gas interests.

Send details to: PO Box

13557, Denver, CO 80201

ANTIQUES/

COLLECTIBLES/

RESTORATION

BUYING ANTIQUES

Furniture and Smalls.

G.S. Antiques

802-461-3004

PICKER PARADISE

We Buy — Sell -

Trade- Estate Sales

Call For appointment

802-461-6441

DIRECTOR

NORTHFIELD SENIOR CENTER

Person with excellent management skills and

business knowledge needed for 25 hour per week

position at an active, caring senior community

center in Northfield. The director will be responsible

for providing nutritional, recreational, educational,

and social services for older residents of the

Center’s service area. Financial management,

record keeping skills, and grant writing are an

essential part of the job. Fund raising for non-profits

and volunteer recruitment and management is

desired. QuickBooks, Excel and Word is needed.

Send resume, letter of introduction and references

by November 1, 2015 to:

Board of Directors

c/o Thelma Baroffio

587 N. Main Street

Northfield, VT 05663

CLASSIFIEDS

ANTIQUES/

COLLECTIBLES/

RESTORATION

TWO ANTIQUE WALL Oak

Hand Crank Telephone, the

bells ring, $450.00 obo. 802-

505-6682

MISCELLANEOUS

“GREEN MOUNTAIN

BARGAIN SHOP”

802-461-7828

We Buy-Sell-Barter

“Lets Make a Deal”

Williamstown VT

$ A1-CASH PAID

UP TO $300+

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

802-522-4279.

A PLACE FOR MOM. The

nation’s largest senior living

referral service. Contact our

trusted, local experts today!

Our service is FREE / no obligation.

CALL 1-844-722-7993

A PLACE FOR MOM. The

nation’s largest senior living

referral service. Contact our

trusted, local experts today!

Our service is FREE / no obligation.

CALL 1-800-417-0524

ADVERTISE to 10 Million

Homes across the USA! Place

your ad in over 140 community

newspapers, with circulation

totaling over 10 million

homes. Contact Independent

Free Papers of America IFPA

at danielleburnett-ifpa@live.

com or visit our website cadnetads.com

for more information.

MISCELLANEOUS

BABY CRIB, White convertible

w/mattress $29. Two Flat

Screen TV’s 19” W/CD PLAY-

ER & 26” $95 & $100 (NICE)

OBO 802-622-0622

BATHE SAFELY and stay in

the home you love with the

#1 selling walk-in tub in North

America. For an in-home appointment,

call: 888-308-5610

Become a published author!

Publications sold at all major

secular & specialty Christian

bookstores. CALL Christian

Faith Publishing for your

FREE author submission kit.

1-855-548-5379

Dish Network-Satellite Television

Services. Now Over 190

channels for ONLY $49.99 /

mo! HBO-FREE for one year,

FREE installation, FREE

Streaming, FREE HD. Add

Internet for $14.95 a month.

1-800-718-1593

FUNERALS CAN BE VERY

EXPENSIVE. Can your loved

ones afford it? Protect them

with Final Expense Insurance.

Call today to learn more. 800-

758-0417

GOT DEER

35 PLUS YEARS

CUT AND WRAP

$85 per DEER

802-522-3864

HARDWOOD KINDLING,

Meshbags $8.00 / ea. Free

delivery to Seniors. 802-279-

2595

continued on next page

Vermont Association for

the Blind and Visually

Impaired

DriVer neeDeD

Driver needed to work with a visually

impaired employee with a guide dog

in our Berlin office four days per week.

Must have reliable vehicle, clean driving

record and flexible schedule.

Hourly rate plus mileage.

Please call Cathie Peller at 802-505-4006

for an application or e-mail resume to

cpeller@vabvi.org.

EOE

www.WalkerVT.com

Barre-Montpelier, VT

CARREER OPPORTUNITY:

Sales Consultant

Walker Mazda/Volkswagen seeking a Sales Consultant to become

an integral part of our team! You be would assisting customers

throughout the entire sales process, and maintaining a professional

relationship for years after. We are looking for an individual who is

looking for a career, not just a job, and an individual who truly enjoys

customer service.

Walker Mazda/Volkswagen has been servicing Vermonters

automotive needs for over 65 years and is a well-known, well

established new car dealership, with a great reputation. You would

enjoy a newly renovated, state of the art facility and be joining a team

of true professionals who works together, making sure each and

every customer has a truly exceptional experience.

You may currently be a top performer in the automotive industry, but

unhappy with the opportunities where you are. Come in and talk to

the team at Walker Mazda/Volkswagen.

We offer a full range of benefits including:

• Health Insurance • 401K

• Dental Insurance • Paid Vacations

• Disability Insurance • Paid Holidays

• Life Insurance

• Strong Earning Potential

Your call/interview will be held in the strictest confidence.

For an interview please contact

Jon Cassel at 802-223-3434 or email jcassel@walkervt.com.

E.O.E

NOW HIRING

SEASONAL DELIVERY DRIVERS

$1000 SIGN ON BONUS!

Full Time, Part Time, Long & Short Term Seasonal

- Competitive Pay & Bonuses

- Great Benefits (Heath & Dental)

- CDL B w/Hazmat & Tanker Preferred

Apply at the office or call:

IRVING ENERGY

24 SMITH ST

BARRE, VT

603-724-5818

www.irvingenergy.com

Home Heating Oil, Diesel Fuel and Propane

DONOR SERVICES ASSISTANT – TEMPORARY

– PART-TIME – Based in Barre, Vermont – Be

part of a fun and energetic team in a busy

office-setting. You can gain experience in the

nonprofit sector and contribute to the worthy

cause of ensuring that no one in Vermont

goes hungry. Daily responsibilities include

data entry; helping with mailings; and other

administrative and customer service duties.

The perfect candidate has a high level of

attention to detail and is very comfortable

with technology.

For more information, visit

https://www.vtfoodbank.org/employment

Please submit application on-line; be sure to include a cover

letter & resume Attention: Human Resources Department,

Francine Chittenden. The Vermont Foodbank is an EEO.

www.WalkerVT.com

Barre-Montpelier, VT

CARREER OPPORTUNITY:

Automotive Technician

Walker Mazda/Volkswagen seeking an Automotive Technician to become

an integral part of our team! We want an individual looking for a career

with a growing organization. You may currently be a top producer in the

automobile industry, but unhappy with the opportunities where you are.

Come in and talk with the team at Walker Mazda/Volkswagen.

Walker Mazda/Volkswagen has been servicing Vermonters automotive

needs for over 65 years and is a well-known, well established new car

dealership, with a great reputation. You would enjoy a newly renovated,

state of the art facility and be joining a team of true professionals who

works together, making sure each and every customer has a truly

exceptional experience.

Qualifications:

• Previous experience as an automotive technician,

mechanic, or other related fields

• Knowledge of diagnostic and repair equipment

• Strong mechanical aptitude and troubleshooting skills

• Deadline and detail-oriented

• Valid Driver’s License, with good driving history

We offer a full range of benefits including:

• Health Insurance

• 401K

• Dental Insurance

• Paid Vacations

• Disability Insurance • Paid Holidays

• Life Insurance

• Strong Earning Potential

Your call/interview will be held in the strictest confidence.

For an interview please contact

Dennis Routhier at 802-223-3434

or email drouthier@walkervt.com.

E.O.E

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 29


STOP

NEVER GIVE YOUR:

•SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

•CREDIT CARD NUMBER

•BANK ACCOUNT NUMBER

Or any other

personal information

To someone you don’t know

when answering an advertisement.

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL TOMORROW

WHAT YOU CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753 ~ Central Vermont’s Newspaper

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, VT 05641

35 ¢

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CLASSIFIEDS

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Capitalizing more than the first 2 words, etc. 70¢/WORD

DEADLINE: For The WORLD is MONDAY by 10:00

AM

CANCELLATIONS: A classified ad cancelled before 10:00 AM

on Monday will receive credit for the remaining paid weeks.

The WORLD asks that you check your ad on its first publication. If you find an error

please notify us immediately so that corrections can be made. The WORLD will not be

responsible for more than one incorrect publication of the ad.

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THE COST OF YOUR AD IN THE WORLD

Each separate word, each phone number counts as one word

Number of words ____________ times 35¢($3.50 min.) _________________ (cost for one week)

times number of weeks __________ ■ 4 for 3 Special

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING FORM

403 U.S. RT. 302 - BERLIN • BARRE, VT 05641-2274

479-2582 • 1-800-639-9753 • FAX 479-7916

TOTAL COST __________________

$ ■ FULL PAYMENT MUST ACCOMPANY THIS FORM ■ ✔

■ MasterCard

■ Visa

Credit Card

Number ____________________________________________________ ■ Discover

CVC#______

Signature __________________________________________Exp. Date ___________________

Use your VISA/MC/DISCOVER

and call 479-2582 or

1-800-639-9753

CHECK HEADING:

■ Animals-Farm ......................500

■ Animals-Pet .........................430

■ Antiques/Restorations .........144

■ Baby/Children Items ............140

■ Bicycles ...............................220

■ Boating/Fishing ...................210

■ Building Materials ................300

■ Business Items ....................080

■ Business Opportunities .......060

■ Camping ..............................205

■ Childcare Service ................030

■ Christmas Trees ..................370

■ Class & Workshops .............103

■ Clothing & Accessories .......130

■ Computers/Electronics ........100

■ Farm/Garden/Lawn .............410

■ Free Ads ..............................108

■ Furniture ..............................180

■ Garage Sales/Flea Mkt. ......145

■ Health ..................................113

■ Home Appliances ................160

■ Hunting/Guns/Archery .........305

■ Insurance/Investments ........090

■ Job Opportunities ................020

■ Lost and Found ...................110

■ Miscellaneous .....................150

■ Musical ................................200

■ Personals ............................105

■ Professional Services .........540

■ Rideshare ............................125

■ Snow Removal Equip. .........355

■ Snowmobiles/Access. .........360

■ Sporting Equipment ............250

■ Storage................................235

■ Support Groups ..................107

■ Tools ....................................330

■ Wanted ................................120

■ Wood/Heating Equip. ...........350

■ Work Wanted .......................040

AUTOMOTIVE

■ Campers/Motor Homes .......845

■ Cars & Accessories ............875

■ Motorcycles/ATV’s ...............850

■ Trucks/Vans/Jeeps Access. . 870

■ Vintage/Classic Vehicles .....873

■ Work Vehicles/Heavy Equip. ....855

REAL ESTATE

■ Apts./House for Rent ...........630

■ Camps for Sale ...................650

■ Comm. Rentals/Sales .........605

■ Condominiums ....................680

■ Apt. Blds. for Sale ................685

■ Homes .................................690

■ Land for Sale .......................670

■ Mobile Homes .....................600

■ Vacation Rentals/Sales .......645

■ Wanted to Rent/Buy ............610

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SUPPORT our service members,

veterans and their families

in their time of need. For

more information visit the

Fisher House website at www.

fi sherhouse.org

VISTA FLAME 170 Pellet

Stove in good working order,

$500. ELDERLY MURRAY

SnowBlower, Powerful, stills

works, $200. 802-223-4101

WE CAN remove bankruptcies,

judgments, liens, and

bad loans from your credit fi le

forever! The Federal Trade

Commission says companies

that promise to scrub your

credit report of accurate negative

information for a fee are

lying. Under FEDERAL law,

accurate negative information

can be reported for up to

seven years, and some bankruptcies

for up to 10 years.

Learn about managing credit

and debt at ftc.gov / credit. A

message from The World and

the FTC.

continued on next page

Before Bobbleheads, There Were

‘Nodders’

Two types of collectors bid for a porcelain figure of a

well-dressed French couple that was sold at a Southern auction

in 2016. A 14-inch-high Asian sorcerer and his companion

wearing brightly decorated clothes were “nodders.”

The heads moved and looked as if they were nodding “yes”

when the figures were moved. Nodders were first made in

China in the late 1600s, often showing a smiling, agreeable

Buddha. By Victorian times in England, toys were made

with nodding heads, as well as decorative porcelain figures

of all kinds that could nod “yes” or “no” or even have hands

playing a piano.

Because of the nodders’ entertainment as well as decorative

value, they were collected in the 1900s. Many new and

fake nodders appeared on the market. The second group of

bidders probably collected porcelains by Jacob Petit’s company,

a French firm that made many decorative porcelains

from the early 1800s to 1862. The successful bid for the

nodder was $562.

***

Q: Two years ago, I bought an American Federal onedrawer

stand that was made in about 1815. The description

said the drawer has “rare Vaseline glass pulls that appear to

be original.” I had no idea what Vaseline glass was, so I

looked up the information on the internet. I’m concerned

that the glass color is due to radiation emission, and I wonder

about its safety. One of the pulls has a crack. Does this

increase radiation emission? I have grandchildren who visit

frequently and have relegated this piece of furniture to a

little-used room. I’m considering selling this stand.

A: You can test the knobs on your stand to see if they are

Vaseline glass by holding one under a black light. Vaseline

glass will glow a neon greenish-yellow color because it

contains a small amount of uranium dioxide. You don’t

have to worry, though, because they are not exposing you

or your grandchildren to harmful amounts of radiation.

Even though the knobs may contain very small amounts of

uranium, it is less than what you get from the atmosphere

and things that occur naturally every day. It is safe to use

your stand. Radiation won’t leak out of a crack in the

glass.

***

Tip: Wear cotton gloves when cleaning any type of metal.

Oils in the skin will leave a mark.

The 50th Anniversary edition of “Kovels’ Antiques &

Collectibles Price Guide 2018” has just been published.

Along with Terry Kovel’s reflections on 50 years of collecting,

the book features 20,000 listings and more than 2,500

full-color photographs, plus trends, special events and

surprises. Check out KovelsOnlineStore.com for the new

price guide and other resources.

(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.


FURNITURE

COPPER PEBBLE, Wendall

Queen size metal Bed, like

new, $300. Chest Of Drawers;

40. 5”Wx18. 5”Dx30”H, 3drawers,

set back 2drawers, $75

obo. 802-426-3113(pic’s available).

LARGE BLACK Leather Sofa,

New condition, Must move

yourself, $400. 802-223-2062

MUSICAL

MICHAEL RICCIARELLI,

Fretted Instrument Repair.

802-229-0952 or

802-272-1875 www.northbranchinstruments.com

STORAGE

BIG ROCK PROPERTIES

Self storage units available,

5x10, 10x10, 10x20. Rte 113

Chelsea. 802-249-2368.

www.bigrockselfstorage.com

CAR, BOAT, BIKE STOR-

AGE.

October-May $275.

Bikes $175.00

.802-485-7500

HEATED STORAGE Cars and

motorcycles October 15-May.

Call now to reserve. Williamstown,

Mark 802-461-7689

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

GARFIELD

~ 3 Years Old ~

Garfield has had quite the life in his 3

years! He has been an indoor/outdoor

feline, who as experience living with other

felines and humans of all ages. Garfield

did not have necessary vet care in the

past, resulting in some vision loss and

pupil dilation due to previous damage to

his optic nerves. He may have sustained

some trauma, or had a bout of optic

neuritis (inflammation of nerves) which

damaged his nerves irreparably. There is

no cure for this condition once the nerves

have degenerated.

STORAGE

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

FOR LEASE OR SALE...

STORAGE

CONTAINERS

DELIVERED TO YOUR SITE

PLENTY OF STORAGE TRAILERS

& CONTAINERS AVAILABLE

Call For Prices

1-877-204-3054

L E A S

I N G

Exit 3

off I-89

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Royalton, VT

1-877-204-3054 • (802) 763-7876

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

HUNTING/GUNS/

ARCHERY

GOT DEER

35 PLUS YEARS

CUT AND WRAP

$85 per DEER

802-522-3864

CLASSIFIEDS

NEW AND used guns, muzzle

loaders, accessories. Snowsville

Store, E.Braintree 802-

728-5252

TOOLS/

MACHINERY

GENERAC GENERATOR

6500 Series, 13HP engine,

20 original hours, $1200. 802-

223-4757

OLD BLACK SMITH ANVIL

asking $350.00. 802-505-

6682

Tool Warehouse Outlet, Inc.

Rt. 302 • Barre-Montpelier

Central Vermont's Best

Selection Of Quality Tools

Discount Prices!

- Limited Tool Rentals -

802-479-3363 800-462-7656

TOOLS REPAIRED

Very fast turn around time.

Tool Warehouse Outlet, Barre-

Montpelier Rd.

802-479-3363,

1-800-462-7656

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

BEWARE OF The Vermont

Land Trust. You shake hands

with them be sure to count

your fi ngers when you are

done. 802-454-8561.

DAVE’S LOGGING &

FIREWOOD

Green & Seasoned

802-454-1062

DON’T NEED a Full Cord

1/3 Cord Seasoned to Dry

16” Delivered $110.00

802-454-8561

DRY FIREWOOD

16” Split, You Pick Up,

$260 / cord. 802-223-4757

FIREWOOD for SALE; cut to

length, split and delivered in

Montpelier and Barre. Green

$215 / cord, Seasoned $300 /

cord, all Hardwood. 802-485-

8525

GREEN FIREWOOD

Split & Delivered

$225 / cord

Kirk Thompson

802-456-7421

Beyond Microchipping

DEAR PAW’S CORNER: I’m

fine with microchipping my pets.

I have a 2-year-old collie mix,

“Bard,” and a 5-year-old cat,

“Millie,” and both are chipped.

But I worry that if they get out of

the house and get lost, I’ll have to

rely on strangers getting them to a

veterinarian or shelter to have

their chip scanned. I’d like to take finding my pets into my

own hands.

-- Carl G., Madison, Wisconsin

DEAR CARL: With the rise of the smartphone and an

increase in small, wearable technology, you can take a

more active role in finding your pets. A microchip is an

important component because unlike a collar, it won’t fall

off, making it the best backup if your pet is lost.

However, advanced pet technology is out there, and a

huge number of pet owners are taking advantage of it. The

Los Angeles Times reported that 43 percent of dog owners

now own an electronic tracking device, based on an APPA

survey.

Tracking collars like the LinkAPC sync with a smartphone

app that reports your dog’s location on demand. It

includes a fitness tracker. That collar will run you almost

$150, but there are budget trackers like the TrackR Bravo,

a small device which costs just under $30 and attaches to

your dog’s collar.

Pet owner networking apps also are popular, allowing

neighbors and friends to connect with each other through

their pets. They can serve as places to ask for help in finding

a lost pet, essentially sending out an APB to other owners

and thereby reaching much farther than just posting

“lost pet” fliers around the neighborhood.

Adding any of these products or apps can give you

greater control over locating your pets should they get

out.

Send your questions, comments and tips to ask@pawscorner.com.

(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

GARAGE SALES FLEA MARKETS RUMMAGES

ANTIQUES MARKET

Sunday October 22

Antiques Market 1st of the

season coming up on Sunday,

October 22.

The Canadian Club

414 East Montpelier Rd

(Rt 14) Barre. 8am-1pm

Call Don Willis Antiques

if you’d like to set up or for

more information.

802-751-6138

www.montpelierantiques

market.com

Facebook-Montpelier Antiques

Market

BARRE MASSIVE SALE

Thursday 12-5

Friday Saturday 9-4

Everything Must GO!

Evening the Clothes Rack,

Furniture & Tent!!

Priced to Sell

28 Knoll Drive

Tent in Backyard.

1589 VT Rte 14S • East Montpelier • 476-3811

centralvermonthumane.org

Tues.-Fri. 1pm-5pm,

Sat. 10am-4pm

DOWNLOAD OUR APP!

World Publications

FREE

★★★★★

HUGE GARAGE SALE

Old / New / In between,

Friday & Saturday

8-3

314 Hill street

Barre Vt

MARSHFIELD Oct 14 Raindate

Oct 15, Antiques, collectiblies,

hunting, fi shing

and camping items. 8-2pm.

301 Peacham Pond Rd,.

LARGE MOVING SALE

OCT 13, 14, 15

9-3

ALL categories of household

items, tools, fabric for quilting

and upholstery, items

for crafts, larger size adult

outer wear, furniture, few

antiques, dog supplies, and

much more. 533 Cummings

Rd, Barre Town, VT.

USE # 527 for GPS and Follow

Long Driveway to the

end.

HUNTING/GUNS/

ARCHERY

TABLES

AVAILABLE

for Canadian Club

Sun., Nov. 5, 2017

Contact

Gloria Marceau

433-5589

gmarceau61@yahoo.com

YARD SALE

SAT, OCT 14

9 TO 4

7 Wilson St

So. Barre

Puzzles, glassware, kitchen

appliances, clothes, exercise

equipment, books -audio,

paper-hardback, kitchen,

table & 4chairs, beanie

babies

and more.

FOR THE MOST CURRENT CLASSIFIED ADS,

VISIT OUR WEB PAGE:

www.vt-world.com

WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

LOG SPLITTERS

4 RENT

All Sizes,

Reasonable Rates,

Pearl Street Motors.

802-223-3336

PELLETIER’S PELLETS

Will be open on Saturdays

for your pellet needs. 8-noon.

East Barre (back of car

wash). 802-249-7857

QUALITY FIREWOOD, Cut /

Split and Delivered.

802-279-2155

STUMPS STUMPS STUMPS

We Grind All Stumps for reasonable

prices, Call Randy

Pickel Tree Service at

802-479-3403/802-249-7164

continued on next page

Classified

Deadline Is

Monday

Before 10AM

SAFES

6 Sizes ~ 29 to 65 Guns

Green Mountain Boyz Logo

1 Hour Fire Rated

All Models On Display

In The Safe Barn At:

Rt. 12, E. Braintree

802-728-5252

HO M E DELIVERY AVAILABLE

DON’T PUT OFF

‘TIL TOMORROW

WHAT YOU CAN

SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free

1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin

Barre, Vermont 05641









Cedar T&G, Cedar Clapboards


Other:



Solar Welder/Generator, 3500



DeWalt, Delta & Skil Radial







Roof Window Millwork and


































800-634-7653

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 31


WOOD/HEATING

EQUIP.

USED FURNACE Airco

80000 BTU forced hot air oil

furnace Beckett Burner

cleaned and serviced every

year, some duct work, needs

to be reassembled $300.

802-244-5564

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

ALUMINUM FUEL SADDLE

TANK NEEDED. 100 Gallon

or Larger Round Tank Off of A

Truck. Will Take One or More

Tanks. 802-883-9305

BRUSH-HOGGING BY

BRIAN

Central Vermont area.

No fi eld is to small or to

large. Call for a quote.

802-839-6527.

FOOD GRADE Barrels totes,

We have over 700 in stock

from 2 1/2Gal — 275 Gal

totes. Call for Info; Bicknell

Barrels The Barrel Man. 802-

439-5149/802-439-5519.

LARGE CRAFTSMEN

WOOD SPLITTER,

27Tons, 5yrs old, really good

condition, $1200.00.

802-223-4757

FARM/GARDEN/

LAWN

STUMPS STUMPS STUMPS

We Grind All Stumps for reasonable

prices, Call Randy

Pickel Tree Service

802-479-3403/802-249-7164

TIRED OF BARK MULCH?

COLORED STONE ROCKS!

New landscape stone in

stock, 1” winter white marble

chips 3/4” Pink granite chips.

landscapestonesofvermont.

co Black Rock Coal,

East Montpelier, VT.

802-223-4385

1-800-639-3197.

TWO ROW corn head for

New Holland chopper. Model

824. Good condition. $1,100.

802-728-9434.

ANIMALS/PETS

Country

Pampered

Paws

Pet Grooming &

Boarding

East Montpelier

802-229-0114

Radiant Heated Floors For Winter,

Air Conditioning In Summer

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

5” Residential & 6” Commercial Free Estimates / Fully Insured

Custom Gutters

Available in colors to match

Made from the heaviest weight

aluminum .032 gauge

We offer a 20-Year warranty on

materials and 5-Year workmanship

guarantee

All Seamless Copper & Aluminum Plus Half-Round Classics

Superior Installation–We Use Bar Hangers, Which Are Screwed Into The

Fascia Board For Greater Durability

800-499-6326 • 802-334-6326

Visit Our Website: www.willeysgutters.com

CLASSIFIEDS

GOLDEN RETRIEVERS

Pure breed Golden Retrievers.

Family pets, no papers.

$550. Ready to go Oct. 24.

Located in Brookfi eld, Vt. Call

802-276-2131, $200 deposit

to hold.

ANIMALS/FARM

HORSE HOOF TRIMMING

AND SHOEING

Good Measure Farm,

Bob Krenick,

Brookfi eld, VT.

Horses are a gift

from god; Keep them

well shod.

802-276-3184

Kidder’s Smokehouse,LLC.

Custom smoke & cure. We do

cornbeef. Orange. 802-498-

4550. Monday-Friday 9-5:30,

ONLY BY APPOINTMENT

SATURDAY’S / SUNDAY’S

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

$A1-CASH PAID

UP TO $300+

CARS, TRUCKS

For More Info, 802-522-4279

DOES YOUR home need a

good exterior cleaning? We

can pressure wash it spotless.

FREE ESTIMATES Call

802-461-6441.

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

ANTIQUE & VINTAGE

CLOCKS

Professionally Cleaned

& Repaired. Reasonable

Prices, Pickup / Delivery

Available,

ClockWork Wayne,

802-431-5416

(Northfi eld, VT)

CARPET AND

UPHOLSTERY

CLEANING

Residential & Commercial

223-6490

“Our Reputation Is Clean!”

BRUSH HOGGING large or

small areas, Rhett Savoie,

802-272-7130.

CAR & TRUCK

UNDERCOATING

Protect and Prevent Rust

from Winter Road Salt

Call for an appointment

Steve Morris Auto Sales

Orange, Vermont

802-272-8354

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

DmFURNACE

MAN

•Oil Furnace Tune-Ups

•Cleanings •Repairs

•Installations

Fully Licensed & Insured

Reasonable Rates

Call Daryl

802-249-2814

FALL CLEAN-UP

& MORE...

Leaf Vac

Flowerbed Cut Back

802-883-5090

Green-Scapes

Landworks

FULL QUALITY

TREE SERVICE

FALL CLEAN-UP

Removal & Full Tree Services,

Stump Grinding, Hedge and

Shrubs trimming, for free estimates

call Randy 802-479-

3403/802-249-7164 35+ years

experience, Fully Insured.

HANDYMAN AVAILABLE

Home repair and maintenance,

all phases roof to basement.

Free Estimates. Call Charlie.

802-461-3226.

SERVICE DIRECTORY

For

Classified

Advertising

That Works

Call 479-2582

or

1-800-639-9753

PROFESSIONAL

SERVICES

LAWN MOWING

LEAF MULCHING

& WEED WACKING

Free Estimates

Bob Morin

802-522-9753

NEED HELP around home or

offi ce? Handyman services

available. Call Joe. 802-498-

3692.

ODD JOBS Need a helping

hand: Call to inquire. Steve @

Fresh Paths 802-522-7236

PROFESSIONAL WINDOW

CLEANING

done in Barre / Montpelier area.

Free Estimates. Call Joe 802-

498-3692.

STUMPS STUMPS STUMPS

We Grind All Stumps for reasonable

prices, Call Randy

Pickel Tree Service at

802-479-3403/802-249-7164

WET BASEMENT??

Let Us help fi x the problem

forever from the outside of

the Foundation. We will excavate

and install an underdrain

system with Perforate pipe,

clean stone, and Filter Fabric.

Free Estimates, Call Sunrise

Construction LLC at 802-461-

6441

DON’T PUT OFF ‘TIL

TOMORROW WHAT YOU

CAN SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free 1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin • Barre, Vermont 05641

• EPDM & TPO RUBBER

• STANDING SEAM

• ASPHALT SHINGLES

• CEDAR SHINGLES

• VINYL SIDING

• WOOD SIDING

(802)-249-2368

Washington, VT

Residential/Commercial

Fully Insured

LEAF REMOVAL

& FALL CLEAN-UP

ABARE LAWN CARE

& PROPERTY SERVICES

Eric Abare

476-6941

793-7472

802-883-5090

Serving Year Round, Seasonal,

Commercial & Residential Properties

Flowerbed Cut Back

Leaf Vac

Fall clean-up

& More...

Rates Lowered Due To The Economy

CENTRAL VERMONT PAINTING

~Interior ~Exterior ~Pressure Washing

~5 Year Guarantee ~Quality Work

~Commercial/Residential ~Free Estimates

~Insured ~EMP Lead Removal Certified

15 Years Experience

802-793-6351CELL

of profit

5% goes tocharity

of yoUr

choice

379 So. Barre Rd., South Barre

802-479-2007 Old VT Lottery Building, next to the PO

www.DarwinsSewandVac.com

Email: info@DarwinsSewandVac.com

Open Wed.-Thurs.-Fri. 10AM to 6PM, Sat. 8AM to 1PM

The

Sewing Basket

“A Professional Sewing Service

Since 1982”

Alterations and Tailoring

Tuxedo Rentals

Dry Cleaning Services

Embroidery

Monograms

476-8389

www.sewingbasketvt.com

Embroidery, Screenprinting,

Monograms, Photo Transfers

Stock Logos, Custom Logos

Sweatshirts, Tees, Bags,

Caps, Blankets & Much More

479-7024

howard@andersonimprints.com

BOTH NOW LOCATED AT

325 NORTH MAiN ST., BARRE

Daniels Metal Fabrication, Inc.

Over 39 Years Experience

Custom Sheet Metal Fabrication

•Furnace Plenums

•Stove Heat Shields

•Roof Flashing - Drip Edge

•Ductwork - Offsets -Transitions

•Pellet Stove Hopper Extensions

456 East Montpelier Road, Montpelier

802-223-2801 802-223-3789

Bob’s Creative Landscaping

*Trees, Shrubs,

Evergreens

*Patios, Walls,

Walkways, Decking

*General

Maintenance,

Planting

*Designing

& Consulting!

Specializing

in

Concrete

Pavers

Bob Richardson, Owner

Tel: 802 472-8877

Cell: 802 249-8448

GreG’s

PaintinG & CarPentrY

Metal Roof Painting

• Handpaint or Spray

• Metal Roof Painting

• Interior/Exterior

• Guarantee

• Free Estimates

• Reasonable Low Rates

• Neat, Quality Work

• References • Insured

Call 802-479-2733

gpdpainting@aol.com EPA, RRP, EMP Certified

page 32 The WORLD October 11, 2017


THE ENERGY EFFICIENT HOME | THE WORLD

How to find the right replacement windows

Replacing old windows is often a

worthwhile investment for homeowners.

Energy-effi cient windows

can prevent heating and cooling loss

and keep homes more comfortable throughout

the year. Such windows also can improve

a home’s resale value, proving a good return

on investment for homeowners who want to

upgrade their homes before putting them on

the market.

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, homeowners

might find it more cost-effective to replace very old and/or

inefficient windows to improve their energy efficiency. Such

an upgrade can save homeowners substantial amounts of

money on heating and cooling costs.

Window replacement projects can be costly, so it pays to

get the job right the first time. Before beginning a window

replacement project, homeowners should research which

windows will meet their specific needs, learning the subtleties

between finishes and features, as well as comparing

prices for the windows and installation.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT TIME OF YEAR

The best time of year to plan window replacement is when

the weather will be warm, ideally in the spring or early summer.

However, homeowners do not want conditions to be too

warm, as each room where new windows will be installed

will temporarily be exposed to the elements. Furthermore,

caulk adheres better in warmer weather and will dispense

easily.

CONSIDER AVAILABLE FEATURES

When replacing windows, homeowners may want to

install the same style windows they currently have. But the

problems that led to the need to replace windows may still

exist even when new windows are installed. When replacing

windows, consider energy performance ratings based on the

locations of the windows in the house. To make sure they

make the most educated decision, homeowners can investigate

the solar heat gain coefficient, U-factor, visible transmittance

and light-to-solar gain. Explanations of these ratings

are available at Energy.gov.

DON’T IGNORE MAINTENANCE NEEDS

Maintenance costs involved with cleaning, repairs and

painting can add up. When shopping for windows, consider

the amount of maintenance they will need. Wood-framed

windows may require more upkeep than aluminum, fiberglass

or vinyl. Also, consider if certain window types, such

as double-hung windows, casement windows, awning windows,

or slider windows, would be practical.

KEEP HOME STYLE IN MIND

A poor match between windows and the style of the home

can produce unwanted changes in the appearance of the

home. Replacement windows should match the style and

appearance desired.

EXPECT MINIMAL DISRUPTION

When homeowners hire professionals who are good at

their craft, window replacement projects should not be a

terrible inconvenience. According to American Window

Products, Inc., seasoned professionals will be able to complete

a replacement window upgrade in a short amount of

time depending on the size of the home and the number of

windows being replaced.

Replacing windows can be a costly task, but one that will

provide a more energy efficient home that can help homeowners

save money in the long run.

SERVICE DIRECTORY

BUILDING GARAGES

FROM FLOOR TO ROOF

Starting At $ 9,900

24 x 24 garage, 6” concrete floors with steel

rebar, (2) 7 x 9 garage doors, one entry door.

Garages to your specifications, any size.

House Framing & Addition Work

Call 802-296-1522 • Ask for Ray

Are you experiencing computer issues affecting

your business? Have security concerns? Or do

you just need simple helpdesk support?

At rbTechnologies, we support Microsoft

Windows, VMware, Linux and diversified

computer networks, offering end to end

Are you experiencing computer solutions issues for affecting your your business business? data and

Have security concerns? Or

communication

do you just need

systems.

simple helpdesk support?

We support Microsoft Windows, If you are VMware, having computer Linux & diversified network issues, computer in

networks, offering solutions need for of network your business upgrades, data moving & communication

to the cloud

or just looking for simple helpdesk support, try

systems.

giving rbTechnologies a call. We are local and

Computer network issues?

would

In need

love

of

to hear

network

from

upgrades?

you!

Moving to the

cloud or just looking for simple helpdesk support? Call us!

We are local and would love to hear from you!

Are you experiencing computer issues affecting

your business? Have security concerns? Or do

you just need simple helpdesk support?

At rbTechnologies, we support Microsoft

Windows, VMware, Linux and diversified

computer networks, offering end to end

solutions for your business data and

communication systems.

Troy West

If you are having computer network issues, in

need of network upgrades, moving to the cloud

Carpet Cleaning

or just looking for simple helpdesk support, try

giving rbTechnologies SEE THE a call. DIFFERENCE!

We are local and

would love to hear from you!

1970 Vermont Rt. 141970 South Vermont | Rt. East 14 South Montpelier, | East VT 05651

802.223.4448 • 802.223.4448 rbtechvt.com

rbtechvt.com

802-498-3718

Dry Circular Foam

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

1970 Vermont Rt. 14 South | East Montpelier, VT 05651

https://www.facebook.com/TroyWestCarpetCleaning/

802.223.4448

rbtechvt.com

Grant’s Trash Removal

-Residential and

small commercial clean-outs

-Junk, metal & debris removal

Trash & Recycling Drop

SATURDAYS 8AM-NOON

at Black Bear BioDiesel

in Plainfield

Call Heather @ 279-3469

•Light Moving

•House Clean-Out

•Landfill Runs

•Garage Clean-Out

•Reasonable Rates

Local Business

Long Distance Runs

Deliveries for

Local Businesses

(PAUL’S TRASH)

TRUCK FOR HIRE!

Tom Moore

T&T Truck For Hire

Montpelier

802-224-1360

Top To BoTTom Chimney ServiCeS

Richard Dickinson

(802) 479-1811

Chimney Building, Repairs, Caps

Stainless Steel Liners and Cleaning

Free Estimates/Insured

Gendron

Building

Quality In

Concrete

Concrete business since 1972.

Repairs • New floors and walls • Decorative concrete

Crane work • Consulting • ICF foundations

114 Three Mile Bridge Rd., Middlesex, VT

(802) 229-0480 gendronconcrete.com

Worth’s Seamless Rain Gutters, Inc.

An

Investment

You Can

Hang On

To!!

In Your Area

To Serve!

NO JOB TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL,

WITH QUALITY YOU CAN HANG ONTO!

• Copper and Aluminum Gutters

• K Style & Half Round Gutters

• 5” and 6” Commercial & Residential Gutters

• Gutter Toppers • Snow & Ice Restraint Systems

• Hott Topper (prevents ice damming)

Over 29 Years in Business

FREE ESTIMATES ~ FULLY INSURED!

3165 U.S. Route 5

P.O. Box 732, Derby VT 05829

Toll Free 800-870-2113 • Phone 802-766-2113

joanne@worthgutters.com

Come visit us at www.worthgutters.com

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 33


Motorcycle Repair

STREET & DIRT

- Full Restorations

- Engine Rebuilding

- Carburetor rebuilding

- Gas Tank Repair & Painting

- Oil Changes

- Tire Mounting & Balancing

PARTS &

ACCESSORIES

FALL SAVINGS

AVAILABLE AT CAPITOL CITY KIA

LET'S PLAY BALL

OIL CHANGE

UP TO 5 QUARTS OF OIL

LT. TRUCKS & SYNTHETIC OIL EXTRA

TIRE ROTATION

IF NEEDED

CAR WASH & Interior Vacuum

ALL

FOR

TIRE

SPECIALS NOW!

STATE INSPECTIONS

$39 95

Plus Tax

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON

AT CAPITAL CITY KIA

Please present coupon at vehicle write-up.

Offer good thru 10/31/17.

ONLY AT CAPITOL CITY KIA

15 % DISCOUNT

TO ALL ACTIVE & INACTIVE

MILITARY PERSONNEL

AVAILABLE AT CAPITOL CITY KIA

- May not be

combined

with any

other offer

2309 S. Randolph Rd.

Randolph Center

VT 05061

802728-3264

802498-8213

Jerry Dudley's Auto Connection

Robert Dudley

Jerry Dudley

CARS

395 Washington Street

Barre, VT 05641

Phone: 802.476.8114

30+ Years In Satisfying Customers

Find Us Online at dudleyauto.com

TRUCKS, SUVs & VANS

★ Warranties Available ★

We Are Now A FULL SERVICE SHOP Doing State

Inspections, Tires, Oil & Filter, Mechanical, etc.

L K

• Most cars & light trucks

• Inspection only, repairs extra

• May not be combined with any other offer

Please present coupon at vehicle write-up.

Offer good through 10/31/17.

We Also Inspect Campers & Trailers!

The best service at the best prices. Period.

page 34 The WORLD October 11, 2017

AUTOMOTIVE

CAMPERS &

TRUCKS/VANS/

MOTORHOMES

JEEPS/ACCESS.

AVAILABLE AT CAPITOL CITY KIA

AVAILABLE AT CAPITOL CITY KIA

VERMONT

INSPECTION

10

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES & MODELS

DUE

FAX

US!

Now Placing Your

Classified Or Display Ad

Is Even Easier!

Our Fax Number Is

802479-7916

Please Include Contact

Person & Payment Info

VISA, MasterCard & Discover

BACK TO SCHOOL

DETAILING SPECIAL

“Protect Your Vehicle From Winter Grime”

- Exterior hand wash & wax

$

79 95

- Vacuum interior

- Dust down the dash

- Wash windows, inside & out

- May not be combined with any other offer

OFFER GOOD WITH THIS COUPON

AT CAPITAL CITY KIA

Please present coupon at vehicle write-up.

Offer good thru 10/31/17.

Reg. Value: $134.95

VERMONT

STATE

INSPECTION

$

9 95

FREE CAR WASH

WITH ANY SERVICE

You Don’t Have To Purchase Your Vehicle Here To Take Advantage Of Our Quality Service!

Plus

Tax

07 FORD TAURUS

auto., PW, PL, SR, Mag wheels

$3,995

CORNER OF

RT. 2 & GALLISON HILL RD.

MONTPELIER, VT

Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 7-5

Wed. 7-7 SAT. 8-2

Service & Parts

Call toll free: 833-759-2738

www.captiolcitykia.com

2009 CANTEBURY Park

Model with loft. Used summers

only. Very clean, great

condition. Great option for

snowbirds here in the summer.

Must be moved. Located in

Williamstown. 802-433-6796

RV, CAMP, SOLAR BATTER-

IES. 2 West Marine AGM

Batteries, Group 8D, 12 Volt,

245AH. 150 Pounds each.

$300. 802-883-9305

MOTORCYCLES/

ATVS

WANTED OLD JAPANESE

MOTORCYCLES KAWASAKI

Z1-900 (1972-75), KZ900,

KZ1000 (1976-1982), Z1R, KZ

1000MK2 (1979-,80), W1-650,

H1-500 (1969-72), H2-750

(1972-1975), S1-250, S2-350,

S3-400, KH250, KH400, SU-

ZUKI-GS400, GT380, HON-

DA-CB750K (1969-1976),

CBX1000 (1979,80) CASH!!

1-800-772-1142 1-310-721-

0726 usa@classicrunners.

com

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

JUST GOOD AUTOS

296 East Montpelier Rd • Rt. 14 North - Barre

802-479-0140

2005 BUICK LACROSSE

auto., PW, PL

$3,995

2007 FORD FOCUS SES

4 dr., 5 spd., ps, pl

$2,995

2007 FORD EXPLORER XLT

auto., low miles, 4x4, loaded, sharp red!

$6,995

2008 FORD F250 LX

auto., 4x4, AC, PW, PL, 8 ft. Fisher SS V-plow,

low miles - 32K, 1 owner

$17,995

2008 BUICK LUCERNE CXL

auto., loaded, leather, sunroof, one owner

$5,995

2007 FORD FOCUS SE

Auto., PW, PL, AC, NY title, low miles

$4,495

2007 FORD TAURUS

auto., PW, PL, SR, Mag wheels

$3,995

2005 CHRYSLER

TOWN & COUNTRY LX

Auto., 6 cyl., PW, PL, low miles

$3,295

1994 JEEP CHEROKEE

LAREDO 4X4

AC, PW, PL, low miles, one owner

$4,995

2009 CHEVROLET COBALT LS

2-door, auto., low miles

$5,995

2006 FORD FOCUS

4-door, auto, PW, PL, AC

$3,995

2006 FORD F150 XCAB XLT 4X4

auto., AC, PW, PL, one owner,

low miles, NY title, warranty

$12,995

2005 FORD FOCUS 3 DR.

5 spd., PW, PL, low miles

$3,495

2005 FORD FOCUS SES

loaded, sunroof, 5-spd, low miles, sharp red

$4,595

2003 FORD CROWN VICTORIA

auto., loaded, low miles (81K)

$3,495

2003 TOYOTA RAV4

auto., 4WD, loaded, low miles

$5,995

EXTENDED WARRANTIES AVAILABLE

JUST GOOD AUTOS

Trades Welcome

Prices Negotiable

Just a Sample of Many

Just Good Autos!

WORK VEHICLES/

HEAVY

EQUIPMENT

1987 GMC DUMP TRUCK

7000 Series, gas engine w/

air brakes, 77K mi, Very good

condition, $3500. 802-223-

4757

TRUCKS/VANS/

JEEPS/ACCESS.

2002 DODGE RAM PICKUP

2500 $10,995 East Barre

Auto Sales 802-479-5370 or

866-928-9370 Text 11DM TO

27414

2007 CHEVY EXPRESS

CARGO VAN, RWD, 2500

135 (STK # 28017A): 4-SPD,

Automatic w/OD, 52K, Now

$12,988. Cody Chevrolet-

Cadillac Barre-Montpelier Rd,

223-6337, 1800-278-CODY or

888-495-0672

2008 TOYOTA TACOMA Access

Cab 4WD 6CYL Auto

PS CD / Stereo, New factory

leaf springs (4), exhaust, Inspected

To Feb 2018, Nice

Clean Truck, $59,700K Asking

$13,500.

802-476-5311

2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

$9,995 East Barre Auto Sales

802-476-5370 or (866) 928-

9370. For more details text

0X8E to 27414

2010 CHEVROLET TRA-

VERSE $12,995 East Barre

Auto Sales 802-476-5370 or

(866) 928-9370. For more details

text 0K04 to 27414

2011 GMC PICK UP, 4dr, Club

Cab, 34K mi. Plow, good condition,

1 owner, $22,000.00.

802-223-5577

2015 SUPER CREW FORD

LARIAT 4WD / AWD, All Options,

Beautiful Truck, Excellent

Condition, 26,800mi.

Never driven in the Winter,

$39,500.00. 802-229-0205

BLAKES

Southern Autos

Central Vermont’s

Longest Running

Used Car Dealer!

Specializing in

the best preowned

vehicles

from North

Carolina

Call or stop by

and see Dick Blake

Route 14

E. Montpelier

223-7191

DBA-BLAKE-LOSO

223-7191

We Repair All

Snowplow

Brands

2008 Buick Lucerne CXL

low miles, mint, mint, mint!

must be seen!

CARS / TRUCKS WANTED!!!

All Makes / Models 2000-2016!

Any Condition. Running or

Not. Top $$$ Paid! Free Towing!

We’re Nationwide! Call

Now: 1-888-985-1806

GARAGE- KEPT 2008

Jeep Liberty Sport 4x4. Used

week-ends only for fi shing!

Excellent condition, 27,581

original miles. Must see 802-

479-0248

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

$ A1-CASH PAID

UP TO $300+

JUNK CARS, TRUCKS

802-522-4279.

(4) TIRES 205/50R17 889V

Continental Radial Tubeless

with good tread asking $150.

obo. 802-505-6682

* USED

AUTOMOTIVE

GLASS / RIMS!*

Windshields, doors, quarter

panels, side, rear windows,

802-522-9140

1990 TOYOTA CELICA, Classic

car, automatic, 198,000

miles, runs great. Maintained

by local mechanic. Asking

$1,000. Call 279-3717

1997 BMW 328ic, 2 dr convertible,

68K, cute dark blue,

tan int.., low mileage tires,

Good cond. $3850.

Carl at 802-479-0962

2003 DODGE INTREPID,

Smooth running but rust on

right rear fender before inspection.

Would sell for car

parts. Automatic starter, good

winter tires avail.

802-461-6132

continued on next page

Serving

Vermonters

for 57 Years!

We Do

Vermont

State

Inspections

10

DUE NOW!

Back from No. Carolina

2010 Chrysler Town &

Country Van

3 seats, leather, Touring Pkg.,

loaded, mint condition

2011 GMC Denali Sierra

4 Door AWD Pickup

loaded with all the extras and

hard Tonneau cover

Snowplows

SALES & SERVICE

For Superior Snowplowing Performance

McLEODS

SPRING & CHASSIS

“Your Truck Chassis Specialists”

32 BLACKWELL ST., BARRE, VT 05641 • 1-802-476-4971


AUTOMOTIVE

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

2006 HONDA ACCORD

$6,500 East Barre Auto Sales

802-476-5370 or 866-928-

9370 For more Details Text

1YHL TO 27414

2011 KIA SORENTO $7,995

East Barre Auto Sales 802-

476-5370 or (866) 928-9370

For more details text 0W6U to

27414

2013 CHEVROLET EQUI-

NOX AWD LTZ(1618A) Now

$20,988. Cody Chevrolet-

Cadillac, Barre-Montpelier Rd.

Montpelier. 223-6337, 1-800-

278-Cody, 888-495-0672

www.codychevrolet.com

2015 BUICK ENCORE AWD

(2267P) Certifi ed Pre-owned,

only 20K, strong Now $22,988.

Cody Chevrolet-Cadillac,

Barre Montpelier Rd. Montpelier.

223-6337, 1-800-278-

CODY, 888-495-0672

2015 CHEVROLET SILVERA-

DO 2500HD, Crew Cab, Standard

Box 4-WD LTZ ,(36117A)

Now $48,988. Cody Chevrolet-

Cadillac Barre-Montpelier Rd.

Montpelier. 223-6337, 1-800-

278-CODY, 888-495-0672 or

www.codychevrolet.com

* On Oct. 20, 1944, U.S.

Gen. Douglas MacArthur

wades ashore onto the

Philippine island of Leyte,

fulfilling his vow to return to

the area he was forced to flee

in 1942 under orders from

President Franklin Roosevelt.

* On Oct. 22, 1797, Andre-

Jacques Garnerin makes the

first parachute jump from a

hydrogen balloon 3,200 feet

above Paris. As he had failed

to include an air vent at the

top of the prototype, Garnerin

oscillated wildly in his

descent, but he landed shaken

but unhurt.

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

2016 CHEVY CRUISE Limited

(2263P) GM Certifi ed

pre-owned, automatic Now

$15,988, Cody Chevrolet Cadillac,

Barre-Montpelier Rd,

Montpelier. 223-6337, 1-800-

278-CODY, 888-495-0672 or

www.codychevrolet.com

4 GOODYEAR Ultra Grip

tires, 205/70/15 Used one

season. $300. Came off 2001

Subaru Forester.

Denise 802-356-0636

CARS / TRUCKS WANTED!!!

All Make / Models 2000-2015!

Any Condition. Running or

Not. Competitive Offer! Free

Towing! We’re Nationwide!

Call Now: 1-888-416-2330

Donate Your Car to Veterans

Today! Help and Support our

Veterans. Fast — FREE pick

up. 100% tax deductible. Call

1-800-245-0398.

FOUR HAKKAPELIITTA WIN-

TER TIRES; 235/45R18 4000

miles or less, great tread.

$250.00 obo 802-223-7609

FOUR IMPERIAL SNOW tires,

195-65-15, next to new tread,

$150.00. 802-522-2499













The new FISHER XV2 v-plow is loaded with features and ready to

take on the harshest winter conditions.

FULL SERVICE

FISHER DEALER!

CARS &

ACCESSORIES

ERASE BAD CREDIT

FOREVER!

Credit repair companies make

false claims and promises to

erase a trail of unpaid bills or

late payments from your credit

report. However, only time can

erase negative, but accurate

credit information. In addition,

federal law forbids credit repair

companies from collecting

money before they provide

their service. TIP: If you have

questions about your credit

history or you want to know

how to get a free copy of your

credit report call the ATTOR-

NEY GENERAL’S CONSUM-

ER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

at 1-800-649-2424. Don’t

send any money to a credit repair

company until you check

it out.

Got an older car, boat or RV?

Do the humane thing. Donate

it to the Humane Society. Call

1-855-558-3509

NEW & USED TIRES ALL

SIZES, Used Rims, 802-883-

5506/272-6611

402 VT RTE 107

EXIT 3 OFF I-89

SOUTH ROYALTON,

VERMONT

(802) 763-2585

Toll Free 800-877-5854

www.luckystrailers.com

FOR THE MOST CURRENT CLASSIFIED ADS, VISIT OUR WEB PAGE:

www.vt-world.com

PUSH - PULL OR DRAG

MINIMUM

$AVE

TRADE $

2000

ALLOWANCE

IF IT’S WORTH MORE, YOU’LL GET MORE

2017 Nissan Sentra

#3984A, 1.8L, 14,232 miles

$

16,450

2016 Nissan Rogue

#674, 2.5L, 13,000 miles

$

25,025

2013 GMC Sierra 1500 SL 4WD

#3417A, 4x4, 33,178 miles

$

27,995

2016 Ford Fusion

#P610 (Titanium) 2.0L, 20,245 miles

$

23,750

2015 Nissan Altima

#P587, 2.55L, 36,000 miles

$

19,995

2012 Nissan Frontier 4x4

#4024A, 41,000 miles

$

20,595

$$$

2016 Nissan Frontier 4x4

#P668, 12,488 miles

$

29,995

2015 Kia Optima LX FWD

#661A, 2.4L, 22,222 miles

$

14,950

2010 Nissan Maxima 3.5

#3868A, loaded, 75,000 miles

$

14,795

ROCK-TOBER FEST AT FORMULA NISSAN USED CARS

E-mail

us!

Now Placing

Your Classified

Or Display Ad Is

Even Easier!

sales@vt-world.com

Please include contact

person

& payment info

Only

M-F 8:30-6 SAT 8:30-5

1504 US-302 Barre,VT

(802) 479-2277

www.formulanissan.com

If you are looking at this space so are

29,999* other people

*According to the nationally known audit firm

Circulation Verification Council (CVC)

The WORLD has an average readership of 30,000 per issue

Audited numbers are numbers you can trust.

We Sell TIRES

Norm Trepanier

Body Shop Manager

Kristian Page

Assistant Manager

COLLISION CENTER

For Your Next Body Shop Needs

CALL THE

WE REPAIR

ALL MAKES

BEST!

AND MODELS

CODY COLLISION CENTER

received a 100% customer

satisfaction rating and a

100% of respondents saying they

would return and would

recommend the facility to others!

AW A R D E D

100%

SATISFACTION

CA L L NO R M AT TH E CO L L I S I O N CENTER 802-613-3017

JUST EAST OF MONTPELIER ON RTE 2 • BERLIN, VT

TIRES

#10, YOU ARE DUE!

Vermont State

Inspection

$

34 95

PLUS TAX

$

• Most Cars & Light Trucks • Pass or Fail

See Service Advisor for Details

• We Service All

Makes & Models

• Fleet & Commercial

Accounts Welcome

• We Honor All

Extended Warranties

BEST

PRICES

IN TOWN

GM PRICE MATCH

110% OF THE DIFFERENCE

FOR UP TO 30 DAYS, All prices compared. Must include all fees, tires,

installation, shipping, wheel weights, tax & shop charges

FALL SERVICE SPECIAL

QUICK WASH

QUICK VACUUM

CHECK COOLING SYSTEM

CHECK AND TOP OFF MOST FLUIDS

CHECK TIRES AND BRAKES

CHECK STEERING AND SUSPENSION

CHECK WIPERS AND ALL LIGHTS

CHECK ALL FILTERS BELTS AND HOSES

CHECK BATTERY PERFORMANCE

19 95

OFFERS VALID AT THIS DEALERSHIP ONLY. MAY NOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER OFFERS. TAX & SUPPLIES EXTRA.

Call Toll Free 833-759-2738

MONDAY - FRIDAY 7 - 5 • SATURDAY 7 - 12. OFFERS GOOD WITH AD TIL 10-31-17.

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 35


WORLD AUTOMOTIVE

What to do when your vehicle breaks down

Knowing what to do when a car

breaks down can make such unfortunate

situations much less stressful

for drivers. Smartphones and wifi

networks may make it less stressful to cope

with broken down vehicles. However, wifi

networks are not always accessible in remote

locations, so drivers would be wise to revisit

these tips for handling broken down vehicles,

courtesy of Esurance, in advance of their next

road trip.

• Turn on hazard lights. Hazard lights inform other drivers

that something is wrong with your vehicle, and the sight

of hazard lights typically compels fellow motorists to give

drivers a wide berth and facilitate their moving off of the

roadway.

• Attempt to get off the highway. After turning on their hazard

lights, drivers who know or suspect something is wrong

with their vehicles should try to get off the highway. Move

into the right-hand lane as soon as possible, ultimately trying

to get onto the shoulder. Avoid the left-hand shoulder if

possible, as the left lane is a passing lane and motorists likely

won’t be expecting vehicles in this area of the highway.

• Turn the steering wheel away from the road. Broken down

vehicles are unpredictable, and drivers may not have the

luxury of pulling over onto flat road surfaces. Turning the

steering wheel away from the road prevents it from rolling

into traffic if drivers are forced to pull over on an incline.

• Be especially careful before exiting the vehicle. Exiting a

broken down vehicle can be very dangerous, especially when

drivers are forced to pull over on busy highways. Drivers

who have pulled over into the right shoulder should wait to

exit the car until there is ample time for them to get out and

safely make it to the shoulder. If necessary, crawl across the

front seat and exit using the passenger-side door. All passengers

should exit the vehicle on the passenger-side if the car

has been pulled onto the right shoulder.

• Call for help. Only after they have safely gotten their vehicles

off the highway should drivers call for help. Passengers

may want to avoid calling until the car is off the road as

well, as it can make for faster relief if callers wait until they

know their exact location to call for help.

• Set up flares or triangles behind the vehicle. If it’s safe to

do so, set up flares or triangles behind the vehicle. If the

flares or triangles are buried in the trunk, drivers can ask a

passenger to serve as lookout and warn them if they need to

get away from the vehicle.

• Pop the hood. An opened hood is another indicator that a

vehicle is broken down and can be especially valuable to

drivers who do not have flares or triangles.

• Wait for help. Do not attempt to fix the vehicle on the side

of the highway. Doing so leaves drivers vulnerable to oncoming

motorists.

Buying a car this week?

Check Out Hundreds

of New And Used

Car Specials From

Local Dealers.

page 36 The WORLD October 11, 2017


AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE EXCELLENCE • ASE CERTIFIED TECHNICIANS • AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE EXCELLENCE

Protect Your Auto Investment

Choose a shop that employees

ASE-certifi ed auto technicians to

ensure your vehicle maintenance

and repair dollars are wisely spent.

Studies from the National Institute for Automotive Service

Excellence (ASE) show vehicles that receive regular maintenance

and service retain more of their value, get better gasoline

mileage, and pollute less than cars that are neglected. But

today’s computer-loaded systems leave many former do-ityourselfers

hesitant to do much weekend tinkering. What’s a

conscientious vehicle owner to do?

HOW CONSUMERS BENEFIT FROM ASE CERTI-

FICATION

Finding a competent auto repair professional should not be

difficult … and with that guiding principle, the nonprofit,

independent ASE was founded in 1972.

The mission was clear: Develop a mechanism by which

working auto technicians could prove their competence to

themselves, their employers, and to consumers.

The solution: A series of national certification exams covering

all major automotive repair and service specialties.

The result: An elite group of automotive service professionals

at work in repair establishments throughout the nation.

WHY USE ASE-CERTIFIED AUTO TECHNICIANS?

Consumers benefit from ASE’s certification program

because it takes much of the guesswork out of finding a competent

technician.

Perhaps years ago, any shade-tree mechanic would do; after

all, cars were simpler, less complex. But with today’s hightech

vehicles — family sedans, sports coupes, rugged SUVs,

and powerful pickups — the margin for error is small because

mistakes are more costly. It makes good financial sense, then,

to protect your sizeable automotive investment through regular

maintenance and service performed by ASE-certified professionals.

Because the program is voluntary, technicians who have

taken the time and expense to earn ASE certification can be

counted on to have a strong sense of pride in accomplishment

and professionalism — which should be good news for consumers.

Moreover, prior to taking ASE exams, many technicians

attend training classes or study on their own in order to

brush up on their knowledge. The time they spend sharpening

their skills translates directly to the work they perform on

vehicles every day on the job.

the repair industry. however, ASE certification is not a designation

for life; technicians must recertify every five years in

order to demonstrate a commitment to continuing education

and staying abreast of constantly changing technologies.

HOW TO FIND AN ASE PROFESSIONAL

ASE technicians can be found at every type of repair facility:

new car dealerships, independent garages, service stations,

franchised outlets, collision shops, tire dealers, parts

stores and more. There are more than 360,000 ASE-certified

professionals at work nationally. Repair facilities employing

ASE professionals usually display the distinctive blue and

white ASE sign on the premises and post their technicians’

credentials in their customer service areas.

Employers often include the ASE logo in their advertising

as well. Further, establishments with a high percentage of

certified pros on staff may display evidence of membership in

the elite Blue Seal of Excellence Recognition Program. ASEcertified

professionals are issued shoulder insignia or lapel

pins, as well as personalized credentials and wall certificates

listing their exact areas of certification.

For additional information and seasonal car care tips visit

www.ase.com. ASE joins the automotive aftermarket industry

in recognizing April as National Car Care Month.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT REPAIR SHOP: A CHECK-

LIST

ASE certifies individual technicians — not repair establishments.

But it stands to reason that shop owners who encourage

their technicians to become ASE certified will be just as

proactively involved in the other aspects of their businesses as

well. Here are some tips on finding a good repair establishment:

START SHOPPING FOR A REPAIR FACILITY BE-

FORE YOU NEED ONE.

Ask your friends and associates for their recommendations;

consult local consumer groups.

Arrange for alternate transportation in advance so you will

not feel forced to choose a shop based solely on location.

Look for a neat, well-organized facility, with vehicles in the

parking lot equal in value to your own and modern equipment

in the service bays.

Look for a courteous staff, with a service consultant willing

to answer all of your questions.

Look for policies regarding estimated repair costs, diagnostic

fees, guarantees, acceptable methods of payment, etc.

Ask if the repair facility specializes in or regularly performs

your type of needed repair work.

Look for signs of professionalism in the customer service

area such as civic, community, or customer service awards.

Look for evidence of qualified technicians: trade school

diplomas, certificates of advanced courses, and ASE certification.

Look for the ASE sign.

Facilities with a high percentage of ASE-certified professionals

may also be members of the elite Blue Seal of

Excellence Recognition Program. Ask the shop if it is a member

of the program.

Automotive

Service

Excellence

L. to R.: Steve Jones, Scott Taylor, Dave Jones

"Service Only A Family Business Can Provide"

ALLAN JONES & SONS

150 Ayers Street, Barre

479-1449 • 476-6741

www.allanjonestire.com

HOW DOES ASE CERTIFICATION WORK?

More than 100,000 candidates sit for ASE exams each year.

These exams — the only independent national certification

tests available to automotive professionals — are developed

and regularly updated by representatives from the service and

repair industry, vocational educators, working technicians,

and ASE’s own in-house technical specialists. The exams

stress real-world diagnostic and repair problems, not theory.

Mechanics who pass at least one exam and fulfill the handson

work experience requirement earn the title of “ASE-

Certified Automobile Technician,” while those who pass all

eight automotive exams earn “Master Auto Technician” status.

There are also tests for parts specialists, collision repair

technicians, automotive service consultants, and segments of

What is ASE?

ASE, is short for the National Institute for

Automotive Service Excellence. Since 1972

our independent non-profit organization has

worked to improve the quality of vehicle

repair and service by testing and certifying

automotive professionals.

WHAT DOES ASE DO?

ASE promotes excellence in automotive

repair and service. over 300,000 Automotive

Technician and Service Professionals hold

ASE Certifications. ASE Certified Technicians work in every part

of the automotive service industry. We certify the automotive

technician and service professionals not the auto shops.

Cadillac

VE R M O N T ’S TR U C KST O R E

Barre-Montpelier 802-223-6337 • 800-278-CODY

WHY DOES ASE EXIST?

To protect the automotive service consumer, shop owner, and

the automotive technician. We test and certify automotive professionals

so that shop owners and service customers can better

gauge a technicians level of expertise before contracting the technician’s

services. We certify the automotive technician professional

so they can offer tangible proof of their technical knowledge.

ASE Certification testing means peace of mind for auto

service managers, customers.

HOW DOES ASE CERTIFICATION WORK?

In addition to passing an ASE Certification test, automotive

technicians must have two years of on the job training or one year

of on the job training and a two-year degree in automotive repair

to qualify for certification.

The exams are not easy. Only two out of every three test-takers

pass on their first attempt. To remain ASE certified professionals

must be retest every five years to keep up with ever advancing

automotive technology.

WHO WRITES THE CERTIFICATION TESTS?

ASE Certification tests are written in workshops by a national

panel of seasoned automotive industry professionals and executives,

including working technicians, automobile manufacturers,

aftermarket manufacturers, and educators.

Exams are segmented by sub-specialty such as automobile,

medium/heavy truck, truck equipment, school bus, collision

repair, and more. There are 40-plus exams each designed to discern

the automotive service technician’s knowledge of job-related

skills.

Left to Right: Caleb Holbrook (ASE), Terry Lackey (Master Tech),

Josh Scribner (Master Tech), Fran Leonard (ASE),

Neal Foster (Master Tech), Al Miller (Service Writer)

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 37


REAL ESTATE

MONTPELIER - $149,900

Walk to schools and shopping! 3-Bedrooms,

1-Bath, Food Pantry, Fireplace, Chandeliers in

LR and DR, Porches, Wood doors, trim, stairway.

Small Lot with Off-Street Parking.

Buyer-Brokers may also show this home.

802-371-7524

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

The Montpelier Housing Authority is

accepting applications for two, three and

four bedroom units at the Cummings

Street Apartments.

Income restrictions apply. Rent, including

utilities will not exceed 30% of income.

Landlord, credit and criminal record

checks conducted. References required.

For information contact us at

229-9232.

Equal Housing Opportunity

Beautiful Home On

Beautiful Lake Eligo

For Sale By Owner – Conveniently located

off Route 14 in Greensboro, this home is a

32’ x 36’ two-story with three bedrooms and two

baths, plus basement with nine-foot ceiling. A large

garage compliments the home. The homestead is

situated on one acre with 285 feet of lake frontage.

Enjoy the clean Lake Eligo which occupies 190

acres. Say you saw this listing in The WORLD!

Shown By Appointment Only

1-802-760-0832

OPEN HOUSE

Fri., Oct. 13 • 3:00 to 6:00 PM

86 Cottage Street, Hardwick

Move-in ready

home with

3bds/2ba in

village setting

near

Farmers'

Market

and

Recreation

Field.

MLS#4657072

$89,900

Visit Our Website For Details On These And Other Listings

HARRINGTON REALTY

www.harringtonvt.com

802-563-6000 or 802-595-1156

Cabot, Vermont

page 38 The WORLD October 11, 2017

PUBLISHER’S

NOTICE

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this

newspaper is subject to the fair housing

act which makes it illegal to advertise

“any preference, limitation or discrimination

based on race, color, religion,

sex, handicap, familial status or

national origin, or an intention, to make

any such preference, limitation or discrimination.”

Additionally, Vermont’s Fair Housing

and Public Accomodations Act prohibits

advertising that indicates any preference,

limitation or discrimination based

on age, marital status, sexual orientation

or receipt of public assistance.

This newspaper will not knowingly

accept any advertising for real estate

which is in violation of the law. Our

readers are hereby informed that all

dwellings advertised in this newspaper

are available on an equal opportunity

basis.

To file a complaint of discrimination,

call the Vermont Human Rights

Commisson toll-free at 1-800-416-2010

(voice & TTY) or call HUD toll

free at 1-800-669-9777 (voice)

or 1-800-927-9275 (TTY).

MOBILE HOMES/

RENT/SALE

14’X66’ 2005 REDMAN MO-

BILE HOME 2 bedrooms,

Granite countertops, sheetrock

thoughout, along with standing

seam roof $59,900.00.

Located @ Weston’s Mobile

Home Park. CALL Ellery @

802-839-6207

COMMERCIAL

RENTALS/SALES

OFFICE FOR RENT:

The School House

395 Paine Turnpike-North

Berlin, VT 05602

802-225-6143

Classifi ed

Deadline Is

MONDAY

Before 10AM

DON’T PUT OFF

‘TIL TOMORROW

WHAT YOU CAN

SELL TODAY!

479-2582

Or Toll Free

1-800-639-9753

Central Vermont’s Newspaper

CLASSIFIEDS

403 U.S. Route 302 - Berlin

Barre, Vermont 05641

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

BARRE SMALL 2nd

Floor 1 Bedroom w/heat

& Hot water. No Pets,

Non-Smoking, Landlord References.

802-479-9619.

BARRE, 2ND FLOOR, 1 large

& 1 small bedroom, Heat,

garbage and snow removal

included. Non-smoking, No

pets. Security & 1st month

rent. $850.00. 802-272-6361

BARRE, HILL St. Beautiful 3rd

fl oor apt w/deck, 2 bedrooms.

$800 includes w/d and heat.

Available NOW. 802-229-

5702. email sal.b@myfairpoint.net

BARRE, LARGE 1 Bedroom,

Ground fl oor. Heat / snow / rubbish

included. $750 / mo. Available

Oct 15th .

802-883-5506 Weekdays.

BARRE, LARGE 2 Bedroom,

2nd fl oor. Heat / hotwater / snow

/ rubbish included. $875 / mo.

Available Oct 1st.

802-883-5506 Weekdays.

FOR RENT, CALAIS, Maple

Corner Area — Cottage on

Dead-end Road, comfortable

for one or two people. One

bedroom, equipped kitchen,

living room with fi replace, 2nd

fl oor bedroom, 1 1/2 baths,

Propane Rinnai heater. Peaceful

walking trails. $1,200. / mo.

Lease. Phone: 802-223-5510

NO Pets

Minutes to Barre! Heated Garage!

Electric, cable, internet,

heat and water Included as

well as stove, refrigerator,

washer / dryer. This Beautiful

One Bed Room Apartment

is situated on 200 acre estate

with Pond and Mountain

Views. No pets, Care taking

responsible required at $850

month. Call 239-869-6404 for

details.

FREE HOME

APPRAISAL!

Just mention

this ad

APARTMENTS

ROOMS/HOUSES

FOR RENT

MONTPELIER, 3 Bedroom, 2

Bath HOME, off street parking,

yard, deck, $1,550.00

Plus Utilities, Non-smoking,

Lease. 802-279-5772

RULE OF THUMB......

Describe your property,

not the “appropriate” buyer or

renter, not the landlord,

not the neighbors.

Just describe the property and

you’ll almost always obey the

law.

WASHINGTON, 2BDRM spacious

recently renovated single

family home. Energy effi -

cient, w/d hook-up, large yard,

porch, no dogs, non-smoking.

$950. / mo+utilities 802-883-

9395/802-595-3909.

WILLIAMSTOWN 1bdrm.

Heat, hot water, rubbish &

snow removable included,

coin-op laundry, No dogs,

nonsmoking. $725 + deposit.

802-433-5832

VACATION

RENTALS/SALES

ALL INCLUSIVE RESORT

packages at Sandals, Dreams,

Secrets, Riu, Barcelo, Occidental

and many more. Punta

Cana, Mexico, Jamaica and

many of the Caribbean islands.

Search available options

for 2017/2018 at

www.NCPtravel.com or call

877-270-7260.

COZY CABIN on Mirror Lake,

Excellent Bicycling,

Foliage walks, Fishing,

Fire pit, Canoe,

Heat ,

Hot Water,

$450 / weekly, $65 / overnight,

$25 / day visits.

802-456-1706

DOWNLOAD OUR APP!

World Publications

FREE

★★★★★

Home Loans for Every Need

To apply online for a FREE, no commitment

mortgage pre-approval, visit:

www.HomeLoansVermont.com

We are the Experts in home Financing

Patti Shedd

Loan Officer

NMLS#98725

(802) 476-7000

PShedd@PremiumMortgage.com

14 North Main Street, Ste 5015 | Barre, VT 05641

Equal Housing Lender | Licensed Lender State of VT | NMLS#854380

VACATION

RENTALS/SALES

WARM WEATHER is Year

Round in Aruba. The water

is safe, and the dining is fantastic.

Walk out to the beach.

3-Bedroom weeks available.

Sleeps 8. email: carolaction@

aol.com

for more information.

LAND FOR SALE

GROTON, 2 ACRE MOBILE

HOME LOT $39,000.00.

802-222-5065

HOMES

$68,900 — LIKE NEW, effi cient

2 bed / 2 bath SINGLE-WIDE

for sale in Weston’s MHP,

Berlin with covered walkway.

Energy star package, range,

refrigerator, dishwasher, and

microwave. Qualifying buyer

could get up to $27,500 down

payment assistance. Park

rent is $350+/- month, taxes

$906.52 last year. Call Dan at

(802)-229-2721 for more information.

BARRE CITY — $149, 900.

FSBO, So. Main Street, 3-bedrooms,

1-bath, New roofs /

siding / windows, Corner lot,

Garage, Deck, Walking distance

to schools and close to

Interstate access. Pictures on

Craigslist at goo.gl / GnmXNk

or Call Alice 802-505-0151 for

details.

NEW HOME & LAND package,

Williamstown VT. $149,900.

3bdrm, 2 bath, great neighborhood,

close to recreation, access

to I-89. Don’t miss out!.

802-272-7422.

PRE-OWNED Double -wide

mobile homes for sale. 1997

Titan, 28x56 +3 Bed/2 Bath,

$64,900; 1999 Pine Grove,

28’x68’ +/-. 3 Bed / 2 Bath,

$69,900. Prices include 1 year

furnace warranty, delivery

within 30 miles, block & level

upon delivery, installation of

vinyl skirting, fi nish interior &

exterior. Financing assistance

available. Call 802-229-2721

for more information. Homes

are available to view at 374

River St in Montpelier or online

at FecteauHomes.com /

Pre-owned

ABOUT FORECLOSURE?

Having trouble paying your

mortgage? The Federal Trade

Commission says don’t pay

any fees in advance to people

who promise to protect

your home from foreclosure.

Report them to the FTC, the

nation’s consumer protection

agency. For more information,

call 1-877-FTC-HELP or click

on ftc.gov. A message from

The World and the FTC.

Cannot combine with any other offer. Minimum mortgage amount of $80,000. Must

close your mortgage financing with Premium Mortgage. Other restrictions may apply.


5%

5%

5%

5%

5%

5%

Photo: 46493331

phone. But even if efforts to conserve water at home may not Price Just Lowered

make a dramatic impact on monthly utility bills, Two the Bedrooms, following

measures can go a long way toward preserving one of the dated Windows

Family Room With Woodstove, Up-

planet’s most precious resources.

Just Outside Village, Public Water and Sewer

On 1.18 Acres, Brook

Plainfield $138,000

Call Tim, 552-0184

Photo: 46161061t

gallons of water each year. Shower heads that have earned Duplex On Desirable Camp Street

the EPA’s WaterSense label have met various conservation

Well Maintained, Each Unit Has Three Bedrooms

Formal Dining Room, French Doors

Hardwood Floors, Period Woodwork

Barre $149,500

Contact Michael, 552-0338

Home Mortgage Rates

FLEXIBLE

DESIGNS

WINDY TOWN

WINDY WOOD – BARRE TOWN

“A common interest community”

“A common interest community”

SHOWN BY OPEN APPOINTMENT HOUSE EVERY ANYTIME SUNDAY - CALL 11:00 802-249-8251 AM TO 1:00 OR 802-734-1920

PM

LAST

DOWN One Level Living: single and duplex OR shown units, 2 by bedrooms, appointment 2 baths, anytime full basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

LENDER UPDATE RATE APR TERM PTS PAYMENT Photo: 46499301

Priced from the mid $220,000’s CALL 802-249-8251 OR 802-734-1920

Community National 10/6/17 4.000% 4.008% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

One Level Living: single and duplex units, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,

Bank 1-800-340-3460 3.375% 3.389% 15 yr fixed 0 5% Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery, ¾ mile on Hill Street, left onto

full basement, 1 or 2 car garage option

Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left and turn into Windy Wood.

Single family homes priced from $267,000 and

New England Federal 10/6/17 3.875% 3.899% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Duplex homes priced from $229,000

Credit Union 866-805-6267 3.250% 3.292% 15 yr fixed 0 5% Directions: From RT 302, turn onto Hill Street at Elmwood Cemetery,

¾ mile on Hill Street, left onto Windy Wood Road, look for sign on left

Northfield Savings 10/6/17 3.875% 3.914% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

and turn into Windy Wood.

Bank (NSB) 3.125% 3.193% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

802-485-5871

Updated Weekly

5%

5%

REAL ESTATE

How to conserve water at home

Conservation is an essential component

of an eco-friendly lifestyle.

Conserving the planet’s natural

resources can have a profound

impact on the planet, and conserving at home

is a great way for men and women to get the

ball rolling on their conservation efforts.

One of the most effective ways to conserve at home is to

reduce water consumption. Few people give much thought to

how much water they consume at home, as water bills tend

to be considerably lower than other utilities like energy and

• Fix leaky faucets. Leaky faucets in a home might not seem

like they waste much water each day. However, the U.S.

Geological Survey estimates that a single home with three

leaky faucets that each produce one drip per minute will

waste 104 gallons of water per year from these faucets alone.

This waste is easily prevented by simply fixing leaky faucets

the moment drips are noticed.

criteria established by the EPA. Such shower heads are 20

• Wash your car at a commercial car wash. Some vehicle percent more efficient than the average product that does not

owners may enjoy washing their cars at home in their driveways.

But getting a car washed at a professional car wash can save 2,900 gallons of water per year by installing shower

have Photo: the 46623851 label. According to the EPA, the average family can

conserve substantial amounts of water. That’s because many heads that have earned the WaterSense label.

new car wash facilities employ water reclamation systems New • Use To a dishwasher. The MarketThis particular effort to conserve water

that reuse water. According to San Diego Car 1850 Care, Cape, a professional

car wash that employs water reclamation technology, Kitchen With Natural Communications Cherry Cabinets, Foundation, Pantry

organization devoted to

Restored is one Interior that everyone Doors, can One embrace. Car Garage According to the GRACE

each car washed at their facility consumes just nine to 15 developing innovating strategies to increase public awareness

gallons of water per wash. That’s a considerable savings First Floor Bedroom about the Plus issues Two facing More our Upstairs environment, using an energyefficient

Orange dishwasher $99,000 instead of hand-washing dishes can save

compared to washing at home, as the State of Maryland’s

Department of the Environment estimates that 100 gallons as much as 15.5 gallons per wash.

Contact Doug, 505-2051

of water are consumed during a single 10-minute car wash at

home using a garden hose.

• Install shower heads that earned the WaterSense label. The

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says that showering

accounts for nearly 17 percent of home water consumption.

For the average family, that translates to almost 1.2 trillion

VT State Employees 10/6/17 3.875% 3.914% 30 yr fixed 0 5%

Credit Union (VSECU) 3.250% 3.319% 15 yr fixed 0 5%

1-800-371-5162 X5345

Conserving water at home can have a profound impact

on the environment. And efforts at conservation are often

simpler than many people may think.

In Capitol Complex, Zoned Allowing Office Use

Entry Foyer, Hardwood Flooring, Sunroom, Parlor

Study With Fireplace Flanked By Bookshelves

Four Bedrooms Including Master Suite

Montpelier $459,000

Contact Tim, 552-0184

Price Just Lowered

Two Bedrooms, Family Room With Woodstove,

Updated Windows

Just Outside Village, Public Water/Sewer

On 1.18 Acres, Brook

Plainfield $138,000

Call Tim, 552-0184

New To The Market

1850 Cape, Restored Interior Doors, One Car Garage

Kitchen With Natural Cherry Cabinets, Pantry

First Floor Bedroom

Plus Two More Upstairs

Orange $99,000

Contact Doug, 505-2051

Duplex On Desirable Camp Street

Well Maintained, Each Unit Has Three Bedrooms

Formal Dining Room, French Doors

Hardwood Floors, Period Woodwork

Barre $149,500

Contact Michael, 552-0338

Rates can change without notice.

***APRs are based on 20% down payment. Some products are available with as little as

5% down, with purchase of Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI). The cost of PMI is not

included in the APR calculations.

Are you in need of

adequate shelter?

Is your total family income

$25-40,000?

Would you be willing

to help build your own

affordable house?

Central Vermont Habitat for Humanity is now accepting

applications through December 1st for the next Habitat

Home to be built in Randolph!

Applications can be found and printed at

centralvermonthabitat.org

or request one to be mailed

by calling or emailing

cvhfh.execdir@outlook.com

802-522-8611.

Orientation Meetings for interested

applicants held on Oct.18th 5-7pm

and Oct. 21st 12-2pm,

Bethany Church, Randolph!

HUGE PRICE REDUCTION!

Located in Berlin just over the Montpelier town line and only a few

miles from Norwich University, this 3 bedroom home has a 2 car

garage, paved driveway, enclosed three season room, and a newer

kitchen with oak cabinets. Hardwood floors. Many newer vinyl

windows and easy care vinyl siding. It is a solid home that would be

gorgeous with a few cosmetic updates. Shorten your commute time

and live here! MLS# 4347646

$165,000

Contact MarthaLange@C21Jack.com

or 802-229-9444

317 River St.,

Montpelier

www.C21Jack.com

REALTOR ®

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated

Martha Lange

802-229-9444

In Capitol Complex, Zoned Allowing Office Use

Entry Foyer, Hardwood Flooring, Sunroom, Parlor

Study W/Fireplace Flanked By Bookshelves

Four Bedrooms Including Master Suite

Montpelier $459,000

Contact Tim, 552-0184

81 Main St., Montpelier 229-0345

135 Washington St., Barre 476-6500

1-800-696-1456

HeneyRealtors.com

October 11, 2017 The WORLD page 39


PRICE

REDUCED

Randolph - $500,000

This Stoneleigh circa 1850 home is situated on a lovely 10+

acre lot that overlooks and abuts the Montague Golf Course.

This spacious home has plenty of room for family and friends

to enjoy and has potential rental income with a 1 bedroom

apartment located in the detached 3 bay garage/barn. This

attractive home features a striking wrap around, covered

porch with a stone façade.

MLS #4661260

Barre Town - $599,000

Appreciation for detail can be seen throughout this 4

bedroom, 5 bath home! Large windows throughout allow for

naturally, well-lit rooms offering stunning, panoramic views

of the rolling hills VT is so well known for. The attention to

comfort and luxury do not stop with the interior of this fi ne

home! The backyard is extremely well landscaped with native

Vermont stonework, a heated pool and backup generator!

MLS #4480191

Marshfield - $345,000

4 bedroom home in the country on 9.6 partially wooded acres

with a magnifi cent stone wall, views of spruce mountain, wild

berries, a large deck for entertaining, 2 bay out building and

plenty of room to do whatever you want. Corian counter tops,

Stainless Steel appliances, Radiant Heated tiled fl oor and

vaulted ceilings are just some of the features in this wonderful

property!

MLS #4645164

NEW

LISTING

JUST

LISTING

Northfield - $245,000

Here is an opportunity to own and operate your own business!

This turnkey restaurant is fully equipped and comes with all

existing inventory. The building is approximately 2100 SF and

includes a large dining room, commercial grade kitchen, large

walk-in freezer, and plenty of off-street parking.

MLS #4662421

Barre Town - $240,000

Single level living at its best. This spacious four bedroom

home is located on a large lot with mountain views that can

best be enjoyed from the its deck or relaxing by

the pool. The two car attached garage has ample storage

space above.

MLS #4638442

Barre Town - $165,000

Beautiful hardwood fl oors brighten up this 3 bedroom, 1 bath

home! The bright and open eat-in kitchen, with sliding glass

doors, that lead to the side deck. Enjoy the spacious lot that

offers a storage shed, berry bushes in the summer, great

place to go sliding in the winter and a beautiful patio that is

perfect for cookouts and camp fi res with family and friends.

MLS #4658044

PRICE

REDUCED

HUNTERS’ BUY OF THE WEEK!

HUNTERS’ BUY OF THE WEEK!

Barre City - $165,000

Nice middle unit with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 1st floor laundry

and an attached garage. Open floor plan on 1st floor and

unfi nished space in the basement for you to finish to your

style. The upstairs boasts the master bedroom and bath, plus

an additional bedroom with its own bath. Downstairs includes

a nice bedroom/den to use as you desire.

MLS #4644994

Chelsea - $75,000

Invest in your very own getaway! This A-frame style building

is nestled on a hill on over 10 acres of prime land. Don’t worry

about roughing it too much, power is available and water via

a spring. Enjoy getting away and enjoy the peace and quiet.

Great hunting!

MLS #4474431

Williamstown - $50,000

Enjoy a quiet getaway on this 25 acre parcel. Located just

3 miles from the village of Williamstown, but still far enough

away to escape to the woods. Enjoy numerous opportunities

for year-round recreational activities like camping, hunting,

hiking and snowshoeing.

MLS #4625871

“As a Vermont family business, we know what home means. Our approach is local, personalized and unique.

Local ownership and decision making combined with the resources and strengths of one of the largest real estate

John Biondolillo

BARRE • ESSEX JCT. • ST. JOHNSBURY • STOWE • STRATTON • WOODSTOCK

BARRE • ESSEX JCT. • ST. JOHNSBURY 802.479.3366 • STOWE • STRATTON • WOODSTOCK

brokerages in the northeast allows 802.479.3366 us to offer our clients the best of all worlds.

Call us today to learn more about the William Raveis difference.” –John B.

Come work with a local family-owned company that knows the market and gets results.

802.479.3366

RaveisVT.com

Marcia Biondolillo

Indep

Indep

Butch Churchill Courtney Brummert Kevin Copeland Kevin Petrochko Lisa Brassard Michele Smedy Michelle Hebert Rich Ibey Sarah Pregent Sue Arguin

BARRE • ESSEX JCT. • ST. JOHNSBURY • STOWE • STRATTON • WOODSTOCK

802.479.3366

BARRE • ESSEX JCT. • ST. JOHNSBURY • STOWE • STRATTON • WOODSTOCK

802.479.3366

page 40 The WORLD October 11, 2017

Independently Owned and Operated

Independently Owned and Operated

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