CAMA's Masterseries presents Juilliard String Quartet - Saturday, November 11, 2017 - Program Magazine

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Juilliard String Quartet
Saturday, November 11, 2017
Lobero Theatre, 8pm

Joseph Lin Violin • Ronald Copes Violin
Roger Tapping Viola • Astrid Schween Cello

Franz Joseph Haydn: Quartet in D Major, Op.76, No.5
Béla Bartók: Quartet No.5, Sz.102
Antonín Dvořák: Quartet No.11 in C Major, Op.61

Known through its performances and recordings as the quintessential American string quartet, the Juilliard String Quartet returns to the Lobero Theatre with new cellist Astrid Schween. In 2011, the multiple Grammy® Award-winning Quartet became the first classical music ensemble to receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.

SPONSOR:
Bitsy & Denny Bacon and the Becton Family Foundation

#CAMASB

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

masterseries at The Lobero Theatre

SEASON SPONSORSHIP: ESPERIA FOUNDATION

JUILLIARD

STRING

QUARTET

SIR ANDRÁS SCHIFF

ISABEL

BAYRAKDARIAN

PETER

SERKIN

COMMUNITY COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ARTS ASSOCIATION MUSIC ASSOCIATION

www.camasb.org


Simon Powis photo


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

masterseries at The Lobero Theatre

SEASON SPONSOR: ESPERIA FOUNDATION

JUILLIARD STRING QUARTET

JOSEPH LIN, VIOLIN • RONALD COPES, VIOLIN

ROGER TAPPING, VIOLA • ASTRID SCHWEEN, CELLO

Saturday, November 11, 2017, 8pm • Lobero Theatre, Santa Barbara

FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN

(1732-1809)

BÉLA BARTÓK

(1881-1945)

Quartet in D Major, Op.76, No.5

Allegretto

Largo. Cantabile e mesto

Menuetto. Allegro

Finale. Presto

Quartet No.5, Sz.102, BB 110

Allegro

Adagio Molto

Scherzo: alla bulgarese

Andante

Finale: Allegro vivace

INTERMISSION

ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK

(1841-1904)

Quartet in C Major, Op.61

Allegro

Poco adagio e molto cantabile

Allegro vivo

Finale. Vivace

Programs and artists subject to change

Colbert Artists Management, Inc.

307 Seventh Avenue, Suite 2006 | New York, NY 10001 | (212) 757-0782 | www.colbertartists.com

CAMA gratefully acknowledges our sponsors for this evening’s performance…

Masterseries Season Sponsor: Esperia Foundation

Sponsor: Bitsy & Denny Bacon and the Becton Family Foundation

We request that you switch off cellular phones, watch alarms and pager signals during

the performance. The photographing or sound recording of this concert or possession of

any device for such photographing or sound recording is prohibited.

Stage flower arrangements by S.R. Hogue & Co.

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION | www.camasb.org


Biography

Simon Powis photo

Juilliard

String Quartet

With unparalleled artistry and enduring

vigor, the Juilliard String Quartet continues

to inspire audiences around the world

with its performances. Founded in 1946,

and widely known as “the quintessential

American string quartet,” the Juilliard

draws on a deep and vital engagement

with the classics, while embracing the

mission of championing new works – a

vibrant combination of the familiar and the

daring. Each performance of the Juilliard

Quartet is a unique experience, bringing

together the four members’ profound

understanding, total commitment, and

unceasing curiosity in sharing the wonders

of the string quartet literature.

Having welcomed cellist Astrid

Schween and celebrated its 70th

anniversary last season, the Juilliard String

Quartet marks the 2017-2018 season with

highly anticipated return appearances

in Seattle, Santa Barbara, Pasadena,

Memphis, Raleigh, Houston, Amsterdam,

and Copenhagen. The Quartet continues its

acclaimed annual performances in Detroit,

Philadelphia, and at the Ravinia Festival,

along with numerous concerts at home in

New York City, including appearances at

Lincoln Center and Town Hall. The season

kicks off with the release of a new album

featuring the world premiere recording

of Mario Davidovsky’s Fragments (2016),

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together with Beethoven Op.95 and Bartók

No.1. Highlights of concert programming

throughout the 2017-2018 season include

visionary works by Beethoven, Bartók,

and Dvořák, as well as James MacMillan’s

haunting and evocative Quartet No.2, Why

is this night different? (1998).

The Juilliard String Quartet’s

groundbreaking interactive app on

Schubert’s “Death and the Maiden”, was

released in 2015 by the innovative app

developer, Touchpress, jointly with the

Juilliard School. Both the app and the

JSQ’s 2014 recording of the “Death and

the Maiden” are available on iTunes.

Celebrating one of the great collaborative

relationships in American music, Sony

Classical’s reissue of the Juilliard Quartet’s

landmark recordings of the first four Elliott

Carter String Quartets together with the

2013 recording of the Carter Quartet No.5

traces a remarkable period in the evolution

of both the composer and the ensemble.

The Quartet’s recordings of the Bartók and

Schoenberg Quartets, as well as those of

Debussy, Ravel and Beethoven, have won

Grammy® Awards, and in 2011 the Quartet

became the first classical music ensemble

to receive a Lifetime Achievement Award

from the National Academy of Recording

Arts and Sciences.

Devoted master teachers, the members

of the Juilliard String Quartet offer classes

and open rehearsals when on tour. At the

Juilliard School, where they are the String

Quartet in Residence, all are sought-after

members of the string and chamber music

faculty, and annually in May they are hosts

of the 5-day internationally recognized

Juilliard String Quartet Seminar. During

the summer, the JSQ works closely on

string quartet repertoire with students at

the renowned Tanglewood Music Center.

In performance, recordings and

incomparable work educating the major

artists and quartets of our time, the Juilliard

String Quartet has carried the banner of

the United States and the Juilliard School

throughout the world.

JOSEPH LIN, VIOLIN

An active solo and chamber

musician, Joseph Lin

was a founding member

of the Formosa Quartet,

winner of the 2006 London

International String

Quartet Competition. He

was named a Presidential Scholar in the

Arts and has won numerous awards,

including the Concert Artists Guild

International Competition, the Pro Musicis

International Award and First Prize at

the inaugural Michael Hill World Violin

Competition in New Zealand. His recordings

include the music of Korngold and Busoni

on the Naxos label, the unaccompanied

works of Bach and Ysaÿe on the N&F

label, and the Formosa Quartet’s debut CD

released by EMI. Mr. Lin has appeared as

a soloist with the New Japan Philharmonic,

the Sapporo Symphony, the Taiwan National

Symphony, the Auckland Philharmonia, the

Ukraine National Philharmonic, and the

Boston Symphony.

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION | www.camasb.org

5


After graduating from Harvard in

2000, he began an extended exploration

of China in 2002, and studied Chinese

music in Beijing as a Fulbright Scholar in

2004. From 2007 to 2011, Mr. Lin was an

Assistant Professor at Cornell University,

where he organized the inaugural Chinese

Musicians Residency. Joseph Lin’s violin

teachers have included Mary Canberg,

Shirley Givens and Lynn Chang.

Merriweather Post Competition and

the Concours International d’Exécution

Musicale in Geneva. During the summer he

is on faculty of the Kneisel Hall Chamber

Music Festival. For two decades, he served

as Professor of Violin at the University of

California, Santa Barbara, and joined the

faculty of The Juilliard School in 1997,

where he serves as chair of the violin

department.

RONALD COPES, VIOLIN

ROGER TAPPING, VIOLA

Praised by audiences

and critics alike for his

insightful artistry, violinist

Ronald Copes has toured

extensively with Music

From Marlboro ensembles,

the Los Angeles and

Dunsmuir Piano Quartets, and with the

Juilliard String Quartet. During the 2011-

2013 seasons, he and Seymour Lipkin

performed cycles of the complete

Beethoven Sonatas for Piano and Violin at

the Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Festival

and the Juilliard School.

Mr. Copes has recorded numerous

solo and chamber music works for radio

and television broadcast as well as for

Sony Classical, Orion, CRI, Klavier, Bridge,

New World Records, ECM and the Musical

Heritage Society. He has worked closely

with composers including Stephen

Hartke and Donald Crockett, and has

garnered prizes in the Artists’ Advisory

Council International Competition, the

Roger Tapping joined

the Julliard Quartet and

the Juilliard School viola

faculty in 2013.

He moved from London to

the USA in 1995 to join the

Takács Quartet. His decade

with them included many Beethoven and

Bartók cycles in major cities around the

world. Their Decca/London recordings,

including the complete quartets of

Bartók and Beethoven, won many awards

including Gramophone Magazine’s Hall

of Fame, three Gramophone Awards,

a Grammy® and three more Grammy®

nominations.

He has been on the viola faculty of the

New England Conservatory, where he also

directed the Chamber Music program, and

he has served on the faculties of Itzhak

Perlman’s Chamber Music Workshop, the

Tanglewood Quartet Seminar and Yellow

Barn, and given viola master classes at

Banff.

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“Each of the four has a notably beautiful tone, a sound

that sings out but also blends. They show a shared

understanding of the music they play; every bow stroke

adds to its meaning and its integrity.”

—Chicago Tribune

Mr. Tapping played and recorded with

a number of London’s leading chamber

ensembles, including Britain’s longest

established quartet, the Allegri Quartet. He

was a founding member of the Chamber

Orchestra of Europe. He has performed as

a guest with many distinguished quartets

from the U.S. and Europe, and he was a

member of the Boston Chamber Music

Society.

His teachers were Margaret Major and

Bruno Giuranna, and he participated in

master classes with William Primrose.

He holds degrees from the University of

Cambridge, is a member of the Order

of the Knight Cross of the Hungarian

Republic, has an Honorary Doctorate from

the University of Nottingham, and is a

Fellow of the Guildhall School of Music.

ASTRID SCHWEEN,

CELLO

Cellist Astrid Schween is an

internationally recognized

soloist, chamber artist,

and teacher. Her recent

appearances have included performances

with the Boston, Memphis, Detroit

and Seattle Chamber Music societies,

the Boston Trio and ongoing recital

partnerships with celebrated pianists

Randall Hodgkinson and Michael Gurt. An

active juror and panelist, she was recently

featured in Strings and Strad magazines,

on “Living the Classical Life,” National

Public Radio and as a guest speaker at the

Library of Congress on the role of women

in music.

As a longtime member of the Lark

Quartet, Astrid performed at major

venues around the world and received

many honors including the Naumburg

Chamber Music Award. During her tenure,

the quartet produced critically acclaimed

recordings for the Arabesque, Decca/Argo,

New World, CRI and Point labels, and

commissioned numerous works.

Astrid made her debut as soloist with

the New York Philharmonic under the

direction of Zubin Mehta and received

her degrees from the Juilliard School.

Her teachers included Harvey Shapiro,

Leonard Rose, Bernard Greenhouse and

Jacqueline du Pré. She participated in

the Marlboro Music Festival and William

Pleeth Master Classes, and was for many

years on the faculty of the University of

Massachusetts, Hartt School of Music,

Mount Holyoke College and Interlochen.

In September 2016, she succeeded Joel

Krosnick as cellist of the Juilliard String

Quartet and joined the Juilliard faculty.

7


Program Notes

©Susan Halpern, 2017

STRING QUARTET, IN D MAJOR,

OP.76, NO.5

Joseph Haydn

Born March 31, 1732, in Rohrau;

died May 31, 1809, in Vienna

In 1795, Haydn returned from his second

visit to London and settled in Vienna to live

out his remaining years as music’s grand

old man. Mozart, whom he had so greatly

admired, had died too young four years

before, and Beethoven, who was to be the

leader of the next generation (and of the

entire next century), was then only the

musical season’s best debutante. England

had showered wealth and honors on Haydn,

resulting in his lingering there for two

months after his last scheduled concert

before going home to the Continent.

By the standards of the time, Haydn

was an old man, sixty-three. What no

one knew was how different the work of

his last years would be. He had written

more than a hundred symphonies, but

after the dozen masterpieces that he

had composed expressly for his London

audiences, he never wrote another; yet

with the knowledge of Handel’s oratorios

that he had acquired in London, he

modernized and revitalized that form in

The Creation and The Seasons. He also

wrote six masses and some other sacred

works for the princely family that he had

served as staff conductor and composer

for thirty years.

Haydn’s greatest music until this time

had always been in his larger instrumental

works, but in his last few years, he wrote

almost no music except a few string

quartets, music that sums up a lifetime

of invention of the highest order. In 1797,

he wrote the six quartets we know as

Op.76, and in 1799, the two of Op.77. He

started another in 1803, but gave up after

two movements, which he allowed to be

published in 1806 with the apologetic

message, “All my strength is gone; I am

old and weak.” He wrote the last eight

completed quartets with the kind of

controlled freedom that comes only with

great maturity. Their rich instrumental

texture looks far forward, perhaps as far

as the work of Brahms.

The works in Op.76 are sometimes

called the Erdődy Quartets, after the

Hungarian Count who commissioned

them. For the fee of 100 ducats, Haydn

withheld them from publication until

1799, so that the Count could have

exclusive use of them for two years. The

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Erdődys, who were related by marriage

to Haydn’s employers, the Esterházys,

were a family of great music lovers who,

a generation later, were closely involved

with Beethoven; they also helped launch

the career of the ten-year-old Franz Liszt.

Count Ladislaus Erdődy is listed among

the subscribers to Mozart’s Vienna

concerts in 1783; Beethoven dedicated

his two Trios, Op.70 (1808), and two

Cello Sonatas, Op.102 (1815), to his pupil,

the Countess Maria, wife of Count Peter

Erdődy.

The music of this fifth work in the

Op.76 set tells us that these quartets,

contrary to the custom of the time, were

not intended to make their charms easily

available to amateur chamber music

players. This is concert music, written for

performance by true professionals. The

first violin part soars to great heights

unattainable by the unskilled. The

harmonic and rhythmic complexities of

the music would have thrown any but the

most sophisticated musicians of the time

into confusion. The full texture keeps all

four players almost constantly occupied,

with hardly a moment of rest for any of

them. The subtle interrelationship of the

themes in all four movements places an

interpretative burden on the players,

as does the extraordinary key in which

Haydn composed the slow movement.

The unique structure of the

monothematic first movement may be

read in a number of different ways, for

its changes of key and of tempo seem

to overlap and cross the expected

boundaries of the sections. It is perhaps

most clearly heard as this sequence of

musical events: first, a very long pastoral

theme; second, a minor-key variation of it;

third, a return of the theme, ornamented;

fourth, a development of it, speeded up to

Allegro and running into the descending

scale passages of the coda.

The next movement is also extraordinary.

It is cast in something like

the sonata-form usually found in first

movements, but because Haydn gave it

a slow tempo, he fashioned it in quite a

compact way so that it seems quite brief.

The heading is Largo, cantabile e mesto,

“broad, singing and sad,” and the key,

F-sharp, is one hardly expected to follow

D Major. Furthermore, the six sharps in

the key signature make it excruciatingly

difficult for many string players. In German

musical terminology the word for “sharp”

is the same as that for “cross,” which

led musicians to call this movement the

“Churchyard Largo.”

Twenty-five years earlier, in his Farewell

Symphony, Haydn depicted or at least

evoked, the fatigue of his orchestral

musicians by writing for them in F-sharp,

which almost guaranteed they would play

some wrong notes and would be out of

tune a good part of the time. The reason

Haydn chose it here must have been

rather different.

The third movement is a Minuet, Allegro,

or in some editions, Allegretto; it has a

rather serious cast, with a contrasting

central trio that features a cello solo in its

grumbling low register. The Finale, Presto,

is wittily developed from a little fragment

of a folkdance tune.

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STRING QUARTET NO.5

Béla Bartók

Born March 25, 1881, in Nagyszentmiklós,

Hungary; died September 26, 1945, in New York

Béla Bartók produced a series of six string

quartets over the course of thirty years.

These works, despite their unorthodoxies,

continue and extend the Classical quartet

tradition. The six quartets trace Bartók’s

developing attitude toward the unity of

multi-movement compositions and intermovement

relationships in terms of

themes and motives.

Bartók dedicated his Quartet No.5

to Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, who

had endowed a branch of the Library

of Congress, which had commissioned

the work. Written between August 6 and

September 6, 1934, it premiered at the

Library performed by the Kolisch Quartet,

on April 8, 1935.

It, like Quartet No.4, written six years

before, has a five-movement form in a

symmetrical arrangement where the first

and fifth movements share materials,

and the second and fourth also are

thematically and structurally related.

The corresponding movements are not

identical in either form or substance, but

are constructed of subtly related ideas

that move in similar tempi. The third

movement stands alone as the “kernel”

(Bartók’s word) of the work, its heart, and

all the other movements are “arranged in

layers around it.” All the movements derive

from a variation of a single basic motive

even though the derivation is not always

evident. This symmetry of movements

flanking the “kernel” makes the music

move through a curve that many music

historians have called an “arch.”

The vibrant Allegro first movement and

the Finale, both sonata-like movements,

bind the quartet together with a cyclic

device: the fugue in the last movement is

a development of the opening theme of

the quartet. The first movement is based

on a multiplicity of sharply differentiated

themes: one a rhythmic figure hammered

out in octaves and another interwoven in

an intricate imitative counterpoint. When

the ideas have been developed at some

length, they are recapitulated in reverse

order and melodically inverted, giving the

movement the shape of a small arch at

one end of the large arch that makes

up the whole quartet. In this movement

two thematic complexes are joined by a

transition that takes on almost thematic

importance, something that Bartók

pointed out in his descriptive analysis for

listeners. He went on to point out the fact

that “key centers in the seven segments

of the movement form the ascending

whole tone scale.”

The second movement and the

10


“Whether playing Beethoven, Schubert, Bartók or Carter,

the Juilliard Quartet remains unsurpassed in bringing attention

to details and expressive devices.”

—Cleveland Plain Dealer

fourth movement are parallel in shape.

The second is a slow nocturne built with

an introduction, Adagio molto, followed

by a main section that has three parts:

Andante, Adagio and then Largo, after

which there is a short coda.

The fourth, Andante, also slow in tempo,

like the second, has a flavor of “night

music.” Each has an ABA structure; the

fourth further expands and develops some

of the ideas of the second. Actually almost

everything in the second movement is

duplicated in varied form in the fourth.

Both have similar openings, beginning

hesitantly with fragmentary themes,

followed by “folk-like” principal subjects

and nocturnal melodies in the central

parts. The lyrical theme Bartók uses in

the second movement reappears but in a

more ornamented and expanded version

in the fourth movement.

At the center of the quartet is the

ingratiating Scherzo, Alla bulgarese (“in the

Bulgarian manner”), Vivace, a complicated

web of rhythm and sound. Bartók had first

encountered the kind of uneven rhythms

he uses here in 1912 in the course of his

research on the folk music of Bulgarians

living within the borders of Hungary.

The music is written in measures of nine

beats, which in conventional scores would

be divided into three groups of three,

but perhaps to offset the symmetries

elsewhere in the quartet, Bartók here

uses an uneven group of 4 + 2 + 3 beats.

This characteristic of uneven distribution

and the occasional silent beats, as well

as a sense of syncopation, embodies

Bulgarian folk music, but sometimes

seems, to American ears, to suggest

jazz. This movement has a central trio

section in which the measure is expanded

to ten beats of a constantly repeated,

rapidly rushing figure that the first violin

introduces; at the same time, the other

instruments repeat a simple melody.

The Finale last movement, in spirit and

form (sonata form) like the first movement,

uses many elements derived from the first

movement but with a dance-like abandon.

After an introduction, Allegro vivace, the

music increases in tempo to Presto, and

this regular meter continues to the end.

Rigorously canonic, the lines closely follow

each other at a distance of not more

than a measure. The work pushes forward

with enormous energy through dense

contrapuntal sections, including even an

exciting fugue, and relaxes only for a few

Allegretto interludes, one, according to

Bartók “capricious” and the other, which

is a variant, “indifferent.” In the capricious

one, the second violin articulates a little

melodic subject and is accompanied by

pizzicato chords, sounding “deliciously

out of tune.” The “indifferent” variant is

peculiar; critics have hypothesized that it is

an autobiographical touch, as here Bartók

11


introduces a hurdy-gurdy tune, its melody

taken from one of the movement’s other

episodes and set in augmented values.

Another interesting quality is the use of

silence, a dramatic feature that delivers

significant aural impact and is used several

times in this movement, each time providing

intensity through its contrast. Throughout

the rest of the movement, many passages

of melodies are then imitated in inversion.

The music accelerates and then hurls to an

abrupt end.

Throughout, Bartók pushes the skills

of the string players to the limit. Going

far beyond the conventional, he demands

unusual multiple stops, unorthodox

fingerings, several types of pizzicato and

glissando and a battery of special effects.

Yet the importance of the work is not the

ingenuity of his writing or the novelty of

his style but the strength, distinction and

persuasion with which the composition is

infused.

STRING QUARTET, IN C MAJOR,

OP.61

Antonín Dvořák

Born September 8, 1841, in Nelahozeves;

died May 1, 1904, in Prague

Antonín Dvořák began life modestly as the

son of a village innkeeper and butcher,

whose aspirations were limited to hoping

that his son would take over the family

trade, but Dvořák chose to make a career

in music instead. He studied the violin and

organ locally as a child, and at the age

of sixteen, left home to study in Prague.

Five years later, he joined the orchestra of

the National Theater as a violist (in those

days an instrument usually taken up only

by failed violinists), but he was almost

thirty before he had his first successful

performance of one of his own major

compositions. Then his career took off; as

he wrote more music, his fame grew, and

he eventually became a figure of world

importance. He held a post as professor of

Composition at Prague Conservatory, was

the recipient of honorary degrees from

Cambridge University in England and the

Czech University of Prague, and, during

his three-year residence in the United

States, was director of a conservatory in

New York.

Chamber music had an important place

in Dvořák’s life. Many of his earliest works

were quartets and quintets, modeled after

Beethoven and Schubert, which he played

with his colleagues and friends while

developing his craft. Most of Dvořák’s

mature chamber music is permeated with

the Slavonic qualities of his homeland’s

folk art. In this Op.61 Quartet, however,

he modified his nationalist inclinations

12


considerably and returned to the classical

manner. He was writing for the famous

Vienna-based Hellmesberger Quartet,

which was founded and led by members

of a musical family that had known

Beethoven and was close to Schubert.

Johannes Brahms and his friend, Eduard

Hanslick the powerful, conservative

Viennese music critic, were the influential

intermediaries between the composer and

the performers.

Around October 25, 1881, after

a false start with a very Beethovenian

movement in F Major, Dvořák began work

in earnest on this quartet, hoping, he

wrote to Hellmesberger, that “the dear

Lord will whisper a few melodies to me.”

He completed the work on November 10,

1881, and dedicated it to Hellmesberger,

but a concert hall fire in Vienna led to a

postponement of the première there, so

the Joachim Quartet gave the premiere

performance in Berlin, on November 2,

1882. The group for whom it was intended,

the Hellmesberger Quartet, seems never

to have played it in public.

Dvořák opens the quartet with an

homage to Beethoven: a grand and noble

main theme that soon lends itself to the

adventurous harmonic treatment that

provides the basis for a large scale musical

structure. Next come a Romantically lyrical

slow movement, Poco adagio, and a lively

Scherzo, Allegro vivo, into whose contrasting

central section, Dvořák at last admits some

hint of the folk music of his native Bohemia.

The Vivace Finale, too, introduces highspirited

elements of folk song and dance. •

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

JUILLIARD

STRING

QUARTET

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2017, 8PM

JUILLIARD STRING

QUARTET

Joseph Lin, Violin

Ronald Copes, Violin

Roger Tapping, Viola

Astrid Schween, Cello

HAYDN, BARTÓK, DVOŘÁK

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2018, 8PM

PETER

SERKIN PIANO

MOZART and BACH:

GOLDBERG VARIATIONS

THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 2018, 8PM

SIR ANDRÁS

SCHIFF PIANO

MENDELSSOHN, BEETHOVEN,

BRAHMS, BACH

SATURDAY, MAY 12, 2018, 8PM

ISABEL SOPRANO

BAYRAKDARIAN

ST. LAWRENCE

STRING QUARTET

SONGS BY OTTORINO RESPIGHI,

LEONARD BERNSTEIN (ARRANGED

BY SEROUJ KRADJIAN), PLUS

TROUBADOUR SONGS AND TANGOS!

SIR ANDRÁS SCHIFF

Single tickets at

The Lobero Theatre Box Office

Sir András Schiff: $64, $54​• ​All Other Concerts: $49, $39

(805) 963-0761​ • ​lobero.com

​For more information visit camasb.org

ISABEL

BAYRAKDARIAN

PETER

SERKIN

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA, INC

13


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

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PRINCIPAL SPONSOR

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CO-SPONSORS

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Dorothy & John Gardner

Jocelyne & William Meeker

ORCHESTRA OF THE AGE

OF ENLIGHTENMENT

SPONSORS

Hollis Norris Fund

Alison & Jan Bowlus

CO-SPONSORS

Louise & Michael Caccese

CAMA Women's Board

Lynn P. Kirst

Bob & Val Montgomery

Michele & Andre Saltoun

ACADEMY OF ST. MARTIN

IN THE FIELDS

SPONSORS

Judith L. Hopkinson

Sara Miller McCune

CO-SPONSORS

Peggy & Kurt Anderson

Edward DeLoreto

Jocelyne & William Meeker

Ellen & John Pillsbury

Michele & Andre Saltoun

Michael Tilson Thomas


MASTERSERIES

SEASON SPONSORSHIP:

ESPERIA FOUNDATION

Isabel

Bayrakdarian

JUILLIARD STRING QUARTET

SPONSOR

Bitsy & Denny Bacon and the

Becton Family Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO

SYMPHONY

PRIMARY SPONSOR

The Elaine F. Stepanek

Concert Fund

PRINCIPAL SPONSOR

Herbert & Elaine Kendall

SPONSOR

Bitsy & Denny Bacon and

the Becton Family Foundation

CO-SPONSORS

Anonymous

Lynn P. Kirst

Jocelyne & William Meeker

Sir András Schiff

PETER SERKIN, piano

CO-SPONSOR

CAMA Women's Board

CONCERT PARTNERS

Steve Cloud

Elizabeth Karlsberg & Jeff Young

Stephen J.M. & Anne Morris

SIR ANDRÁS SCHIFF, piano

PRINCIPAL SPONSOR

The Stephen & Carla Hahn Foundation

CO-SPONSORS

Stephen J.M. & Anne Morris

Craig & Ellen Parton

CONCERT PARTNERS

Virginia Castagnola-Hunter

Bridget Colleary

Raye Haskell Melville

ISABEL BAYRAKDARIAN, soprano

ST. LAWRENCE STRING QUARTET

SPONSOR

CAMA Women's Board

CO-SPONSOR

Stephen J.M. & Anne Morris

CONCERT PARTNERS

Robert Boghosian &

Mary E. Gates-Warren

Department of Music, UC Santa Barbara

Frank McGinity

Sheila Bourke McGinity


LIFETIME GIVING

diamond circle

$500,000 and above

Suzanne & Russell Bock

Linda Brown *

Andrew H. Burnett

Foundation

Esperia Foundation

The Stephen & Carla Hahn

Foundation

Judith Hopkinson

Herbert J. Kendall

Sage Publications

Michael Towbes/The Towbes

Foundation

sapphire circle

$250,000 - $499,999

Anonymous

Bitsy & Denny Bacon

CAMA Women’s Board

Léni Fé Bland

TThe Samuel B. & Margaret C.

Mosher Foundation

The Stepanek Foundation

The Wood-Claeyssens

Foundation

ruby circle

$100,000 - $249,999

The Adams Foundation

Mr. & Mrs. David H. Anderson

Deborah & Peter Bertling

Virginia C. Hunter/

Castagnola Family

Foundation

Robert & Christine Emmons

Mary & Ray Freeman

Dr. & Mrs. Melville Haskell

Dolores Hsu

Mr. & Mrs. James H. Hurley, Jr.

Mr. & Mrs. Palmer Jackson

Mrs. Thomas A. Kelly

Shirley & Seymour Lehrer

Sara Miller McCune

Mr & Mrs Frank R Miller, Jr. /

The Henry E. & Lola Monroe

Foundation

John & Kathleen Moselely/

The Nichols Foundation

Nancy & William G. Myers

Michele & Andre Saltoun

The Santa Barbara Foundation

Jan & John G. Severson

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Stepanek

Jeanne C. Thayer

Mrs. Walter J. Thomson

Union Bank

Dr. & Mrs. H. Wallace Vandever

The Wallis Foundation

Nancy & Kent Wood

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Yzurdiaga

emerald circle

$50,000 - $99,999

Anonymous

Ms. Joan C. Benson

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Beuret

Dr. & Mrs. Edward E. Birch

Louise & Michael Caccese

Dr. & Mrs. Jack Catlett

Roger & Sarah Chrisman

NancyBell Coe &

Bill Burke

Mr. & Mrs. Robert M. Colleary

Mrs. Maurice E. Faulkner

Mr. Daniel H. Gainey

Mr. Arthur R. Gaudi

Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Gilson

The George H. Griffiths &

Olive J. Griffiths Charitable

Foundation

Mr. Richard Hellman

Joanne Holderman

Michael & Natalia Howe

The Hutton Parker Foundation

Ellen & Peter Johnson

Judith Little

John & Lucy Lundegard

Mrs. Max E. Meyer

Montecito Bank & Trust

Bob & Val Montgomery

Mr. & Mrs. Craig A. Parton

Performing Arts Scholarship

Foundation

Marjorie S. Petersen/

La Arcada Investment Corp.

Mr. Ted Plute & Mr. Larry Falxa

Lady Ridley-Tree

Barbara & Sam Toumayan

Judy & George Writer

topaz circle

$25,000 - $49,999

Anonymous

Edward Bakewell

Helene & Jerry Beaver

Deborah & Peter Bertling

Robert Boghosian &

Mary E. Gates-Warren

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Burnett

Linda Stafford BurrowsMs.

Huguette Clark

Mrs. Leonard Dalsemer

Edward S. De Loreto

Mr. & Mrs. Larry Durham

Dr. Robert M. & Nancyann

Failing

The George Frederick Jewett

Foundation

Patricia Kaplan

Elizabeth Karlsberg &

Jeff Young

Lynn P. Kirst & Lynn R.

Matteson

Otto Korntheuer/ The Harold L.

Wyman Foundation in memory

of Otto Korntheuer

Chris Lancashire &

Catherine Gee

Mrs. Jon B. Lovelace

Leatrice Luria

Mrs. Frank Magid

Ruth McEwen

Frank McGinity

Sheila Bourke McGinity

Frank R. Miller, Jr.

James & Mary Morouse

Patricia Hitchcock O’Connell

Efrem Ostrow Living Trust

Mr. Ernest J. Panosian

Mr. & Mrs. Roger A. Phillips

Kathryn H. Phillips

Mrs. Kenneth Riley

Judith F. Smith

Marion Stewart

Ina Tournallyay

Mrs. Edward Valentine

The Outhwaite Foundation

The Elizabeth Firth Wade

Endowment Fund

Maxine Prisyon & Milton

Warshaw

Mrs. Roderick Webster

Westmont College

amethyst

circle

$10,000 - $24,999

Anonymous

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Adams

Mrs. David Allison

Dr. & Mrs. Mortimer Andron

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Arthur

Mr. & Mrs. J.W. Bailey

Mrs. Archie Bard

Leslie & Philip Bernstein

Frank Blue &

Lida Light Blue

Mrs. Erno Bonebakker

Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher

CAMA Fellows

Mrs. Margo Chapman

Chubb-Sovereign Life

Insurance Co.

Carnzu A. Clark

Dr. Gregory Dahlen &

Nan Burns

Karen Davidson M.D.

Julia Dawson

Mr. & Mrs. William Esrey

Ronald & Rosalind A. Fendon

Audrey Hillman Fisher

Foundation

Dave Fritzen/DWF Magazines

Catherine H. Gainey

Kay & Richard Glenn

The Godric Foundation

Corinna & Larry Gordon

Mr. & Mrs. Freeman Gosden, Jr.

Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Hanna

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Hanrahan

Lorraine Hansen

Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Hatch

Dr. & Mrs. Richard Hawley

Dr. & Mrs. Alan Heeger

Mr. Preston Hotchkis

Elizabeth & Gary Johnston

Mahri Kerley

KDB Radio

Linda & Michael Keston

Mrs. Robert J. Kuhn

Catherine Lloyd/Actief-cm, Inc.

Leatrice Luria

Nancy & Jim Lynn

Keith J. Mautino

Jayne Menkemeller

Myra & Spencer Nadler

Karin Nelson & Eugene Hibbs, Jr.

Joanne & Alden Orpet

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Patridge

Patricia & Carl Perry

John Perry

Mrs. Ray K. Person

Ellen & John Pillsbury

Anne & Wesley Poulson

Susannah Rake

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Reed

Jack Revoyr

Betty & Don Richardson

The Grace Jones

Richardson Trust

Dorothy Roberts

The Roberts Bros. Foundation

John F. Saladino

Jack & Anitra Sheen

Sally & Jan Smit

Betty Stephens &

Lindsay Fisher

Selby & Diane Sullivan

Joseph M. Thomas

Milan E. Timm

Mark E. Trueblood

Steven D. Trueblood

Kenneth W. & Shirley C. Tucker

Mr. & Mrs. Hubert D. Vos

Barbara & Gary Waer

Mr. &Mrs. David Russell Wolf

Dick & Ann Zylstra

* promised gift

(Gifts and pledges received

as of October 2, 2017)

16


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

“I think too often

people think of the

arts as decoration to

the experiences of life,

sort of a frosting on

the cake. But to me,

the arts are essential

to understanding the

problems of life, and to

helping us get through

the experiences of life

with intelligent understanding

and grace.”

– Philanthropist

and CAMA Friend

Robert M. Light

YOU Ensure

the Tradition

Your generosity through planned giving secures

the future of CAMA. When you include CAMA in

your will or living trust, your contribution ensures

CAMA’s great classical music performances and

music outreach programs continue.

Thank you for being part of our Community.

CAMA offers the opportunity to ensure the

future of our mission to bring world-class music

to Santa Barbara. By including CAMA in your will or

living trust, you leave a legacy of great concerts and

music appreciation outreach programs for future

generations.

Make a gift of cash, stocks or bonds and enjoy immediate tax benefits.

Join Elizabeth Alvarez, CAMA Director of Development,

for lunch to learn more. (805) 276-8270 direct.

Elizabeth@camasb.org

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION

(805) 966-4324 • www.camasb.org

17


CAMA ENDOWMENT: A Sound Investment

YOU ensure that great music and world-class artists

continue to grace Santa Barbara stages for decades to come.

Endowment funds are needed to bridge the gap between ticket sales

and steadily rising artist fees and concert production costs. Funds are also

needed to sustain CAMA’s outstanding music education programs.

MOZART SOCIETY

Our CAMA community members who contribute a cash gift to the endowment of $10,000

or more enjoy many benefits of The Mozart Society, including participation in our annual

black-tie dinner.

LEGACY SOCIETY

Our CAMA community members who have included CAMA in their will or estate plan

belong to the Legacy Society. Legacy Society members participate in the Annual Legacy

Event. In May 2017, Legacy members gathered for a Sunset Cruise on the Channel Cat.

Call Elizabeth Alvarez at the CAMA Office (805) 966-4324 to learn more

about CAMA’s Endowment.

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

INTERNATIONAL SERIES

AT THE GRANADA THEATRE

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

The Granada Theatre, 8pm

ST. LOUIS

SYMPHONY

David Robertson Music Director

Augustin Hadelich Violin

David

Robertson

Thomas Adès: Dances from Powder Her Face (2007)

Benjamin Britten: Violin Concerto, Op.15

Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No.1 in F minor, Op.10

Granada Theatre Box Office (805) 899-2222 • granadasb.org

18


MOZART SOCIETY

conductor’s circle

($500,000 and above)

Mr. & Mrs. Russell S. Bock

Linda Brown*

Esperia Foundation

SAGE Publications

crescendo circle

($250,000-$499,999)

Andrew H. Burnett Foundation

Judith L. Hopkinson

Herbert & Elaine Kendall

cadenza patrons

($100,000-$249,999)

Anonymous

Anonymous

Bitsy Becton Bacon

Mary & Ray Freeman

Mr. & Mrs. James H. Hurley Jr.

William & Nancy Myers

Jan & John Severson

Judith & Julian Smith

Michael Towbes

rondo patrons

($50,000-$99,999)

Peter & Deborah Bertling

Linda & Peter Beuret

Robert & Christine Emmons

Stephen R. & Carla Hahn

Dolores M. Hsu

The Samuel B. & Margaret C.

Mosher Foundation

Santa Barbara Bank & Trust

Mr. & Mrs. Byron K. Wood

concerto patrons

($25,000-$49,999)

Linda Stafford Burrows,

in memory of Frederika

Voogd Burrows

Dr. & Mrs. Jack Catlett

Bridget & Robert Colleary

Mrs. Maurice E. Faulkner

Léni Fé Bland

Dr. & Mrs. Melville H. Haskell, Jr.

Sara Miller McCune

Mr. & Mrs. Frank R. Miller, Jr.

The Hutton Foundation

Efrem Ostrow Living Trust

Craig & Ellen Parton

Walter J. Thomson/

The Thomson Trust

Mr. & Mrs. Sam Toumayan

sonata patrons

($10,000-$24,999)

Anonymous

The Adams Foundation

Mr. & Mrs. Peter Adams

Else Schilling Bard

Dr. & Mrs. Edward E. Birch

Frank Blue & Lida Light Blue

CAMA Women’s Board

(Sally Lee Remembrance

Fund and Marilyn Roe

Remembrance Fund)

Dr. Robert Boghosian &

Ms. Mary E. Gates-Warren

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Butcher

Virginia Castagnola-Hunter

Dr. & Mrs. Charles Chapman

Dr. Karen Davidson

Mr. & Mrs. Larry Durham

Dr. Robert & Nancyann Failing

Dr. & Mrs. Jason Gaines

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Gainey/

Daniel C. Gainey Fund

Arthur R. Gaudi

Sherry & Robert B. Gilson

Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Hanna

Ms. Lorraine Hansen

Joanne C. Holderman

Patricia Kaplan

Elizabeth Karlsberg &

Jeff Young

Mrs. Thomas A. Kelly

Mahri Kerley

Lynn P. Kirst & Lynn R.

Matteson

Dr. & Mrs. Robert J. Kuhn

Mr. John Lundegard/

Lundegard Family Fund

Keith J. Mautino

Jayne Menkemeller

Mr. & Mrs. Max Meyer

Bob & Val Montgomery

Mary & James Morouse

Dr. & Mrs. Spencer Nadler

Patricia Hitchcock O’Connell

Performing Arts Scholarship

Foundation

John Perry

Mrs. Hugh Petersen

Mr. & Mrs. Roger A. Phillips

Ellen & John Pillsbury

Miss Susannah E. Rake

Mrs. Kenneth W. Riley

Michele & Andre Saltoun

Dr. & Mrs. Jack Sheen/Peebles

Sheen Foundation

Sally & Jan E.G. Smit

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Stepanek

Betty J. Stephens, in

recognition of my friend

Judy Hopkinson

Dr. & Mrs. William A. Stewart

Mark E. Trueblood

Dr. & Mrs. H. Wallace Vandever

The Elizabeth Firth Wade

Endowment Fund

Mr. & Mrs. Gary Waer

Mr. & Mrs. David Russell Wolf

* promised gift

LEGACY SOCIETY

WE GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGE CAMA LEGACY SOCIETY MEMBERS FOR

REMEMBERING CAMA IN THEIR ESTATE PLANS WITH A DEFERRED GIFT.

Anonymous

Peter & Becky Adams

Bitsy Becton Bacon

Else Schilling Bard

Peter & Deborah Bertling

Linda & Peter Beuret

Lida Light Blue & Frank Blue

Mrs. Russell S. Bock

Dr. Robert Boghosian &

Ms. Mary-Elizabeth Gates-Warren

Linda Brown *

Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher

Virginia Castagnola-Hunter

Jane & Jack Catlett

Bridget & Bob Colleary

Karen Davidson, M.D &

David B. Davidson, M.D.

Patricia & Larry Durham

Christine & Robert Emmons

Ronald & Rosalind A. Fendon Mary

& Ray Freeman

Arthur R. Gaudi

Stephen & Carla Hahn

Beverly Hanna

Ms. Lorraine Hansen

Joanne C. Holderman

Judith L. Hopkinson

Dolores M. Hsu

Mr. & Mrs. James H. Hurley, Jr.

Elizabeth & Gary Johnston

Herbert & Elaine Kendall

Mahri Kerley

Lynn P. Kirst & Lynn R. Matteson

Lucy & John Lundegard

Keith J. Mautino

Sara Miller McCune

Raye Haskell Melville

Mr. & Mrs. Frank R. Miller, Jr.

Dr. & Mrs. Spencer Nadler

Ellen & Craig Parton

Diana & Roger Phillips

Ellen & John Pillsbury

Michele & Andre Saltoun

Judith & Julian Smith

Mr. & Mrs. Sam Toumayan

Mark E. Trueblood

Dr. & Mrs. H. Wallace Vandever

Barbara & Gary Waer

Nancy & Kent Wood

* promised gift

(Gifts and pledges received

as of October 2, 2017)

19


INTERNATIONAL CIRCLE

Join us for delightful garden parties, the International Circle Wine Intermission,

and other elegant events.

Call Elizabeth Alvarez for an Invitation Packet. (805) 276-8270

PRESIDENT'S CIRCLE

($10,000 and above)

Anonymous (2)

Bitsy & Denny Bacon and

The Becton Family Foundation

Suzanne & Russell Bock

Robert Boghosian &

Mary E. Gates Warren

Alison & Jan Bowlus

NancyBell Coe & Bill Burke

Dan & Meg Burnham

The CAMA Women's Board

Robert & Christine Emmons

The Elaine F. Stepanek

Foundation

Carla Hahn

Hollis Norris Fund

Judith L. Hopkinson

Joan & Palmer Jackson

Ellen & Peter Johnson

Herbert & Elaine Kendall

Lynn P. Kirst

John Lundegard

Sara Miller McCune

Jocelyne & William Meeker

Mary Lloyd & Kendall Mills

Bob & Val Montgomery

Stephen J.M. & Anne Morris

The Samuel B. & Margaret C.

Mosher Foundation

Efrem Ostrow Living Trust

Craig & Ellen Parton

Ellen & John Pillsbury

Michele & Andre Saltoun

Nancy Schlosser

The Shanbrom Family Foundation

The Walter J. &

Holly O. Thomson Foundation

Barbara & Sam Toumayan

The Towbes Fund for the

Performing Arts

George & Judy Writer

Patricia Yzurdiaga

COMPOSER'S CIRCLE

($5,000 - $9,999)

Peggy & Kurt Anderson

Helene & Jerry Beaver

Frank Blue & Lida Light Blue

The Wood-Claeyssens

Foundation

Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher

Louise & Michael Caccese

Stephen Cloud

Bridget Colleary

Edward De Loreto

Ronald & Rosalind A. Fendon

Dorothy & John Gardner

Raye Haskell Melville

Preston & Maurine Hotchkis

Elizabeth Karlsberg & Jeff Young

Winona Fund

Frank McGinity

Sheila Bourke McGinity

Mr. & Mrs. Frank R. Miller, Jr./

The Henry E. & Lola Monroe

Foundation

Montecito Bank & Trust

Performing Arts Scholarship

Foundation

Dorothy Roberts

Judith F. Smith

Irene & Robert Stone/

Stone Family Foundation

VIRTUOSO CIRCLE

($2,500 - $4,999)

Annette & Richard Caleel

Virginia Castagnola-Hunter

Sarah & Roger Chrisman

Fredericka & Dennis Emory

Nancyann & Robert Failing

Mary & Raymond Freeman

Ronda & Bill Hobbs

Shirley Ann & James H. Hurley, Jr.

Jill Dore Kent

Lois Kroc

Shirley & Seymour Lehrer

Ruth & John Matuszeski

Dona & George McCauley

Theodore Plute & Larry Falxa

Steven Trueblood

Department of Music, University

of California, Santa Barbara

Nick & Patty Weber

CONCERTMASTER

CIRCLE ($1,500 - $2,499)

Todd & Allyson Aldrich Family

Charitable Fund

Deborah & Peter Bertling

Linda & Peter Beuret

Edward & Sue Birch

Diane Boss

Suzanne & Peyton Bucy

Jill Felber

Renee Harwick

Renee & Richard Hawley

Maison K

Karin Nelson & Eugene Hibbs/

Maren Henle

Joanne C. Holderman

Karen & Chuck Kaiser

Barbara & Tim Kelley

Connie & Richard Kennelly

Kum Su Kim

Karin Jacobson & Hans Koellner

The Harold L. Wyman

Foundation

Chris Lancashire &

Catherine Gee

MaryAnn Lange

Cynthia Brown & Arthur Ludwig

Gloria & Keith Martin

Sally & George Messerlian

Gail Osherenko & Oran Young

Anne & Daniel Ovadia

Carol & Kenneth Pasternack

Regina & Rick Roney

William E. Sanson

Linda Stafford Burrows

Marion Stewart

Vera & Gary Sutter

Suzanne Holland & Raymond

Thomas

Esther & Tom Wachtell

Barbara & Gary Waer

Westmont College

Victoria & Norman Williamson

Ann & Dick Zylstra

PRINCIPAL PLAYER'S

CIRCLE ($1,000 - $1,499)

Leslie & Philip Bernstein

Wendel Bruss

Patricia Clark

Lois Erburu

Katina Etsell

Audrey Hillman Fisher

Foundation

Catherine H. Gainey

Tish Gainey & Charles Roehm

Perri Harcourt

Glenn Jordan & Michael Stubbs

Peter Karoff

Sally Kinney

Dora Anne Little

Russell Mueller

Ellen & Thomas Orlando

Diana & Roger Phillips

Maurice Singer

Diane Sullivan

Milan E. Timm

Shirley Tucker

Hubert Vos

Nancy Englander &

Harold Williams

Your annual International Circle Membership plays such an important role in continuing

CAMA's grand tradition of bringing the best in classical music to Santa Barbara.

Thank you!

(Gifts and pledges received from

June 1, 2016 – October 2, 2017)

20


MUSICIANS SOCIETY

Your annual gift is vitally important to continuing CAMA's nearly 100-year tradition –

Thank you for your generous annual donation.

Benefactors

($500 - $999)

David Ackert

Shelley & Mark Bookspan

Edith M. Clark

Betsy & Kenneth Coates

Wendy & Rudy Eiser

Thomas & Doris Everhart

Elinor & James Langer

Christie & Morgan Lloyd

Phyllis Brady & Andy Masters

Patriicia & William McKinnon

Pamela McLean &

Frederic Hudson

Peter L. Morris

Maryanne Mott

Natalie Myerson

Justyn Person

Patricia & Robert Reid

Lynn & Mark Schiffmacher

Maureen & Les Shapiro

Halina W. Silverman

Barbara & Wayne Smith

Carol Vernon & Robert Turbin

Dody Waugh & Eric Small

Cheryl & Peter Ziegler

Contributors

($250 - $499)

Sylvia Abualy

Antoinette & Shawn Addison

Jyl & Allan Atmore

Howard A. Babus

Doris Lee Carter

Lavelda & Lynn Clock

Michael & Ruth Ann Collins

Joan & Steven Crossland

Peggy & Timm Crull

Ann & David Dwelley

Margaret Easton

Ghita Ginberg

Linda & Antony Harbour

Debbie & Frank Kendrick

June & William Kistler

Andrew Mester, Jr.

Myra & Spencer Nadler

Carolyn & Dennis Naiman

Maureen O'Rourke

Hensley & James Peterson

Julia & Arthur Pizzinat

Bette & Claude Saks

Ada B. Sandburg

Kathryn Lawhun &

Mark Shinbrot

Karen Spechler

Beverly & Michael Steinfeld

Jacqueline & Ronald Stevens

Mark E. Trueblood

Julie Antelman & William Ure

Lorraine & Stephen Weatherford

Associates

($100 - $249)

Catherine L. Albanese

Nancy & Jesse Alexander

Carol & Gilbert Ashor

Esther & Don Bennett

Myrna Bernard

Alison H. Burnett

Margaret & David Carlberg

Polly Clement

Melissa Colborn

Janet Davis

Marilyn DeYoung

Lois & Jack Duncan

Michael K. Dunn

Julia Emerson

Barbara Faulkner

Eunice & J.Thomas Fly

Bernice & Harris Gelberg

Deborah Branch Geremia

Dolores Airey Gillmore

Nancy & Frederic Golden

Elizabeth & Harland Goldwater

Marge & Donald Graves

Marie-Paule & Laszlo Hajdu

Carolyn Hanst

M.Louise Harper &

Richard Davies

Elizabeth Hastings

Lorna S. Hedges

Edward O. Huntington

Gina & Joseph Jannotta

Virginia Stewart Jarvis

Brian Frank Johnson

Monica & Desmond Jones

Emmy & Fred Keller

Robin Alexandra Kneubuhl

Anna & Petar Kokotovic

Doris Kuhns

Linda & Rob Laskin

Lady Patricia &

Sir Richard Latham

Lavender Oak Ranch LLC

Barbara & Albert Lindemann

Barbara & Ernest Marx

Jeffrey McFarland

Terry McGovern

Meredith McKittrick-Taylor &

Al Taylor

Christine & James V. McNamara

Renée & Edward Mendell

Lori Kraft Meschler

Betty Meyer

Susan Levine & Jack Murray

Carol Hawkins & Larry Pearson

Marilyn Perry

Francis Peters, Jr.

Ann Picker

Eric Boehm

Constance Pratt

Sonia Rosenbaum

Muriel & Ian K. Ross

Shirley & E.Walton Ross

Joan & Geoffrey Rutkowski

Sharon & Ralph Rydman

Doris & Bob Schaffer

Naomi Schmidt

Anitra & Jack Sheen

James Poe Shelton

Joan Tapper & Steven Siegel

Anne Sprecher

Florence & Donald Stivers

Laura Tomooka

Mary H. Walsh

Judy Weirick

Judy & Mort Weisman

Theresa & Julian Weissglass

Donna & Barry Williiams

Deborah Winant

Barbara Wood

David Yager

Taka Yamashita

Grace & Edward Yoon

Friends

($10 - $99)

Anne Ashmore

Robert Baehner

Barbara Bonadeo

Cholame Vineyard

Thomas Craveiro

Patricia Ericson

Hannelore Foraker

Susan & Larry Gerstein

Katherine B. &

Richard D. Godfrey

William S. Hanrahan

Lorraine C. Hansen

Carol Hester

Jalama Canon Ranch

Catherine Leffler

Margaret Menninger

Ellicott Million

Edith & Raymond Ogella

Jean Perloff

Cherie Topper & Mark Rodgers

Judith & Frank Salazar

Joanne Samuelson

Alice & Sheldon Sanov

Susan Schmidt

Diane & Morris Seidler

Allan Serviss

Ann Shaw

Laura & Alan Smith

Julie & Richard Steckel

Patricia & Edward Wallace

Shela West

(Gifts and pledges received from

June 1, 2016 – October 2, 2017)

21


MUSIC EDUCATION PROGRAM

$25,000 and above

The Walter J. & Holly O. Thomson Foundation

$10,000 - $24,999

Ms. Irene Stone/

Stone Family Foundation

$1,000 - $9,999

Sara Miller McCune

Mr. & Mrs. Frank R. Miller, Jr./

The Henry E. & Lola Monroe Foundation

Performing Arts Scholarship Foundation

Westmont College

$100 - $999

Lynn P. Kirst

Volunteer docents are trained by CAMA’s Education

Committee Chair, Joan Crossland, to deliver this

program to area schools monthly. Music enthusiasts

are invited to learn more about the program and

volunteer opportunities.

CAMA Education Endowment

Fund Income

$10,000 AND ABOVE

William & Nancy Myers

$1,000 - $4,999

Linda Stafford Burrows –

This opportunity to experience great musicians excelling

is given in honor and loving memory of Frederika Voogd

Burrows to continue her lifelong passion for enlightening

young people through music and math.

Kathryn H. Phillips, in memory of Don R. Phillips

Walter J. Thomson/The Thomson Trust

$50 - $999

Lynn P. Kirst

Keith J. Mautino

Performing Arts Scholarship Foundation

Marjorie S. Petersen

(Gifts and pledges received from June 1, 2016 – October 2, 2017)

Call the CAMA office at (805) 966-4324 for more information about the docent program.

MEMORIAL GIFTS

IN MEMORY...

Else (Leinie) Schilling Bard

Joanne C. Holderman

John Lundegard

Bridget Colleary

Lynn P. Kirst

Michael Towbes

Bridget Colleary

Susie Vos

Bridget Colleary

Dr. Robert Sinsheimer

& Karen Sinsheimer

Robert Boghosian

& Mary E. Gates Warren

Sybil Mueller

Lynn P. Kirst

Robert M. Light

Edward & Sue Birch

Joanne C. Holderman

Judith L. Hopkinson

Lynn P. Kirst

Betty Meyer

Diana & Roger Phillips

Joan & Geoffrey Rutkowski

Judith F. Smith

Marion Stewart

(Gifts and pledges received from

June 1, 2016 – October 9, 2017)

22


BUSINESS SUPPORTERS

American Riviera Bank

James P. Ballantine

Belmond El Encanto

Wes Bredall

Heather Bryden

Ca' Dario

Camerata Pacifica

Casa Dorinda

Chaucer's Books

Cottage Health System

DD Ford Construction

Eye Glass Factory

First Republic Bank

Flag Factory of Santa Barbara

Gainey Vineyard

Colin Hayward/The Hayward Group

Steven Handelman Studios

Help Unlimited

SR Hogue & Co Florist

Indigo Interiors

Maravilla/Senior Resource Group

Microsoft® Corporation

Montecito Bank & Trust

Northern Trust

Oceania Cruises

Olio e Limone/Olio Crudo Bar/

Olio Pizzeria

Pacific Coast Business Times

Peregrine Galleries

Performing Arts Scholarship

Foundation

Renaud's Patisserie & Bistro

Sabine Myers/Motto Design

Stewart Fine Art

Santa Barbara Choral Society

Santa Barbara Foundation

Santa Barbara Travel Bureau

The Upham Hotel &

Upham Country House

UCSB Arts & Lectures

Westmont Orchestra

Contact Heather Bryden for information about showcasing your business

in CAMA's Program Magazines. (805) 965-5558 • HeatherBryden@cox.net

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

Board of Directors

(as of November 3, 2017)

ROBERT K. MONTGOMERY president

DEBORAH BERTLING, first vice-president

CRAIG A. PARTON second vice-president

WILLIAM MEEKER treasurer

JOAN R. CROSSLAND secretary

Bitsy Becton Bacon

Edward Birch

Jan Bowlus

Daniel P. Burnham

Stephen Cloud

NancyBell Coe

Bridget B. Colleary

Robert J. Emmons

Jill Felber

Joanne C. Holderman

Judith L. Hopkinson

James H. Hurley, Jr.

Peter O. Johnson

Elizabeth Karlsberg

Lynn P. Kirst

Frank E. McGinity

Raye Haskell Melville

Stephen J.M. (Mike) Morris

Patti Ottoboni

Andre M. Saltoun

Judith F. Smith

Sam Toumayan

Judith H. Writer

Catherine Leffler,

president, CAMA Women’s Board

Emeritus Directors

Russell S. Bock*

Dr. Robert M. Failing

Mrs. Maurice E. Faulkner*

Léni Fé Bland*

Arthur R. Gaudi

Stephen Hahn*

Dr. Melville H. Haskell, Jr.*

Mrs. Richard Hellmann*

Dr. Dolores M. Hsu

Herbert J. Kendall

Robert M. Light*

Mrs. Frank R. Miller, Jr.*

Sara Miller McCune

Mary Lloyd Mills

Mrs. Ernest J. Panosian*

Kenneth W. Riley*

Mrs. John G. Severson*

Nancy L. Wood

* Deceased

Administration

Mark E. Trueblood

executive director

Elizabeth Alvarez

director of development

Linda Proud

office manager/subscriber services

Justin Rizzo-Weaver

director of operations

2060 Alameda Padre Serra, Suite 201 Santa Barbara, CA 93103 Tel (805) 966-4324 Fax (805) 962-2014 info@camasb.org

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