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Climate Action 2009-2010

ONTARIO Is leAdINg The

ONTARIO Is leAdINg The fIghT AgAINsT clImATe chANge By eliminating coal-fired generation, encouraging energy conservation and efficiency, adding more green renewable energy, and taking an economy-wide approach to effective long-term energy solutions, Canada’s most populous province, Ontario, is the North American leader in the fight against climate change. Under its Climate Change Action Plan, Ontario is committed to reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to six per cent below 1990 levels by 2014, 15 percent below those levels by 2020, and 80 per cent by 2050. Initiatives to achieve these goals include legislating a new cap and trade system, expanding rapid transit, promoting green technologies, further enhancing the protection of Ontario’s green spaces and moving off coal. By the end of 2014, Ontario will eliminate dirty coal-fired generation from its supply mix as part of a comprehensive While phasing out coal, Ontario has aggressively added new sources of renewable supply. In 2008, nearly 80 per cent of Ontario’s electricity came from non-emitting sources of power such as nuclear, water and wind. Since 2003, Ontario has increased its online wind capacity 80-fold, going from 15 megawatts (MW) of wind power to over 1,100 MW. That’s enough capacity to power more than 300,000 Ontario homes. Earlier this year George Smitherman, Ontario’s Deputy Premier and Minister of Energy and Infrastructure, accepted the 2009 World Wind Energy Award for his “outstanding achievements in making Ontario the leading wind energy jurisdiction in North America.” To further accelerate efforts to help Ontario go green and protect the environment, Ontario’s Legislature passed the Green Energy and Green Economy Act, 2009 this past spring, which includes a stand-alone Act known as the “ ONTARIO’s gReeN eNeRgy AcT RepReseNTs NORTh AmeRIcA’s mOsT AmbITIOus ANd fAR ReAchINg eNAblINg legIslATION ANd wIll plAce ONTARIO As A wORld leAdeR IN ReNewAble eNeRgy develOpmeNT, INdusTRIAl INNOvATION ANd clImATe pROTecTION.” dR. heRmANN scheeR, geNeRAl chAIRmAN Of The wORld cOuNcIl fOR ReNewAble eNeRgy, membeR Of The geRmAN buNdesTAg plan to modernize and green the provincial electricity system. Eliminating coal will be the single biggest contributor to reducing Ontario’s greenhouse gas emissions. The net result to the atmosphere: a potential reduction of up to 30 megatonnes of GHG emissions. It will be the single largest climate change initiative in North America. Ontario is on track to become what is believed to be the first jurisdiction in the world to rid itself of coal-fired electricity generation. In 2008, carbon dioxide emissions from Ontario coal plants were 33 per cent below 2003 levels and fossil plant emissions of acid-rain causing pollutants reached 25-year lows. Green Energy Act, 2009 as well as amendments to several statutes. The new legislation is a bold series of coordinated actions with two equally important thrusts: • Making it easier to bring renewable energy projects to life • Fostering a culture of conservation by helping homeowners, government, schools and industry transition to lower energy use. One of the cornerstones of the Green Energy Act, 2009 is North America’s first comprehensive feed-in tariff program (FIT). It is designed to encourage new renewable energy projects from a diverse range of producers including First Nations and Métis communities, homeowners, cooperatives, schools, stores, factories, office towers and larger-scale commercial generators.

The FIT program offers attractive prices for renewable energy producers and long-term price guarantees to increase investor confidence and make it easier to finance projects. The Green Energy and Green Economy Act, 2009 will encourage billions of dollars in investment to help ensure Ontario’s energy supply mix is one of the cleanest anywhere. Ontario achieved a running head start on achieving a sustainable and reliable electricity system with the establishment of the Ontario Power Authority in 2005 and its initial conservation efforts have produced tangible results. The first milestone for reducing peak demand by 1,350 MW was realized by the end of 2007 and future targets are to be accelerated. by The eNd Of 2014, ONTARIO wIll eNd cOAl-fIRed elecTRIcITy geNeRATION – The sINgle-lARgesT clImATe chANge INITIATIve IN NORTh AmeRIcA The new legislation also creates the opportunity for consumers, public institutions and industry to better manage their energy use through a series of conservation initiatives, including: • Establishing North American leading energy efficiency standards for household appliances • Making energy efficiency a key purpose of Ontario’s Building Code “ We’re doing our part to fight climate change and create good, green jobs for Ontario families,” said Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty. “To get there, we’re renewing our electricity system, improving public transit and greening our cities to make them more liveable. We’re working with Ontario’s scientists, entrepreneurs and concerned citizens to create a more sustainable, nextgeneration economy for years to come.” Tackling climate change is a complex challenge, but also an important opportunity for people around the world to work together to protect our planet through a legacy of innovation, dedication and determination. Ontario has not only started on the path to a more sustainable future, Ontario is a trailblazer. For more inFormation on ontario’s eFForts to combat climate change, please visit: Ontario Ministry of the Environment Climate Change Information www.ontario.ca/climatechange Ontario Ministry of Energy and Infrastructure – Green Energy Act, 2009: www.mei.gov.on.ca/english/energy/gea/ Ontario Power Authority www.powerauthority.on.ca/ • Requiring the development of energy conservation plans throughout the broader public sector, including municipalities, universities, colleges, schools and hospitals Measures under the new legislation are expected to support the creation of 50,000 direct and indirect jobs over three years.

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    Published by: In partnership with:

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    Climate Action Published by Sustain

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    Contents 8 Advertisers Index 9 Than

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    53 57 61 Alternatives to carbon off

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    170 174 176 180 182 184 ARAUCO: cop

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    CLIMATE ACTION WISHES TO THANK OUR

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    Foreword Ban Ki-moon Secretary-Gene

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    © Fotolia/Wilfried Aubossu Introdu

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    HUMAN IMPACT The human cost of clim

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    destroys livelihoods, communities,

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    POLICY proportion of global per cap

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    POLICY EMISSIONS REDUCTION 22 2020

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    Clean energy initiatives Active in

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    © Marianne Gjorv A key to becoming

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    POLICY these activities. However, N

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    Without decisive action, there will

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    POLICY Green recovery policies: BEN

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    POLICY Figure 1: Increases in inves

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    GOVERNANCE POLICY © complexify/Fli

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    Melting ‘people’ ice sculptures

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    POLICY of these saw the laying of 6

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    POLICY Figure 2. Evolution of per c

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    POLICY NATIONAL AGENDA From a mitig

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    POLICY one hundred participants inc

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    © aloshbennett/Flickr POLICY In a

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    POLICY Figure 4. Percentage of eart

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    BUSINESS & FINANCE Alternatives to

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    BUSINESS & FINANCE } Install insula

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    © Office now/Flickr BUSINESS & FIN

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    BUSINESS & FINANCE “ What we real

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    BUSINESS & FINANCE CORPORATE SECTOR

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    Climate change insight SPECIAL FEAT

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    usiness & Finance sustainomics 66 c

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    BUSINESS & FINANCE They would need

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    Consumer power is crucial to tackli

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    BUSINESS & FINANCE Institutional in

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    BUSINESS & FINANCE Figure 1. Averag

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    © WWF Italy Archive UniCredit addr

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    BUSINESS AND FINANCE © IRRI Images

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    BUSINESS AND FINANCE Climate change

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    TECHNOLOGY COAL & CCS 82 will also

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    Achieving sustainable steel The ene

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    TECHNOLOGY CA3-27/EPIA_1 Photovolta

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    TECHNOLOGY SOLAR ENERGY 88 © 2001-

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    Evonik Industries - WHERE ECONOMY M

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    Carbon Management Measure. Reduce.

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    TECHNOLOGY Figure 1. Focus of WP6

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    TECHNOLOGY Energy efficiency is key

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    Greening the world’s telecoms net

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    TECHNOLOGY ICTs’ part in combatin

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    TECHNOLOGY ICTs 102 Satellite commu

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    a key role in fi ghting climate cha

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    TECHNOLOGY © Fotolia/danielschoene

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    TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS ENGAGEMENT 108

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    Sustainable IT. Good for the enviro

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    Why Sustainability Software Sustain

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    TECHNOLOGY Box 1. The SeaGen Turbin

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    Climate Change Is a Geographic Prob

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    © UN Photo/Fred Noy TECHNOLOGY A y

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    TECHNOLOGY © ClimSAT A Uruguayan d

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    CA3-02/Gridwise_2 ENERGY Often on a

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    © tom.arthur/Flickr ENERGY Small u

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    LEADING THE ENERGY CHANGE We must c

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    ENERGY The cost of renewable energy

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    ENERGY RENEWABLES 130 prices to the

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    ENERGY Photo: White House photo 09.

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    Creating legal frameworks in emergi

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    ENERGY Figure 1. Life cycle GHG emi

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    URENCO - fuels nuclear power To mee

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    © 2009 Jupiterimages Unlimited, a

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    TRANSPORT BIOFUELS 146 Rapeseed can

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    Eco-efficient aviation: A DOUBLE VA

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    © Pratt & Whitney Jet engine techn

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    TRANSPORT The maritime climate chal

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