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N O R T H S H O R E

GOLF

W I N T E R 2 0 1 7

GREAT

ESCAPES

+

FORSE OF NATURE

MEN AND WOMEN TEAM UP

GIFTS FOR THE GOLFER


NORTH SHORE GOLF


ABOUT THE COVER:

The 18th hole at River’s Edge Golf Club in Shallotte, N.C.,

is nestled amid bluffs and tidal marshes. This Arnold Palmer-designed

course is consistently ranked as one of the country’s top public courses.

ESSEX MEDIA GROUP, INC.

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2 >>> WINTER 2017


N O R T H S H O R E

GOLF

PUBLISHED BY ESSEX MEDIA GROUP

PUBLISHER

Edward M. Grant

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Beth Bresnahan

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

James N. Wilson

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

William J. Kraft

EDITOR

Bill Brotherton

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Marie Tobin

DESIGNER

Tim McDonough

ADVERTISING SALES

Ernie Carpenter

Michele Iannaco

Jim McFadyen

Ralph Mitchell

Patricia Whalen

DIRECTORS

Edward L. Cahill

John M. Gilberg

Edward M. Grant

Gordon R. Hall

Monica Connell Healey

J. Patrick Norton

Michael H. Shanahan

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Bob Albright

Bob Green

Gary Larrabee

Mitch Marcus

Stacey Marcus

Brion O’Connor

PHOTOGRAPHERS

David Colt

Scott Eisen

Spenser Hasak

Mark Lorenz

Owen O’Rourke

Bob Roche

INSIDE THIS EDITION

Escape to North Carolina ........................................... 6

South Carolina getaway ............................................ 10

State of our game ..................................................... 13

A Forse to be reckoned with ................................. 14

North Shore Golf Notebook .................................... 16

Mike Frangos Commodore Open.............................. 19

Revere Chamber of Commerce outing ...................... 19

Lynn Area Chamber of Commerce tourney .............. 19

Holiday gifts for the golfer .................................. 20

More club champions crowned ................................. 22

On her turf ................................................................ 24

PGA Tour card for Oppenheim .................................. 25

Course directory ...................................................... 26

MGA-WGAM to merge ............................................. 28

A mission to play the top 100 .................................. 30

NORTH SHORE GOLF


EDITOR’S LETTER

Bill Brotherton

bbrotherton@essexmediagroup.com

No fall in this weather

North Shore golfers have certainly been

blessed with lovely weather this fall. It’s

brilliantly sunny and 72 degrees as I’m

writing this in late October. But, as we all

know, it’s just a matter of time before

Old Man Winter and his buddy Jack

Frost shock us back to reality.

Who knows, there might even be snow

on the ground by the time this Winter

edition of North Shore Golf magazine

rolls off the presses in early November.

That’s the perfect time to plan a great

escape from the bitter cold. We offer a

couple of tantalizing toasty options in

this issue. North Carolina’s Brunswick

Islands region is often overshadowed

by its neighbor, Myrtle Beach, about

75 miles to the south. But the Brunswick

Islands area offers 30 championship

courses, great fishing, exceptional dining

and more. Bob Albright magically

transports you there. Mitch Marcus

takes us to Kiawah Island in South

Carolina, where he played three

championship courses of varying

difficulty, including the Ocean Course,

which hosted The War by the Shore

Ryder Cup in 1991.

For those unable to travel to warmer

climes, there is much in this jam-packed

issue to keep you occupied while you’re

puttering around the house waiting for

the ground to thaw.

We spotlight North Shore golfers who

performed well in club tournaments and

in MGA, WGAM and New England PGA

events during the summer and fall. We

chat with renowned course architect

Ron Forse, who is helping Tedesco CC

return its bunkers to their original

design. And we report on the retirement

of Paul Barkhouse, and well-deserved

honors given to Eddie Carbone, the

executive director of this year’s successful

U.S. Senior Open Championship at

Salem CC, and revered area pros Jim

Lane and Bob Green.

Green, Tedesco’s longtime head

professional, examines the state of

the game in his Shades of Green

column. Gary Larrabee applauds Rob

Oppenheim, who grew up in these parts,

for earning his PGA Tour card, and

expresses his disappointment with one

of our most hallowed golf clubs for not

playing ball with the USGA.

We introduce you to TurfScapes, a

Hamilton company that designs and

installs putting greens at private homes.

Our holiday gift guide offers tips that’ll

please the golfers in your family … and

that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

So, slip on a warm sweater, settle into

your favorite chair and get cozy with this

Winter edition of North Shore Golf

magazine. You know, Spring really isn’t

that far away. l

Bill Brotherton is editor of North Shore Golf magazine. He grew up in Beverly, caddied and worked in the pro shop at

Essex CC, is a Ouimet Scholar who graduated from Suffolk University, has written about golf for the Beverly Times and

Daily Item of Lynn. He recently retired from the Boston Herald, where he wrote about music and edited the Features

section. Tell him what you think at brotherton@essexmediagroup.com.

4 >>> WINTER 2017


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NORTH SHORE GOLF


CAROLINA

on my mind

By BOB ALBRIGHT

6 >>> WINTER 2017


If

you are looking for a relaxing getaway this

offseason that features great golf along with

tranquil, unspoiled beaches and some of the

freshest seafood around, then you would be well

served to head for North Carolina’s Brunswick Islands.

Spread out among a collection of barrier islands, 30

scenic, unique, and challenging championship courses

await golfers of all abilities with the only common

thread being the laid back and welcoming atmosphere

that oozes from this slice of golfing heaven. North

Shore Golf made the trip last spring and we offer

up this somewhat ambitious, but very satisfying

four-day itinerary.

>>> P. 8

The 18th hole at River’s Edge Golf Club in Shallotte, N.C.

NORTH SHORE GOLF


on my mind

CAROLINA

8 >>> WINTER 2017

Day 1

After an uneventful flight into Wilmington, N.C.,

we headed to one of the newer and most celebrated

additions to the Brunswick Islands, Cape

Fear National at Brunswick Forest in nearby

Leland, N.C. Opened in 2010, this par 72, 7,217-yard

gem meanders through the Brunswick Forest and is

just 10 minutes from downtown Wilmington. An unmistakable

trademark of Cape Fear are the long and

winding waste bunkers that elegantly frame so many

of the holes. The original footprint had no

natural water hazards, but you never would have

guessed that as renowned local architect Tim Cate

squeezed watery graves seemingly into every nook

and cranny, often outlined by the course’s wispy

signature fescue. With a slope of 138 there is certainly

enough to make Cape Fear as intimidating as Robert

De Niro’s character in the movie of the same name,

but it should not be missed and as I found out rather

quickly, you do get a great roll in those waste bunkers.

The first of three great dinners found us at The

Boundary House in nearby Calabash, N.C., where

the scallops and crab cakes easily lived up to the area’s

billing for sumptuous seafood and the Dogfish Head

IPA on draft quickly smoothed out any rough spots

on the day’s scorecard. After a day that had started in

the wee hours at Logan, this golfer was more than

happy to unwind in the spacious accommodations at

Brunswick Plantation Villas in Calabash.

Day 2

With three distinctly different nines, Brunswick

Plantation Golf Resort has long been a must-play

for golfers visiting the Ocean Isle Beach area. Want a

slice of Scotland? Try the Magnolia Course with its

extensive mounding and deep bunkers. Want to play

something more typical of the region? Try the

Dogwood Course, which serenely strays along the

Caw Caw River with many prodigious hardwoods

lining the fairways. My favorite of the three courses,

which were built in 1991 and extensively renovated in

2006, however, was the Azalea Course. Carved

through dense Carolina woodlands, the course

features a signature hole, the par-3 15th, where golfers

fire at an island green surrounded by oyster shells.

After managing to stay dry on that challenging

green, we decided to head for the water after the

round and found everything we were looking for at

the Ocean Isle Fishing Center at Ocean Isle

Beach, N.C. Whether you are looking to book a

fishing charter, rent a jet ski or take a leisurely sunset

cruise like we did, this all-in-one stop has you

covered. The best option, however, may be just

unwinding at the adjoining.

restaurant and tiki bar with your favorite libation and

watch the tide - and the charter fishing boats - roll in.

Inspired by the two large mahi–mahi I saw unloaded

on the dock below, I opted for the mahi-mahi fish

tacos and was not disappointed.

Day 3

The variety that we found at Brunswick Plantation

was only amplified at our third stop, the Sea Trail

Golf Resort, located in Sunset Beach, N.C. Just like

Brunswick, Sea Trail offers immaculate quarters with

a diverse array of suites and vacation rentals situated

on the pristine fairways of three championship

golf courses.

Tackling the scenic 6,740-yard Willard Byrd

Course was our first order of business in the

morning. Named for and designed by the

aforementioned prolific southern golf architect, this

shot maker’s course will not disappoint as you weave

through a multitude of lakes and tight tree-lined

fairways in pursuit of the course’s impeccable

championship Bermuda greens. Don’t forget to bring

a pair of binoculars either, as within the first three

holes I had already added a pair of sunbathing gators,

a great blue heron and a bald eagle to the photo

library on my iPhone.

If you have time to play only one of Sea Trail’s

triumvirate of alluring options, I recommend

the par-72, 6,761-yard Rees Jones Course, the

consensus favorite among residents and visitors alike.

With water coming into play on 11 holes, the course

offered a bevy of holes that will keep you coming back,

and with the recent conversion from bentgrass greens

to championship Bermuda, this gem has only

gotten better.

After two exquisite rounds, the perfect capper was

to head out to Sunset Beach and try Twin Lakes

Seafood where the fisherman’s platter, complete

with deviled crab for that southern feel, rivals

anything you will find on Cape Ann.

Day 4

Just like you hope to save your best drive for the

18th tee, it’s always great when you can wrap up a golf

getaway on an unrivaled track and we certainly did

just that at River’s Edge Golf Club in Shallotte,

N.C. Among the vast litany of golf gifts that the late

great Arnold Palmer left behind, this breathtaking

6,909-yard, par-72 signature design should not

be overlooked. Nestled amid the bluffs and tidal

marshes along the Shallotte River, this course >>>


eally has it all and is consistently ranked as one of the top

public courses in the state. Of all the great holes, the one you

are most likely to rehash over an ice cold Arnold Palmer

(what else?) in the spacious clubhouse afterward is the No.1

stroke hole, the 570-yard, par-5 ninth. Named “Arnie’s

Revenge,” this hole has the King’s fingerprints all over it and

features a Classic risk vs. reward option on your second shot

over a sweeping marsh.

Alas, the risk quotient of that test swallowed the last three

balls in my bag, but the reward was simply getting the

chance to walk this masterpiece as well as the chance to

spend a few days discovering this welcoming and unhurried

golf oasis that is the Brunswick Islands. l

Bob Albright is a regular contributor to North Shore Golf and several

other magazines. Email him at ralbright33@comcast.net or follow him

on twitter at BobAlbright1

CLOCKWISE, from bottom left: A panoramic view

of Sea Trail Golf Resort in Sunset Beach, N.C.; a water

hole at Sea Trail; Cape Fear National Golf Course in

Leland, N.C.; dead trees populate the bunkers

at Sea Trail.

NORTH SHORE GOLF


PLEASURE

ISLAND

Stage your personal War by the Shore at Kiawah resort

By MITCH MARCUS

A

fter spending several days at Kiawah Island Golf

Resort and playing three of its five courses, I can

rightfully say it is a golfer’s paradise. It is remarkably

beautiful and happy place; even the occasional double bogey

won’t sour your mood.

Kiawah is a barrier island, located about 25 miles

southwest of Charleston, S.C. There is also plenty of doings

to keep non-golfing spouses busy, including shopping at the

Freshfields Village mall, relaxing on the beach, exploring the

island by bicycle and more.

But I was there to golf!

My first round was at Turtle Point. Our foursome agreed

the course was in pristine condition, having undergone a

nine-month renovation overseen by Jack Nicklaus and his

architectural team. Renovations included refurbishing green

complexes, re-grassing the greens, tees and fairways with

paspalum, a salt–tolerant strain also used on the resort’s

Ocean Course, Osprey Point and Oak Point. Turtle Point has

rated as high as 48th on Golf Digest’s 100 Greatest Public

Courses, and has hosted the Carolinas Amateur, the

Carolinas PGA, the South Carolina Amateur and the 1990

PGA Cup matches.

Three oceanfront holes (14-16) are the highlights, but

the entire course is sufficiently challenging for even the

best golfers. There are six sets of tees, allowing for higher

handicappers to enjoy the course at a playable length, while

the way-back Tournament Tees at nearly 7000 yards would

provide a test for anyone, especially considering the

ever-present wind and the small greens. The 14th is an uphill

par 3, with a beautiful ocean vista as a backdrop. Playing

straight into the wind, as we did, was probably a three-club

difference. The next two windswept holes border the ocean.

I was ecstatic to go bogey, par, par.

The famous - or infamous - Ocean Course was the next

test. This Pete Dye design is only the fourth course to have

hosted each of the PGA of America’s major championships,

It also hosted the 1991 Ryder Cup: The War by the Shore.

The wind is always blowing, with no prevailing direction.

From one day to the next, a player might experience an

eight-club differential on any given shot. The course has been

rated as high as the No. 4 public and No 25 best courses in

the United States.

Again, the six tee boxes allow for play at every level. One

of my playing partners, Tony from Texas, played the

tournament tees at 7,356 yards. The rest of us played two

sets of tees forward, a respectable 6,475 yards. Watching

Tony break 80 from the back tees with the wind howling was

the most impressive round of golf I have ever witnessed

firsthand.

My highlight was birdieing the 501-yard 2nd hole, a

beautiful par 5, by sinking a pretty lengthy double-breaking

putt. Pure luck. A 2 on the par-3 5th hole gave me two birdies

on the first five holes. After that, it was all downhill, though,

as a 12-handicap, I was happy to break 90.

A round at Osprey Point followed. This Tom Fazio

designed course was totally renovated in 2014. Also in

pristine condition, this course winds through low-country

forests, lagoons and saltwater marshes. With the wind a bit

more relaxed, and playing the par-72 course at a leisurely

6200 yards, it was a welcome respite from the two previous

demanding rounds. It was playable and pleasing to the

eye, as long as you don’t mind a few alligators sharing your

golf course.

Paradise found at Kiawah Island Golf Resort. l

Mitch Marcus is a North Shore community

banker whose passions include golf and travel.

10 >>> WINTER 2017


P A R A D I S E F O U N D A T

K I A W A H I S L A N D G O L F R E S O R T

Osprey Point, left and top right, and Turtle Point,

bottom right, are among the golf options at

Kiawah Island Golf Resort in South Carolina.

NORTH SHORE GOLF


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N O R T H S H O R E

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12 >>> WINTER 2017


SHADES OF GREEN

THE

STATE

OF OUR

GAME

1457 – ?

REPORTS OF GOLF’S

DEATH ARE GREATLY

EXAGGERATED

By BOB GREEN

With the North Shore's 2017 golf season

winding down, it’s time to examine the state

of our game.

In recent years, we've been bombarded

with news that "golf is in trouble," “the game

isn’t growing," and doomsday predictions

that "golf is losing popularity" and

“participation is dwindling.”

During the 1980s, baby boomers were

reaching the age of making an impact on

the economy. Real estate values were

climbing as boomers entered the housing

market. Salaries were going up.

Golf was growing along with the economy,

and boomers were taking up the game in

record numbers. In 1988, the National Golf

Foundation issued a challenge to developers

to "Build a golf course a day for 10 years” to

meet the demand. The number of golf

courses in the United States increased at an

incredible rate over the next decade.

The flawed thinking was that there were

enough new golfers to fill the memberships

of all the courses that were being built,

many of which were sprouting up in

already-saturated areas. The costs of

land, construction of the courses and the

clubhouses, let alone yearly maintenance

fees, were at a record high.

Supply exceeded demand.

This forced clubs to charge high initiation

fees, high dues and green fees that were

more than the average person could afford.

During the 1990s, developers bought land

and built golf communities. The prediction

was that houses in a golf community could

sell for more than the same house outside

of a golf community. It spurred the growth

of even more golf course developments.

The middle class couldn't afford them.

Consequently, lots went undeveloped and

builders went bankrupt.

Again, supply exceeded demand.

It looked bad, with so many courses

closing. But golf itself was not in

trouble. Flawed thinking and unrealistic

expectations were the reason for these

closures, not that golf was "losing

popularity."

A market correction was

needed.

In the mid- to late-’90s, more

unrealistic expectations occurred,

thanks to the arrival of a young

phenom who was going to motivate

hundreds of thousands of people

to take up the game of golf:

Eldrick "Tiger" Woods.

TIGER

WOODS

Golf industry leaders envisioned a large

increase in participation from inner-city and

minority teens and young adults. It didn't

happen. They certainly were fans, who

watched Tiger on television, but they did not

flock to golf courses and learn to play in the

numbers anticipated.

In the meantime, the golf manufacturing

side of the business exploded in anticipation

of the demand for equipment, creating an

oversupply.

Again, the game itself was not in trouble

just because the number of golfers hadn't

increased to meet the growth of a "new

course per day" mantra and the glut of golf

equipment manufactured to meet the

anticipated demand of new golfers from the

Tiger Boom.

Supply exceeded demand.

With the Tiger phenomena a thing of

the past and participation numbers and

revenues lagging, some industry leaders

offered suggestions on how to interest more

people to take up the game or play more.

TaylorMade Golf CEO Mark King created

a game called "Hack Golf," played with

15-inch cups, and manufactured a set of

oversized, easy-to-hit, nonconforming clubs

designed to make golf easier and, thus,

more attractive.

"This is all just an experiment," said

Benoit Vincent, TaylorMade's chief technology

officer. "We have no idea what this will lead

to, but that's not stopping us from trying it

out. The idea is to make golf more fun for

more people. Part of the plan is to have

people playing only for an hour or 90

minutes at a time, at least at first.”

All in the interest of furthering their goals,

not the goals of those of us who love the

game as it is. You see, it's not about golf, it's

about money. Thankfully, such initiatives

have not caught on.

Golf is and always will be a niche sport.

The entire population of the United States

does not have to play golf to keep the game

vibrant and successful. It would be great if

everyone in the world played golf, but that's

not realistic in any sport. Despite that, golf

has grown incredibly in the past 50 years.

The PGA of America, USGA, LPGA, PGA

Tour and Masters Tournament, in the spirit

of collaboration, are working with each

other to focus on four major areas to

develop the game: >>> P. 31

NORTH SHORE GOLF


May the Forse

be with Tedesco

Ron Forse of Forse Design Inc.,

the golf course architect who helped

Salem Country Club with its long-term

improvement plan in advance of the

2017 U.S. Senior Open, on Oct. 17

toured the ongoing renovation project

that he is supervising at Tedesco

Country Club in Marblehead.

Nearly every bunker on the course

is being remade according to the

original design. >>>

WHAT MAKES THIS AREA

SO BEAUTIFUL IS WHAT MAKES

IT SO DIFFICULT TO WORK WITH.

~RON FORSE


PHOTOS: Spenser Hasak

14 >>> WINTER 2017


RON

FORSE

“We’re out here talking about where bunkers will go, the elevation of them,

and how many,” said Forse as he walked around the elevated green of the

12th hole with Matthew Staffieri, owner of MAS Golf Course Construction,

who was using an excavator to carve out the bunkers.

“Ledge rock dictates what is done,” said Forse. “What makes this area so

beautiful is what makes it so difficult to work with.”

“I love New England,” said Forse, who grew up in New Jersey but spent a

lot of time on Cape Cod as a kid, visiting family. “I love the history, landscape,

soil, rock, and topography. Courses in this area have character and quirk.”

“You don’t need a water feature or ocean to make a course interesting, the

landscape can do that.”

Forse Design has worked on more than 15 clubs in Massachusetts. l

OPPOSITE PAGE:

Golf course architect

Ron Forse, left, and Matthew

Staffieri, owner of MAS

Golf Course Construction,

discuss bunker shaping and

placement around the 12th

green at Tedesco Country

Club as part of the ongoing

renovation project.

TOP RIGHT:

The 16th green has been

torn up and restored to what

you see here, with bunkers

and fescue harking back

to its original design.

BELOW RIGHT:

The threesome of

Bill Demakis, 90,

a member since 1967,

Dan Nolan, 70, a member

since 1992, both

of Swampscott, and

Ed Barry, 93, a member

since 1948 of Salem,

hit to a temporary hole

cut in the fairway of

the 12th hole as

construction gets

underway around

the green.

NORTH SHORE GOLF


N O R T H S H O R E

GOLF

Notebook

Celebration time for Barkhouse,

Green, Lane and Carbone

FROM THE TOP:

Paul and Nancy Barkhouse,

Bob Green, Jim Lane and

Eddie Carbone.

By BILL BROTHERTON

North Shore golf legend Paul Barkhouse, one

of the many outstanding junior players who

came out of Lynn’s Happy Valley (now Larry

Gannon Municipal) under the tutelage of the

aforementioned Mr. Gannon, will be honored,

along with wife Nancy, at a testimonial roast,

hosted by Woburn Country Club on Friday, Nov.

17, starting at 6 p.m.

Barkhouse, after 53 years as a caddie, head

professional and player, recently retired as

Woburn CC’s head professional after 17 years

there. The affable 76-year-old previously was head

pro at Ferncroft CC and Ipswich CC.

For details on the testimonial roast,

contact chairman Barry Donovan at

bdonovan117@hotmail.com.

••••••••••••

The Francis Ouimet Scholarship Fund

presented its inaugural Ouimet Golf Professional

of the Year award to long-time Tedesco

Country Club professional Bob Green at a

Ouimet outing at Wellesley CC on Oct. 2.

Green, who has been head professional at

Tedesco for 39 years, is one of the strongest

promoters of the scholarship. During his tenure,

Tedesco has had 140 Ouimet Scholars including

all four of his children who worked as caddies or

in the pro shop. Each fall, Bob organizes a

meeting with all potential scholarship recipients

and their parents to explain the benefits of being

a Ouimet Scholar and offers them help on how to

navigate the application process. Bob works

tirelessly with Tedesco’s Ouimet chairperson,

Michael Zmetrovich, to ensure that all club

caddies and golf employees take advantage of

this scholarship opportunity.

“Frankly, I am speechless receiving this award.

The Ouimet Scholarship has been such an

asset for the young men and women who have

worked at our club over the years. They are such

outstanding kids and being able to help them

every year was an honor itself,” said Green, who

is an important contributor to North Shore Golf

magazine. His “Shades of Green” column is a

readers favorite.

The award will annually recognize a New

England PGA Professional for not only their

efforts and achievements in guiding the young

men and women who work for them to the

Francis Ouimet Scholarship, but also their

ongoing mentoring through college and beyond.

The recipient will be someone who works closely

with The Fund and plays an important role in

promoting both the scholarship to kids, their

parents and also the various Ouimet programs to

the club membership.

••••••••••••

On Sept. 30 at Nashawtuc CC in Concord, the

New England Professional Golfers Association

held its annual award banquet. Among those

honored were Jim Lane, the retired head PGA

professional at Winchester Country Club, and

Ed Carbone, the executive director of this year’s

successful U.S. Senior Open Championship at

Salem Country Club.

Lane, a Salem State College graduate, was

inducted into the NEPGA Hall of Fame with

Willie Ogg of Worcester CC, who helped found

the NEPGA with Eugene “Skip” Wogan of

Essex CC. Lane, a Melrose resident, was head pro

at Winchester for 25 years.

Carbone, who lives in Manchester-by-the-Sea

and grew up at Charles River Country Club,

received the George S. Wemyss Award, given to

the person who has been a longtime supporter of

the NEPGA, its members and the game of golf.

Gary Larrabee, the Salem News golf writer and

a North Shore Golf magazine columnist, won the

2016 Wemyss Award.

Carbone joined the NEPGA as operations

manager in 1993 and served as executive director

from 1998 to 2004. He next became executive

director of the PGA Tour spot at Doral in Miami,

Fla., for 10 years before joining the Bruno Event

Team and being assigned executive director of the

2017 U.S. Senior Open.

••••••••••••

Essex County Club and Myopia Hunt

Club have again made Golf magazine’s list of Top

100 Courses in the United States. Essex CC in

Manchester-by-the-Sea, a Donald Ross design,

was ranked 67th. Myopia in South Hamilton, a

Herbert Leeds design, was ranked 69th.

The Country Club in Brookline (No. 22), Old

Sandwich in Plymouth (No. 49), Kittansett

in Marion (No. 74) and Boston Golf Club in

Hingham (No. 86) are the only other Bay State

courses on the list.

••••••••••••

The Turner Hill team of Mary Jane O’Neill

and Mary Marengi in a matching of cards won

the annual Eleanor LaBonte tournament, held at

The Orchards in South Hadley on Aug. 28. They

shot a 1-over 73. >>>

16 >>> WINTER 2017


N O R T H S H O R E

GOLF

Notebook

FROM LEFT:

Frank Vana Jr. of Boxford at the Senior Amateur, Al and Abigail Taney of the Meadow at

Peabody at the Father-Daughter, and Mark and Michael Souliotis of Haverhill CC at the

Father-Son. PHOTOS: David Colt/MGA.

Other local teams who competed included Ann Dawson and

Gina Manning of Gannon; Valerie Casella and Sally DeGan

of Sagamore Spring; Jane Tryder of Mount Hood and

Alice McElhinney of Sagamore Spring; Judy Corson and

Barbara Horwood of Sagamore Spring; Joan Apkin of

Renaissance and Anne Windhol of Nabnasset Lake; Betsy Masse

of Renaissance and Clare O’Brien of Butter Brook GC; Jeanette

Surette and Mary Pecoraro of Sagamore Spring; Cathy

Bukozanska of Wenham CC and Connie Packard of Presidents

GC; and Lynda Brandi and Patricia Granger of Bellevue.

••••••••••••

North Shore women golfers made a strong impression at the

Mildred Gardinor Prunaret Cup tourney, held at Kernwood CC

in Salem Sept. 19. Wet weather forced the cancellation of the final

two rounds.

The team of Donna DiLeso of Sagamore Spring and Janet Kim

of Ferncroft won the C Flight. Lisa Spinale and Terry Berenson

of Kernwood won the D Flight. Leslie Ogan and Wendy Fermon

of Kernwood captured the E Flight. Leea Osborne-Trussell and

Allyson Christopher of Ould Newbury are F Flight champs.

Jenny Ceppi of Bass Rocks and Mary Marengi of Turner Hill

played well in the A Flight.

B Flight competitors included locals Sally DeGan and Valerie

Casella of Sagamore Spring; Ann Dawson and Mary E. Hunt of

Gannon; Diane Carter of Salem CC and Marianne Doane of

Beverly Golf & Tennis Club; and Mary Jane O’Neill of Turner Hill

and Kym Pappathanasi of Renaissance.

Erika Allen of Sagamore Spring and Chris Whitney of Beverly

G&T Club, and Pam Cote of Beverly G&T Club and Betty Arnold

of Concord CC played well in the C Flight.

D Flight teams included Connie Hayton and Terry Durkin of

Sagamore Spring, and Louise Healey and Cynthia Rodzen

of Ould Newbury.

In the E Flight, local tandems included Carmen Madore and

Tina Smith of Beverly G&T Club, and Kathleen Jauron and

Gina Manning of Gannon.

F Flight teams included Michele Feld and Gail Bryson of

Ferncroft; Julie Henehan and Debbie Mallett of Beverly G&T;

and Mary Gail Brock and Elizabeth Wozniak of The Meadow

at Peabody.

••••••••••••

The WGAM Senior Championship was held Aug. 15 and 16 at

Indian Pond CC in Kingston. Sandy Potter of Bass Rocks won the

Class B title, shooting 91.

Other North Shore golfers who competed were, in Class A, Diane

Carter of Salem (80), Karen Richardson of Ould Newbury (80),

Ann Dawson of Gannon (86), Erika Allen of Sagamore Spring

(87), Valerie Casella of Sagamore Spring (87), Mary E. Hunt of

Gannon (88), Marianne Doane of Beverly G&T (90) and

Marcia Veale of Wenham (90); in Class B, Christina Veator of

Ferncroft (98) and Janet Moran of Ferncroft (102); in Class C,

Gretchen Ochme of Wenham (107); in Class D, Julie Lombara

of Gannon (104); in Class E, Juanita Grass of Gannon (107),

Jeanette Surette of Sagamore Spring (117) and Mary Pecoraro

of Sagamore Spring (125).

••••••••••••

At the U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball qualifier at Boston Golf

Club in Hingham on Oct. 2, two local teams played well but did not

make the cut. Mary Marengi and Mary Jane O’Neill of Turner

Hill shot 80, while Betsy Masse and Terri Burtoft of Haverhill

shot 86.

••••••••••••

Oakley Country Club in Watertown hosted the Massachusetts

Senior Amateur Championship Sept. 18 and 19. Keith Smith of

Franklin CC won with a two-round, 2-under score of 140.

Locals making the cut at the Donald Ross-designed course included

Frank Vana Jr. of Boxford and Marlborough CC (143), James

Staffieri of Indian Ridge (148), Steve Camara of Ferncroft (150),

Cy Kilgore of Tedesco (153), Jerry Markham of Wenham (157),

Ned Yetten of Turner Hill (157) and Jimmy Grant of Bradford

CC (160).

Not making the cut were Chuck Costello of Ferncroft (79),

Mike Armstrong of Bear Hill GC (79), John Carroll of Indian

Ridge (79), Robert Bogart of Salem CC (79), Robert McKenna

of Black Swan (80), Jack Nicolas of Kernwood (82), Colin Ahern

of Andover (82), Charles Tryder of Bellevue (83) and

John Jaskul of Vesper (88). >>> P. 18

NORTH SHORE GOLF


GOLF

N O R T H S H O R E

Notebook

Mark Turner of Bass Rocks (72-69-73) and Chris Francoeur

of Amesbury CC (69-71-77) steered Team Massachusetts to the New

England Junior Amateur Invitational at Manchester CC in Vermont.

Team Mass. finished the three rounds at 9-under-par. Connecticut

finished second at 14-over-par.

••••••••••••

Steven C. Tasho and Steven R. Tasho of Thorny Lea captured

the MGA Father-Son Senior Division title with a record-setting

9-under 63 at Andover CC on Aug. 15. North Shore teams that

participated were Brendan and Joseph Monahan III of

Winchester(69), Matthew and Steve Markell of Winchester (72);

Bill Drohen of Brookmeadow and James Drohen of Bradford

(73); Michael and Mark Souliotis of Haverhill (74); Tony and

Tyler Conigliari of Bass Rocks (74); Frank Vana Sr. and Frank

Vana Jr. of Andover CC (75); Doug and Stanley Briggs of Indian

Ridge (75); Christian and Mike Mckenna of Beverly G&T (78);

Michael and Jim Holbrook of Ferncroft (79); John and Athan

Goulos of The Meadow at Peabody (79); Tim and Brendan

Sheehy of Indian Ridge (80); Michael and Michael Plansky of

Black Swan (81); Mike and Tom Landry of Tedesco (81);

George and Bradford Costa of Bradford (82); Jim and Ken

Oppenheim of Indian Ridge (84); and Jonathan and Jordan

Yorks of Kernwood (85).

The Junior Division crown was won by Robert and Jack

Mancini of Thorny Lea on Aug. 16 at Andover CC. They teamed

for a 1-under 71. North Shore teams included Rob and Rob

Carpentier of Andover CC (77); Ryan and Kevin Daly of Salem

(78); Scott and Nicholas Hampoian of Thomson (78); John

and Timothy Dias of North Andover CC (78); Brendan and

Brendan Cooke of Tedesco (79); David and Will Grady of

Haverhill (79); David and Dave Sacco of Salem CC (80); and

Sean and David Savage of Winchester (81).

••••••••••••

The MGA’s Father & Daughter Championship took place at the

Ridge Club in Sandwich on Aug. 21.

Geno and Jackie Gonzalez of Charles River shot a 4-under 67

to best John and Tate Hadges of Thorny Lea by a shot in the

Championship Division. North Shore teams included David and

Elizabeth Friel of Vesper (80); George Scharfe and Molly

Prinn of Essex CC (82), S. Carpenter and daughter “Bimba”

Carpenter of Myopia (83); Ken Hughes and Caroline Hughes

Wilder of Indian Ridge (84); Tom Rourke and Kathleen

Natale of Ferncroft (87); Al and Abigail Taney of The Meadow

at Peabody (88); Kevin and Kimberly Lane of Bear Hill (92); and

Barry Haley and Kelly Sullivan of Renaissance (95).

In the Forward Division, Philip and Morgan Smith of

Vesper won the crown in a playoff, shooting 75. Ralph and Cailey

Colantuno of Tedesco teamed for an 83.

••••••••••••

The WGAM Mother & Son tournament took place at Waubeeka Golf

Links in Williamstown on July 18. Kathleen and Colin Natale

of Ferncroft finished first with a 72. The Meadow at Peabody teams

of Mary Gail Brock and David shot 79, while Mrs. Brock and

son Ian had 88. Maureen and Patrick Sullivan of Renaissance

had 84.

••••••••••••

Betsy Masse and Teresa Burtoft of Haverhill won the

WGAM’s Curtis Bowl for the second consecutive year, finishing

8-over 79 at Taconic GC in Williamstown in July.

••••••••••••

Frank Dully of Kernwood and Eric Barlow of Winchester

won the NEPGA’s Senior-Junior Championship at Walpole CC,

combining for a 7-under 61.

••••••••••••

A 5-under 64 was good enough for Kirk Hanefeld, director of

instruction at Salem Country Club, to win the NEPGA Avidia Stroke

Play Championship at The Misquamicut Club in Watch Hill, R.I.

••••••••••••

The WGAM Sheeran Trophy was held at Willowbend in Mashpee

on Oct. 10 and 11. This husband and wife tournament uses selected

drives, alternate shots. The winners were Emily and Jamie Hass

of Blue Hill Country Club with a 1-over 72.

That was five shots better than the runners-up, which included

Caroline and Nicholas Wilder of Vesper CC.

Other North Shore teams that competed included: Jane and

Charles Tryder of Mount Hood (78); Erika and Michael Allen

of Beverly G&T (80); Joy and Richie Santoro of Thomson CC

(82); Diane and George Carter of Salem CC (83); Marianne

and Peter Doane of Beverly G&T (84); Diane and Jay O’Neill

of Haverhill CC (84); Kathleen and Robert Coppins of Meadow

Brook GC (84); Monette and Peter Verrier of Meadow Brook

GC (84); Wendy and Jeff Fermon of Kernwood CC (85); Sheryl

and Chris Doherty of Indian Ridge CC (86); Karen and Peter

Tehan of Ferncroft CC (88); Lisa and Chuck DeSalvo of

Tedesco CC (91); Connie and Joe Hayton of Sagamore Spring

(94); Virginia and Will Townsend of Bass Rocks GC (97);

Susan and Daniel Mariani of Indian Ridge CC (99); Donna

E. Holt-Sieradzki and Benjamin Sieradzki of Renaissance GC

(99); Joan and Robert LePage of Bass Rocks GC (99).

••••••••••••

Colin Brennan of Indian Ridge captured the Massachusetts

Mid-Amateur Championship at Franklin CC Sept. 25-27. His

3-under 210 (67-70-73) edged Matt Parziale of Thorny Lea by one

shot.

Frank Vana Jr. of Marlborough CC and Boxford, and Mike

Mottola of Indian Ridge made the cut, shooting 218 and 226

respectively.

North Shore golfers who missed the 36-hole cut were Gregory

Poor of Haverhill (73-78), Phil Miceli of Sagamore Spring

(73-78), Steve Camara of Ferncroft (78-74), Jon Desrocher of

Merrimack Valley (76-76), Mike McCann of Andover CC (76-77),

Stephen Miele Jr. of Woburn CC (79-75), Tyler Williams of

The Meadow at Peabody (80-76), David D’Entrement of Long

Meadow (79-82), Shawn Scott of Long Meadow (77-84), Sean

Andrews of Thomson (84-78), Jeff Weishaar of Renaissance

(89-75), Kevin Bilo of Cape Ann GC (82-82), Brian Theriault

of Andover CC (85-81) and Dan Tucker of Sagamore Spring

(82-WD). l

18 >>> WINTER 2017


THE 48TH ANNUAL MIKE FRANGOS COMMODORE INVITATIONAL GOLF TOURNAMENT

was held at Myopia Hunt Club in South Hamilton on Sept. 18. A full field of 132 golfers played in the

bramble format tourney. All proceeds benefited Northeast Arc and its programs.

PHOTOS: Bob Roche

AROUND the COURSE

TOP:

Commodore Open, from left: Kacy Jauron of Swampscott

follows through on a long putt; Scott Garabedian of Salem

sets up to hit from the fescue; Swampscott’s Jauron clan

Dick, Bob and Mike get together with cousin Cindy

Millspaugh; and George Behrakis tries to coax his ball into

the hole.

MIDDLE:

Revere Chamber tourney, from left: The threesome of Brad

Mahoney of Melrose, John Grande of Melrose and Kevin

Delisle of Billerica; the team of Bob Cataldo of Saugus,

Jenafer

Friedland of Tewksbury and Mark Nicholas of Woburn.

REVERE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

held its annual golf tournament May 19 at Mount Hood Golf Course

in Melrose. Fun was had by all.

PHOTOS: Spenser Hasak

BOTTOM:

Lynn Area Chamber outing, from left: Lynn Police Officer

Titou Kim watches his drive; Christian Hassel of Cataldo

Ambulance putts under the watchful eyes of his teammates;

Dave Pierce, John Olson, Howie Gautreau and Bob Marquis,

all of Columbia Insurance Agency of Lynn.

The LYNN AREA CHAMBER

OF COMMERCE held its annual golf

tournament at Gannon Municipal Golf

Course in Lynn on August 16. The business

community networked and had fun during

the daylong event.

PHOTOS: Mark Lorenz

NORTH SHORE GOLF


LINKS

TO

9

FINE HOLIDAY

GIFT IDEAS

By STACEY MARCUS

1 2

3

4

5 6

Golf season in New England does not last all year, but this fall brought us a few extra

weeks to hit the links. Why wait until next spring to put a smile on the face of your favorite

golfer? We assembled links to great holiday gifts for that special golfer in your life.

Many of these items are available at local sports retailers and pro shops, too. Aces!

20 >>> WINTER 2017


7

1. Bridgestone TOUR B Line of Golf Balls

Designed using data from more than 3 million ball-fitting

sessions, the TOUR B line features several options for players

of all abilities. TOUR B X and XS are designed for low handicap

golfers looking for exceptional feel.

$45/dozen BridgestoneGolf.com

2. “Getting to the Green: Golf, Financial Planning,

and Life, Not Necessarily in That Order”

“Getting to the Green” by Altair Gobo takes a light look at the many

things that golf, financial planning and (by extension) life have in common.

$21.99 amazon.com and area book sellers

3. THE PLAYERS Pin Flag Wallet

Carry a piece of the "5th major" in your back pocket. This wallet's bill

divider is crafted from an authentic pin flag from the 2015 THE PLAYERS

Championship at TPC Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra, Fla.Gift-boxed with

authentication card.

$160 tokens-icons.com/products/the-players-pin-flag-wallet

4. TPC Sawgrass Golf Ball Bottle Opener

Remember that drive that found the drink at 17? Bottle

opener crafted from golf balls actually recovered from the

water surrounding the island green at TPC Sawgrass’

famed 17th hole. Gift-boxed with authentication card.

$85

tokens-icons.com/products/tpc-sawgrass-golf-ball-bottle-opener

8

5. TecTecTec Laser Rangefinders

TecTecTec’s line of technologically advanced laser rangefinders

accurately measure distances precise within one yard

• VPRO500 measures up to 540 yards. (Standard $150, Slope $180)

• VPRO DLX measures up to 600 yards. (Standard $180, Slope $230)

• VPRO DLX1K measures up to 1,000 yards. (Standard $200, Slope $250)

US.TecTecTec.com

6. Zepp Golf 2 swing analyzer

The Zepp Golf 2 attaches to the back of your glove so you can see your

swing, track metrics such as speed and hip rotation, and be guided to

improve your course performance. The app also offers personalized

training suggestions through videos starring sports pros and can record

live-action footage of your swing in 3-D, to post and share on social media.

$149.99 zepp.com/shop/

9

7. Vital winter outfit

Pair the Vital two-way full-zip jacket with stretch leggings for

a comfy and fashionable outfit for winter days on the course.

When temperature becomes a factor, the brand’s DryFuze fabric

technology works to transport moisture from your skin to the

clothing’s exterior.

Full-Zip Jacket $105.50 Shade Pant $86 chase54.com

8. ECCO S-Drive

This light and lively shoe is an entirely new take on golf

footwear. Drawing inspiration from the running market, the

bold, athletic styling is matched with a simple, yet highlytechnical

asymmetrical last to enhance both fit and feel.

$160 ccousa.com

9. Save the Duck Puffer Jacket

Save the Duck collaborates with international associations

and organizations launching special projects and charities that

support sustainability.

$278 savetheduckusa.com

NORTH SHORE GOLF


CLUB CHAMPS CROWNED

AT NORTH SHORE COURSES

By ANNE MARIE TOBIN

2 0 17

It’s been a glorious fall on the North Shore as area clubs

wrapped up their 2017 seasons with annual club

championship tournaments. In the fall issue, we

highlighted many champions’ stories. We follow up with

more results and wish to thank all of the clubs that

graciously shared their stories, results and photos.

______

At Sagamore Spring Golf Course in Lynnfield, a

husband and wife team took center stage in the club’s stroke

play senior championship. Connie Hayton took the

women’s gross title, while hubby Joe Hayton won the senior

men’s net title.

“That has never happened in my 18 years here at

Sagamore,” said PGA teaching instructor and director

of teaching Steve Vaughn. “It was really cool to have a

husband and wife team winning championships, something

really special.”

Fifty-year-old Jim Chesna won the senior gross title in his

first attempt, while Donna DiLeso took the women’s senior

net title. The 2017 men’s club champion is Dan Tucker, who

prevailed over Chesna in the match play final. Bill Yeo won

the net title, defeating Bill Tripes in the final. DiIeso doubled

up, winning the women’s club championship, while Kathy

Rovnak won the women’s net title.

_____

Mac Lee and Karen Joseph won titles at Andover

Country Club. Lee shot 295 in the 72-hole men’s

championship, while Joseph won the women’s title with a

36-hole score of 192. Thomas Finn took the junior title with

a 36-hole total of 157, while Brian Theriault won the senior

title with a 36-hole score of 149. ______

At Ferncroft Country Club in Danvers, Steven Camara

swept the men’s and seniors’ championships, while

Lisa Anderson won the women’s club championship and

Trent Han won the junior title.

______

Mike McAuliffe and Gerry Feeley were first-time winners

at Indian Ridge Country Club in Andover with McAuliffe,

50, winning the senior championship in his first attempt over

runner-up Peter Ciaccia. Feeley, 70, won the super-senior

championship. Chris Dunham defeated Jim Staffieri to

take the men’s title. Cheryl Doherty won the women’s club

championship and Susan Burnley won the women’s net

championship, both for the second straight year.

Sue Mariani won the senior women’s gross championship

while Sandra Divincenzo won the net title.

______

At Nabnasset Lake Country Club in Westford, Dave

Walshe won his first men’s club championship, defeating

Mike Schnyer 4 & 3 in the final. Molly Smith, 12, is

believed to be the youngest women’s champion in the club’s

history. Earlier this summer, Smith also won women’s

championship titles at Vesper Country Club in Tyngsboro

and Mount Pleasant Golf Club in Lowell. Steve Jackson

won his second senior title, while 66-year-old Al Burndrett

won his first super-senior title.

______

Morgan Smith, 13, Molly’s older sister, completed the family

grand slam, winning the women’s club championship at Long

Meadow Golf Club in Lowell.

______

Myopia Hunt Club in South Hamilton crowned several

champions this summer. Josh Webber defeated Ted Ober

1-up in the 18-hole final to win the men’s club championship.

In another close match, Deidre Clark defeated

Penny Ward 1-up, also in 18 holes, to take the women’s title.

Ward found the winner’s circle, though, taking the seasonlong

net match play championship, defeating Marcie

Hunsaker in the final, 3&2, while Jeff Murphy captured

the men’s net championship, defeating Webber in 18 holes,

1-up. The senior championship was won by Joe Roberts,

who defeated Carle Shotwell, 4&3, while R.J. Fates

defeated G.L. Needham, 3&2, to capture the super-senior

title for the 70-and-over set. Tom Riley won the junior

championship.

______

At Renaissance Golf Club in Haverhill, Jeff Weischaar

won the men’s club championship and Teri Burtoft won the

women’s club championship. Weischaar defeated Pete

Beaulieu, 2-up, while Burtoft defeated Betsy Masse, 2&1.

Joe Harnden won the senior club championship for the

umpteenth time, while Lynn Wailes won her first senior

women’s title. Jim McDonald was the senior men’s net

title, while Joan Apkin captured the senior women’s net

championship. James Robbins won the junior club

championship and Ava Spencer won the junior-junior

club championship. >>>

22 >>> WINTER 2017


LEFT: Rockport club champs, Jeff Hobbs and Beth Rowen

RIGHT: Hillview men’s Net B division champion, George Stack

OUR COURSES ARE LOCATED IN LYNN, NORTH READING AND BEVERLY

Erica Allen and James Whitney successfully defended

their 2016 titles at Beverly Golf & Tennis Club.

______

Nick Maccario completed a dream summer, winning his

fourth men’s club championship in the past seven years at

Bradford Golf Club in Haverhill. Maccario shot a

2-under par 211 over the 54-hole event to win by a

whopping 19 shots over Dustin Rollins. Earlier in

the summer, Maccario was a quarterfinalist in the

Massachusetts Amateur and finished fourth at the Ouimet

Memorial Tournament. He also lapped the field at the

2017 Healey Memorial Tournament, formerly the Rogers

Tournament, shooting a Bradford course-record 8-under-par

63 to win by 12 shots. Jim Drohen won his third senior title

in the past five years in a 2-hole playoff win over Jim Grant.

Both players finished the 36-hole stroke play rounds tied at

152 before Drohen sealed the victory with a par on the second

extra hole.

______

At scenic Cape Ann Golf Club in Essex, Kendall Stone

won the men’s club championship with a 36-hole total of 159,

while Bailey Kaplan took the women’s title with a 173.

Robert Hawkes won the men’s senior championship with

a 160, while Ted Stanton won the net division with a 134.

David Hascard, 64, won the men’s super-senior title

with a 168, while Andrea Young won the women’s net

championship with a 144.

______

Wendy Vanderhart won the women’s club championship

at Hillview Golf Course, while Dennis Rollfs won the

men’s club championship in a playoff over Tyler Currie.

Both players finished the 36-hole tournament tied at 148, then

Rollfs secured his first title with a par on the first extra hole.

Alex Chaisson won the men’s Net A division title, while

George Stack won the B division.

______

At Rockport Golf Club, Jeff Hobbs won his twelfth men’s

title with a 72-hole score of 287, 14 shots ahead of runner-up

Kevin Olson. Beth Rowen shot a 3-round 287 and won her

first Rockport title over Dani Dragonas, who was four shots

back. Mike Palazola, in his first time playing as a senior,

took the senior title with a 36-hole 157. l

Anne Marie Tobin is Sports editor of the Lynnfield and Peabody Weekly

News. She is a member of the Massachusetts Golf Hall of Fame. She can be

reached at atobin@weeklynews.net

GFMI

Golf Facilities

Management Inc.

O W N E D A N D O P E R A T E D B Y

Chris Carter, PGA

Steve Murphy, GCSAA

North Reading, MA 01864

978-664-4435

www.Hillviewgc.com

www.Beverlygolfandtennis.com

www.Gannongolfclub.com

Managing Public Golf Courses for 30 Years

NORTH SHORE GOLF


L

ooking for the roots of some of the

most imaginative synthetic putting

greens in New England?

Well, you need look no farther than

Hamilton. It’s there, in a renovated old Volvo

repair shop on Route 1A, where you will

find Karen Moulton and her company, TM

Turfscapes.

Turfscapes installs a wide array of synthetic

pet areas, roof decks, patios and playgrounds,

but Moulton figures that about half of

her jobs come with three or more holes

and varying degrees of undulations and

graduated rough.

“The reason is that because when we start

talking about doing someone’s backyard,

invariably there is a golf lover in there who

asks how much more it would be to add a

putting green,” said Moulton, who grew up

in Ipswich and started the company in 2010

with the support of her husband, Tom, who

owns a landscape business.

Such was the case at one of TM Turfscapes’

most scenic installations near Lynch Park in

Beverly. The company was originally slated

to turf over a portion of a bluestone patio.

Instead, the owner upped the ante by adding

a kidney-shaped three-hole green that is

guarded by a pool just a flop shot away, not

to mention that the Atlantic Ocean is no

more than a 8-iron beyond that.

(Moulton says she cannot take credit for

the miniature orange T. rex that hovers over

the green, much like its larger, iconic version

has done for so many years on Route 1

in Saugus.)

There really is no limit as to where

Moulton and her crew can spread her realistic

turf. From basements (often accompanying

golf simulators) to roof-top decks, she has

seen – and installed – it all from Camden,

Maine, to the Cape.

There is some maintenance involved, but

compared to the meticulous care that the real

McCoy demands it pales in comparison.

Mostly, Moulton says, it involves keeping the

green and rough free of leaves, pine needles

On her Turf

Karen Moulton’s company

spreading putting greens across

the North Shore and beyond

By BOB ALBRIGHT

and other debris that can eventually spread

its fibers and subsequently slow the roll of

the ball.

“We have replaced three (real) greens

where people had invested in the real

thing, but it just proved to be too much

maintenance for them,” she said.

Prices vary depending on the quality of

the turf and accompanying fringe and on

the foundation underneath. A rooftop

application that uses a pedestal system to

compensate for the natural pitch of the roof

can be the most costly.

Utilizing its patented SYNLawn technology,

TM Turfscapes offers four styles of nylon turf

- at four different price points. All turf comes

with a 15-year guarantee and generally rolls

between 10 to 12 on the Stimpmeter,

depending on how much sand is used, and

all greens are built to conform with noted

short game guru Dave Pelz’s “12 Elements of

Practice.”

To insure that you have ample room to

drain at least a winding 20-foot snake,

Moulton suggests that greens are at least

25 feet long and 20 feet wide. Adding

undulations, fringe and even bunkers are all

options, but will increase the cost.

“It adds up fast and it’s like putting in a

patio or a deck to your house,” Moulton

pointed out. “Like any capital improvement

to your home, you really want to take the

time to plan it out and do it right.”

All Turfscapes greens are receptive to short

chip shots of less than 30 yards. And those

with large backyards and those who want to

dip deeper in their bag can opt for the

company’s patented “shot stopper” technology,

which holds approach shots of 150 yards

or more.

“Anything can be done,” Moulton added,

with a smile.

Well, almost anything. Like we said before,

the bright orange T. rex is all on you. l

Bob Albright is a freelance writer. He can be

reached at ralbright33@comcast.net

An orange dinosaur guards the putting green installed at a waterfront

home in Beverly by Karen Moulton’s company TM Turfscapes.

PHOTOS: Spenser Hasak


Cheers for Oppenheim;

jeers for stubborn Myopia

Gary Larrabee

garylarrabee.com

A

s we say farewell to another glorious golf season

here on the North Shore – and you most-blessed

ones head for Florida or Arizona – it’s time to

acknowledge one young man who simply will not

give up chasing a dream and take to task one of our storied

golf club memberships that is falling short in fulfilling its

responsibilities to the game.

First, huge plaudits – and a standing ovation – to 37-yearold

Rob Oppenheim. At first glance one might think that

Oppenheim, he of Salem and Andover heritage, was floundering

as a professional golfer. But in fact, he is thriving. His story

has become more remarkable after he regained his PGA Tour

card on Oct. 2 by finishing fifth overall and winning $161,000

in the four-tournament Web.com playoffs. Note that he won

only $150,000 during the entire Web.com regular season and

was looking at another year on the Web.com circuit unless he

came up big in the second-chance playoffs.

In a cutthroat competition in which many players

Oppenheim’s age are one-and-doners upon falling off the PGA

Tour money wagon, Oppenheim is Mr. Persistence, a true

believer in his quest to succeed in the Big Show.

And this coming at a fragile age when the majority of his

fellow competitors, especially America’s new crop of stars on

the big tour, are in their 20s. Oppenheim, a former Massachusetts

Amateur and Open winner, is surely a late bloomer, but could

care less about his age. He has been a man of patience since

joining the Web.com Tour in 2010 and earning his first PGA

Tour card in 2016, a short-lived one-year membership that

tossed him back on the Web.com circuit for 2017.

“So much of the game at this level is patience and knowing

your limitations; knowing who you are and how to get the best

out of your abilities,” Oppenheim told this observer in 2016.

So, after winning less than $500,000 on the PGA Tour in 2016

and failing to regain his card by a mere $392, it was back to

the Web.com in ’17, where the age discrepancy between the

shorter-hitting Oppenheim and his rivals was even wider.

No matter. The soft-spoken Oppenheim was optimistic

heading into 2017 and confirmed that outlook when he, taking

advantage of a sponsor exemption into the AT&T Pebble

Beach Pro-Am in February, finished eighth and won $216,000

– the largest paycheck of his career. Only hitch was the cash

did not count on his 2017 Web.com earnings.

Determined to rejoin the Speith/Thomas/Fowler/Johnson

bandwagon for 2017, Oppenheim played 18 of the last 19

weeks of the Web.com campaign, saving his best golf for the

end – the Web.com playoffs. Then he went right out and made

it 19 tournaments in 20 weeks by competing in the first event

STRAIGHT DOWN THE MIDDLE

of the new PGA Tour season in Napa, Calif., the Safeway Open.

Rob missed the cut at Safeway, then took a breather – finally

– the following week.

Just call him Iron Man or Marathon Man. And a marvelous

story when he’s ready to write his memoir. But hopefully, first

he will reach the summit in his second bid on the PGA Tour.

Second, a few raspberries – and not for the first time from

this aging servant – to one of the region’s great golf clubs –

Myopia – for continuing to reject the concept of hosting an

appropriate United States Golf Association championship for

the first time since 1908. The South Hamilton club boasts one

of America’s 100 greatest courses, created by Herbert Leeds

in the 1890s. The club gained immediate acclaim and became

the first club to host four U.S. Opens, the last in 1908.

But why no USGA championships since?

The answer is irrelevant today, but the issue was pertinent

all year as Salem entertained its sixth USGA championship,

the 38th U.S. Senior Open June 29-July 2. Financials aside,

the event was a major success, like the previous five, and the

magnificent Donald Ross-designed course sparkled during 20

hours of Fox Sports television coverage.

The U.S. Open has passed Myopia by. But the course, which

when played is like a trip a century back in time, all these

decades could have been a regular rotating venue for a lowkey

national tournament.

Myopia is ideal, in my humble opinion, for staging a U.S.

Senior Amateur, men’s or women’s, a U.S. Girls’ Junior, or a

Four-Ball, the newest championship on the USGA calendar.

Consummating such an arrangement with the USGA would

make national headlines in the golf media and draw exceptional

galleries come tourney week.

I know Myopia’s membership and leaders are sick of

reading about this under my name. But I remain keen on the

matter. I would love to see them reconsider their current

stance and welcome the golf world onto their sacred property

– and Fox Sports, too – for a USGA championship. It’s never

too late.

Word has reached us from Plano, Texas, that Cotton Dunn,

Kernwood’s head pro from 1969 to 1982, died Oct. 7 at his

home. Dunn was 79. l

NORTH SHORE GOLF


NS GOLF /// COURSE DIRECTORY

PRIVATE CLUBS

Andover Country Club

60 Canterbury St., Andover, MA 01810

andovercountryclub.com; 978-475-1263

Golf Professional Daniel Taylor

Slope 131; Rating 73.1

Bass Rocks Golf Club

34 Beach Road, Gloucester, MA 01930

bassrocksgolfclub.org; 978-283-1866

Golf Professional Peter Hood

Slope 124; Rating 69.3

Bear Hill Golf Club

2 North St., Stoneham, MA 02180

bearhillgolfclub.com; 781-245-4295

Golf Professional Jeff Wirbal

9 holes; Slope 133; Rating 71.9

Bellevue Golf Club

320 Porter St., Melrose, MA 02176

bellevuegolfclub.com; 781-665-7900

Golf Professional Jeffrey Monteleone

9 holes: Slope 128; Rating 69.8

Essex County Club

153 School St.,

Manchester-by-the-Sea, MA 01944

essexcc.org; 978-526-7311

Golf Professional Jack Davis

Slope 136; Rating 72.5

Ferncroft Country Club

10 Village Road, Middleton, MA 01949

ferncroftcc.com; 978-739-4032

Golf Professional Philip Leiss

27 holes; Slope 135; Rating 72.9

Haverhill Country Club

58 Brickett Lane, Haverhill, MA 01831

haverhillcc.com; 978-373-1146

Golf Professional Jason Dufresne

Slope 129; Rating 70.6

Indian Ridge Country Club

Lovejoy Road, Andover, MA 01810

indianridgecountryclub.us; 978-475-9484

Golf Professional Mike Miller

Slope 133; Rating 72.1

Ipswich Country Club

148 Country Club Way, Ipswich, MA 01938

ipswichclub.com; 978-356-3999

Golf Professional Daniel R. Dwyer

Slope 139; Rating 73.9

Kernwood Country Club

1 Kernwood St., Salem, MA 01970

kernwood.org; 978-745-1210

Golf Professional Frank Dully

Slope 130; Rating 71.7

Long Meadow Golf Club

165 Havilah St., Lowell, MA 01852

longmeadowgolfclub.com; 978-441-1542

Golf Professional Gene Manley

9 holes; Slope 127; Rating 69.3

Meadow Brook Golf Club

292 Grove St., Reading, MA 01867

meadowbrookgolfclub.org; 781-942-1334

Golf Professional Steve Sheridan

9 holes; Slope 137; Rating 73.8

Mount Pleasant Golf Club

141 Staples St., Lowell, MA 01851

mpgc.com; 978-452-8228

Golf Professional Joel Jenkins

9 holes; Slope 126; Rating 70.1

Myopia Hunt Club

435 Bay Road, South Hamilton, MA 01982

myopiahuntclub.org; 978-468-4433

Golf Professional Mike Bemis

Slope 135; Rating 73.2

Nabnasset Lake Country Club

47 Oak Hill Rd., Westford, MA 01886

nabnassetlakecc.com; 978-692-2560

Golf Professional Dan Gillis

9 holes; Slope 119; Rating 67.0

North Andover Country Club 01845

500 Great Pond Rd.,

North Andover, MA

northandovercc.com; 978-687-7414

Golf Professional Peter Farley

9 holes; Slope 119; Rating 65.4

Renaissance Golf Club

377 Kenoza St., Haverhill, MA 01830

renaissancema.com; 978-241-6712

Golf Professional Stuart P. Cady

Slope 142; Rating 75.0

Salem Country Club

133 Forest St., Peabody, MA 01960

salemcountryclub.org; 978-538-5400

Golf Professional Kevin Wood

Slope 134; Rating 73.5

Tedesco Country Club

154 Tedesco St., Marblehead, MA 01945

tedescocc.org; 781-631-2800

Golf Professional Robert Green

Slope 129; Rating 72.1

Thomson Country Club

2 Mid Iron Drive, North Reading, MA 01864

thomsoncc.com; 978-664-2016

Golf Professional Christopher Young

Slope 132; Rating 72.8

The Golf Club at Turner Hill

3 Manor House Lane, Ipswich, MA 01938

turnerhill.com; 978-356-7070

Golf Professionals: Nate Hopley

and Mike Brown

Slope 138; Rating 75.1

Vesper Country Club

185 Pawtucket Blvd.,

Tyngsborough, MA 01879

vespercc.com; 978-458-8731

Golf Professional Stephen Doyle

Slope 137; Rating 73.6

Winchester Country Club

468 Mystic St., Winchester, MA 01890

winchestercc.org; 781-729-1181

Golf Professional Jim Salinetti

Slope 137; Rating 73.5

Winthrop Golf Club

453 Main St., Winthrop, MA 02152

winthropgolf.com; 617-799-1455

Golf Professional Jim Bruce

9 holes; Slope 116; Rating 68.5

PUBLIC CLUBS

Amesbury Golf and Country Club

46 Monroe St., Amesbury, MA; 978-388-5153

amesburycountryclub.com; 9 holes.

Club Pro Butch Mellon; Tee times: 5 days in

advance; Fee for 9 holes: $20/$21

weekday/weekend;Fee for 18 holes: $30/$32

weekday/weekend; Cart rental: $15 per

person for 18 holes, $7.50 per person for 9

holes; Yards 6,095; Slope 125; Rating 70.5

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 28

Beverly Golf & Tennis Club

134 McKay St., Beverly, MA;

978-922-9072 ext. 111

beverlygolfandtennis.net; 18 holes.

Golf Professional: Dave Dionne; Tee times:

7 days in advance (members), 5 days in

advance (non-members) Fee for 18 holes:

$40/$45 weekday/weekends; Cart rental: $16

per person for 18 holes; Yards 6,276; Slope

126; Rating: 70.8 SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 23

Black Swan Country Club

258 Andover St., Georgetown, MA

978-352-7926; blackswancountryclub.com;

18 holes. Director of Golf: Dave Trull;

Tee times: 6 days in advance; Fee for 9/18

holes: $26/$45 weekday, $29/$54 weekends;

Cart rental: $19 for 18 holes; Yards 6,803;

Slope 129; Rating: 72.9

Bradford Country Club

201 Chadwick Road, Bradford, MA

978-372-8587; bradfordcc.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Kevin Murphy; Tee times: 6 days in

advance (online tee times also available); Fee

for 9/18 holes: $19/$34 weekdays, $23/$44

weekends; Cart rental: $20 per person for 18

holes; Yards: 6,157; Slope 130; Rating 70.8

Candlewood Golf Course

75 Essex Road, Ipswich, MA; 978-356-5377

candlewoodgolf.net; 9 holes.

Tee times: no; Fee for 9/18 holes: $16/$21

weekday, $17/$22; weekend; Cart rental:

$14 for 9 holes; Yards: 2,075; Slope N/A;

Rating N/A

Cape Ann Golf Club

99 John Wise Ave., Essex, MA

978-768-7544; capeanngolf.com; 9 holes.

Club Pro: none; Tee times: 5 days in advance;

Fee for 9/18 holes: $25/$38 everyday; Cart

rentals: $11 per rider for 9 holes; Yards 5,862;

Slope 119; Rating 68.3

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 29

Cedar Glen Golf Course

60 Water St., Saugus, MA

781-233-3609 cedarglengolf.com; 9 holes.

Club Pro: none; Tee times: no; Fee for 9/18

holes: $20/$34 weekdays, $22/$37 weekend;

Cart rental: $18 for 9 holes; Yards 6,050;

Slope 107; Rating 66.7

Chelmsford Country Club

66 Park Road, Chelmsford, MA

978-256-1818 sterlinggolf.com/chelmsford;

9 holes.Club Pro: Gary Burke; Tee times: 4

days in advance; Fee for 9/18 holes: $19/$26

weekday, $22/$30 weekend; Cart rental: $16

for 18 holes; Yards: 4,934; Slope 108,

Rating 64.6

Country Club of Billerica

51 Baldwin Road, Billerica, MA

978-667-9121 ext. 22;

countryclubofbillerica.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Ed O’Connell; Tee times: 5 days in

advance; Fee 9/18 holes: $22/$35 weekday,

$25/$40 weekend; Cart rental: $17 per person

for 18 holes; Yards 5,847; Slope 123; Rating 67.9

Country Club of New Hampshire

187 Kearsarge Valley Road,

North Sutton, N.H.; 603-927-4246

ccnh@golfmanagementco.com; 18 holes.

Fee for 9/18 holes: $20/$36 weekday,

Cart rental: $17 per person for 18 holes;

Yards 6,256; Slope 126, Rating 70.3

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 32

Crystal Lake Golf Club

940 North Broadway, Haverhill, MA

978-374-9621; golfcrystallake.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: none; Teetimes: 10 days in advance

for members, 7 days in advance for public;

Fees: 18 holes $28 weekdays,

$37 weekends; Cart rental: $18 for 18 holes;

Yards 6,525; Slope 129; Rating 72.4

Evergreen Valley Golf Course

18 Boyd Drive, Newburyport, MA

978-463-8600; evergreenvalleygolf.com;

9 holes. Tee times: no; Fee for 9/18 holes:

$13/$25 everyday; Cart rental: $14 for 9

holes; Yards 2,997; Slope 108; Rating 67.4

Far Corner Golf Course

5 Barker Road, Boxford, MA; 978-352-8300

farcornergolf.com; 27 holes. Club Pro: John

O’Connor; Tee times: 5 days in advance; Fee

for 9/18 holes: $23/$41; weekday, $27/$47

weekend; Cart rental: $18 per person

Four Oaks Country Club

1 Clubhouse Lane, Dracut, MA

978-455-0054; fouroakscountryclub.com

Golf Pro: Anthony Martinho; Tee times: 6 days

in advance; Fee 9/18 holes: $24/$41

weekday, $30/$51 weekend; Cart rental: $20

per person for 18 holes; Yards 6,268; Slope

136; Rating 71.4

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 28

Gannon Municipal Golf Club

60 Great Woods Road, Lynn, MA

781-592-8238; gannongolfclub.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: David Sibley; Tee times: 2 days in

advance after 6 p.m.; Nonresident fee for 9/18

holes: $22/$39 weekday, $24/$47 weekend;

Cart rental: $18 per person for 18 holes;

Yards 6,110; Slope123; Rating 70.2

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 23

Hickory Hill Golf Club

200 North Lowell St., Methuen, MA

978-686-0822; golfhickoryhill.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: none; Tee times: every day;

Fee: 18 holes: $42 Mon.-Thurs., $45 Fri., $52

Sat.-Sun., Cart rental: $18 per person for 18

holes; Yards 6,287;Slope: 123; Rating: 70.8

Hillview Golf Course

149 North St., North Reading, MA

978-664-4435, hillviewgc.com; 18 holes.

Golf Pro: Chris Carter;

Tee times: 3 days in advance; Fee for 9/18

holes: $22/$40; Weekday, $25/$43 weekend;

Cart rental: $16 per rider for 18holes;

Yards 5,773; Slope 120; Rating 67.4

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 23

26 >>> WINTER 2017


NS GOLF /// COURSE DIRECTORY

PUBLIC COURSES, continued

King Rail Reserve Golf Course

427 Walnut St., Lynnfield, MA; 781-334-4643;

9 holes. Club Pro: Eddie Whalley; Fees for

9/18 holes: $21/$31 weekday, $22/$44

weekend; Cart rental: $9 per person for

9 holes; Yards 3,460; Slope 112; Rating 63.6

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 32

The Meadow at Peabody

80 Granite St., Peabody, MA; 978-532-9390

peabodymeadowgolf.com; 18 holes.

Director of Golf: Peter Cronan; Tee times:

3 days in advance; Nonresident fee for 9/18

holes: $21/$40 weekday, $26/$47 weekend;

Cart rental: $10 per person for 9 holes

Yards 6,708; Slope 135; Rating 73.7

Merrimack Valley Golf Club

210 Howe St., Methuen, MA; 978-685-9717

merrimackvalleygolfclub.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Steve Katter; Tee times: 7 days in

advance; Fee for 9/18; Holes: $23/$38

weekday, $28/$48 weekend; Cart rental:

$18 per person for 18 holes; Yards 6,012;

Slope 29;Rating 70.1

Middleton Golf Course

105 S. Main St., Middleton, MA; 978-774-4075

middletongolf.com; 18 holes. Club Pro: Chris

Costa; Tee times: 1 week in advance; Fee for

9/18 holes: $23/$36 daily; Cart rental: $12 per

person for 18 holes; Yards 3,215 Slope N/A;

Rating N/A SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 29

Mount Hood Golf Club

100 Slayton Rd., Melrose, MA

781-665-6656; mthoodgolfclub.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Mike Farrell; Tee times: 5 days in

advance; Nonresident fee for 9/18 holes:

$25/$43 weekday, $50 for 18 on a weekend;

Yards 5,630; Slope 115; Rating 65.4

Murphy’s Garrison Par 3

654 Hilldale Ave., Haverhill, MA

978-374-938; garrisongolf.com/contact;

9 holes. Club Pro: Ted Murphy; Tee times: no;

Fee for 9 holes: $11 weekday, $12 weekend;

Yards 1,005; Slope N/A; Rating N/A

Nahant Golf Club at Kelley Greens

1 Willow Road, Nahant, MA

781-581-9000; nahantgolfclub.com;

9 holes; Golf Pro: Toby Ahern;

Tee times: 3 days in advance; Non-resident

fee for 9 holes: $18 weekday, $21 weekend;

Cart rental: $12 for 9 holes;Yards 3,910;

Slope: 104; Rating 61.0

New Meadows Golf Club

32 Wildes Road, Topsfield, MA

978-887-9307; newmeadowsgolf.com; 9 holes.

Club Manager: Gerry Peckerman; Tee times:

yes; Fee for 9 holes: $19 weekday, $22

weekend; Cart Rental: $9 per person for 9

holes, $15 perperson for 18 holes;

Yards 2,883; Slope 117; Rating 64.8

Olde Salem Greens

75 Wilson St., Salem, MA; 978-744-2149;

9 holes. Club Pro: none; Tee times: 1 day

in advance weekday, 2 days on weekend;

Non-resident fee for 9 holes: $20

weekday/$21 weekend; Cart rental: $13

for 9 holes; Yards 3089; Slope 121;

Rating 69.4

Ould Newbury Golf Club

319 Newburyport Turnpike, Newbury, MA

978-465-9888; ouldnewbury.com; 9 holes;

Club Pro: Jim Hilton; Tee Times: No; Fee for

9/18 holes: $25/$38 weekday, private play on

weekend; Car Rental: $10 per person for 9

holes; Yards 6,230; Slope 128; Rating 71.0

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 29

Reedy Meadow At Lynnfield Centre

195 Summer St., Lynnfield, MA

781-334-9877; 9 holes. Club Pro: Donnie

Lyons; Tee times: no; Fee for 9/18 holes:

$20/$30 weekday, $21/$31 weekend;

Cart rental: $8 for 9 holes per person;

Yards 5,120; Slope 102; Rating 63.8

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 32

Rockport Golf Club

Country Club Road, Rockport, MA

978-546-3340; rockportgolfclub.net

9 holes. Club Pro: Stephen Clayton;

Tee times: 1 day in advance; Fee for 9/18

holes: $25/$37 everyday; Cart rental: $13

for 9 holes; Yards 6,076; Slope 125;

Rating 69.8

Rowley Country Club

235 Dodge Road, Rowley, MA

978-948-2731; rowleycountryclub.com;

9 holes. Club Pro: Darin Chin-Aleong; fee

for 9/18 holes: $21/$33 weekday, $23/$35

weekend; Cart rental: $19 for 9 holes for two

riders; Yards 5,936; Slope 131; Rating 69.1

Sagamore Spring Golf Course

1287 Main St., Lynnfield, MA; 781-334-3151

sagamoregolf.com; 18 holes. Club Pro: Steve

Vaughn; Tee times: 7 days in advance; Fee

for 9/18 holes: $27/$45 weekday, $29/$52

weekend; Cart rental: $12 for 9 holes per

person; Yards 5,914; Slope 124; Rating 68.8

Stoneham Oaks

101 R. Montvale Ave., Stoneham, MA

781-438-7888; stonehamoaks.com; 9 holes.

Club Pro: Michael Gaffney; Tee times: no;

Non-resident fees for 9 holes: $16 weekday,

$18 weekend; Cart rental: $9 per person

for 9 holes; Yards 1,125; Slope N/A;

Rating N/A

Swanson Meadows GC

216 Rangeway Road, Billerica, MA

978-670-7777; swansonmeadows.com;

9 holes. Club Pro: none; Tee times: 7 days in

advance; Fee for 9 holes: $22 weekday,$25

weekend; Cart rental: $11 per person; Yards

4,486; Slope 108; Rating 62.6

Tewksbury Country Club

1880 Main St., Tewksbury, MA; 978-640-0033

tewksburycc.com; 9 holes. Club Pro: Mike

Rogers; Tee times: Friday-Sunday 2 days in

advance; Fee for 9/18 holes: $23/$39 weekday,

$26/$42 weekend; Cart rental: $11 per person

for 9 holes; Yards 5,268; Slope 116; Rating 65.6

Trull Brook Golf Course

170 River Rd., Tewksbury, MA; 978-851-6731

trullbrook.com; 18 holes. Club Pro: Al Santos;

Tee times: 7 days in advance; Fee for 18 holes:

$42 weekday, $53 weekend; Cart rental: $18

per person for 18 holes; Yards 6,345;

Slope 124; Rating 69.8

Tyngsboro Country Club

80 Pawtucket Blvd., Tyngsboro, MA

978-649-7334; 9 holes. Tee times: 5 days

in advance for weekends; Fee for 9 holes:

$17weekday, $19 weekend; Cart rental: $14

for 9 holes; Yards 2,397; Slope 104;

Rating 65.2

Unicorn Golf Course

460 Williams St., Stoneham, MA

781-438-9732; unicorngc.com

9 holes. Club Pro: Jeff Barnes; Tee times: no;

Nonresident fee for 9 holes: $22 weekday/ $24

weekend; Cart rental: $9 per person;

Yards 6,446; Slope 127; Rating 71.6

Wenham Country Club

94 Main St., Wenham, MA; 978-468-4714

wenhamcountryclub.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Jason Greene; Tee times: weekends

only; Fee for 9/18 holes: $23.50/$38 weekday,

$25/$44 weekend; Cart rental: $16 per person

for 18 holes; Yards 4,554; Slope 118;

Rating 63.3 SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 35

Windham Country Club

1 Country Club Drive., Windham, NH

603-434-2093; windhamcc.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Joanne Flynn; Tee times: 7 days in

advance; Fee for 9/18 holes: $24/$42 weekday,

$29/$50 weekend; Cart rental: $9 per person

for 9 holes; Yards 6,442; Slope 135; Rating 71.2

Woburn Country Club

5 Country Club Road, Woburn, MA

781-933-9880; woburncountryclub.com;

9 holes. Club Pro: Paul Barkhouse; Tee times:

2 days in advance; Non-resident fee for 9

holes: $21 weekday and $22 weekend;

Cart rental: $16 for 9 holes;

Yards 5,973; Slope 121;

Rating 68.9

DRIVING RANGES

INDOOR FACILITIES

BFM Mini Golf & Driving Range

327 Main St., North Reading, MA

978-664-9276

Big Sticks Golf

26 Ray Ave., Burlington, MA

bigsticksgolf.com

781-229-2269

The Clubhouse Golf & Entertainment

222 S. Main St., Middleton, MA

theclubhousege.com

978-539-8725

Dilisio Golf Range

115 Swampscott Road, Salem, MA

dilisiogolfdrivingrange.com

978-745-6766

Golf Country

160 S. Main St., Middleton, MA

golfcountry.org

978-774-4476

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 32

Golf Galaxy

40 Walkers Brook Drive, Reading, MA

golfgalaxy.com

781-944-0535

Golfers Warehouse

4 Newbury St., Danvers, MA

edwinwattsgolf.com

978-777-4653

Golftec

194 Newbury St., Peabody, MA

golftec.com/locations

978-777-2930

Paradise Family Golf

25 Lonegan Road, Middleton, MA

paradisefamilygolf.com

978-750-4653

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 5

Sagamore Golf

22 North Road, North Hampton, NH

sagamoregolf.com

603-964-8393

Sarkisian Farms & Driving Range

153 Chandler Road, Andover, MA

sarkisianfarms.com

978-668-5522

Sun ‘n Air Golf Center

210 Conant St., Danvers, MA

sunairgolf.com

978-774-8180

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 29

NORTH SHORE GOLF


Visit our

Website for available

Outing Dates

Greater Boston’s Rediscovered Classic

WEB SPECIALS

at

playgolfne.com

Mike Farrell, PGA Professional

Slayton Road, Melrose, MA

www.mthoodgolfclub.com

Call for tee times & directions.

781-665-6656

Junior Schools & Clinics

Full Service Pro Shop • Lessons

Bar • Restaurant • Functions

Golf Outings & Tournaments

BOOK YOUR

TEE TIME TODAY

Just 30 minutes

North of Boston

1 CLUBHOUSE LANE • DRACUT, MA

amesbury

country club

SEMI-PRIVATE 9 HOLE GOLF COURSE

3 COUNTRY CLUB ROAD

AMESBURY, MASSACHUSETTS

PRO SHOP: 978-388-5153

amesburycountryclub.com

JUST MINUTES FROM THE

NEW HAMPSHIRE AND MAINE SEACOASTS

PUBLIC WELCOME

18 hole championship golf course

GREAT SENIOR RATES MONDAY – FRIDAY • BAR & GRILLE

GRAZIE ITALIAN RESTAURANT • WEDDINGS AND EVENTS

PUBLIC WELCOME

FOUROAKSCOUNTRYCLUB.COM • 978-455-0054

28 >>> WINTER 2017


Welcome to one of the

most scenic nine holes, anywhere.

OPEN DAILY YEAR ROUND (WEATHER PERMITTING)

FOR TEE TIMES CALL

978-768-7544

OUR “FAIRWAY PUB” OPENS DAILY AT 11am

PUB MENU & DAILY SPECIALS

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT

CAPEANNGOLF.COM

DIRECTIONS | RATES | HISTORY | COURSE LAYOUT

CAPE ANN GOLF CLUB

99 JOHN WISE AVENUE • ESSEX, MA

























1287 Main St., Lynnfield, MA 01940

781-334-3151

sagamoregolf.com

Tee times 7 days in advance

____

PGA instruction available

____

Driving range and

new short game area

____

New golf cart fleet

NEW FOR 2017

REDESIGNED 9TH HOLE

(OPENING EARLY SUMMER!)

NORTH SHORE GOLF


The original b

cket list

THESE GOLFERS ARE DETERMINED TO PLAY AMERICA’S

TOP 100 PUBLIC COURSES

By STACEY MARCUS

Long before Jack Nicholson and Morgan

Freeman teamed up in the movie “The Bucket List”

to play a couple of aged curmudgeons determined

to fulfill their life’s fantasies, James Motzkin and his

friends were embarking on their own dream

journey: to play the top 100 public golf courses in

the United States.

Their road map, which ranks America’s greatest

golf courses, was established in 1966 by Golf Digest

and is published biennially. The group, most from

the North Shore, have been hitting the links across

the country for more than two decades and,

according to Motzkin, have the bucket about 75

percent full.

Motzkin, a Georgetown resident and founder/

president of JRM Hauling and Recycling, reflects

on the genesis of his golf trips while pointing to a

plaque behind his desk at his corporate office on

Route 1 in Peabody. Peter Gamache of Peabody

gave him the plaque with pegs and a

list of the top 100 courses; he

decided to make it his mission to play

them all and share the joy with a

group of friends.

“We are not interested in becoming

professional golfers, we are just

enjoying the moment,” said Motzkin,

who plays to an 18 handicap at Salem

and Kernwood and meticulously

plans the trips to include three key

elements: many rounds of golf, fine

restaurants and points of interest.

Son Jimmy loves the annual

tradition. “We have a lot of of fun

times and lots of laughs. I enjoy

spending time with everyone, especially my father,”

he said. His favorite course is Bethpage Black on

Long Island, N.Y.

Each trip is unique, galvanizing large and small

groups. In addition to the Motzkins, members

include Mitch Marcus (Marblehead), Art McCarthy

(Reading), Peter Gamache (Peabody) and Tom

Flanagan (Reading).

“Jimmy (senior) does an incredible job targeting

the golf courses he wants to play, organizing a great

trip, inviting friends both old and new, and making

sure that everyone has so much fun they want to

come back for the next trip!” said McCarthy.

“I went on my first golf trip well over 15 years ago,

to TPC Sawgrass outside of Jacksonville. Mitch

Marcus was the only guy I knew well from this

group of eight golfers. I became fast friends with the

other six and continue to play golf with them all to

this day. What I remember most about that first trip

was Jimmy making a birdie 2 on the famous par-3

17th hole. He hit his tee shot to within 10 feet of the

pin on the island green and then drained the putt

to clinch the match, defeating me and my partner

that day,” said McCarthy, with a chuckle.

McCarthy’s favorite golf course is Pinehurst No.

2 in North Carolina. It’s James Motzkin’s, too. It is

BUCKET

LIST

James Motzkin Sr.

the first course Motzkin played on his cross-country

journey and he speaks with great affection of

the challenge the course presented, the fine

accommodations and a setting that reminded him

of a New England village. The fact that Motzkin

eagled a hole at Pinehurst certainly helped earn its

top spot on his list.

Other treasured courses include Pebble Beach in

California, TPC in Phoenix, Ariz., Bandon Dunes in

Bandon, Ore., Whistling Straits in Sheboygan,

Wisc., Bethpage in N.Y., Sea Island Golf Club in

Georgia, and Crumpin-Fox in Bernardston, Mass.

Throughout the years, Motzkin and his posse

have traveled by motor coach, plane and car to golf

around the country. Once, when the New England

Patriots were playing in Minnesota, they flew out

to watch the game and scratch Interlachen and

Hazeltine golf courses off the list. A trip to play

Bethpage State Park in New York was paired with

a trip to the Empire State Building.

“I’ve been to every state in the

country,” noted Motzkin; the last

state on the list was North Dakota.

“It is like being a kid at Christmas,”

said Gamache, who notes the trips

keep getting better and better.

“Imagine four grown men singing

in the car throughout the state

of Oregon,” joked Motzkin.

Marcus said that the scenery on

the way to Bandon Dunes was

breathtaking. One of his most

memorable times is when they

played Dancing Rabbit in Mississippi

and he bought a round of drinks to

celebrate their round. One of the women in the

lounge, listening to the music being played, asked.

“Do you know who this lady is? It’s Nicki Minaj

and she is going to be the next big rap singer?”

Marcus notes that months later his daughter was

playing music and she said,”I love Nicki Minaj!”

“We share an inexplicable camaraderie that

cannot be put into words,” said Motzkin. All golfers

understand what he means. Motzkin took his

then-4-year-old grandson to play golf in Palm

Beach, Fla., but thinks he is a tad young to join in

on the golf trips. “He likes to chase the golf cart

most of all,” said Jimmy the younger.

When it comes to comparing one course to

another, Motzkin notes that although the courses

are diverse, the crew has one tradition they practice

at every course. “Before we hit the ball, we look

around and remember how blessed we are to be in

this situation.”

So what classic track is next on the bucket list?

Undecided, said Motzkin, who will begin planning

it soon. l

Stacey Marcus is a freelance writer. She can be reached at

stacey@staceymarcuswrites.com

30 >>> WINTER 2017


CONTINUED FROM P. 13

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