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10 december 2017_final

News From Non -Aligned

News From Non -Aligned World Indonesia-Tunisia bilateral relations By IINS Research Team The recent visit of Indonesian Foreign Minister Retno Marsudi to Tunisia and the meeting between the Foreign Ministers of the two nations held in Tunis in October 2017 has further strengthened the bilateral relations between the two. Both Indonesia and Tunisia have based their foreign policy ideals on the principles of the Non-Aligned Movement. Besides the Non-Aligned Movement, the two nations participate in other multilateral forums such as the Organization of Islamic Countries (OIC). “At the 10th Tunisia-Indonesia Joint Ministerial Session, both the nations agreed to increase cooperation in the field of counter terrorism, including in the context of intelligence cooperation, the prevention of funding for terrorism, the handling of foreign terrorist figures (FTF), as well as the radicalized program and interfaith dialogue. In this regard, the two Foreign Ministers of the two countries agreed to encourage the immediate completion of the MoU on counterterrorism cooperation” Indonesian contacts with Tunisia predates the latter’s independence in 1956. The relations and cooperation between the two countries started with the visit of Tunisian freedom fighter Habib Bourguiba to Jakarta followed by the establishment of Tunisian independence representative office in the city in 1952 to lobby the Asian nations support for Tunisian independence. Characters of the Tunisian independence movement were present at the Asian-African Conference in 1955, and then then Indonesia President Sukarno allowed the opening of Tunisia’s struggle for independence in Jakarta. Indonesia opened the Embassy in Tunis in 1960, which also marked the opening of diplomatic relations between the two countries. The Tunisian Embassy in Jakarta opened on 14 October 1987. The issue of democracy is an important highlight in Indonesia-Tunisia relations. Tunisia has high regards for the successful functioning of democracy in Indonesia. During the transition period in Tunisia, the Indonesian government through Institute for Peace and Democracy (IPD) held a Workshop on Indonesia – Tunisia Capacity Building Partnership for Democracy: Dialogue on Empowering the Electoral Management Bodies from 10-16 May 2013. The Dialogue aimed to accommodate the sharing of experiences and lesson learned on managing a peaceful and successful election with a legitimate result as well as establishing political consensus, particularly during the time of political transition. During the 2014 Indonesian presidential election, a group of representatives from Tunisia visited to Indonesia for observing the electoral process in the country. In 2014, when the implementation of democratic transition in Tunisia took place, it was applauded by the Indonesian political class, civil society, and the press. In an editorial Jakarta post lauded Tunisia for the nation’s strong commitment to transform itself into a fully democratic state. There are robust political ties between the two nations and both the nations strongly espouse the cause of the other in various multilateral forums. Tunisia supported the nomination of Indonesia in the UN Industrial Development Council (UNIDO) and International Maritime Organization Council Category while Indonesia supported Tunisia’s nomination in the Council of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the Inter-governmental Committee for Physical Education and Sport (IGCPES). At the 10th Tunisia-Indonesia Joint Ministerial Session, both the nations agreed to increase cooperation in the field of counter terrorism, including in the context of intelligence cooperation, the prevention of funding for terrorism, the handling of foreign terrorist figures (FTF), as well as the radicalized program and interfaith dialogue. In this regard, the two Foreign Ministers of the two countries agreed to encourage the immediate completion of the MoU on counterterrorism cooperation. There are strong economic ties between the two nations. The current volume of trade between Tunisia and Indonesia is between 120 and 150 million dinars (between 48 and 60 million U.S. dollars). The current investment of Indonesian companies in Tunisia has reached more than US $ 100 million in the oil and gas sector. Indonesia’s main export products to Tunisia are palm oil and its derivatives, while from Tunisia to Indonesia is the date. In 2014, the Tunisia Indonesia Business Association (TIBA) was inaugurated. TIBA is a forum of association for the enhancement of relations and cooperation network between Indonesian Contd.....On Page 16 December, 2017 (8)

NAM and human security The emergence of new security threats has led to a reconceptualization of the concept of security. Security in a post-Cold War world is not merely an absence from armed threat or war. The concept has undergone an expansion and has been moving away from traditional, state-centric conceptions of security that focused primarily on the safety of states from military aggression, to one that concentrates on the security of the individuals, their protection and empowerment. The term Human Security was first popularized by the United Nations Development Program in the early 1990s. It emerged in the post-Cold War era as a way to link various humanitarian, economic, and social issues in order to alleviate human suffering and assure security. The Commission for Human Security defines human security thus: “Human security means protecting fundamental freedoms – freedoms that are the essence of life. It means protecting people from critical (severe) and pervasive (widespread) threats and situations. It means using processes that build on people’s strengths and aspirations. It means creating political, social, environmental, economic, military and cultural systems that together give people the building blocks of survival, livelihood and dignity”. As a people-centered concept, human security places the individual at the ‘centre of analysis.’ Non-Aligned Movement has reaffirmed the commitment to discuss and define human security in the UN General Assembly, in conformity with the principles enshrined in the Charter and taking into consideration the common understanding of the notion of the human security in General Assembly resolution 66/290. The UNGA Resolution 66/290 states that human security is an approach to assist Member States in identifying and addressing widespread and cross-cutting challenges to the survival, livelihood and dignity of their people. In accordance with the above UNGA resolution, NAM recognises that human security entails the right of people to live in freedom and dignity, free from poverty and despair. All individuals, in particular vulnerable people, are entitled to freedom from fear and freedom from want, with an equal opportunity to enjoy all their rights and fully develop their human potential. NAM Member States have implemented a range of national initiatives to promote human security. Mongolia is endeavouring to ensure human security of its people through both national action and international cooperation. Mongolia launched in late 2000 the Good News From Non -Aligned World By Dr. Ankit Srivastava, Editor Governance for Human Security Program aimed at improving the capacity to formulate and implement policies to ensure human security. This has resulted in securing national commitment by all the branches of the State power to its implementation; institutionalize the program’s implementation mechanism; and lay the groundwork for greater involvement and participation of the civil society, private sector and academia. “NAM Member States have implemented a range of national initiatives to promote human security. Mongolia is endeavouring to ensure human security of its people through both national action and international cooperation. Mongolia launched in late 2000 the Good Governance for Human Security Program aimed at improving the capacity to formulate and implement policies to ensure human security. This has resulted in securing national commitment by all the branches of the State power to its implementation; institutionalize the program’s implementation mechanism; and lay the groundwork” In Ecuador, the inclusion of human security in Ecuador’s constitution which is currently being realized through Plan Ecuador, a people-focused, preventive and multidimensional framework, aims to solve the interrelated problems of poverty, exclusion and violence. In Kenya, The Kenya Vision 2030 is the national long-term development blue-print that aims to transform Kenya into a newly industrialising, middleincome country. The Vision comprises of three key pillars: Economic; Social; and Political. The Economic Pillar aims to achieve an average economic growth rate of 10 per cent per annum and sustaining the same until 2030. The Social Pillar seeks to engender just, cohesive and equitable social development in a clean and secure environment, while the Political Pillar aims to realise an issue-based, people-centred, resultoriented and accountable democratic system. The Movement further recognises that human security calls for people-centred, comprehensive, context-specific and prevention-oriented responses that strengthen the protection and empowerment of all people and all communities and that human security recognizes the inter-linkages between peace, development and human rights, and equally considers civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights. (9) December, 2017

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