FS_122817

22ndcenturymedia

The Frankfort Station 122817

Mcgrath out

President of Providence Catholic High School

steps down, Page 4

Vehicle crash

Car driver injured in collision with semitrailer

in Frankfort, Page 7

Holiday wishes

Children submit letters to Santa through

Frankfort Park District program, Page 9

Frankfort’s Award-Winning Hometown Newspaper frankfortstation.com • December 28, 2017 • Vol. 12 No. 30 • $1

A

®

Publication

,LLC

Frankfort

families watch

classic films at

annual holiday

movie night,

Page 3

Hailey Hogan (left)

and Jennifer Silsbee,

of Kankakee, watch

“Rudolph the Red-Nosed

Reindeer” Thursday, Dec.

21 during the Frankfort

Park District’s Classic

Holiday Movie Night at

the Founders Community

Center. Photo by Laurie

Fanelli/22nd Century

Media


2 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station calendar

frankfortstation.com

In this week’s

station

Standout Student...........10

Sound Off.....................13

Faith Briefs....................16

Puzzles..........................22

Classifieds................ 24-33

Sports...................... 34-40

The Frankfort

Station

ph: 708.326.9170 fx: 708.326.9179

Editor

Nuria Mathog, x14

nuria@frankfortstation.com

Sales director

Dana Anderson, x17

d.anderson@22ndcenturymedia.com

real estate sales

Tricia Weber, x47

t.weber@22ndcenturymedia.com

business directory Sales

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j.nemec@22ndcenturymedia.com

Legal Notices

Jeff Schouten, x51

j.schouten@22ndcenturymedia.com

PUBLISHER

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Managing Editor

Bill Jones, x20

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president

Andrew Nicks

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EDITORIAL DESIGN DIRECTOR

Nancy Burgan, x30

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22 nd Century Media

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Published by

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Amanda Stoll

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

THURSDAY

Elephant and Piggie Party

2-4 p.m. Dec. 28, Frankfort

Public Library, 21119

S. Pfeiffer Road, Frankfort.

Come to the library and

spend an afternoon with Elephant

and Piggie. There will

be crafts, games, stories, and

so much more Gerald and

Piggie fun. This program is

for children in kindergarten

through the third grade.

Plan Commission Meeting

6:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec.

28, Village Administration

Building, 432 W. Nebraska

St., Frankfort. The Frankfort

Plan Commission meets the

second and fourth Thursdays

of each month. For the agenda

or more information, visit

www.villageoffrankfort.

com, or call (815) 469-2177.

FRIDAY

Frankfort Creates

3:30-4:30 p.m. Dec. 29,

Frankfort Public Library,

21119 S. Pfeiffer Road,

Frankfort. Former writing

tutor, English major and

your one and only teen librarian,

Ms. Sarah, will be

available on a first-come,

first serve basis to read essays,

short storys, or other

writing and give feedback

to students. For more information,

call (815) 469-2423

ext. 132 or email sehlers@

frankfortlibrary.org.

MONDAY

Chamber of Commerce

Closure

The Chamber of Commerce

office will be closed on

Monday, Jan. 1 and Tuesday,

Jan. 2 for the New Year’s.

UPCOMING

Business After Hours

5-7 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 11,

Little Joe’s and Spa Remedy,

20805 S. La Grange Road,

Frankfort. Join the Frankfort

Chamber of Commerce for

a multi-chamber Business

After Hours. For more information,

call (815) 469-3356.

Healthy Living Expo

9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday,

Jan. 13, Tinley Park Convention

Center South Pavilion,

18451 Convention Center

Drive. People can join 22nd

Century Media and Planet

Fitness for the free event,

featuring more than 40 vendors,

free 30-minute workouts,

skin cancer screenings,

blood drive, bone marrow

drive, speaker sessions,

giveaways, and more. For

more information, call (708)

326-9170 ext. 16 or visit

www.22ndcenturymedia.

com/healthy.

Raptors Fundraiser

7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 13, 7

p.m. Saturday, Jan. 13, The

Alley Grill and Taphouse,

18700 Old La Grange Road,

Mokena. Support this Frankfort

Square 12U Raptors

baseball team’s trip to Ball

parks of America in Branson,

Missouri in July 2018. Cost

is $35 for three hours of umlimited

beer, wine and food,

with trivia included, or $75

for three hours of unlimited

beer, wine and food with Texas

Hold ‘em included. There

will also be raffle prizes,

door prizes and a 50/50 pot.

For more information, email

jennym215@hotmail.com or

jpasyk@sbcglobal.net.

Meet, Greet & Network

7:30-9 a.m. Tuesday, Jan.

16, Frankfort Public Library,

21119 S. Pfeiffer Road,

Frankfort. Join the Frankfort

Chamber of Commerce for

a Meet, Greet & Network

event. For more information,

call (815) 469-3356.

Ribbon Cutting

5-7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.

17, Cancer Support Center,

19645 S. La Grange Road.

Mokena. Join the Frankfort

Chamber of Commerce

for a multi-chamber ribbon

cutting and reception at the

Cancer Support Center’s

new location in Mokena.

The ribbon cutting will be at

5:30 p.m. For more information,

call (815) 469-3356.

Social Media Workshop

8-11 a.m. Wednesday, Jan.

24, Frankfort Public Library,

21119 S. Pfeiffer Road,

Frankfort. Join the Frankfort

Chamber of Commerce for a

social media workshop. Cost

is $15 per person and reservations

are required. For

more information and registration,

call (815) 469-3356.

Daddy Daughter Dance

Deadline to register is Jan.

26. Event will be held from

6-8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 2 and

Saturday, Feb. 3, Founders

Community Center, 140

Oak St., Frankfort. Join the

Frankfort Park District for an

Under the Sea dance. Light

refreshments will be served

along with entertainment

courtesy of a live DJ. To capture

the evening, a professional

photographer will be

available to take formal pictures

at an additional charge.

Register early, this event fills

up quickly. Pre-registration

is required, and tickets will

not be sold at the door. Cost

is $11 per person. For more

information and registration,

call (815) 469-9400 or visit

www.frankfortparks.org.

LWSRA Jumpfest

Noon-6 p.m. Saturday,

Jan. 27, Lincolnway Special

Recreation Association, 1900

Heather Glen Drive, New

Lenox. Come enjoy a gym

full of inflatables while helping

to raise money for LWS-

RA. Cost is $10 per child,

payable at the door. This is a

family event open to the community

and all children must

be accompanied by an adult.

Note: the event will be designated

for individuals with

special needs from noon-1.

For more information, visit

www.LWSRA.org/jumpfest.

Business After Hours

5-7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan.

30, Ballet 5:8, 20517 S. La

Grange Road, Frankfort.

Join the Frankfort Chamber

of Commerce for a Business

After Hours. For more information,

call (815) 469-3356.

ONGOING

Mobile Workforce Center

9:30 a.m.-noon Fridays in

December, Frankfort Public

Library District, 21119 S.

Pfeiffer Road, Frankfort. The

mobile unit travels throughout

Will County to help residents

with resume development,

cover letters and job applications.

The workforce center

contains 11 computer stations,

internet access, and offers

keyboarding lessons, as well

as resume and job search assistance

using online listings

including jobs4people.org and

Illinois workNet.

Artists Sought

Deadline to apply is Monday,

Jan. 15. Applications are

open for artists wishing to be

featured in the Forest Preserve

District of Will County’s summer

“Arts & Nature on the

River” event at Four Rivers

Environmental Education

Center in Channahon. The

event is set for noon-4 p.m. on

Saturday, June 16, but the artist

lineup is being assembled

now. The District is looking

for 12-20 individuals or small

groups from a variety of disciplines.

This year’s theme is

“Sharing Landscapes.” Artists

may use the natural setting of

Four Rivers and the surrounding

McKinley Woods – Kerry

Sheridan Grove, or any element

of nature, to link their art

form to the theme. Categories

include: exhibits, demonstrations,

performances and participatory,

or hands-on, activities.

Interested artists are

invited to forward a brief artist

bio, description of their work

and a representative photo,

video or audio file along with

their take on the theme to

FourRivers@fpdwc.org. Artists

will be notified by Feb. 1

if they have been selected to

participate in the event.

Boy Scout Troop 270

7 p.m. Thursdays during

the school year, Frankfort

Fire Department Training

Center, 24420 S. La Grange

Road, Frankfort. Prospective

scouts ages 11-17 and

parents are welcome to

visit during Frankfort Boy

Scout Troop 270 meetings.

For more information, visit

www.frankforttroop270.org.

Women’s Club Scholarships

Applications must be postmarked

by Feb. 15. The General

Federation of Women’s

Clubs Illinois is offering

scholarships, through the

GFWC Mokena Woman’s

Club sponsorship, for students

planning on enrolling in

an Illinois college, university,

trade or vocational school

for the Fall Semester 2018.

Applicants are not limited to

current high school seniors.

Applications are available

on the Lincoln-Way High

Schools, Providence Catholic

High School, Mokena Public

Library and Frankfort Public

Library websites. Mail applications

to: Judy Rader, 132

11th St., Lincoln, IL 62656.

Frankfort Kiwanis Club

Meetings

7:30 a.m. the first and third

Thursdays of each month,

Griffin Lair Room, Lincoln-

Way East High School, 201

Colorado Ave., Frankfort.

The Kiwanis Board of Directors

meets two times a

month. Interested men and

women are invited to join.

For more information, call

(815) 530-4995.

To submit an item to the

printed calendar, contact

Amanda Stoll at (708)

326-9170 ext. 34, or email

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

Deadline is noon Thursdays

one week prior to publication.


frankfortstation.com news

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 3

Classic Holiday Movie Night provides Frankfort family fun

Laurie Fanelli, Freelance Reporter

Families joined together at the

Founders Community Center for a

few reindeer games, holiday crafts

and a very special party on Thursday,

Dec. 21, as the Frankfort Park

District presented its Classic Holiday

Movie Night.

Attendees were encouraged to

dress down in their coziest pajamas

and slippers to enjoy a

screening of the classic Christmas

special “Rudolph the Red-Nosed

Reindeer” in the gym. Popcorn,

cookies and “frozen” hot chocolate

complimented the animated

feature, which continues to delight

viewers young and old more than

50 years after it first premiered on

television.

Special Events Coordinator

Cali DeBella was happy to screen

“Rudolph” this year, as it is a fan

favorite and its 47-minute runtime

gave families ample opportunities

to partake in all of the event’s activities.

“We have some games and a

reindeer craft along with the movie

and a special guest, Santa Claus,

will be visiting later on,” she said.

The Paluch family, of Oak

Lawn – Carolyn, Bob and 3-yearold

Mary – came out to the Classic

Holiday Movie Night on the

recommendation of Mary’s grandfather,

Frankfort resident Paul

Schlesinger.

“It sounded cute,” Carolyn

Paluch said. “Mary’s into the Rudolph

story, and it seems like a

great event and a good chance to

get together to do something fun

before the holidays.”

Mary Paluch even wore a pretty

red dress to match Santa’s famous

sleigh-leader’s peculiar proboscis,

and she also brought along a favorite

holiday story to enjoy before the

start of the movie. “It’s Frosty the

Snowman,” she said, pointing to

the book’s colorful cover.

A bit of Christmas magic allowed

Kankakee residents Jennifer

Silsbee and 8-year-old Hailey

Hogan to attend the movie night.

They had traveled up north for a

different event, but were directed

to the Founders Center at the

recommendation of the Frankfort

Public Library.

“We were planning on going to

a Santa pajama party, but didn’t

realize that it was actually in West

Frankfort,” Silsbee explained.

“This was a happy accident, and it

worked out great because she was

already in her PJs. And, I can’t

remember the last time I’ve seen

‘Rudolph,’ so this is perfect.”

Hogan was actually watching

“Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”

for the very first time, although

she is familiar with the

song of the same name.

“I like how his nose is bright,”

she said.

Jordyn (left) and Vincent Woods, of Frankfort, work on a holiday craft Thursday, Dec. 21 during the Frankfort

Park District’s Classic Holiday Movie Night at the Founders Community Center.

Photos by Laurie Fanelli/Freelance Reporter

As the opening credits of the

movie began, attendees settled in

across the chairs, bleachers and

blankets brought from home ready

to be swept away to the North Pole

for some “Holly Jolly Christmas”

cheer.

With this year coming to a close,

the Frankfort Park District is gearing

up for even more fun in 2018.

On Jan. 20, the annual Winter on

the Green – Winter Carnival will

give families an opportunity to get

outside in downtown Frankfort.

“If there is snow we will be

ready with a few snow games, but

the last year or two it’s been super,

super cold, so it all depends on the

weather,” DeBella explained. “No

matter what, we’ll have a variety

of fun carnival games and good

stuff for the kids so they can get

outside and play.”

More information about upcoming

events at the Frankfort Park

District can be found at www.

frankfortparks.org.

Frankfort resident Audrey Smith plays reindeer games with her father, Sean.

Frankfort residents Brooks Buitta, Isla Nightingale and Stowe Buitta get comfortable as

they watch the movie.


4 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station news

frankfortstation.com

Frankfort Village Board

Trustees approve consent agenda,

wish residents happy holidays

Meredith Dobes

Freelance Reporter

Ahead of the final week

of 2017, the Frankfort Village

Board unanimously approved

the consent agenda at

its Dec. 18 regular meeting

and wished Frankfort residents

happy holidays.

The consent agenda consisted

of meeting minutes,

bills and payroll, and 10 additional

items.

Under Departmental Operations,

the board awarded

a contract to Robinson Engineering

Ltd. for Phase III

engineering services for the

reconstruction of St. Francis

Road between 88th and 84th

Avenues, resurfacing of the

road between 84th and 80th

avenues, replacement of the

road’s bridge, and the construction

of a multi-use path.

The work is not to exceed

$531,790, and the Village’s

share of that cost is $106,358.

Trustee Dick Trevarthan

said the Village is hoping for

construction to begin on the

project next summer.

The board also approved

an agreement with Homer

Tree Care Inc. not to exceed

$46,922.40 for the removal

of 583 trees that have been

impacted by the emerald ash

borer, as well as an engineering

services agreement with

Burns & McDonnell for

$19,960 for design engineering

services, easement acquisition

and permitting services

for the relocation of the North

Wastewater Treatment Plant

standby generator to Jackson

Creek Life Station.

The Village’s North WWTP

recently received a new backup

power generator, but the

old generator is still in good

condition, Trevarthan said.

Under Land Use and Policy,

the Village Board passed

an amendment to its Traffic

Code regarding overweight

and oversized vehicles. The

amendment allows the Village

to issue permits to these

types of vehicles and control

which roadways they use.

This would ensure these vehicles

are not traveling on

damaged roadways or roadways

that are under construction,

for example, according

to Trustee Bob Kennedy.

The board added a Class

D-2 liquor license classification

to the Village Code, specifically

for brew pubs. The

license allows for the retail

sale of liquor in conjunction

with a restaurant, as well as

limited carry-out of beer that

has been manufactured by

the brewery. These types of

establishments are also required

to have a brew pub

license from the State.

Trustees approved the final

disbursement of $20,000

of the Blue Olde Stone LLC

escrow account. Of this

amount, $15,000 was to be

distributed to the Frankfort

Park District for a park site in

the Olde Stone Village subdivision,

and $5,000 was to be

remitted to the developer.

The Village is to receive

additional rent from Verizon

Wireless through its lease of

the Village’s water tower at

1025 Lambrecht Road, following

the board’s approval

of an amended lease agreement

with the company.

Verizon plans to reinstall

upgraded equipment following

the Village’s completed

painting of the water tower.

The Village negotiated a

$3,600 increase in annual

rent with the company, which

pays roughly $50,400 annually

currently to rent the

space.

Finally, under Land Use and

Policy, the board approved an

updated policy prohibiting

sexual harassment, per Illinois

Public Act 100-0554. The act

mandates that all governmental

entities adopt a sexual harassment

policy that meets the

requirements of the State Officials

and Employees Ethics

Act by Jan. 15.

Kennedy noted that the

Village does already have

such a policy in place, but it

needed to add new language,

particularly regarding filing

complaints against the Village

manager.

Under the Plan Commission,

the Village Board approved

a final plat for resubdivision

of lots 55 and 56 in

the Olde Stone Village subdivision.

Additionally, the board

approved the designation of

Freedom of Information officers

for the Village and the

Frankfort Police Department.

For the Village, Building Supervisor

Adam Nielsen was

named FOI officer, with Assistant

Village Administrator

Jeff Cook as an alternate. For

the police department, Deputy

Police Chief Kevin Keegan

was named FOI officer, with

Beverly Glass and Donna Roesel

named as alternates.

To wrap up the meeting,

Mayor Jim Holland and each

of the trustees wished Frankfort

residents happy holidays

and a happy New Year.

Holland noted that winners

of this year’s holiday

beautification awards will be

listed on the Village’s website,

under “Hot Topics”. He

also announced that Winter

on the Green will begin

noon-2 p.m. Saturday, Jan.

13, and continue during the

same times every Saturday

through Feb. 10.

Provi’s president steps down

amid mobile device allegations

Amanda Stoll, Assistant Editor

The Rev. Richard J. Mc-

Grath is no longer president

of Providence Catholic High

School, following allegations

and an investigation

into alleged “inappropriate

material on his mobile device,”

according to a press

release from the school.

The press release, sent at

12:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 22,

stated McGrath left his position

at the school effective

immediately.

A letter from The Diocese

of Joliet stated much of the

same information as the

school release and added,

“We ask everyone to refrain

from speculation in this matter

as the investigation continues.”

The release from Providence

stated that the Diocese

as well as the Augustinian

Order, of which McGrath is

a member, are taking appropriate

measures in response

to the allegations. It also

stated they are cooperating

with local authorities.

Until a new president is selected,

the Rev. John Merkelis

is to serve as acting president

at the school in addition to his

duties as pastoral director.

The Frankfort Station

has sent a request for comment

to the school, but no

reply was immediately

received.

The Frankfort Station to stay free

Staff Report

Thanks to the thousands

of Frankfort residents who

returned request forms, The

Frankfort Station will remain

free of charge.

Because of these diligent

residents, The Station

maintained its second-class

mail status from the U.S.

Postal Service. One of the

requirements of the USPS

to retain second-class mail

status is that every three

years more than half the

homes in town sign a card

From dec. 22

The Rev. Richard J. McGrath stepped down from his

position as president of Providence Catholic High School

after an investigation into alleged “inappropriate material

on his mobile device.” Photo submitted

requesting the publication.

The Station’s qualification

for this vaunted status means

that Frankfort residents will

receive their Station on a

timely basis and that the

postal costs for The Station

have been greatly reduced,

thereby allowing the paper

to remain free.

If you are a resident who

has not returned a request

form and do not want to

rely on the good graces of

your neighbors or have had

the delivery of your paper

discontinued, you can visit

FrankfortStation.com/deliv

ery and fill out the form in

seconds.

If you are unsure about

whether you returned your

card, contact our circulation

department at (708) 326-

9170.

Thank you again for the

excellent participation in

our program to keep The

Station free. Even more

good news is that we will

not have to ask you for help

again until 2020, when the

USPS will ask us to repeat

the process.


frankfortstation.com frankfort

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6 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station news

frankfortstation.com

Frankfort D157-C Board of Education

Trustees approve tax levy, consider approval of $1 million abatement in January

Meredith Dobes

Freelance Reporter

The Frankfort School District

157-C Board of Education

unanimously approved

an approximately $28.7

million property tax levy at

its Dec. 20 regular meeting,

but School Board members

FREE

Registration

THERE’S A BETTER WAY

TO ADVERTISE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON

CONTACT

The Frankfort Station

DANA ANDERSON

708.326.9170 ext. 17 d.anderson@22ndcenturymedia.com

are not quite unanimous in

their opinions on a potential

abatement.

In January, the board is

predicted to vote on a roughly

$1 million tax abatement,

which would put some tax

dollars back in residents'

pockets.

Director of Finance and

Operations Kate Ambrosini

recommended no more than

an approximately $1 million

abatement, taking into

account uncertainty with

State funding and a potential

property tax freeze from the

State. She said a property

tax freeze would allow the

district to use equalized assessed

valuation and new

construction when calculating

its levy but would

prevent it from using any

increases in the Consumer

Price Index.

"If we pass a higher abatement

and there is a property

tax freeze, that will be

significant as we move forward,"

she said, regarding

the financial impact to the

district.

Board Member Kevin

Regas said he thinks a

roughly $1 million abatement

is too low and

questioned how capital

improvement projects estimates

were made in materials

Ambrosini provided,

particularly in regard to

parking lot improvements,

which could range between

$35,000-$500,000.

Ambrosini said she wants

to ensure that if the district

has to make unforeseen repairs

that have large costs

and has to perform major

maintenance, the district will

have enough funds available

to do so.

Regas said he still thinks

an approximately $1 million

abatement is too low, and

the district does not need

to build its fund balance so

much each year.

Other board members,

including Edith Lutz, Edie

Adamski, Brett Cosich and

Larry Kociolek, agreed uncertainty

of State funding

Round it up

A recap of Dec. 20 School Board action and discussion

• Hickory Creek Middle to vote on the materials

School physical

at its next meeting.

education teacher Ryan • Board members

Talaga was recognized unanimously approved

for being a recipient of the purchase of financial

the Symetra "Heroes reporting software from

in the Classroom" PMA for $8,225 for the

award for going above remainder of the fiscal

and beyond to help a year.

student he had in his • The School Board

classes for five years. unanimously approved

• District 157-C principals the renewal of the

and administrators Comprehensive

provided the School Insurance Program

Board with reports on through the Suburban

the benefits of teacher

Schools Cooperative

leaders and tech

Insurance Pool for

coaches in the schools.

2018, at a premium of

$75,454.

These are teachers and

• Board members

staff members who

unanimously approved

provide instructional

a temporary transfer

support to other

of $50,000 from the

teachers.

Working Cash Fund

• Superintendent Maura

to the Debt Service

Zinni said the Frankfort

Fund. This would be

Police Department

transferred if the district

recently conducted

does not receive tax

training with teachers

payments in time to pay

on how to respond in bond payments due at

the event of an active the end of December.

shooter situation. She The board also

said the most important unanimously approved

piece is training the permanent transfers

district's adults on of $600,000 from

how to respond, as the the Education Fund

students will follow their to the Debt Service

instructions in such a Fund, $400,000 from

situation.

the Operations and

• The School Board Maintenance Fund to

discussed the district's the Debt Service Fund

2018-2019 Parent and $600,000 from

Student Handbook and the Education Fund

its 2018 Personnel to the Operations and

Manual, and is expected Maintenance Fund.

would prevent them from

pursuing a higher abatement.

Cosich said he is not opposed

to giving more back

but just not this year.

"There are factors outside

of 157-C, and there's no

more clarity on them now

than there was last year,"

Board Vice President Tom

Reidy said. "I don't trust other

governmental bodies to

make choices that are good

for this district."


frankfortstation.com news

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 7

From dec. 22

Police Reports

Three residential

burglaries reported

Frankfort Fire Protection District firefighters respond to

the scene of a collision between a semitrailer and a car at

Laraway and La Grange roads on Dec. 18. Photo submitted

Man injured in crash in Frankfort

Nuria Mathog, Editor

A New Lenox man was

hospitalized following a twovehicle

collision in Frankfort

the evening of Monday,

Dec. 18.

According to a news release

from the Frankfort Fire Protection

District, firefighters responded

to the intersection of

Laraway and La Grange roads

at about 10:50 p.m. Dec. 18

following a crash involving a

car and a semitrailer. The trailer

reportedly struck the side of

the car, driving both vehicles

into a traffic light pole at the

southeast corner of the intersection.

A heavy duty wrecker from

Wes Kochel Inc. in Monee

was called to lift the semitrailer

away from the car, the

release states. Along with

Frankfort firefighters, a squad

company from the Manhattan

Fire District responded to

the scene, and a New Lenox

Fire District ambulance was

called to treat the semitrailer

driver, who reportedly refused

medical care.

The car’s driver was treated

for injuries and remained conscious

during the extrication

process, which concluded at

approximately 1 a.m., and

was transported via Life Star

helicopter to Advocate Christ

Medical Center in Oak Lawn,

according to the release.

Firefighters with the

Frankfort Fire District reportedly

remained at the scene of

the collision until 2:40 a.m.,

and the New Lenox Fire District,

Richton Park Fire Department,

Tinley Park Fire

Department and Orland Park

Fire District also assisted.

Frankfort Deputy Police

Chief Kevin Keegan said the

driver of the semitrailer was

cited for disobeying a traffic

signal after allegedly running

a red light at the intersection.

As of the afternoon of Dec.

19, the driver of the car was

reportedly in stable condition,

Keegan said.

The Frankfort Police

Department received

three separate reports of

residential burglaries on

Dec. 17.

Two of the incidents were

reported in the 8800 block

of Brown Drive, while

the third was reported in

the 21400 block of Breton

Road. All of the reports involved

forced or unlawful

entry through the rear door

of the residence, and miscellaneous

items were reported

taken.

According to Frankfort

Deputy Police Chief Kevin

Keegan, the missing items

included purses, wallets,

credit cards, cash, a driver’s

license and key fobs.

Dec. 16

• Cannon D. Gates, 57, of

2341 Fillmore St. in Gary,

Ind., was cited at the intersection

of Center and Laraway

roads for allegedly

driving with a suspended

license.

Dec. 14

• David A. Boosted, 66, of

3S080 Glen Drive North in

Warrenville, was cited at the

intersection of Oak and Kansas

streets for alleged DUI,

improper lane usage and

having no insurance.

Dec. 13

• Anthony J. Cingrani, 28,

of 8650 S. 84th Court in

Hickory Hills was charged

with felony retail theft. The

charge stemmed from the

alleged theft of power tools

collectively valued at $788

from Home Depot, according

to Keegan.

• Karlee M. Harper, 24, of

17221 70th Ave. in Tinley

Park was cited for allegedly

having no valid registration

and driving with a suspended

license.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Frankfort

Station’s Police Reports

are compiled from official

reports found online on the

Frankfort Police Department’s

website or releases

issued by the department and

other agencies. Individuals

named in these reports are

considered innocent of all

charges until proven guilty in

a court of law.

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the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 9

Girl Scout Brownie Troop helps children fighting cancer

Submitted by Pediatric Oncology

Treasure Chest Foundation

Girl Scouts requires the leadership

and planning skills necessary

to make a positive impact in the

community. That is exactly what

the members of Girl Scout Troop

75153 of Frankfort did recently

when they collected $50 in gift

cards, more than 200 toys and volunteered

to label and categorize the

toys to benefit the Pediatric Oncology

Treasure Chest Foundation

(POTCF). The toys will comfort

children fighting cancer across the

nation including those receiving

treatment at Hope Children’s Hospital

in Oak Lawn.

The Girl Scout mission is simple:

To build girls of courage, confidence

and character who make

the world a better place.

Girl Scout Troop Leader Theresa

Larkin said, “Our goal is to teach

the girls to give back to the community.”

Mrs. Nicole Pacini added,

“This is our second time giving to

kids with cancer, I actually suggested

giving to the Treasure Chest

again.”

“The Treasure Chest Foundation

is especially grateful to Girl Scout

Troop 75153 for their gift of service,”

said Treasure Chest Foundation

CEO and Founder Colleen

Kisel. “Not only do we appreciate

the girls’ hard work, but we are so

happy to be a part of this wonderful

organization which is dedicated

to making the world a better place.

The Treasure Chest Foundation is

a better place because of Girl Scout

Troop 75153.”

The POTCF is a unique organization

whose services impact more

than 13,000 young cancer patients

enduring 20,000 clinic visits each

Frankfort area children

send letters to Santa

Megann Horstead

Freelance Reporter

It is around this time of year when a

certain jolly man from the North Pole

checks his list and checks it twice to

find out who’s been naughty or nice.

As the calendar year came to a

close, Frankfort area children and

their families were motivated to

send letters to Santa Claus.

This time around, about 75 children

helped fill Santa’s mailbox this

holiday season, using the drop-off

box located in the main hall at the

Founders Community Center. The

box was often filled with letters upon

letters, carefully crafted on Santathemed

background paper.

With the assistance of Santa’s

helpers working remotely, the

Frankfort Park District collected all

the letters delivered between Feb. 23

and Dec. 6.

Children composed their letters

with some assistance provided by their

parents or other family members. The

content of each one varied, though a

checklist was provided to help those

interested in writing to Santa.

Some children listed what they

had done well during the year and

the things they need to improve on.

One child wanted to test how far

Santa could go to surprise them this

year, requesting an item to be fulfilled

from their wish list.

“A child wants a brother or sister,”

said Cali DeBella, special events coordinator

for Frankfort Park District,

referring to a request that stood out.

“[I] don’t think Santa will be able to

get that.”

No one admitted to being naughty

this year. No one thanked Santa for

last year’s presents this time around,

and no one asked Santa any questions

this year, either.

Out of the many letters to Santa,

a plethora of requests were made.

Typically, Legos are a common toy

that children wished for.

“This program gives us … great

joy to receive so many letters from

children all over,” DeBella said.

month in 19 states across the nation.

Nowhere else in the nation

does such a program exist. Colleen

Kisel founded the organization in

1996 after her then seven-year-old

son Martin had been diagnosed

with leukemia in 1993. Kisel discovered

that giving her son a toy

after each procedure provided a

calming distraction from his pain,

noting that when children are diagnosed

with cancer their world soon

becomes filled with doctors, nurses,

chemotherapy drugs, surgeries

and seemingly endless painful procedures.

Martin celebrated his 24th

anniversary of remission from the

disease earlier this year.

For additional information about

the Treasure Chest Foundation,

please contact Colleen Kisel at

(708) 687-8697 or visit the Foundation’s

web site at www.trea

surechest.org.

County breaks ground on new courthouse

Submitted by Will County Board

Will County officials broke

ground Dec. 18 on a new stateof-the-art

courthouse, which will

replace the current facility on Jefferson

Street in Joliet.

“This new courthouse will place

us squarely in the forefront of public

safety and justice administration in

Illinois,” Board Speaker Jim Moustis

(R-Frankfort) said. “Enhancing

public safety for residents is of

utmost importance to this board.

The existing space had become too

small, inefficient and costly to operate.

The new courthouse will create

a safer and more efficient building

for our workers, for jurors and for

the visiting public. It will also provide

enough space as the county

continues to grow.”

The new courthouse will be

built on the former First Midwest

Bank site, on the southwest corner

of Ottawa and Jefferson streets in

downtown Joliet. Demolition of

the First Midwest Bank building

is expected to be complete in

early 2018. The county purchased

that property in 2014.

Members of Frankfort’s Girl Scout Brownie Troop 75153 take a break

from organizing more than 200 toys they collected to benefit the

Treasure Chest Foundation and kids fighting cancer. (Front row, left to

right): little brother Vincent Pacini, Paisley Deanching, Gabriela Larkin

and Allison Basile, (back row, left to right): Girl Scouts Sophia Pacini,

Jillian Kwiecinski, Amelia Lurkin, Molly Smith, Chloe Roldan, Megan

Sullivan and Megan Egglesfield. Photo submitted

“We went over each and every

detail in this building,” said Minority

Leader Herb Brooks, Jr.

(D-Joliet). “It’s very rewarding to

see construction starting. I’m glad

the board could work together on

this to provide Will County residents

with a top notch facility.”

The Board enlisted architecture

firm Wight & Co. to design the

building. The new 365,000 square

foot structure will be 10 stories

and hold 38 courtrooms. The current

courthouse is four stories and

has only 23 courtrooms.

“Wight & Co. provided the

board with a number of design

and construction options so we

could create the best facility for

our residents within our budget,”

said Ray Tuminello (R-New

Lenox), chair of the Capital Improvements

Committee. “In addition

to the courtrooms, the courthouse

will house offices for the

state’s attorney, the circuit clerk,

and more.”

As they enter the building,

jurors will be greeted by a twostory

lobby filled with natural

light from large windows. The

first floor will also have a larger

jury commission room to accommodate

residents called to

perform their civic duty. Lower

level floors will contain offices

and courtrooms for high-volume

courts, such as criminal misdemeanor,

civil small claims, and

adult probation courts. The fourth

and fifth floor will hold criminal

felony courts, the public defender’s

office, and a small cafe.

Floors six and seven include highvolume

family courts, the eighth

and ninth floors include additional

courts, and the tenth floor will

hold a grand jury.

The path towards the new

courthouse has been a long one.

In August 2013 the Will County

Board first approved a comprehensive

plan for major capital

improvement projects throughout

the county. This plan included the

construction of the new courthouse

following the new Public

Safety Complex, which was completed

this month.

The new courthouse is expected

to be completed in late 2020 at

a total cost of $215 million.


10 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station school

frankfortstation.com

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Sophia Barnard was chosen as this week’s Standout

Student for her academic excellence

What is one essential you must have when

studying and why?

One essential when studying is colorful

pens. I use this because it helps me memorize

what I am trying to learn.

What do you like to do when not in school or

studying?

When I am not in school or studying, I like

to run outside, specifically long distance. I

also enjoy cheering and tumbling.

What is your dream job and why?

My dream job is to become a missionary

nurse. I want to have a job that mixes both

of what I love. Helping people and traveling.

What are some of your most-played songs

on your iPod?

My most-played songs on my iPod are

“It’s Time” by Imagine Dragons, “Africa”

by Toto, “Sunset Lover” by Petit Biscuit and

“We Built This City” by Jefferson Starship.

What is one thing people don’t know about

you?

One thing people don’t know about me is

that I enjoy sprinting in track more than long

distance.

Whom do you look up to and why?

I look up to my sister because she has very

good grades and never gives up n what she

wants.

What do you keep under your bed?

I keep a memory box under my bed. It has

all of my keepsakes in it. For example, I have

a glass figure that I got from Alaska. I have a

dollar from the Bahamas and I have a cross I

got from my grandma when I was little.

Who is your favorite teacher and why?

My favorite teacher is Mrs. Jeglinski because

she always took time out of her day

to get me extra help. She also helped me to

Photo submitted

learn as much as I could and push me to my

limit.

What is your favorite class and why?

My favorite class is ELA because I love to

write and create stories.

What is one thing that stands out about

your school?

One thing that stands out about my school

is our sports skills. We have many state titles

at our school.

What extracurriculars do you wish your

school had?

Although there are many extracurriculars

at Hickory Creek, I wish there was a photography

club.

What’s your morning routine?

My morning routine is after I wake up and

get ready for school, I study for any tests that

I have that week. I also eat a full and complete

breakfast.

If you could change one thing about school,

what would it be?

If I could change one thing about Hickory

Creek, I would give all grade levels the option

to choose their electives.

What is your favorite thing to eat in the

cafeteria?

My favorite thing to eat in the cafeteria is

pizza for hot lunch.

What is your best memory from school?

My best memory from school was from

seventh grade during a program called Peer

P.E. Gabi, Evelyn and I were doing an obstacle

course in gym. It was so fun to personally

connect with Gabi and build our friendship.

Standout Student is a weekly feature in The Station.

Nominations come from Frankfort schools.


frankfortstation.com frankfort

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 11

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12 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station news

frankfortstation.com

FROM THE TINLEY JUNCTION

Four charged after stolen

van wrecks car, garage

Kelly Robertson awoke

to an explosion, or so she

thought.

After rushing to her bedroom

window, she saw the

ruckus — a white mini van

had sped up her driveway

and into her daughter’s car,

propelling it through the

property’s garage door.

“It was crazy,” Robertston

told The Tinley Junction a few

hours later. “I kept thinking,

‘Oh my god, what just happened?’”

I worried about the

garage falling onto her car.”

Eventually, four individuals

from the van were arrested

by Tinley Park police,

who had followed and attempted

to pull over the van

in the Robertson’s cul-de-sac

on 66th Avenue near 182nd

Place.

Charges are pending further

investigation, and no one

was injured in the incident.

Reporting by Joe Coughlin,

Interim Editor. For more, visit

TinleyJunction.com.

FROM THE NEW LENOX PATRIOT

Retired 670 The Score radio

host brings book signing

tour to New Lenox

If you bring him, people

will come.

For the second time this

month, Terry Boers — former

670 The Score radio

personality and Chicago

Sun-Times sports reporter

— stopped in the southwest

suburbs to sign copies of his

new book, “The Score of

a Lifetime: 25 Years Talking

Chicago Sports.” And

for the second time, dozens

upon dozens of fans lined

up for their chance to talk

with the radio legend.

The latest stop on the

book tour took Boers to

Tom Kelly’s Chophouse &

Pub in New Lenox on Dec.

20. Prior to signing copies

of his book, Boers sat in for

a half-hour with current 670

host Laurence Holmes during

the opening segment of

Holmes’ evening show.

Boers said it has been

great working with Holmes

again.

“Laurence and I have

been friends for a long time,

and it’s fun,” Boers said. “I

just don’t want to horn in

on his show. The show is

so good, and it doesn’t need

me. But it’s been fun doing

a little bit of radio again. I

can only do so much, because

of my voice.”

Reporting by Jon DePaolis,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit NewLenoxPatriot.com.

FROM THE MOKENA MESSENGER

Mokena man attempts to

make traffic stops, flees

police

Martin J. Fridrich, 40,

of the 11600 block of Roberts

Street in Mokena, was

charged Dec. 14 with one

count of felony aggravated

fleeing and eluding police by

Riverside Police, and issued

several traffic tickets.

According to a police report,

a Riverside police officer

observed Fridrich in a

vehicle travelling at 67 mph

in a 25 mph zone while displaying

an oscillating strobe

light inside the vehicle. The

officer recalled a similar report

from earlier in the day

that came from Countryside

police, where the same vehicle

was reported to have fled

police there.

The Riverside officer pursued

Fridrich, but the driver

reportedly was able to flee

onto Interstate 55, where the

officer decided not to pursue

him further.

Later that same day, this

time in Burr Ridge, officers

apprehended Fridrich after

he allegedly was attempting

to conduct traffic stops with

his vehicle.

Riverside Police Chief

Tom Weitzel noted Burr

Ridge and Countryside also

charged Fridrich with traffic

violations. Other charges

against Fridrich are pending

a grand jury investigation,

he said.

Reporting by T.J. Kremer III,

Editor. For more, visit Moke

naMessenger.com.

FROM THE LOCKPORT LEGEND

Joliet’s Gallery Seven joins

arts scene in Lockport

Joliet’s fine arts gallery

has found a new home in the

City of Lockport.

Gallery Seven’s decision

to relocate was predicated,

in part, by the Will County

Metropolitan Exposition

& Auditorium Authority’s

decision to part ways with

the gallery after nearly 10

years.

“It’s a relief to know we

can continue what we do,”

said Jay Anderson, one of

the member artists for Gallery

Seven. “It was a shock

to get a 90-day eviction notice.

We are starting from

zero, in terms of planning.

We’re thrilled to be in Lockport’s

Gaylord Building.”

Anderson anticipated

there will be greater foot

traffic at its new location,

800 W. 8th St., in downtown

Lockport.

“We plan to make good

use of it,” Anderson said.

Gallery Seven’s relocation

is made possible thanks

to a number of moving

parts, with support garnered

through partnerships with

the National Trust for Historic

Preservation, Heritage

Corridor Convention and

Visitors Bureau, Gaylord

Building and the City of

Lockport.

Gaylord Building Executive

Director Pamela Owens

said they received a $50,000

grant from the National Endowment

for the Arts, and

the timing of Gallery Seven’s

intent to move could not

have been better.

Reporting by Megann Horstead,

Freelance Reporter. For

more, visit LockportLegend.

com.


frankfortstation.com sound off

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 13

Social snapshot

Top Web Stories

From FrankfortStation.com as of Tuesday,

Dec. 26.

1. Townhomes take shape in downtown

Frankfort

2. BREAKING: Man injured in crash in

Frankfort

3. Provi's president steps down amid

mobile device allegations

4. Nutrition Hub offers regimen of aloe, tea

and protein shakes to promote health

5. East girls bowling team clinches

Lincoln-Way Cup championship

Become a member: FrankfortStation.com/plus

From the assistant editor

Create a resolution you can stick to in 2018

Amanda Stoll

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

Let’s talk about New

Year’s resolutions,

you know, those

things we all make and — if

you are like me — rarely

keep.

I had the same New Year’s

resolution for roughly 15

years, and I was never able

to keep it.

I am a nail biter, through

and through.

I’ve wanted to stop since

about middle school, and the

desire to quit intensified during

my microbiology class in

high school.

I am a bit of a germaphobe

anyway, but learning about

infectious diseases and

swabbing the school for bacteria

made it start to sink in.

Fortunately, I have a

strong immune system and

rarely get sick, so it was easy

for me to continue to ignore

the fact that I was transporting

nasty bacteria into my

body constantly.

I finally got up the urge

to stop two years ago after

being in a long-term relationship

and knowing the

possibility of an engagement

was there.

Out of self-consciousness,

I knew I didn’t want people

looking at my hands in the

shape they were in. It was

then that I decided to get

serious about stopping the

habit.

My mom said I started biting

my nails as soon as I got

teeth, which was a little late

for me at two years old, but

nonetheless, I’ve been doing

it just about my entire life.

“It’s really just making

you do something you want

to do anyway,” as my mom

says.

So, during that same

discussion with my mom

last week about resolutions, I

realized that it is not enough

for most people to just

“want” to change something.

You have to set yourself

up for success, and by that I

mean planning.

No matter your resolution,

which is really just some

type of goal for yourself, you

can succeed at keeping it.

Something I learned in

college while setting goals

for my service organization

was the concept of a

SMART goal.

It might seem like something

you do at a cheesy

corporate retreat or during

a team building activity at

school, but, the thing is, I

think there is something to it.

SMART stands for specific,

measurable, attainable,

realistic and timely.

An example of a resolution

that I know many

people make is: “I want to

lose weight, so I am going

to work out more and eat

healthier.”

But how much weight? By

when? How will you do it?

A SMARTer goal would

be: “My current pants size is

20. By the end of the year I

would like to be a size 12. I

want to lose two pounds of

fat per month by increasing

my protein intake, eating at

least two servings of fruits

and three servings of vegetables

per day and exercising

3 days a week.”

This goal is much more

specific about the results you

are looking for. It is measurable

because you gauge your

progress by your waist size.

The goal is attainable

if your body has the ability

to lose that much fat.

It is realistic because you

have created a schedule for

yourself and a pace for your

weight loss.

So, try your hand at making

your New Year’s resolution

happen this year. See

how it goes, and, if you stick

to your well-thought-out

plan, I know you can do it.

“Last Saturday our police cadets served at

the Abraham National Cemetary’s Wreaths

Across America event. This event’s mission is

to Remember U.S. Veterans, to Honor those

who serve, and to Teach your children the

value of freedom. We were grateful for this

amazing and humbling experience.”

— Frankfort Police Department from Dec. 20

Like The Frankfort Station: facebook.com/frankfortstation

“Spreading positivity one candy cane at a

time from BeThe Change! Good luck on

finals this week LWE @LWEStudentSec @

LWEgirlsswim @lwebadminton @lwestuco @

LWESchoBowl @LWE_FFL @LWEKeyClub

@LWEastWrestling @LWEBestBuddies”

— @LWEGriffins from Dec. 18

Follow The Frankfort Station: @FrankfrtStation

Photo Op

This week’s Photo Op

came from Frankfort

resident Ashley

Miller and features

her daughter Brielle

Marie Raine dressed

as an Elf on the

Shelf.

Have you captured

something unique, interesting,

beautiful or just

plain fun on camera?

Submit a photo for

“Photo Op” by emailing

it to nuria@frankfortstation.com,

or mailing

it to 11516 W. 183rd St.,

Office Condo 3 Unit SW,

Orland Park, IL, 60467.

Sound Off Policy

Editorials and columns are the

opinions of the author. Pieces

from 22nd Century Media are

the thoughts of the company as

a whole. The Frankfort Station

encourages readers to write

letters to Sound Off. All letters

must be signed, and names and

hometowns will be published.

We also ask that writers include

their address and phone number

for verification, not publication.

Letters should be limited to

400 words. The Frankfort Station

reserves the right to edit letters.

Letters become property of The

Frankfort Station. Letters that

are published do not reflect

the thoughts and views of The

Frankfort Station. Letters can be

mailed to: The Frankfort Station,

11516 West 183rd Street, Unit

SW Office Condo #3, Orland

Park, Illinois, 60467. Fax letters

to (708) 326-9179 or e-mail to

nuria@frankfortstation.com.

www.frankfortstation.com.


14 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station frankfort

frankfortstation.com

SOLD

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Homer Glen

16630 McDonald Dr

Lockport

11472 Greystone Drive

Orland Park

8222 Karli Jean Court

Frankfort

SOLD

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16613 Hunter Trail

Tinley Park

12736 Berkshire Dr

Mokena

1319 Acorn St

Lemont

15332 S Oak Run Ct

Lockport

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WHEN YOU’RE READY TO SELL

CALL

MIKE MCCATTY

AND ASSOCIATES

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Orland Park

2512 Tanaga Basin

New Lenox

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Orland Park

708.945.2121

mccattyrealestate.com

10839 Antelope Ln

Orland Park

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16730 Pineview Dr

Homer Glen

8812 Meadowlark

Tinley Park

20115 E. Brightway Dr

Mokena

1705 London Rd

New Lenox

SOLD

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572 Aberdeen Rd

Frankfort

13258 Maverick Trail

Homer Glen

8536 169th St

Tinley Park

19447 Tramore Ln

Mokena


the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | frankfortstation.com

Holiday cheer

Winners selected for 22nd Century Media’s

2017 Holiday Card Contest, Page 18

Colorful cocktails Girl in the

Park's drinks list comes with plenty of razzledazzle,

but flavor still comes first, Page 23

Frankfort ‘Power Rangers’ fans meet Red Ranger actor, Page 17

Shorewood resident Chris Gonzalez (left) has an action figure signed by Austin St. John (right), the original Red Ranger from “Mighty Morphin Power Rangers” on Saturday, Dec. 23

at Amazing Fantasy Books & Comics. Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media


16 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station faith

frankfortstation.com

Faith Briefs

Heritage Baptist Church (21739 S. La

Grange Road, Frankfort)

Morning Worship

10:30 a.m. Sundays.

Evening Worships

6 p.m. Sundays.

Sunday School

9:30 a.m. Sundays.

Ladies’ Bible Study

9 a.m. Tuesdays.

Truth Trackers

7 p.m. Wednesdays. This

group is for students in

grades K-6.

International Community Church (200 S.

Elsner Road, Frankfort)

Sunday Service

10 a.m. Nursery available.

For more information, visit

www.icchurch.us.

Teen Impact

7 p.m. Mondays.

Divorce Care support group

7 p.m. Mondays. For more

information about this divorce

support group, contact

the church at (815) 469-1966

or email iccis4me@sbcglob

al.net.

Frankfort United Methodist Church (215

Linden Drive, Frankfort)

Worship Service

9-10 a.m. Sundays. For

more information, call (815)

469-5249.

Living Streams / Calvary Chapel (7837 W.

Lincoln Highway, Frankfort)

Midweek Bible Study

7 p.m. Wednesdays. The

group study will focus on

Old Testament-II Kings. For

more information, call (815)

464-5230.

Sunday Morning Service

10 a.m. The weekly service

will focus on Book of

Matthew. For more information,

call (815) 464-5230.

American Islamic Association (8860 W. St.

Francis Road, Frankfort)

Daily Prayer Services

For service times, visit

www.AIAmasjid.org.

Jum’ah Prayer Services

Fridays. Sermon at 1:10

p.m. followed by prayers at

1:30 p.m.

The Family Hearth (119 Kansas St.,

Frankfort)

Spiritual Direction

By appointment. Personal

spiritual direction session

for men or women with a

male/female spiritual director

who is fully trained and

experienced with 15 years of

experience. Free will donation.

To register, call (708)

334-1988 or email family

hearthfrankfort@gmail.com.

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (177

Luther Lane, Frankfort)

New Year’s Eve Worship

8 and 10: 46 a.m. Sunday,

Dec. 31.

Divine Worship Service

8 a.m. Sundays.

Adult Bible Study

9:30 a.m. Sundays.

Sunday School

9:30 a.m. Sundays.

Contemporary Worship

Service

10:46 a.m. Sundays.

Weight Watchers

9:30-10:30 a.m. Mondays.

Alcoholics Anonymous

10 a.m.-noon Saturdays.

St. Peter’s United Church of Christ (12 W.

Sauk Trail, Frankfort)

Sunday Worship with

Communion

9:30 a.m. every first Sunday

of the month.

Sunday School

9:30-10:45 a.m. Sundays.

Bible Study

7 p.m. Tuesdays and 10

a.m. Thursdays.

Sew What?

This is an ongoing gathering

for beginning to advanced

sewers that alternates

on Fridays and Saturdays.

For dates and more information,

call (815) 469-2220.

USO Drop-off

The church serves as a

drop-off location for donations

to the USO from 9

a.m.-1 p.m. every weekday.

The church accepts

entertainment items such

as movies and games; food

including beef jerky, powdered

drink mix and coffee;

hygiene items such as baby

wipes, shampoo and toothpaste;

and miscellaneous

items such as bug spray, sunscreen

and fabric softener.

For a list of things that can

and cannot be donated, or for

more information, call (815)

469-2220.

Hickory Creek Community Church (10660

W. Lincoln Highway, Frankfort)

Worship Services

5 p.m. Saturdays and 9

a.m., 11 a.m. Sundays. For

more information, call (815)

469-9496.

Powerzone Kids Ministries

During worship at 5 p.m.

Saturday and 9 a.m., 11 a.m.

Sundays. Children newborn

to fifth grade will enjoy ageappropriate

Bible lessons

each week. For more information,

call (815) 469-9496.

Reach Student Ministries

6:45-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays.

Students from sixth

grade through high school can

worship, connect with other

students, learn about God and

his word, and enjoy high energy

activities. For more information,

call (815) 469-9496.

Mixed Bible Studies

We have many Bible studies

that meet throughout the

week in the evenings. Contact

the church at (815) 469-

9496 for a current schedule.

Women’s Bible Study

Gathering is typically on

Mondays, Tuesdays and

Fridays at various times

throughout the year. Contact

the church at (815) 469-9496

for a current schedule.

Men’s Bible Study

7:30-9 a.m. Saturdays at

the church. Session is off the

last Saturday of every month.

Amazing Love Lutheran Church (21301 S.

Pfeiffer Road, Frankfort)

Mornings with Mommy

10–11 a.m. first and third

Wednesdays of each month.

The cost to attend the onehour

session is $5 per child

per session, and payments

can be made by cash or check.

Registration is required, and

those interested may do so

online. For more information,

contact program director

Marlena Spurbeck at mar

lenaspurbeck@gmail.com or

visit www.amazinglove.org/

mornings-with-mommy.

Teen Group

Teens in grades 6-12 are

welcome to join. There will

be a meeting with new activities

every second Saturday

of the month. For more

information, visit www.

amazinglove-ministries.org.

Women’s Group

9:30-11:30 a.m. every first

and third Saturday of the

month, at the church. This

semester we will be studying

“Uninvited” by Lysa Ter-

Keurst. More information is

available at the church.

Men’s Group

6:30-8 a.m. every second

and fourth Saturday of the

month, at the church. This

group uses the Men’s Fraternity

curriculum, which is

currently focusing on “Winning

at Work and Home.”

St. Anthony Catholic Church (7659 Sauk

Trail, Frankfort)

Mass Service

5 p.m. Saturdays; 7:30

a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 p.m. and

noon Sundays.

Reconciliation

4-4:50 p.m. Saturdays.

Knights of Columbus

Meetings

7:30 p.m. every second

and fourth Tuesday of the

month in St. Anthony Hall.

The Knights help at parish

functions such as the church

picnic and their annual pancake

breakfast.

Pro-Life Rosary Group

7 p.m. every first Monday

of the month in the Padua

Center. This group prays for

the Rosary of Life for the

unborn. If interested in joining,

call (815) 469-3750.

Bereavement Support

7 p.m. once a month at

the Padua Center. For more

information, call (815) 469-

3750.

Tuesday Morning Rosary and

Scripture Group

9:30 a.m. Tuesdays at the

Padua Center. To join, call

the Parish Office at (815)

469-3750.

St. Anthony Seniors

Wednesday afternoons

monthly. Seniors gather for

meetings, bingo and more.

For more information, contact

Pat Backus at (708) 720-9321.

Sew ‘n’ Sews

10 a.m. Tuesdays in

Memenas Hall. Attendees

make handmade crafts for

the church. For more information,

call (815) 469-3750.

Holy Spirit Prayer Group

7 p.m. Tuesdays at the Padua

Center. Meetings are open

to anyone who would like to

join to grow spiritually through

praise, prayer, scripture and

music. For more information,

call (815) 469-3750.

St. Anthony Religious

Education

Faith formation Classes

are Wednesdays or Sundays

weekly beginning first

through eighth grade. Please

call (815) 469-3750 for more

information.

Lighthouse Fellowship (8128 W. Lincoln

Highway, Frankfort)

Group Prayer Meeting

7 p.m. Wednesdays. All

are welcome.

Revolution Youth Group

7-9 p.m. Wednesdays. This

youth ministry is for those in

grades 7-12. Meet for worship,

games, food and Bible study.

Enter through the upper-west

doors. For more information,

call (815) 469-0611.

Men’s Prayer Group

8-9 a.m. Saturdays.

Bible Study

9:30-10:30 a.m. Sundays.

These small groups meet at

the church and are open to

anyone who wants to attend,

offering a place to ask questions

and get answers without

being put on the spot.

Coed groups for students and

adults of all ages are offered

along with men’s and women’s

groups. For more information,

call (815) 469-0611.

Peace Community Church (21300 S.

LaGrange Road, Frankfort)

Worship Services

9:30 a.m. Sundays. The

church offers a staffed nursery

during the service, Sunday

School programs and

biblically based teaching.

For more information, visit

www.peaceinfrankfort.org.

Food Pantry

Peace’s food pantry is

open the first Sunday of

every month. For more information

on the pantry’s

services, email deacons@

peaceinfrankfort.org.

Healing Hope

7:30-8:30 p.m. every other

Sunday.

To have your church’s

events included in Faith

Briefs, email them to Assistant

Editor Amanda Stoll at

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

or call (708) 326-9179 ext. 34.

Deadline is noon Thursdays

one week prior to publication.


frankfortstation.com life & arts

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 17

'Power Rangers' actor visits Frankfort comic book store

Laurie Fanelli

Freelance Reporter

Around Christmastime it's

pretty common to see a line

forming with people excited

to talk to a famous man in

red.

However, it wasn't Santa

Claus that drew people to

Frankfort's Amazing Fantasy

Books & Comics on Saturday,

Dec. 23. Austin St. John

– the actor who played the

original Red Ranger, Jason

Lee Scott, from the television

series “Mighty Morphin

Power Rangers” – stopped by

the popular shop to sign autographs,

take photos and meet

with fans from 1 to 4 p.m.

Amazing Fantasy has hosted

several creator and artist

signings in the past, but St.

John's event marked its first

big celebrity meet-and-greet.

“It's exciting,” store manager

Matt Bollini said. “We

found out last minute that

Austin St. John was going to

be in town and he was interested

in doing a signing. So,

we set up a table and we're

really excited to see what it

becomes.”

Although the signing

wasn't scheduled to begin

until 1 p.m., fans started lining

up as soon as the store

opened at 11 in the morning.

Midlothian resident Jerry

Marquette and his family

were first in line.

“I've been watching Power

Rangers since I was a little

kid so it's cool to finally meet

Austin St. John,” Marquette

said.

Marquette's children —

Keigan Strang, 11, and Mickenzie

Marquette, 8 — were

also excited for the event as

they recently watched the

2017 film “Power Rangers.”

“I liked it,” Mickenzie

Marquette said. “I liked how

the Gold Queen could build

monsters with gold.”

Strang added, “Billy was

really funny in the movie.”

The original “Mighty Morphin

Power Rangers” series

first premiered back in 1993

and it continues to attract

new fans thanks in part to

the show's timeless theme of

good overtaking evil.

“I think another big part

of it is that they keep putting

out new Rangers projects and

kids love the karate and martial

arts aspect of it,” said Jesse

Kora, who works part-time

at Amazing Fantasy helping

with events.

St. John offered a variety

of pictures to sign – $50 per

signature or a photo combo

for $80 – but most fans arrived

with their own unique

memorabilia. After adding

St. John's signature, Chicago

resident, Philip England, now

has a “Power Rangers” portrait

signed by all of the living

actors from the original

series. Action figures, posters

and red helmets were also

among the collectables St.

John autographed.

In the coming year, Amazing

Fantasy will continue to

offer everyday fun and a variety

of special events.

“We've got a handful of

gaming events coming up

and a few big sales scheduled

around C2E2 (Chicago Comic

& Entertainment Expo), so

there's a lot to look forward

to with that,” Bollini said.

It's never too late to start a

new hobby and Amazing Fantasy

makes it easy for people

to get into comics with its annual

Free Comic Book Day

on the first Saturday in May. A

great selection of works from

a variety of publishers will

be available that day to serve

as an introduction to the medium

as well as a sneak peak

at what will be coming out in

the future.

More information about

upcoming events at Amazing

Fantasy Books & Comics can

be found at www.facebook.

com/AmazingFantasyComicsFrankfort.

Austin St. John, the original Red Ranger from “Mighty Morphin Power Rangers,” signs memorabilia during a visit to

Amazing Fantasy Books & Comics Saturday, Dec. 23. Photos by Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media

Max (left) and Dante Gonzalez of Chicago pose for a photo as they wait in line.


18 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station life & arts

frankfortstation.com

“ABSOLUTELY

THE NO.1 SHOW

“A gift

forthisplanet.”

—Georgian veteranjournalist

Helena Apkhadze

IN THE WORLD.”

Art That Connects Heaven and Earth

—Kenn Wells,former leaddancer

of the English NationalBallet


Ihavereviewedabout about 4,000 shows since1942.

None can compare to whatIsaw tonight.”

—Richard Connema, renowned Broadway critic

“Thereisamassivepower in this

thatcan embracethe world. It brings greathope.

It is truly atouch of heaven.”

—DanielHerman, ministerofCulture of the Czech Republic

“Mesmerizing! Iencourage everyonetosee and

all of us to learn from.”

—Donna Karan, creator of DKNY

Humor wins out in 2017 Holiday Card Contest

Orland Parker takes

top prize, while

Mokena entry earns

Funniest award

Bill Jones, Managing Editor

While 22nd Century Media

Southwest Chicago’s

2017 Holiday Card Contest

had categories for Best in

Show and Funniest, there

was nothing saying the Best

in Show winner could not

also be funny.

And the entry of Christine

Benes, of Orland Park, rose

to the top among many on the

voting staff.

The craftsmanship was

spot on. The background

checkers and striping already

had three layers, and

on top of that came a few

more. A sparkly border had

just enough glitter to make it

shine while not pouring out

of the envelope. The inner

piece featured charred edges,

pins holding the corners

down, solid artwork, a spinning

wheel and an intriguing

setup.

Staff found it to be the perfect

blend of solid crafting

skills and a lighthearted message,

voting it Best in Show.

For her effort, Benes is to

receive a certificate good for

two tickets for the Blue Man

Group at the Briar Street

Theatre in Chicago (some

restrictions apply); a gift

card valued at $50 for Mr.

Benny’s Steak & Lobster

House, 19200 Everett Lane

in Mokena; a five-class pass

($70 value) for Gawea Yoga,

1000 S. State St. in Lockport;

and four Play Passes for free

admission to the KidsWork

Children’s Museum, 11

White St. in Frankfort.

The humor did not stop

there, though, as 22nd Century

Media awarded Chuck

Medrano and Andrea Lane,

of Mokena, the honor of

Funniest in the 2017 Holiday

Card Contest for their

“How the Pit Stole Christmas

Card,” featuring pupperoos

GiGi and Levi. Playing on

the sizes of the dogs, the pit is

commanding the small pooch

while riding atop a wagon

with gifts. The old-school

movie poster vibe helped sell

it all.

For their work, Medrano

and Lane are to receive two

hours of free bowling for up

to six people, including shoe

rentals, along with a pizza

and pitcher full of pop, at Laraway

Lanes, 1009 West Laraway

Road in New Lenox; a

gift certificate valued at $25

Chuck Medrano and Andrea

Lane, of Mokena, won the

Funniest award in the 2017

Holiday Card Contest for

this submission.

for Chesdan’s Pizzeria &

Grille, 15764 S. Bell Road

in Homer Glen; and four unlimited

play Power Cards for

Dave & Buster’s, 49 Orland

Park Place in Orland Park.

The staff of 22nd Century

Media would like to thank

everyone who took the time

to enter this year’s Holiday

Card Contest. There were

plenty of incredibly wellmade

cards, funny photos

and much more. One person

even stopped by the office to

explain why he delivers every

card personally.

Thank you all for brightening

the season for us.

MAR 21-25

Rosemont

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“The greatest of thegreat!

It mustbeexperienced.”

—Christine Walevska, “goddess of the cello”,

watched Shen Yun 5times

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HarrisTheater

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Prices:$80-$200

Christine Benes, of Orland Park, submitted the Best in Show winner for 22nd Century

Media Southwest Chicago’s annual Holiday Card Contest. Images submitted


frankfortstation.com life & arts

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 19

Mission Meals provides holiday meal for those in need

Amanda Stoll, Assistant Editor

Going out to eat at a restaurant

is something many people take for

granted, whether it’s once or twice

a week or for special occasions.

But for some families, it just isn’t

in the budget.

Every few months a local nonprofit

organization brings the experience

to those same people who

wouldn’t normally be able to afford

a dinner complete with a full

meal and table service.

Mission Meals hosted their annual

holiday dinner at Eggcetera

Cafe in Mokena Thursday, Dec.

14, with about 150 people in attendance

throughout the night. The

evening was made extra special

with live music, face painting and

a visit from Santa Claus.

Not only was the event festive,

but Mission Meals provided each

attendee with a bag of food to take

home and everyday necessities,

such as gloves, hats, toiletries and

a cozy fleece blanket.

Tammy Leonard, president of

One Love Global Wellness, has

continued the tradition that was

started by her father years ago at

his own restaurant.

Now in its fourth year at Eggcetera

Cafe, Mission Meals involves

numerous volunteers both

behind the scenes and on the day

of the event. Leonard said local

schools, scouts and community

groups get involved with the meal

each year, as well as the accompanying

bags and supplies they send

home with each of the attendees.

Eggcetera owner Dino Bastas

served up chicken soup followed by

a traditional holiday meal with turkey,

stuffing, mashed potatoes and

vegetables followed by dessert.

“We see people who they’re just

having a run of bad luck for a few

months, and something like this

helps bring up their spirits,” Bastas

said.

Mission Meals also serves homeless

individuals in the area through

their Mission Meals on the Street

program, where they deliver bags

of necessities to people living on

the street.

The items for those bags are donated

and assembled by volunteers

like Nicole Guzak, of New Lenox,

and her family, who volunteered

at the meal in addition to making

bags for the homeless.

“This is new,” Guzak said about

volunteering. “... This is the beginning

of my journey to move toward

helping others.”

Community groups and businesses

— such as Hicks Insurance

group, which was a sponsor of the

event — also donate their time and

money for the meal and to make the

bags. This year was a first for the

employees at Hicks, who pooled

their money to make 20 bags.

Eileen O’Brien, a Hicks Insurance

employee, said she brought the idea

to owner Jerry Hicks after talking to

Leonard about it at a fitness class.

“That got us into a conversation

Sisters Kay Sands (left) and Mary O’Louglin (right) pose for a photo with

volunteer coordinator Felicia Carmody while volunteering at Mission

Meals at Eggcetera Cafe on Thursday, Dec. 14. The trio has been

volunteering for the event since it began in 2011.

Photos by Amanda Stoll/22nd Century Media

about how there’s so many homeless

people and people that are at a

disadvantage here in our community

of Mokena that I never even thought

about or knew anything about,” said

O’Brien, who said the experience

was an eye-opener for her.

Hicks said he appreciated being

able to do something to benefit the

local community.

“Personally, it’s things you take

for granted, like going out for dinner,

and you see people eating here that

might not have the opportunity to go

out to dinner,” Hicks said. “I think

[Mission Meals] is a great thing.”

As the night got underway,

musician and songwriter Andrew

Salgado joined the party to play

Brittany (right) and David Brunner

(center) pose for a photo with

Santa as he heads into the

Mission Meals event at Eggcetera

Cafe on Thursday, Dec. 14.

some music on the guitar.

Salgado wasn’t originally scheduled

to be there, but has worked with

Leonard through nonprofits in the

past. He said he jumped at the opportunity

to play at the event, which

he found out about the day of.

So, he showed up at Eggcetera

and volunteer Larry Plotts brought

a guitar for him to play. Before

long, the room was filled with music

and singing.

“I think acts of random kindness

is kind of the way that we can give

everything back here, and I think

it’s just a good step,” Salgado said.

Face painting ensued, starting

with snowflakes across one little

forehead. Jenny Hunter, of Frankfort,

provided the paint and the

creativity. Hunter is the founder of

an adaptive art foundation called

Ephraim’s House, which provides

creative opportunities for individuals

with special needs.

Leonard said people who come

for the meal are going through all

kinds of situations in their life,

whether it’s a struggle with health

issues or unemployment, and the

meal allows them the chance to unwind

and be waited on for the night

without the monetary stress.

“The people that are here live

in our community and they’re

our friends and our neighbors and

sometimes we don’t realize that

they need help,” Leonard said.

In memoriam

John Patrick Reidy

John Patrick Reidy,

82, of Frankfort

died Dec. 19. John is survived

by his four children and seven

grandchildren. John served in

the U.S. Navy on the USS Baya.

He retired as a captain from the

Chicago Fire Department with

29 years of service. A memorial

was held Dec. 23, followed

by a service at Gerardi Funeral

Home. Interment was private. In

lieu of flowers, memorials can

be made to the Illinois Veterans

Home, 1 Veteran’s Dr, Manteno,

IL 60950.

David A. Schumpp

David A. Schumpp,

81, of Frankfort,

died Dec. 20. Loving husband

of 55 years to Virginia Schumpp

(Pflum); beloved brother of Robert

(Joyce) Schumpp and uncle to

many nieces and nephews. David

was a veteran of the U.S. Army

serving in Korea and worked for

Illinois Bell/Ameritech for 40

years. He was an adjunct professor

at Governors State University and

St. Xavier University, a longtime

member of the Prestwick Country

Club who served as president for

three terms, a Frankfort Planning

Commissioner for 12 years and a

member of Builders Tee Golf Club.

A memorial visitation was held at

Kurtz Memorial Chapel on Dec.

27. A memorial mass will be held

at St. Anthony Catholic Church at

7659 W. Sauk Trail in Frankfort on

Thursday, Dec. 28, 2017 at 10 a.m.

Inurnment was private. In lieu of

flowers, memorial donations to the

Joliet Area Community Hospice,

www.joliethospice.org would be

appreciated.

Donald C. Myers

Donald C. Myers,

86, of Frankfort and

formerly of Sauk Village, Tinley

Park and Kellart Lake in Cissna

Park, died Dec. 21. Loving husband

of 65 years to Vivian Myers

(Vanderberg); beloved father of

Steven (Cheryl) Myers and Susan

(Martin) Olsen ; dearest brother

of Diana (late Robert) Gullstrom,

Donna (late Lyle) Kramer, late

Eugene Myers and late Rowena

Myers; cherished grandfather of

Jeffrey (Marguerite) Myers, Matthew

Myers, Samuel Olsen and

Abigail Olsen; great-grandfather

of Leo Myers and fond uncle to

many nieces and nephews. Donald

was a veteran of the U.S.

Navy serving in Korea. Family

received friends Dec. 23, and a

funeral service followed in the funeral

home chapel. Interment followed

at Skyline Memorial Park

in Monee. In lieu of flowers, memorial

donations to the Wounded

Warrior Project www. woundedwarriorproject.org

would be appreciated.

Have someone’s life you’d like to

honor? Email nuria@frankfortstation.

com with information about a loved

one who was a part of the Frankfort

community.


20 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station frankfort

frankfortstation.com frankfortstation.com frankfort

The frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 21

Murphy Group

815-464-1110

SOLD

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Happy Holidays!

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James

Murphy

SOLD

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SOLD

Quality Real Estate Brokerage

Celebrating

20 Years In

Frankfort!

Joan

Armon

Michelle

Pomykalski

Carol

Loebe

Kathleen

Lamarca-

Keane

JoAnn

Tomczak

June

Gill

Gerard

Huguelet

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Michelle

McMahon

Kathleen

Giacalone

WWW.MURPHYREALESTATEGROUP.COM

25 E. COLORADO AVE. • FRANKFORT, IL 60423


frankfortstation.com the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 21

Delete


22 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station puzzles

frankfortstation.com

crosstown CROSSWORD & Sudoku

The crosstowns: Frankfort, Homer Glen, Lockport, Mokena, New Lenox, Orland Park, Tinley Park

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Cindy LaFleur

Across

1. __ glance

4. Immigrant’s subj.

7. Historic opening?

10. Seal babies

12. Citi Field’s forerunner

14. “The Sounds of India”

musician, first name

15. Sunscreen’s purpose

18. AAA, e.g.

19. Discounted

20. Feeling of apprehension

22. Compromise

23. Class 8A State

Championship winners,

2017

27. Get it wrong

28. Capital or Marx

suffix

30. Peeples of “North

Shore,” 1987

31. Numero ___

32. Bauxite, e.g.

34. Yes at sea

37. Inclined

38. Sundial number

39. Court fig.

40. Griffins sophomore

running back, 2017

43. Where It.’s at

44. Freelancer’s enclosure

45. Original manufacturer’s

item

46. Chinese river

48. Congo’s continent,

abbr.

51. Bear-like

53. Ferrari’s home

55. Calf-length skirts

58. Rejects

59. India setting

62. Nonsense

64. John, in Russia

65. Sponsorship

66. Pot component

67. Speechless

68. Stock page hdg.

69. Lander in Stockholm

Down

1. Juxtapose

2. CNN founder Ted

3. Possession indicators

4. New York time (abbr.)

5. Actor LaBeouf of

“Transformers”

6. “Exodus” author Uris

7. Faux___

8. Trailer park sights

9. Article in Der Spiegel

11. Number on a baseball

card

13. Britain, to Caesar

14. Payment

16. “Dallas” matriarch

Miss ___

17. So-so grades

21. Go to and fro

24. Down Under natives

25. Huff

26. Rocky peak

29. Proverb

30. Stable sound

33. 66, e.g.: Abbr.

35. Chinese principle

36. ___ de Cologne

37. Not fully shut

40. Tempe sch.

41. Asian juice used

medicinally

42. Required

43. Go inside

47. Helper

49. Celebration

50. Outbreaks

52. One-named supermodel

54. Wing ___ prayer

56. Cassio’s rival

57. Crack

59. Ambition

60. A Law and Order

version

61. “____ the Walrus,”

Beatles hit

63. U.S. Army medal

FRANKFORT

Pete Mitchell’s Bar & Grill

(21000 Frankfort Square

Road, Frankfort; (815)

464-8100)

6-8 p.m. Wednesdays:

Free N’ Fun Bar Game.

Free to play.

TINLEY PARK

The Whistle Sports Bar &

Grill

(7537 W. 159th St., Tinley

Park; (708) 904-4990)

■6-8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Bar

Bingo

■2-5 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Happy Hour

■3-5 ■ p.m. Fridays:

Teacher Appreciation

■3-5 ■ p.m. Saturdays and

Sundays: Happy Hour

LOCKPORT

The Outpost Pub & Grill

(14929 Archer Ave.,

Lockport; (815) 836-

8893)

■8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays and

Thursdays: Live DJ and

Karaoke

MOKENA

The Alley Grill and Tap

House

(18700 S. Old LaGrange

Road, Mokena; (708) 478-

3610)

■9 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Karaoke

Fox’s Restaurant and Pub

(11247 W. 187th St.,

Mokena; (708) 478-8888)

■6 ■ p.m. Thursdays,

Fridays and Saturdays:

Performance by Jerry

Eadie

Jenny’s Southside Tap

(10160 191st St.,

Mokena; (708) 479-6873)

■6 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Acoustic

Avenue, Psychic

night - second Tuesday

every month.

■9 ■ p.m. Thursdays:

Karaoke

■Fridays ■ and Saturdays:

Live bands

NEW LENOX

Little Joe’s Restaurant

(1300 N. Cedar Road,

New Lenox; (815) 463-

1099)

■5-8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays:

Piano Styles by Joe

To place an event

in The Scene, email

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.

com.

answers

How to play Sudoku

Each sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that

has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3

squares. To solve the puzzle, each row, column and

box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9.

LEVEL: Medium

Sudoku by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan


frankfortstation.com dining out

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 23

The Dish

Girl in the Park puts on a show with purpose

Flashy drinks and

meals play to flavor

profiles, in addition

to style

Bill Jones, Managing Editor

A customer orders an Old

Fashioned 108 at Girl in the

Park. The server shows up

with the classic cocktail, expertly

prepared with a beautiful

brown hue aided by the

addition of cinnamon and

cloves in a glass that blossoms

out toward the drinker.

There are two medium-sized

ice balls keeping it cold.

When he sets it at the table,

the server pulls out a lighter,

twists the orange peel and the

flame takes the fuel, flaring

up as the oils from the peel

rocket as tiny fireballs toward

the top of the cocktail. He explains

he is heating the oils

to activate both their flavor

and, more importantly, scent

through the warming process.

On the one hand, it appears

to be pure spectacle — the

cocktail equivalent of setting

ablaze a frying pan with saganaki

tableside at a Greek

restaurant. And make no

mistake, it is an act of showmanship,

much like the blue

hue and pink sugar rim of the

Winter Blues margarita, or

crushing ice to order for the

whiskey smash.

But like most of the Instagram-ready

presentations at

the Orland Park restaurant

and bar, there is more than

meets the eye. And sometimes

that means educating

customers, if Girl in the Park

hopes to get them out of their

comfort zones.

“As much as we’re known

for food — and we’re very

much a food-forward establishment

— one of the things

our customers don’t know

about is cocktails,” co-owner

Robert Parker said.

While Robert’s wife and

Girl in the Park co-owner,

Jayme, is developing the food

side of the menu, he is working

with staff on the everchanging

cocktails selection.

And despite some suburban

customers balking at the citylike

$12 drink prices when

the establishment opened

roughly one year ago, they

are starting to understand the

premium nature of the drinks.

Much like Girl in the Park’s

food, the drinks avoid things

filled with preservatives and

Girl in the Park

11265 W. 159th St. in

Orland Park

Hours

• 11 a.m.-11 p.m.

Tuesday-Wednesday

• 11 a.m-1 a.m.

Thursday

• 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Friday

• 11:30 a.m.-2 a.m.

Saturday

• 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.

Sundays

For more information …

Web: www.girlinthepark.

com

Phone: (708) 226-0042

unnatural ingredients. They

use no mixers, opting instead

to craft everything in house,

by hand. Girl in the Park

makes its own syrups. It uses

Danny Gonzalez, of Orland Park, sets fire to the oils of a

citrus peel Thursday, Dec. 21, over the Old-Fashioned 108 at

Girl in the Park in Orland Park. Bill Jones/22nd Century Media

fresh, seasonal ingredients.

It leaves the bright-red maraschino

cherries behind for a

dark, imported version from

Italy. It even creates its own

infusions, with everything

from strawberry and basil

vodka that takes 14 days to

make to a riff on Fireball,

crafted in-house through a

number of experiments with

whiskey and chili peppers.

While it would be easier

and cheaper to simply mix

the cocktails everyone knows

and loves with commercially

available ingredients, Robert

said he knows the effort is

what will set Girl in the Park

apart in the long run.

“To do what we do from

a cocktail perspective is tedious,

expensive and a [ton]

of work,” he said. “We’re

in Orland, restaurant-heavy.

People can go anywhere and

get a burger and a drink up

LaGrange. Something has to

be different.”











9425 . 191

$90 ( )


24 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station classifieds

frankfortstation.com


frankfortstation.com classifieds

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 25

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

Automotive

DEADLINE -

$52

4 lines/

Friday at 3pm

LOCAL

7 papers

REALTOR

DIRECTORY

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2006 Basement Waterproofing

2011 Brick/Chimney Experts

A+

Contact Classified Department

to Advertise in this Directory

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170

(708)

326.9170


26 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station real estate

frankfortstation.com

Sponsored content

The Frankfort Station’s

of the

WEEK

What: A Georgian Colonial

home sitting on half an acre

Where: 11392 McKenna

Drive in Frankfort

Amenities: This custom

home welcomes you with

an inviting front porch and

an impressive grand foyer.

The home is adorned with

beautiful Brazilian cherry

floors throughout the living,

dining and family rooms

and continues upstairs.

If you love to entertain,

this kitchen is for you. the

kitchen boasts Thermador

appliances, including a

double oven with convection,

a large island, and a

breakfast room adjoining

the family room, which

features a fireplace and

vaulted ceilings with views

of sunsets and a spacious

fenced-in yard. Charming

architectural features and the

timeless design are evident

throughout. The home also

includes dual staircases

to the second floor and

basement, French doors in

the living and dining room,

a first floor office, English

basement with a fireplace

and windows looking out, an

all-weather deck, a master

suite with two walk-in closets,

two large bedrooms with

bathrooms and a guest room

over the garage with a 19-

foot by 7-foot walk-in closet.

Welcome home.

Asking Price: $589,000

Listing Agent: Jessica Jakubowski of CRIS Realty.

For a private tour or more information on this

property, please call (312) 810-6722 or visit www.jessicajakubowski.com

To list a home as Home of the Week, contact t.weber@22ndcenturymedia.com.

Oct. 4

• 21310 Plank Trail Drive,

Frankfort, 60423-8870

— Christopher S Clancy

Ttee to Abdullah Y Tadros,

Dena O Tadros, $455,000

• 318 Wisconsin Road,

Frankfort, 60423-1144

— Johnathon Caminker to

Gabor A Meszaros, Emily

Meszaros, $270,000

• 7748 W. Almond Court,

Frankfort, 60423-6934 —

Mary A Wilson to Rachel J

Nowak, $125,000

Oct. 5

• 20036 Laporte

Meadows Drive, Frankfort,

60423-1737 — First Bank

Of Manhattan Truste to

Richard M Burtner, Melissa

L Burtner, $464,000

• 21162 Woodbridge

Drive, Frankfort, 60423-

8823 — Sues Trust to

James E Bragiel, Clairann

A Bragiel, $313,500

• 7838 W. Evan Terrace,

Frankfort, 60423-9134

— Notardonato Trust

to Jonathan J Stocks,

$240,000

• 8615 Cullen Drive,

Frankfort, 60423-8991

— Mark Yacobozzi to

Michael D Sneed, Lisa A

Sneed, $450,000

• 941 Shetland Drive,

Frankfort, 60423-9767 —

Gerald Ablan to Michael

Burdick, Sarah Burdick,

$467,000

Oct. 10

• 20256 S. Frankfort

Square Road, Frankfort,

60423-6918 — Michael J

Daidone to Timothy Klahn,

$162,000

• 8611 W. Blackthorne

Way, Frankfort, 60423-

1294 — Brad E Feldmeier

to Kenneth Feldmeier,

$365,000

Oct. 11

• 22561 Misty Falls Lane,

Frankfort, 60423-5143 —

Jayson M Polad to John T

Partyka, $420,000

• 7444 W. Benton

Drive, Frankfort, 60423-

9101 — John Graham

Inc to Steven M Bierma,

$235,000

Oct. 12

• 19843 S. Skye Drive,

Frankfort, 60423-7519 —

Jonathan Riofski to Dustin

Upton, Lauren Upton,

$240,000

Oct. 13

• 20366 Fallingwater

Circle, Frankfort, 60423-

1806 — Mineiko Trust to

Thomas Pinto, Charlene C

Pinto, $325,000

• 24362 S. Harvest

Hills Road, Frankfort,

60423-8298 — Grace

J Cavenaugh to Daniel

Wrobel, $290,000

• 7921 W. Carrie Court,

Frankfort, 60423-9147

— Timothy D Woods to

Bryan Z Stevens, Tiffany J

Stevens, $227,000

Oct. 16

• 20340 S. Cobble

Stone Court, Frankfort,

60423-9700 — Abdallah Y

Tadros to Justin Vaughan,

$301,500

• 20615 S. Acorn Ridge

Drive, Frankfort, 60423-

8143 — Adam Flores to

Erin L Foley, Christopher

M Wilkas, $235,000

• 22920 Maddeline Lane,

Frankfort, 60423-8579 —

Robert W Olmsted to Eric

A Sucha, Laura J Sucha,

$420,000

• 517 Elm St, Frankfort,

60423-1105 — Hpa

Borrower 2016-1 Llc

to Brian J Hannigan,

Adrienne L Hannigan,

$277,500

Oct. 17

• 2071 S. Ellen Lane,

Frankfort, 60423 —

Thomas W Marquardt

to Daniel Pi Diekemper,

Emily A Laning, $260,000

The Going Rate is provided by

Record Information Services

Inc. For more information,

visit www.public-record.com

or call (630) 557-1000.


frankfortstation.com classifieds

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 27

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

2011 Brick/Chimney Experts 2025 Concrete Work 2080 Firewood

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2060 Drywall

2017 Cleaning Services

Calling all








2025 Concrete Work

2070 Electrical

Drywall

*Hanging *Taping

*New Homes

*Additions

*Remodeling

Call Greg At:

(815)485-3782

Attention Realtors

Looking to Advertise?

REACH MORE THAN 96,000 HOMES &BUSINESSES

EACH WEEK!

See the Classified Section for more info, or

Call 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

MORTGAGE

ALERT!

LOCK-IN MORE BUSINESS.

ADVERTISE

LOCALLY.

CONTACT THE

CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT

708-326-9170

22ndcenturymedia.com

($25 Value)

DRIVE

CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

Want to

See

Your

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in the

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708-326-9170

for a FREE

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and Quote!

2075 Fencing

Exp

CODE #

...to place your Classified Ad!

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708.326.9170

22ndCenturyMedia.com


28 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station classifieds

frankfortstation.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

2090 Flooring

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

2130 Heating/Cooling

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

2132 Home Improvement

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2120 Handyman

CALL TODAY FOR AFREE ESTIMATE

Aprilaire Humidifier Installed $495

Furnace Clean&Check $80

*Must present coupon to receive offer. Expires 12/31/17

(708) 532-7579

HANDYMAN SERVICE —WHATEVER YOU NEED

"OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE"

Windows, Doors, Decks Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling, Plumbing Interior and

Exterior Painting Wall Paper Removal Professional Work At Competitive Prices

CALL MIKE AT 708-790-3416

2132 Home Improvement

Residential/Commercial

“Design/Build Professionals"

CARRARA REPAIR SERVICE

+ Electrical

+ Plumbing

+Painting

40 Years

Experience

+ Drywall Repair

+Furniture/Wood

Touch Up, Repair

&Refinishing

“We can

fix anything!”

708.717.3445

NO JOB TOO SMALL!



Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling · Room Additions · Finished Basements · Decks/Pergolas

· Screen Rooms/ 3 Season Rooms · Front Porches/Porticos · Commercial BuildOuts

- We provide Design, Product, and Installation -

Free Consultation:

Showroom:

Member

HomerChamber

of Commerce

Visit Our Showroom Location at 1223 N Convent St. Bourbonnais

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

Call Us Today 708.326.9170


frankfortstation.com classifieds

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 29

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2170 Plumbing

2135 Insulation 2150 Paint & Decorating

2150 Paint & Decorating

Neat, Clean, Professional

Work At ACompetitive Price

Specializing in all

Interior/Exterior Painting

• Drywall/PlasterRepair

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• Deck/Fence Staining

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Free Estimates

Senior Discounts

Forquality & service you

can trust, call us today!

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PAINTING

Interior / Exterior

Fast, Neat Painting

Drywall

Wallpaper Removal

Staining

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20% Off with this ad

708-606-3926

Want to

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in the

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Insured • 30 Years Experience

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for a FREE

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• Waterheaters

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Complete Plumbing Service

• WaterLeaks

• RPZ Testing

• Ejector Pumps

•Disposals

• Toilets

815.603.6085


30 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station classifieds

frankfortstation.com


frankfortstation.com classifieds

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 31

2296 Window Fashions

Blinds &

Shades

Repair

I Do Windows &

Interiors

Call Pat

815 355 1112

815 485 1112

o f f i c e

I Do House Calls

Too!

2220 Siding

2255 Tree Service

2294 Window Cleaning

P.K.WINDOW

CLEANING CO.

Window Cleaning

Gutter Cleaning

Power Washing

Office Cleaning

call and get $40.00 off

708 974-8044

www.pkwindowcleaning.com

...to place

your

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MORTGAGE

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LOCALLY.

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HIRE LOCALLY

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CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

2390 Computer Services/Repair

LG Washer/Dryer w/storage

$950. 14 cu. ft. upright freezer

$225. Unused, like-new fridge

$250. Patio table &4chairs,

bar-height $250. 708-846-3577

2489 Merchandise Wanted

Metal Wanted

Scrap Metal, Garden

Tractors,

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ANYTHING METAL!

Call 815-210-8819

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Professional

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Automotive

$52 4 lines/

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$50 7 7 papers

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It!

2490 Misc. Merchandise

Toro Lawn Mower, 30” Cut

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Calling all








2701 Property for

Sale

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 20348 S. Green Meadow Lane,

Frankfort , IL 60423 (Single Family

Residence -Detached). On the 4th day

of January, 2018 to be held at 12:00

noon, at the Will County Courthouse

Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street, Room 201,

Joliet, IL 60432, under Case Title: Reverse

Mortgage Solutions, Inc. Plaintiff

V. Georgia Gruccio; United States of

America; Secretary of Housing and Urban

Development; Unknown Owners

and Non-Record Claimants; Defendant.

Case No. 16CH 0552 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required bysubdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

Randall S. Miller & Associates

120 N. LaSalle Suite 1140

Chicago, IL 60602

P: 1-312-239-3432

F: 1-312-284-4820

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 19932 South Rosewood Drive,

Frankfort, IL 60423 (SINGLE FAMILY

HOME WITH ATTACHED 2 CAR

GARAGE.). On the 4th day of January,

2018 to be held at 12:00 noon, at the

Will County Courthouse Annex, 57 N.

Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL

60432, under Case Title: FEDERAL

NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIA-

TION ("FANNIE MAE"), ACORPO-

RATION ORGANIZED AND EXIST-

ING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Plaintiff V. JAVIER SALAZAR;

MARIA SALAZAR; MIDLAND

FUNDING LLC, Defendant.

Case No. 16CH 2061 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. No judicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

2701 Property for

Sale

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County. Judgment amount is

$298,704.27 plus interest, cost and post

judgment advances, if any.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required bysubdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

PIERCE AND ASSOCIATES

1 N. Dearborn Suite 1300

Chicago, Illinois 60602

P: 312-346-9088

F:

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

2703 Legal

Notices

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Reverse Mortgage Solutions, Inc.

Plaintiff,

vs.

Georgia Gruccio; United States of

America; Secretary of Housing and Urban

Development; Unknown Owners

and Non-Record Claimants;

Defendant.

No. 16 CH 0552

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 20th day of June, 2017,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

4th day of January, 2018 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

Lot 133 in Unit No. 1Farm Brook Terrace,

aSubdivision of part of the West

60 acres of the Southeast 1/4 of Section

13, Township 35 North, Range 12, East

of the Third Principal Meridian, according

tothe plat thereof recorded March

17, 1987 as Document Number

R87-13495, and Certificate of Correction

recorded January 26, 1989 as Document

Number R89-04419, in Will

County, Illinois.


32 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station classifieds

frankfortstation.com

2703 Legal

Notices

Commonly known as:

20348 S. Green Meadow Lane, Frankfort

, IL 60423

Description of Improvements:

Single Family Residence - Detached

P.I.N.:

19-09-13-401-011-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

Randall S. Miller & Associates

120 N. LaSalle Suite 1140

Chicago, IL 60602

P: 1-312-239-3432

F: 1-312-284-4820

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE

ASSOCIATION ("FANNIE MAE"), A

CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND

EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Plaintiff,

vs.

JAVIER SALAZAR; MARIA SALA-

ZAR; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC,

Defendant.

No. 16 CH 2061

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 12th day of September,

2017, MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

4th day of January, 2018 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction to the highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

LOT 10INBLOCK 12 IN FRANK-

FORT SQUARE UNIT NO. 4, BEING

A SUBDIVISION OF PART OFTHE

NORTH 1/2 OF THE NORTHEAST

1/4 OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 35

2703 Legal

Notices

NORTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE

THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, IN

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS, AC-

CORDING TOTHE PLAT THEREOF

RECORDED JUNE 6, 1972 AS DOCU-

MENT NUMBER R72-15231, IN THE

OFFICE OF THE RECORDER OF

DEEDS, IN WILL COUNTY, ILLI-

NOIS.

Commonly known as:

19932 South Rosewood Drive, Frankfort,

IL 60423

Description of Improvements:

SINGLE FAMILY HOME WITH AT-

TACHED 2 CAR GARAGE.

P.I.N.:

19-09-14-203-010-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County. Judgment amount is

$298,704.27 plus interest, cost and post

judgment advances, if any.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

PIERCE AND ASSOCIATES

1 N. Dearborn Suite 1300

Chicago, Illinois 60602

P: 312-346-9088

F:

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

LEGAL NOTICE

We hereby give notice that apublic

hearing will be held before the Village

ofFrankfort Plan Commission/Zoning

Board of Appeals on

January 11, 2018, at 6:30 p.m., in

the Board Room of the Frankfort

Village Hall, 432 W. Nebraska

Street, Illinois 60423.

Simonetta L. Pacek has filed an application

for indoor recreation/entertainment

to operate Danse Integro,

adance/theater studio, proposed

at 750 Center Road. The

property is legally described as follows:

PIN: 19-09-28-400-629-0000

THAT PART OF THE SOUTH

633.5 FEET OF THE EAST 1/2

OF THE SOUTHEAST FRAC-

TIONAL QUARTER OF SEC-

TION 28, IN TOWNSHIP 35

2703 Legal

Notices

NORTH, AND IN RANGE 12

EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCI-

PAL MERIDIAN, LYING

SOUTH AND EAST OF THAT

PART THEREOF CONVEYED

BY DEEDS RECORDED AS

DOCUMENT NOS. R67-16407

AND R67-16408, IN WILL

COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

2900 Merchandise

Under $100

2Xmas dolls, animated and illuminated

moving figures $25

ea. 708.478.8976

22K gold edge decorator plates

$25 ea. complete fern fossil

270-350 mil years old, carbon

dated at Argonna Lab $75.

815.838.9179

25 pairs of men’s jeans. 17

pairs 38x32, 4pairs 38x30, 2

pairs 36x32 &2pairs34x34.

Lee, Carhartt, Wrangler and

Canyon River Blues. $60.

815.838.8340

Car stuff: windshield winter

cover, fits all $10. T.Wax spray

protectant $3. T.Wax foaming

wheel cleaner $3. Dapont spray

tire shine $3. 708.460.8308

Cherry rivet gun, aircraft

grade, G36 w/ 3/16 riverter

pulling hand. Comes with generous

supply of rivets, cleco

fasteners &cleco plyers $75.

Call Tom 815.462.3884

Covered cat litter box w/ all

extras $15. New 2008 school

house dinner plate $10. Cast

iron new bacon press $8. 4

pack LED night lights $6.

708.460.8308

Craftsman rare vintage commercial

long barrel air hammer

9 pc chisel set & case $75.

New American camper kerosene

lantern vintage 12” high

sturdy metal construction $25.

708.466.9907

Fur coat: Silver fox L. About

26” from neck to hem. From

Finland, like new, worn once.

$100 obo. 815.524.7302 Lockport.

Get ready for the new year:

Aerobic glide exercise equipment

$25 obo. Gunthe Renker

fitness flyer exercise equipment

$25 obo. Mokena. Call

708.691.6715. Leave message

Ihave aHooby Horse, Iknow

some little boy or girl wold

love to have! Like new! $25.

708.623.9992

Luggage, Bailey’s duffle, balisitc

grey, 5 pocket sections,

shoulder strap $25. Samsonite

silhouette grey train case $20.

Excellent

708.444.8535

condition.

Calling all


frankfortstation.com classifieds

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 33

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

FREE FREE FREE

CLASSIFIED MERCHANDISE ADS!!!

In this tough economy, we'll give you a free

merchandise ad totaling $100 or less.

· Write your FREE ad in 30 words or less.

· One free ad per week.

· Same ad may not be submitted more than 3 times.

· The total selling price of your ad must not exceed $100.

· Ads will be published on a space available basis.

· Free Ads are Not Guaranteed to Run!

GUARANTEE Your Merchandise Ad To Run!

Free Merchandise Ad - All Seven Papers

Ad Copy Here (please print):

Merchandise Pre-Paid Ad $30! 4 lines! 7 papers!

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Name:

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®

Exp Date

Please cut this form out and mail or fax it back to us at:

22nd Century Media

11516 W. 183rd St, Suite #3 Unit SW

Orland Park, IL 60467

FAX: 708.326.9179

Circle One:

BUY IT!

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- IN THE -

CLASSIFIEDS

708.326.9170


34 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station sports

frankfortstation.com

Athlete of the Week


I love the idea of a

publication which is a

true amalgamation of

rich history, current

events and timely

political topics!

Congratulations! I really

enjoyed Chicagoly

Magazine!”

—sarah w., of highland park

Celebrated by critics and readers, the depth and strength

of Chicagoly’s storytelling is unmatched in this city.

Don’t miss another issue.

Subscribe today.

Chicagolymag.com/subscribe

a 22nd century media publication

10 Questions

with Delani Grayer

Delani Grayer is a senior

guard on the Griffins girls

basketball team

How’d you get started

in basketball?

I started playing in the

summer before fifth grade. It

was my who mostly wanted

me to do some type of physical

activity, and I chose basketball

just because I had

tried everything else and it

kind of stuck.

Do you have any rituals

or superstitions?

When we line up, when

we run out on the court, I’m

kind of obsessive where I

make sure everyone’s in the

exact same order that they

were always in before the

game.

Do you have any plans

for college?

I’m planning to go to a

[historically black college

and universities] because

I will be the first graduate

from an HBCU from my

family. I’ve gotten full tuition

to Tuskegee … and I’m

about to get accepted into

Howard University, as well

… [I plan to major in] either

pre-veterinary medicine, biology

or animal science.

What’s the hardest part

of playing basketball?

I think the hardest part

would have to be the time

commitment because I’m involved

in a lot of clubs and I

always find it hard to dedicate

the time I want to those

clubs while sharing my time

with basketball.

If you won the lottery,

what would be the first

thing you would buy?

I don’t feel like I would

buy anything. There was this

boy who had gotten bullied

on social media lately, and

he’s starting a charity for

people who also get bullied

for facial deformities. And,

so, I think I would donate it

to them because my cousin

had a cleft lip, and he used

to get a bunch of crap about

it when he was younger. He

never really had the money

to fix it until he was older. I

know how [getting bullied]

feels from having someone in

my family deal with that, and

I wouldn’t want anyone else

to have to go through that.

And if they wanted to get ti

fixed, then they would have

the money from the charity in

order to get it fixed.

What’s your ideal postgame

meal?

My mom makes a mean

pot pie, so that would be my

ideal post-game meal.

What item do you

currently own that you

couldn’t live without?

I’d have to say my phone.

I like staying connected,

and it’s an easy way to stay

connected with people who

you’re not with all the time.

Who would you pick for

a dream three-on-three

game?

Photo submitted

I think I’d choose Michael

Jordan and Kyrie Irving …

I’m good with my assists

and I fell like Michael Jordan

would be good at easily

scoring, and he was just

a beast in his time. Kyrie

Irving is really good with

the ball, and it’s just fun to

watch him play, and I’d like

to be a part of that.

If you could own an

exotic pet, what would

it be?

Definitely a koala bear.

They sleep a lot and they’re

really cute.

Do you have any

phobias?

Not really, but I think the

thing I would avoid if I were

in a room by myself would

be a clown.

Interview by Contributing Editor

T.J. Kremer III


frankfortstation.com sports

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 35

Frankfort youth cheer squads score big at state championship

Jason Maholy

Freelance Reporter

Two cheer squads with the

Frankfort Falcons youth football

and cheerleading organization

concluded their 2017

seasons by hoisting championship

trophies.

The Falcons’ super lightweight

dance team and junior

varsity cheerleaders were

both crowned tops in their

respective divisions at the Illinois

Recreational Cheer Association

Cheer and Dance

State Championship. The

10th annual competition was

held Dec. 1-3 at the Sears

Center in Hoffman Estates.

The super lightweights,

composed of first- and second-graders,

successfully defended

their 2016 title, while

the junior varsity, a group

of fifth- and sixth-graders,

earned the first championship

in its history. The Falcons

varsity cheer and fifth-grade

dance squads also had strong

showings, with both finishing

runner-up in their respective

divisions.

Super lightweight coach

Dawn Camodeca said the

team’s second consecutive

state championship was the

culmination of more than

five months of hard work and

determination. The squad

returned only five girls from

2016, while the other 15

members had never cheered

before the team began practicing

in late July.

“It’s pretty amazing,”

Camodeca said. “We just

have a great support system,

and the other coaches help a

lot... So, I did not do it alone.”

Through hard work that

included practicing two days

a week, cheering on the sidelines

during games, and attending

clinics to work on

every move and skill until it

was mastered, the girls became

a fine-tuned unit.

“Every practice was working

on a new move, whether

kicks or turns or jumps, and

keep going over and over

and over,” Camodeca said.

“They were determined they

were going to do well and

they just always came ready

to work and just kept pushing

forward.”

With three-fourths of the

squad having never cheered

before this season, Camodeca

and her assistant coaches

didn’t know what to expect

early on.

“We had high hopes, but

there was definitely uncertainty;

we didn’t know how

the girls were going to progress,”

she explained. “Then,

a few months in, we were

hopeful of at least making it

to the state competition.”

The expectations were

raised when the group qualified

for the state competition

via a first-place finish at its

first competition of the fall.

Coaches were at that point

optimistic the team could finish

in the top three at state.

Camodeca was never a

cheerleader, and until serving

as an assistant on the super

lightweight team in 2016

had never coached the sport.

The decision to get involved

has led to one of the most rewarding

experiences of her

life, she said.

“I’ve volunteered may

times over the years for various

things, but to see those little

people – those young girls

– come in with not very much

self-confidence, or even walk

into the room with their head

down, and then a few months

later they’re taking over the

room,” she said. “They walk

in, they find their own power,

they find that confidence in

themselves and it’s just really

amazing to watch.”

The Falcons junior varsity,

meanwhile, had a

bumpy road to the title despite

entering the competition

flying high on the heels

of three first-place finishes.

Their hopes for a championship

were dealt a serious

blow when the girls finished

third on the opening

The Frankfort Falcons junior varsity cheerleaders won their division at the Illinois

Recreational Cheer Association Cheer and Dance State Championship, held from Dec. 1-3

at the Sears Center in Hoffman Estates. Photos submitted

day of the state event.

“They made a lot of mistakes

on Friday,” said team

mom Amy Bogucki, who

noted a pyramid collapse was

just one of several errors that

left the season hanging in the

balance. “We were on the

edge of our seats wondering

if we were going to (finish in

the top three and) come back

on Sunday.”

The situation was shocking

given the squad’s excellence

during the season, but the

degree of difficulty in its routine

earned the group enough

points to qualify for the finals

on the competition’s last day.

The team did not perform

Saturday, and the girls, undeterred

by their disappointing

initial showing, resolved to

win the title, Bogucki said.

“These are 25 of the most

dedicated, amazing kids you

ever want to meet,” she added.

“They got together and

were like, ‘We’re doing this,

no mistakes, we’re going to

get it.’ And they came back

on Sunday and took it all. It

was really cool.

“They knew the mistakes

they made and knew they

had to clean it up, and that’s

exactly what they did.”

Bogucki credited JV head

The super lightweight team, composed of first- and secondgraders,

won their second consecutive state title at the

state championship.

coach Aimee Feehery, assistants

Brooke Scibior, Cassie

Vidro and Jennifer Polomsky,

as well as team members’

parents for the girls being

prepared and unflappable.

“They kept them upbeat

and positive, it was never

negative, and I think a lot of

it stems from home and dedicated

parents,” Bogucki said.

One of the songs in the mix

to which the squad performed

was American Authors’ “Believer,”

which Feehery said

was the team’s favorite.

“It’s about believing in

ourselves, getting better,

being scared, nervous, but

being a believer anyway,”

Feehery said.

Bogucki said the moment

the team was announced as

the champion was like nothing

she had ever experienced.

“Most of the parents were

crying, jumping up and

down,” she said. “For me as a

parent it as the proudest moment.

To see them work so

hard and then see them get

kicked down on Friday, and

to see them pool together and

just kill it on Sunday.

“I have never experienced

that feeling. I still get choked

up and it’s been a couple

weeks. It’s just unexplainable,

just being so proud of

her and her teammates. They

worked their butts off and

they totally deserved it.”

high school

highlights

The rest of the week in

high school sports

Girls basketball

LWE 47, Morgan Park 36

Carolyn Waleski scored

19 points and had 15 rebounds

and steals during the

Dec. 18 game.

High School Highlights is

compiled by Editor Nuria

Mathog, nuria@frankfortstation.com

This Week In

Griffins Varsity

Athletics

Girls basketball

■Dec. ■ 28 – hosts Oak Forest

at Medieval Classic,

10 a.m.

■Dec. ■ 29 – hosts Medieval

Classic Tournament,

10 a.m.

■Jan. ■ 4 – at Lockport,

2:30 p.m.

Boys basketball

■Dec. ■ 28 – at Altamount

Teutopolis Christmas

Tournament, 10:30 a.m.

■Dec. ■ 28 – at Effingham

Teutopolis Christmas

Tournament, 3:15 p.m.

■Dec. ■ 29 – at Teutopolis

Christmas Tournament

Wrestling

■Dec. ■ 29 – at DeKalb Don

Flavin Invite, 9 a.m.

■Dec. ■ 30 – at DeKalb Don

Flavin Invite, 9 a.m.

Boys bowling

■Jan. ■ 2 – at Plainfield South,

10 a.m.

Boys swimming and

diving

■Jan. ■ 4 – hosts Lockport,

10 a.m.

Visit us online at

frankfortstation.com


36 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station sports

frankfortstation.com

Boys basketball

East boys basketball team edges Central on the court

Randy Whalen

Freelance Reporter

The old saying says "bigtime

players hit big-time

shots in big-time games."

In a big-time game the

Lincoln-Way East boys

basketball team had a pair

of players do just that. Joey

Buggemi scored 10 points in

the third quarter and fellow

senior guard Zach Parduhn

matched him with 10 points

in the fourth quarter as the

Griffins rallied in the second

half for a 55-50 win over

Lincoln-Way Central before

a packed house in a District

210 tussle on Friday, Dec. 22

in New Lenox.

The third of the Griffin trio

of senior guards, Sam Shafer,

finished with 14 points and

nine rebounds as East (7-2)

won its second straight close

game after suffering backto-back

losses. The Knights

(4-6) were coming off a nice

rally victory over Minooka,

but fell just short down the

stretch against East.

"It felt pretty good," Parduhn

said. "Things weren't

clicking for me at the beginning

of the game. I just kind

of kept my head, and finally

in the fourth quarter when

it mattered, I stuck with it

and battled through it. I got

it done.

"It's bragging rights too. A

lot of those guys we played

with as freshmen and sophomores,

so it means a lot to

beat those guys."

Anytime the Knights got

close down the stretch, there

was Parduhn. He hit a pair

of jumpers to start the fourth

quarter and then things

looked good for the Griffins

when junior guard Tyler

Vaundry hit a 3-pointer midway

through the period for a

49-42 lead. Those were the

only East points not scored

by Parduhn in the fourth

quarter.

East's Joey Buggemi goes on the defense while Central's Nathan Purcell dribbles the ball.

But trailing 49-44 Central

rallied as recently brought up

twin freshmen guards Mike

Maloney (10 points) and

Matt Maloney (6 points) hit

a pair of 3-pointers around a

Parduhn jumper. That closed

the score to 51-50 with 49

seconds to play in the game.

Parduhn, who scored all

12 of his points in the second

half, knocked down a

pair of free throws with 31.3

seconds to play to restore

the lead to three. Following

a time out, Central senior

guard Chris Robinson, who

had a team-high 14 points,

was just long on a potential

game-tying 3-pointer from

the top of the key. Shafer

grabbed the rebound and

got it ahead to Parduhn, who

was fouled and made the

game clinching free throws

with 2.8 seconds to play.

"He's our floor general,"

East coach Rich Kolimas

said of Parduhn. "This is his

third year on the varsity, so

he's capable of making those

shots down the stretch. We

set a lot of ball screens for

him and he had a lot of open

looks. He knocked them

down.

"Forget the records. We

all know each other. It was

a good battle, a close game.

We just took away their dribble

penetration."

Central led 26-23 at halftime

and 28-25 with 6:35

left in the third quarter. Then

Parduhn scored his initial

basket, Buggemi (14 points)

scored six straight and Shafer

converted an old-fashioned

3-point play in an 11-0

run that gave the Griffins,

who were coming off a 53-

51 win at Lyons Township

on Saturday, Dec. 16, the

lead for good.

"We switched to a 1-2-2

and that gave them troubles,"

Buggemi said of what

opened up the third quarter

spurt. "We were jumping the

passing lanes, and it got us

some easy buckets in transition.

Putting pressure on

them, not letting them put

pressure on us, not letting

them pass over us, not letting

them finish.

"We've been rivals with

[Central] since North closed.

Me, Sam, and Zach have

been together for three years

and we wanted this win."

With the Knights back

within 36-34, junior center

Alex Witkowski scored on a

layup and Buggemi banged

home back-to-back baskets

in a 6-0 run. East led 42-36

after three.

Although the first half was

close throughout, there was

only one tie (4-4), an two

lead changes. A Robinson

3-pointer gave the Knights

the lead at 6-4 with 2:41

left in the first quarter. They

never trailed the rest of the

half and led 8-6 after the first

quarter.

A Mike Maloney 3-pointer

gave Central its largest lead

at 21-15 with 3:24 left in the

first half. Junior guard Julian

Barr buried a 3-pointer with

just over a minute left in the

half to close East within 25-

23, but a Robinson basket

restored the lead to three at

intermission.

Junior guard Nathan Purcell

and senior forward Andrew

Hancock (7 rebounds)

each added seven points for

the Knights.

"We told 'em at halftime

they were going to switch

defenses, and we were prepared

for it," Central coach

Bob Curran said. "The kids

just didn't make plays. But

they put forth effort to get

into the passing lanes. And

East's Zach Parduhn shoots the ball while Central's Chris

Robinson attempts to block the shot Friday, Dec. 22.

Photos by Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

Parduhn had a great fourth

quarter."

Central's previous game

was a 44-42 home victory

on Saturday, Dec. 16 over

Minooka. The Knights were

down to 28-9 at the half,

but rallied to win. Robinson

led the way with 11 points,

senior guard Luke Handley

added 10 points and senior

forward EJ Charles (8

points) scored an old-fashioned

3-point play with four

seconds left in the game for

the winning points.

The Knights have been

without starting point guard,

Sean Curran - Bob's son -

with a left ankle injury that

happened in a 52-51 loss on

Dec. 6 at Illina Christian.

They hope he can return

soon, but moves like bringing

up the Maloney twins

should pay dividends for the

team.

"We're still trying to figure

this team out," coach Curran

said. "But we're playing better

and these things will only

help us down the road."

This week, on Thursday,

Dec. 28 and Friday, Dec. 29,

the Griffins travel downstate

to play at the Effingham -

Teutopolis Christmas Classic.

Central is at the Maine

East Holiday Tournament,

which starts on Wednesday,

Dec. 27and goes through

Saturday, Dec. 30.


frankfortstation.com sports

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 37

Griffins girls basketball defeats Knights in LW matchup

Randy Whalen

Freelance Reporter

Carolyn Waleski has been

making big plays on the

basketball court for awhile.

So, when it came down to

crunch time in a big District

210 rivalry game, the Lincoln-Way

East senior naturally

made another one last

weekend.

The guard came up with a

fourth-quarter steal, converting

that into a layup and an

old-fashioned 3-point play.

Those were three of her

game-high 16 points, and it

was also the pivotal play, as

East held off a late charge

by Lincoln-Way Central and

emerged with a 46-33 victory

in a local matchup on Friday,

Dec. 22 in New Lenox.

Kaley Sheehan added 11

points for the Griffins (11-

1). Abi Baumgartner had a

monster game for Central

(5-5). The junior post player

scored 13 points and grabbed

16 rebounds.

But the highlight of the

evening certainly came from

Waleski. The Knights had

narrowed an 18-point third

quarter deficit back down to

single digits. In a slow-starting

fourth quarter, Central

senior center Lauren Kraft (4

points) hit a free throw with

6 minutes to play to make

the score 38-31. The Knights

got the ball back and looked

to potentially make it a

4-point game.

Waleski had other ideas.

She swooped in, stole the

ball, and raced right to the

basket and scored. She was

fouled on the play, calmly hit

the free throw and reopened

a 10-point lead with 5:38 to

play. A minute or so later, junior

guard Sydney Nekola,

who scored five of her eight

points in the fourth quarter,

nailed a 3-pointer for a 44-

31 lead, and that was the

ballgame.

"I try to find any loose ball

that I can," Waleski said.

"It's just the intensity I have.

In my head, I know that can

be a huge spot for the team.

We just feed off each other,

and I want to do good things

for the team."

East coach Jim Martin has

seen Waleski do her magic

both as an opponent, when

she played her first two seasons

at the now-closed Lincoln-Way

North, and now as

as a player for him the past

two seasons.

"She's the Energizer Bunny,"

he said of Waleski. "She

just goes and goes, and goes.

We have the confidence in

our leader."

Central coach Dave Campanile

credited the Griffins

defense, too.

"Her length showed,"

Campanile said of the 5-foot-

10 Waleski. "I thought we

made some good decisions,

but they just ripped the

ball out of our hands a few

times."

Things started well for the

Knights. They trailed 2-0,

but then went on a 10-2 spurt

before settling for an 11-6

lead after one quarter. But

then they started turning the

ball over, committing 19 of

their 22 turnovers in the final

three quarters.

"I was pleased with our

start in the magnitude of this

game," Campanile said. "We

wanted to play tough, and

we did. We started out well

and beat their press early.

But they played good halfcourt

defense and got fastbreak

points."

Trailing 14-10 with just

over 6 minutes left in the

first half, five different players

scored, as the Griffins

gathered a 13-0 run to take

the lead for good. Waleski

capped the burst by converting

a turnover into a layup

with 27 seconds left in the

half. Baumgartner scored in

the final seconds, as Central

stopped the run and closed

back within 23-16 at halftime.

The Griffins continued the

onslaught in the opening 4

minutes of the third quarter

with a 12-1 run. Sheehan

scored the middle eight

points in the burst, including

a pair of 3-pointers, as East

led 35-17 with 3:52 left in

the third quarter.

"We wanted to get out

and go." Martin said of the

big spurt. "It was a credit to

our girls off the bench [like

Sheehan]. We wore them

down."

After scoring three

points in a span of 10:43

the Knights, however, went

on a 13-0 run in a span

of just under 3 minutes.

Baumgartner scored the

first four points, and then

junior guards Corryn Mejdrich

and Natalie Spudic (7

points, 6 rebounds), along

with sophomore guard Regan

LoConte (6 points), all

hit 3-pointers, as Central

closed within five points.

But senior forward Lauren

Hunter (4 points, 4 rebounds)

hammered home

a layup, as the Griffins

closed the quarter with the

final three points for a 37-

30 lead after three.

By the time the girls game

was ending, a large crowd

had settled in to finish watching

them and get ready for

the boys game to follow. The

crowd made a neat neighborhood

game even better.

"It's neat,"Waleski said of

the matchup. "We all know

each other's players so well.

Our defense was playing really

well, with intensity and

energy, and it was fun playing

in front of that many

people."

Before the game, the

Knights honored Martin,

who will retire at the end of

this season after 19 years as

a head girls basketball coach

in the district, including the

last 18 years at East. After

being an assistant coach for a

few years under Don Hayes

in the late 1990s, Martin

moved to head girls basketball

coach in the 1999-2000

season at what was still the

one-and-only Lincoln-Way

at that time.

So, before the game, Campanile

came out to center

court and presented Martin

a frame with pictures on it

from that 1999-2000 season.

"It was something we

wanted to do for Jim," said

Campanile, who was an assistant

under Martin for 12

years at East. "I told my AD,

Matt Lyke, that it would be

great. He found some old

pictures of the 2000 team,

and we framed them with

the saying, 'Once a Knight,

always a Knight.'"

Martin appreciated it.

"I started out here," he

said of Central, which was

the original and main campus

through the 1999-2000

school year. "[The picture]

said, 'Once a Knight, always

a Knight,' and was absolutely

nice of them."

East and the Knights might

meet again this week. The

Griffins host the Medieval








East's Kaley Sheehan prepares to take a shot Friday, Dec.

22, during the Griffins' game against the Knights.

Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

Classic and are in opposite

pools. The pool play games

started on Tuesday, Dec. 26,

and run through Thursday,



Dec. 28. The final tourney

day is Friday, Dec. 29, with

times and opponents to be

determined.





1/11/18


38 | December 28, 2017 | The frankfort station sports

frankfortstation.com

Griffins football players honored in Signing Day ceremony

Submitted by Lincoln-Way

Community High School

District 210

In the first-ever Lincoln-

Way East NCAA December

early signing day, parents,

coaches, teammates, friends,

and teachers gathered to recognize

four Griffin football

players for their commitment

to compete in athletics

at the collegiate level.

Athletic Director Mark

Vander Kooi welcomed approximately

125 supporters

in attendance at the ceremony

and applauded the players for

their commitment. “Thank

you for all your hard work

in representing Lincoln-Way

East so well … we are very,

very proud of you,” he said.

The students recognized

were John Christensen, who

will compete at Washington

University in St. Louis;

Brendan Morrissey, who will

also compete at Washington

University in St. Louis;

Turner Pallissard, who will

compete at the University of

Iowa; and Devin O’Rourke,

who will compete at Northwestern

University in Evanston,

Ill.

Coach Rob Zvonar took

time to honor each athlete,

describing their dedication

in the classroom and on the

field. Between honoring the

athletes, guest speakers also

gave advice to the studentsignees.

Those in attendance

heard from three former

Lincoln-Way East graduates

including NFL player

Adam Gettis, University of

Illinois football captain Nick

Allegretti and current Northwestern

Wildcat football

player Mo Almasri.

In a video message from

the New York Giants locker

room, Gettis addressed the

whole Griffin team, the signees,

and also spoke of his

Four Lincoln-Way East football players were honored

at a signing day ceremony Dec. 20. (Left to right) John

Christensen, Brendan Morrissey, Turner Pallissard and

Devin O’Rourke. Photo submitted

previous experience winning

the State Championship with

Lincoln-Way East. “For me,

still, it’s one of the greatest

feelings that I’ve ever had,”

he said.

Coach Zvonar honored

each of the signees individually.

He spoke of John

Christensen’s record-breaking

number, with 152 tackles

in one season. He also

discussed the academic rigor

of Washington University,

where John will attend. At

Washington University, the

average ACT score of accepted

students is a score of

33. John’s stellar exam performance,

GPA of 4.51, and

his “character, leadership,

and work ethic” were all factors

that made him successful

at Lincoln-Way East.

Joining Christensen at

Washington University is

Brendan Morrissey, also

known as “B-Mo” by his

coach and teammates. Morrissey’s

skill on the field

earned him a winning record,

as he won every game

he started as quarterback at

Lincoln-Way East for a total

of 32 victories. Morrissey’s

determination on the field

matched his determination

in the classroom; he earned a

33 on his ACT and excelled

in his classes.

Senior Turner Pallissard

will go on to play football

at University of Iowa and

was recognized as “one of

the best tight ends in the

state of Illinois this season.”

Zvonar praised Pallissard for

his work ethic, stating that

he “attacked each day with

high intensity and a desire

to improve himself and his

football team.”

Pallissard was not only

successful on the field,

but also in the classroom.

Zvonar congratulated Pallissard,

thanking him for his

commitment.

Zvonar then discussed

the success of player Devin

O’Rourke, who is the most

decorated player in Lincoln-

Way East Football history,

along with guest speaker

Nick Allegretti. O’Rourke’s

success on the field was

matched by success in the

classroom. Before attending

Northwestern University

and finishing his final semester

at Lincoln-Way East,

O’Rourke will be the first

Lincoln-Way East player to

participate in the Under Armor

All-American in Orlando,

Florida on Jan. 4, 2018.


frankfortstation.com sports

the frankfort station | December 28, 2017 | 39

fastbreak

Frankfort elementary school student finds strength through judo

Jason Maholy

Freelance Reporter

22nd Century media file

photo

1st-and-3

Three things to

know about the

Griffins' game

against the Knights

1. East senior

guard Carolyn

Waleski scored a

game-high 16 points

and was responsible

for the game's pivotal

play, converting a

fourth-quarter steal

into a layup and

3-point play.

2. During

the first four

minutes, the Griffins

had a 12-1 run,

including eight

points scored by

Kaley Sheehan.

3. The Knights

honored Griffins girls

basketball coach

Jim Martin, who has

served as a head

girls basketball

coach in Lincoln-Way

Community High

School District 210

for 19 years, prior to

the game.

Judo is translated as “gentle

way,” but mess with Dani

Schedin and she might notso-gently

put you on your

back.

The Frankfort girl is 8 years

old and all of 83 pounds, but

has for the past three years

been practicing and competing

in the Japanese martial art

in which the objective is to

throw or otherwise take one’s

opponent to the ground and

subsequently control or subdue

the individual. The fullcontact

grappling sport became

a men’s Olympic sport

in 1964 and was expanded to

include women in 1988, and

has grown in prominence in

recent years with the rise in

popularity of mixed martial

arts.

Dani, a third-grader at

Grand Prairie Elementary

School, began practicing judo

when she was 5 years old and

has since earned several medals

at tournaments. This past

October, she took the title at a

competition in Minooka.

“My dad showed me a video

and it looked cool,” Dani

said of her first exposure to

judo. “I liked the throws.”

Dani is just a child who

enjoys practicing the sport,

learning new throws and

competing to win medals,

and might not recognize her

growth from the same perspective

as her dad, Matt

Schedin. She will soon be

testing for her orange/green

belt, the sixth class of belt

on the U.S. junior scale, ascending

from 12 to one.

Dani Schedin practices judo with teammate Zoe Dempsey.

“It’s given her confidence,”

Matt said. “Having

confidence and how to react,

and learning how to fall

correctly, learning foot steps

and foot placement, how to

break an opponent’s balance

– she understands that

more now than your normal

5-year-old starting out

would.”

Dani will have to prove

she has mastered the tomoe

nage throw in order to earn

her next belt. A person who

might know nothing about

judo has likely seen the tomoe

nage in a fight scene in

a film or television show, or

watching an MMA competition.

The individual making

the throw falls to her back,

essentially pulling the attacker

on top of her, but as

she falls backward plants a

foot in the person’s midsection

and launches him over

her head.

The concept of judo is rooted

in one’s ability to maintain

his or her own balance, while

throwing off the balance of

an opponent and ultimately

using the opponent’s weight

and momentum to one's advantage.

Competitive judo

is strictly a defensive sport,

as thrusts and kicks are not

permitted; however, opponents

must engage with one

another and can be penalized

for passivity.

“People have a misconception

of what it is, they

think it’s kick and punches,”

Matt said. “The object is to

throw your opponent in her

back, and that is the equivalent

of a knockout. You can

also win by (forcing submission

with) chokeholds and

arm locks, but that’s not allowed

at her age.”

Dani described her technique

for one style of throw.

“You pull on them and break

their balance, pull their arm

out and they go off balance,

and use your other hand to

make the throw,” she said.

Dani is schooled in judo

at Pride Martial Arts in

New Lenox, under instructor

Master Ron Poholik.

She competes primarily in

Wisconsin, which Matt described

as “big time judo

country,” so she has done her

Dani Schedin poses with a medal she won in a state

judo tournament. The 8 year old Frankfort resident has

participated in the sport she was 5 years old and has

earned several medals during that time. Photos submitted

Dani Schedin learns techniques from 2015 World bronze

medalist Golan Pollack during a judo clinic.

share of traveling north over

the past three years.

“She’s been sticking with

it,” Matt said. “It’s something

she enjoys and it

means a lot to her, and she’s

constantly gaining confidence

and learning.”

Listen Up

"It's neat. We all know each others' players

so well. Our defense was playing really well

with intensity and energy, and it was fun

playing in front of that many people."

Carolyn Waleski — Lincoln-Way East girls basketball player

What 2 Watch

Girls basketball

At Lockport at 12:30 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 4

• After wrapping up the Medieval Classic Tournament

the previous week, the Griffins girls take on the

Porters on the court.

Index

35 — This Week In

34 — Athlete of the Week

FASTBREAK is compiled by Editor Nuria Mathog, nuria@

frankfortstation.com.


Frankfort’s Hometown Newspaper | www.frankfortstation.com | December 28, 2017

young fighter

Eight-year-old Frankfort girl

competes in judo, Page 39

Cheering along

Frankfort Falcons teams

win state titles at Illinois

championships, Page 35

Central's Regan

LaConte dribbles the

ball down the court

while East's Carolyn

Waleski tries to steal

it Friday, Dec. 22.

Julie mcmann/22nd

century media

East girls basketball

meets Central

on the court, Page 37

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