1859 Jan | Feb 2018

Statehoodmedia

TRIP PLANNER:

OREGON’S

LIGHTHOUSES

PG.106

Interiors Go

Gatsby-Style

Woody Guthrie’s

Missing Songs

Winter Waterfall

Hunting

tough

mother

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Here’s to

day-glow

swagger

Safety looks good on you. For you, work is more than where you clock in and out. It’s where you

hone your craft, develop pride, and boldly share your talents with the world. So whether you’re the

king of the cubicle or the queen of the construction site, we salute your individuality. A lot of life

happens here at work, and at SAIF we’re proud to be a part of it.


Learn more about SAIF

and workers’ comp at saif.com.


4 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Pachamama

Farm

photography by Bradley Lanphear

At Pachamama Farm, Michael Antoci allows

his pigs (and other livestock) to roam free

and forage throughout the property. Twice

each day they’re called in to the barn for

meals consisting of scraps from some of your

favorite Oregon businesses. Maybe there’s

nothing wrong with casting your pearls before

swine after all. (Farm to Table, pg. 36)

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 5


Emily Green

FEATURES

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 • volume 49

88

A Delicious Art

Bend’s Nickol Hayden-Cady, who

owns and operates cult-favorite

Foxtail Bakeshop, brings romance

to the cake game.

photography by Emily Green

80

Columbia’s Tough Mother

Finds Techie Offspring

The company Gert Boyle built

is pushing tech barriers, moving

into warmer seasons and heating

up its stock.

written by Kevin Max

74

Romance on the Road

You’ve survived the holidays.

Now it’s time to step back and frame

the year ahead with one of our five

top romantic getaways.

written by Sheila G. Miller

6 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Florence Events Center, host of the 2nd Star Festival. Funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust.

TOGETHER, WE FUND 1,400+ CULTURAL

NONPROFITS IN OREGON.

INCLUDING THIS BOY AND HIS DRAGON.

Oregonians have a unique opportunity to fund cultural activities in the

state and double their impact for free - with the Cultural Tax Credit. Make

sure you are claiming yours. Doing so takes three simple steps that do so

much for Oregon. Talk to your CPA, or learn more at (503) 986-0088 or

CulturalTrust.org.

DOUBLE THE LOVE. HERE’S HOW:

1. TOTAL

YOUR DONATIONS

TO CULTURE

2. GIVE 3. CLAIM

A MATCHING

AMOUNT TO THE

CULTURAL TRUST

CULTURAL TAX

CREDIT ON YOUR

STATE TAXES


DEPARTMENTS

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 • volume 49

70

LIVE

20 NOTEBOOK

Oregon-made candles, beer and bourbon are sure to heat up the romance. Plus, curl up

with the Oregon Book Award’s top fiction book of 2017 and some tunes out of Astoria.

28 FOOD + DRINK

We’ve got the best sweet treats from around the state, as well as an insider’s look at the

best food spots on the northern Oregon Coast. Bonus: Oregon’s annual truffle festival

returns with epicurean events for everyone.

36 FARM TO TABLE

The hogs at Pachamama Farm receive top treatment—including food from Umpqua

Dairy and Franz Bakery. Talk about keeping it local.

54

Kjersten Hellis

104

Peter Mahar

44 HOME + DESIGN

A historic home in Portland gets a Gatsby-inspired update. Plus, advice for finding your

home’s personal style.

54 MIND+ BODY

In Eugene, Debby King and Nancy Woodke are transforming the golf landscape by

making the sport more accessible to women and children.

56 ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

In May 1941, the Bonneville Power Administration hired Woody Guthrie for a month to

write songs for a film about the hydroelectric system. He wrote thirty songs in thirty days.

THINK

64 STARTUP

Sarah Pool couldn’t stay out of the startup game—lucky for us. With her new company,

Canvas, she’s converting beer’s spent grain into barley milk.

66 WHAT’S GOING UP

The best spots for a romantic dinner are coming your way in Bend, McMinnville

and Portland.

68 WHAT I’M WORKING ON

The Oregon Social Learning Center has conducted a decades-long study on partner

violence and romantic relationships.

Tim Mantoani

70 MY WORKSPACE

In Lake Oswego, a mother and daughter have cornered the Oregon wedding market in the

form of a popular dress store and wedding planning company.

72 GAME CHANGER

The Oregon Community Foundation’s Creative Heights grants let artists take chances.

14 Editor’s Letter

16 1859 Online

118 Map of Oregon

120 Until Next Time

EXPLORE

98 TRAVEL SPOTLIGHT

Underneath Pendleton lies a secret city. Pendleton Underground Tours gives you an

inside look at the town’s somewhat unsavory history.

100 ADVENTURE

Winter is no excuse to stop exploring—and what’s more romantic than a hike to

a waterfall?

104 LODGING

Heceta Head Lighthouse Bed & Breakfast offers a historical stay with most modern

comforts included.

COVER

photo by Shauna Intelisano

(see Columbia’s Tough Mother Finds

Techie Offspring, pg. 80)

106 TRIP PLANNER

Road trip! Take to the coast to learn about the lighthouses still open to the public in an

Oregon Coast quest.

112 NORTHWEST DESTINATION

Sun Valley: Come for the winter. Stay for the summer.


DESIGN

DESIGN

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CUSTOM SOLAR ENERGY HOMES

A space as magnificent as the view.

Inspired by breathtaking surroundings, Neil Kelly’s design/build remodeling team unlocked the

floor plan and entertainment potential of this Oregon Coast kitchen to deliver unobstructed views,

abundant seating and serving space, and an elegant bar for the resident mixologist. Now, the beauty

of the space is rivaled only by the view it commands. No matter what’s outside your window —

beach or mountains, desert or downtown — talk to us. We can give your home a whole new outlook.

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CONTRIBUTORS

KIMBERLY BOWKER

Writer

Trip Planner

Traveling along the contours

of the Oregon coast was

a surprising journey filled

with regional character. Each

lighthouse served the same

function but highlighted

something different when I

arrived—there was the fairytale

lighthouse, the cute short one,

the one high on bluffs and the

one touched by waves. I was

excited to approach every light,

never exactly sure what to

expect—each offered a different

lens to the sea.

(p. 106)

JEN STEVENSON

Writer

Gastronomy/Dining

As winter hits its cold, dark

stride, I love avoiding cabin

fever in one of my favorite

neighborhood restaurants,

where good conversation,

warming cocktails and big bowls

of hot ramen or rich ragu help

take the chill off. Rain or shine,

we food lovers have it so good

here in Oregon, and exciting new

places to eat and drink just won’t

stop opening. Luckily, it’s my job

to keep up with them!

(p. 32)

SHAUNA INTELISANO

Photographer

Cover/Feature 2

It was such an honor to

photograph Gert Boyle, as

I’ve been a fan of Columbia

since I was a kid. Gert truly

embodies the heart and soul

of Columbia. It’s captivating to

listen to her talk about her story

and philosophies on life and

business, and she has a great

sense of humor, too. My favorite

quote of the day from Gert is

when she revealed this insider

tip about her success: “Early to

bed, early to rise, work like hell

and advertise!”

(p. 80)

BRADLEY LANPHEAR

Photographer

Farm to Table

Pachamama Farm was like a window into the past. Michael has

created something truly special, with old-world style practices and

a philosophy of “as little intrusion into the animal’s life as possible.”

It’s refreshing to see livestock animals raised in such a natural and

healthy environment. Not only do they live happy lives, but they have

also played a major role in keeping the land itself healthy.

(p. 36)

10 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


OUR IDEAS STAND

ON THEIR OWN

Building a robot that can stand and walk on two

legs is hard. So hard that few have even tried. But

faculty and students in Oregon State’s top-5-inthe-nation

robotics program have figured it out —

creating robots that are much more capable. Now,

OSU spinoff company, Agility Robotics, is working

on robots that can do everything from package

delivery to search-and-rescue missions.

At Oregon State, we push ourselves to the

very edge of what’s known — and keep going

OUT THERE.

Oregon State University has transformed the

state, nation and world over the last 150 years.

Visit the Oregon Historical Society Museum’s

exhibit, Oregon State University: A Legacy of

Transformation, Feb. 9 to Sept. 9 in Portland.

OSU150.org


EDITOR

MANAGING EDITOR

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

DESIGN

MARKETING + DIGITAL MANAGER

WEBMASTER

OFFICE MANAGER

DIRECTOR OF SALES

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

HOME GROWN CHEF

BEERLANDIA COLUMNIST

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Kevin Max

Sheila G. Miller

Brooke Miracle

Allison Bye

Kelly Rogers

Isaac Peterson

Cindy Miskowiec

Jenny Kamprath

Cindy Guthrie

Jenn Redd

Jill Weisensee

Thor Erickson

Jeremy Storton

Kim Bowker, Susannah Bradley, Melissa Dalton, Sophia McDonald,

Brittany Norton, Sydney Padget, Ben Salmon, Sam Smargiassi,

Jen Stevenson, Mackenzie Wilson

Emily Green, Kjersten Hellis, Shauna Intelisano, Bradley Lanphear,

Peter Mahar, Brittany Norton, Jenn Redd, Sam Smargiassi

Statehood Media

Mailing Address:

Portland Address:

70 SW Century Dr. 1801 NW Upshur St.

Suite 100-218 Suite 100

Bend, Oregon 97702 Portland, Oregon 97209

1859magazine.com/subscribe

@1859oregon

Printed in Canada

All rights reserved. No part of this publiCation may be reproduCed or transmitted in any form or by any means, eleCtroniCally or meChaniCally, inCluding

photoCopy, reCording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the express written permission of Statehood Media. ArtiCles and photographs

appearing in 1859 Oregon’s Magazine may not be reproduCed in whole or in part without the express written Consent of the publisher. 1859 Oregon’s Magazine

and Statehood Media are not responsible for the return of unsoliCited materials. The views and opinions expressed in these artiCles are not neCessarily

those of 1859 Oregon’s Magazine, Statehood Media or its employees, staff or management.

12 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


You’re Home

Once you become a Southern Oregon University Raider, you’re home.

Our supportive campus environment and fierce commitment to inclusion and

diversity provide limitless opportunities for you to reach your fullest potential.

We offer 36 majors, exceptional faculty with the highest degrees in their fields,

a beautiful, vibrant campus, and easy access to an array of natural wonders.

There’s something for everyone at Southern Oregon University.

Call us and arrange a campus tour today.

SOU.EDU | 855-470-3377


FROM THE

EDITOR

A 46-YEAR-OLD Gert Boyle took over the

ailing Columbia Sportswear in 1970 after her

husband died. A lot was on her plate. “When

my husband died and they put me in charge, I

didn’t really know anything,” said the 93-yearold

Tough Mother in an interview. “What

the hell, you know, you gotta do what you

gotta do.” Over the next decades, Gert and

her son, Tim Boyle, would build a sportswear

empire around extremely cold and extremely

wet conditions. The company’s signature

products were parkas with Gore-Tex and

the Bugaboo’s zip-off layers, “tested tough”

through iconic television commercials shot

on mountaintops and in car washes. For

many years, though, this is where the brand

languished, not quite keeping step with time.

Today, Columbia is on a tear. It is designing

cutting-edge products, transforming itself

into a sportswear tech incubator, diversifying

its seasonal revenue, putting footwear

at the fore, connecting with a younger

demographic and impressing Wall Street—

all with the national treasure of Gert Boyle

as chairman of the board. Turn to page 80 to

read about Columbia’s comeback.

We also look at folk singer Woody

Guthrie’s defining moment for his career and

for Oregon, which he recalls, “Thumbing it.

Hitching it. Walking and talking it. Chalking

it. Marking it. Sighting it and hearing it.” The

missing pieces from the story of the musical

icon, whose ballads are as alive and relevant

as they were during The Great Depression,

come together in a fascinating update on

page 56.

There is a place where romance and

nostalgia come together in a stunning

portfolio. The Oregon Coast is home to

nine lighthouses from the nineteenth

century that are architecturally diverse

and open to the public. From Cape Blanco

north to Cape Meares, we lay out our Trip

Planner for a great rainy-weather weekend

outing along a string of beautiful and

historic lighthouses. See Trip Planner on

page 106.

Hop on over to Ketchum, Idaho, for a

visit to the iconic winter playground of

Hollywood’s Golden Era. Two of Ketchum’s

most notable denizens fought on different

ideological battlefields in two World

Wars—Ernest Hemingway, who served

in the armed forces fighting fascism, and

Count Felix Schaffgotsch, an Austrian who

took up with Hitler after developing Sun

Valley. In this Northwest Destination, we

look into the old, the new and summer’s

hidden secret of the Ketchum area. Turn

to page 112.

Don’t wait for Valentine’s Day to make

your big plans this year. Check out our top

five picks for Romantic Getaways in 2018

and find one that’s perfect for you and your

partner. Across the state and into the arms

of cozy, these are some intriguing settings

from fireplaces and Finnish saunas to

glamping on the Columbia River.

Let’s not forget that January is a time

for broken resolutions. Look no further

than the pork belly BLT (page 40) from

Steamboat Inn in our Recipes. Check our

expanded local recipes at 1859magazine.

com to find more regional dishes. Happy

New Year!

14 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


WE’RE #1 BECAUSE

THEY’RE #1

OREGON’S TOP RANKED CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL.

Kids deserve our best — every day. So Doernbecher brings together more children’s

specialists than anywhere else in the region. That’s made us the only children’s

hospital in Oregon to earn specialty rankings among the best in the country.


1859 ONLINE

More ways to connect with your favorite Oregon content

1859magazine.com | #1859oregon | @1859oregon

DIGITAL EXCLUSIVE

At Pachamama Farm, raising happy animals is key. Find out

more in our exclusive online video.

1859oregonmagazine.com/pachamamafarm

VIDEO

Need some baking

inspiration? Check out

our online video and

get an inside look at

the creative process at

Foxtail Bakeshop

in Bend.

1859oregonmagazine.

com/foxtailbakeshop

have a photo that shows off your

oregon experience?

Share it with us by filling out the Oregon Postcard

form on our website. If chosen, you’ll win custom

1859 gear and a chance to be published here.

1859oregonmagazine.com/postcard

photo by Caleb Wallace

Abiqua Falls, Oregon

Emily Green

Bradley Lanphear

16 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


NOTEBOOK 20

FOOD + DRINK 28

FARM TO TABLE 36

HOME + DESIGN 44

MIND + BODY 54

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE 56

pg. 36

Pachamama pigs are wild and free.

Bradley Lanphear


At Oregon Oncology Specialists, we provide advanced, compassionate

cancer care in the Willamette Valley, with highly trained physicians and

staff committed to your needs. In every way, our focus is on you.

Salem | McMinnville | Silverton | Woodburn

(503) 561-6444 | OregonOncologySpecialists.com

how to catch your

dinner in seaside

It’s easy, and there are lots of ways to do it.

First, rent your gear at Trucke’s on Highway 101.

You can razor clam at low tide.

You can fish right off the 12th Avenue bridge.

You can even throw a crab ring in the river at 12th.

Just toss it in, go have fun, then check back later.

Still empty handed? There’s no shame in buying your fresh

catch from Bell Buoy seafood. We won’t tell if you don’t.

seasideOR.com


notebook

Tidbits + To-dos

Beth Van Hoesen

Kingdom Animalia

Visit the Portland Art Museum now through May

to view its Kingdom Animalia exhibit, featuring

art through animals from Dürer to Picasso. The

exhibit offers a depiction of the animal kingdom

over the past 500 years through print, drawing

and posters.

portlandartmuseum.org

Beer Bouquet

Looking for something cool and different

for your Valentine? The beer bouquet is

a great idea for all of the beer lovers in

your life. Recipients receive six seasonal

brews with a snack and choice of glass

centerpiece. You can also sign up for a

year-long subscription.

bouquetofbeer.com

Bourbon and Bacon Fest

OMSI After Dark hosts its second annual

Bourbon and Bacon Fest on January 14 for

one night only. Sip your way through some of

the best bourbon the region has to offer from

distillers large and small. There is no shortage

of bacon tasting, too, from hors d’oeuvres to

main dishes, all with bacon as the star.

portland.bourbonandbaconfest.com

20 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


A NEW YEAR...

A New Place to Call Home.

NOW IS THE PERFECT TIME to make

a move to Mountain Meadows 55+

Community—owned, operated and governed

by the residents themselves.

Pillow Talk

Maloy's offers a fabulous selection of antique and

estate jewelry and fine custom jewelry, as well as

repair and restoration services. We also buy.

Eat.

Drink.

Be dazzled.

Fabulous cuisine,

history, heritage, and

romantic vistas.

See Albany

Discover Oregon

Tel: 541-928-0911

www.albanyvisitors.com

110 3rd Ave SE

Albany, OR 97321

857 Mountain Meadows Drive, Ashland, Oregon 97520

(800) 337-1301, www.mtmeadows.com

Voted America’s Best by National Council on Senior’s Housing.


notebook

Portland Pet Food Company

The Portland Pet Food Company believes you should feed

your dog like you feed yourself—with quality ingredients. With

dog biscuits and meals cooked from scratch, you can be sure

your pooch is getting the best possible nutrition. Bonus—100

percent of the dog food is sourced and made in the

United States.

portlandpetfoodcompany.com

Farmhouse Candle Shop

The Farmhouse Candle Shop in Redmond

began with one goal in mind—to create

chemical-free candles. These soy wax candles

are infused with essential oils and made with

100 percent U.S.-grown soy wax, which is

renewable and biodegradable. A variety of

scents are available in the online shop, plus

they come in a neat little mason jar.

farmhousecandleshop.com

Salem Winter Brewfest

Featuring more than a hundred craft beers and ciders

along with an impressive food and music lineup, this

winter event brings together all the things that make the

Willamette Valley and Salem such a great place.

February 1-4

salemwinterbrewfest.com

22 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Nonstop

EUG to PHX


notebook

Musician

More Grit, More Glory

Astoria’s Holiday Friends

go melancholy

written by Ben Salmon

SINCE 2008, the Astoria band Holiday Friends

has specialized in exuberant pop-rock music,

stuffing songs with vibrant synths, driving

rhythms and earworm melodies. That’s still

true on the band’s new album, Night Terrors.

But this time, the songs have a harder edge,

with more noise and melancholy in the mix.

Singer/guitarist Scott Fagerland

said Astoria’s persistently overcast

skies may play a part in that tonal

shift. But there’s more to it than

just the weather.

“By the time we were finished

writing Night Terrors, we were

mostly in our late 20s, and with that

simply came more life experience,

particularly real challenges and

hurdles … in our day-to-day

lives,” he said. “As a writer for the

majority of the lyrics, I wanted to

be transparent with my struggles.”

Translation: The members of

Holiday Friends aren’t getting any

younger, and the dream they once

had of making it big has given way

to a more realistic view of success.

“We’ve learned how difficult

(breaking through) can be,”

Fagerland said, “but we’ve never

given up on the idea of reaching a

much wider audience.”

Having self-recorded Night

Terrors in its own new studio,

Holiday Friends is better equipped

to reach more people than ever

before. If it takes adding a bit of grit

and gloom to the band’s pop sheen

to do so, all the better.

“I like songs with some weight to

them,” Fagerland said. “I find that I

can listen to them more.”

Austin White

Listen on Spotify

Holiday Friends, based

in Astoria, has been

making music together

since 2008.

24 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


BEND A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

February 9 7:30pm

A Rock Band Of Voices!

Sing-Off

February 10 7:30pm

14 Groups – 2 Divisions

Emcee Deke Sharon

“Father of Modern A Cappella”

TICKETS & INFO

541-317-0700

TowerTheatre.org

@bendacappella


notebook

Bibliophile

First Time’s a Charm

Portland author’s debut novel wins state award

interview by Sheila G. Miller

JOYCE CHERRY CRESSWELL is proof that sometimes a story just

has to be told. After years of hearing family lore about her greatgrandmother’s

time as a doctor in the Civil War, she set out to

research and write a historical fiction version of the woman’s life.

The book, A Great Length of Time, earned the Oregon Book

Award’s Ken Kesey Award for Fiction in September, quite a feat

for a debut novel that she self-published.

Cresswell retired seven years ago after time working at a

nonprofit, as a stay-at-home mom, and as an attorney. When

she retired, it was time to start writing. “I always sort of dared

myself to write and I’d never gotten around to doing it,” she said.

“I decided once I’d retired, there were no more excuses.” Her love

for history, and historical fiction especially, led her to look at the

family story and “start poking around.”

Your book is fiction, but it springs

from at least a kernel of truth?

My mother’s mother was an orphan,

and in 1906 she was adopted out of an

orphanage by two women in Oakland,

California. One of those two women

had been a doctor in the Civil War. It’s

her story I’m telling. I don’t know a lot

about her actual experiences, but she

was relatively well-known—there were

several biographies written about her

but they’re very formal, there’s not

much to tell about her personal life so

it’s hard to know exactly what occurred.

So the basic character of the book is the

same. After that, it’s my imagination.

It may be your imagination, but you

clearly did a lot of research.

The research was just a blast. With the

internet, you can really find anything.

You want to know what the weather

was on June 11, 1864, and you can read

the newspaper reports on the actual

rainstorm while sitting in your kitchen.

Google is digitizing documents, and

they’re currently working through a lot

of old documents and old newspapers

and old books, so you can download

anything you need from that era. I

have the obstetrics textbook that my

great-grandmother was taught with in

medical school. I knew I had to have an

amputation scene in my book, so I have

downloaded from the internet the actual

Army surgical field guides used by both

the North and the Confederates. The

actual manuals. It’s just fabulous—you

can get anything!

Why did you decide to self-publish

the book?

I looked for a publisher for about six

months—not really hard, but pretty

rigorously—and my research was

telling me that publishers are looking

for someone who has a lot of books in

them, who will have four or five really

good books in a lifetime. I knew I didn’t

have that in me—I was already past 60

and I didn’t know if I was going to be

attractive to agents. At the same time,

my elderly mother really wanted a copy

and I really wanted to put a copy in her

hands. I found a

company called

Indigo—they’re

these really cool,

young people who

have graduated

from Portland State University’s

master’s program in publishing and

created a consulting company. You buy

services on an al a carte basis. They were

really fabulous for this intermediary

role for someone who wanted a good,

professional product. If I thought I was

going to spend my career as a fiction

writer or as a nonfiction writer, I probably

would still try to go the traditional route.

But there are really good writers out

there who have turned to self-publishing.

Are you writing anything new?

I would like to do another book. I’m in the

process—I have an outline in the back of

my head. It would be historical fiction

about a family during the Depression. I

think about it and chew on it and I read

stuff about the Depression, but I’m

taking my time.

26 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Uncork the good life.

Sunny southern Oregon provides endless cultural opportunities year-round.

When you choose Rogue Valley Manor’s unparalleled retirement lifestyle,

you can enjoy the region’s wonders every day. Go Rogue in Retirement.

541-857-7214

retirement.org/rvm

Rogue Valley Manor is a Pacific Retirement Services community and an equal housing opportunity.


food + drink

CLOCKWISE, FROM LEFT Hand-painted and tiled pieces are found throughout the Worthy Brewing campus. This inlay is found on wood reclaimed from what was

originally the Oregon Insane Asylum, where the movie One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest was filmed. A galactic mosaic runs through the brewery. Hops are grown on site.

Visitors can observe the night sky from Worthy’s “hopservatory.”

Beerlandia

Disneyland for Beer Drinkers

written by Jeremy Storton

“I WANT TO BUY up all that wood. One day I’m going to use

that wood. That’s Cuckoo wood,” said Roger Worthington, who

defines himself as the Bull Goose Looney at Bend’s Worthy

Brewing, as he sat across from me and my Strata IPA. He is a

disciple of poet-warrior and Oregon author Ken Kesey, who

wrote One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.

Worthy Brewing is now adorned with wood from what was

originally called the Oregon Insane Asylum, where the movie

was filmed. Worthington, a lawyer and hop developer, then

explained how a conversation with fellow lawyer and beer icon

Jim Koch, of The Boston Beer Company, led him to the brewery

biz. Worthington was expounding on new hops and new flavors

for beer drinkers when Koch asked, “Don’t you want to be there

to see their faces light up?”

Every brewery has its schtick—Northwest IPAs, German

lagers, Belgian ales, macro, nano, you name it. Defining Worthy’s

schtick is a bigger challenge. Mix equal parts state ambassador,

Cuckoo’s Nest museum, garden education center, environmental

hub, galactic observatory, center for art and science as well as

brewery and pub—now you’re getting warmer. Worthington

simply calls it, “Beertopia.”

Worthington, who “always envisioned building a mini-campus

where, in one place, you can combine art and science,” blends

creativity and execution and surrounds himself with like-minded

folks. “This around you, right here,” he continued, “speaking

from the Hop Mahal at Worthy Brewing, a little place we call

Beertopia, is a result of a lot of dreaming and a lot of doing.”

“Around here,” he waved his hand as if to display all that

Worthy stands for, “we’re firm believers in drinking up and

dreaming on.”

28 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


finest wines

EXPERIENCE SOME

OF OREGON’S

1859wineclub.com/join-the-club

Join 1859 Wine Club and sample winemakers from across

the state, or gift a membership to family and friends!


food + drink

Recipe Card

recipe courtesy of Bull Run Distillery

Ceres’ Bounty

1½ ounces Bull Run Oregon Single Malt

¼ ounce Allspice Dram

1 ounce apple cardamom shrub (see recipe

below)

¾ ounce lemon juice

¼ ounce simple syrup

1 dropper Messina Cardamom bitters

Add all ingredients to a shaker tin with ice.

Shake and double strain onto a large ice cube

in double old-fashioned glass. Garnish with a

star anise pod.

FOR APPLE CARDAMOM SHRUB

5 pounds Akane apples (or other tart red

apple, such as Pink Lady)

5 cups granulated sugar

3 cups apple cider vinegar

3 tablespoons green cardamom pods

4 cinnamon sticks

Crush cardamom and cinnamon with a mortar

and pestle until just broken, add to vinegar and

let sit to infuse at least overnight and preferably

for three to four days. Strain and store in fridge

for up to three months.

Core and chop apples, add to a food

processor 1 to 2 cups at a time and process

until cubed. Add cubed apple pieces and sugar

to a large container and

allow to macerate

overnight. Strain

macerated fruit syrup

through a fine mesh

strainer into a new

container, pressing the

fruit to extract all juices.

Add cardamom vinegar

to apple syrup, stir well

and allow to rest for one

week for flavors to meld.

Darryl Joannides pours wine for customers at a dinner.

A Little Bit of Italy,

Here in Oregon

written by Carrie Wynkoop of Cellar 503

ASSAGIO—PORTLANDERS REMEMBER it as a cozy

neighborhood trattoria with a fantastic wine list. And no

wonder, given the commitment to great wine that owner-chef

Darryl Joannides brought to the task. His love of Italian food

was matched only by his love of Italian wine.

Fast forward a few years, and after putting Assagio in the

rearview mirror, Joannides dedicated himself to wine. He

interned at a Sonoma winery, and later, with celebrated Oregon

winemaker Andrew Rich at the birth of the Carlton Winemakers

Studio. After discovering the great diversity of Oregon wine, he

opened the Cork Bottle Shop in northeast Portland.

But the winemaking bug had bit, and Joannides combined

his two loves—Italy and Oregon. His latest venture, Viola

Wine Cellars, is about wine crafted in the Italian style using

Northwest ingredients.

Starting with just four varietals, Viola is now up to fifteen,

constantly experimenting to find the varietals that make great

Oregon “Italians.”

The 1859 Wine Club will feature Viola Wine Cellars’ Bianco

D’Allegre in its January shipment.

Join the 1859 Wine Club to explore more Oregon wines

at 1859magazine.com/wineclub

30 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Enjoy our classic Oregon wines &

breathtaking vineyard views

Please join us and learn about the

amazing story of our winery and

the Oregon wine industry as you

take in the sweeping views of the

vineyard. The setting is warm

and relaxing to enjoy our wines

and pair with seasonal dishes.

Wine Tasting | Daily Food Pairings Menu | Winery Tours | Wine Dinners

OPEN DAILY 11 AM - 6 PM

Brewing Adventurous Ales in Bend, OR since 2011

goodlifebrewing.com

WillametteValleyVineyards.com

8800 Enchanted Way SE · Turner, OR 503-588-9463 · info@wvv.com

Jim Bernau, Founder/Winegrower

Made For

Sharing

HOME, GARDEN & GIFT

5th & Olive • 541-342-6820

Monday-Saturday 10-6 • Sunday 10-5

downtoeartheugene.com

DTE 1859 Magazine Jan/Feb2018


food + drink

Kathryn Elsesser

John Valls

Gastronomy

Oregon Truffle Festival

written by Jen Stevenson

A HAUTE SPOT in the midst of the Pacific Northwest’s notoriously saturnine winter,

the Annual Oregon Truffle Festival returns this January and February, with two full

weekends of truffle foraging and feasting throughout the state. From January 25 through

28, Eugene will host the festivities, starting with the Joriad North American Truffle Dog

Championship’s war of the noses, followed by a truffle growers’ speaker series, Grand

Truffle Dinner, truffle macaroni and cheese “macdown” and fresh truffle marketplace

with cooking demonstrations and truffles for sale. On February 16, the merrymaking

moves north to the beautiful Yamhill Valley, as Willamette Valley Vineyards and chef

Ken Forkish (Ken’s Artisan Bakery, Trifecta) kick off the weekend with a wine and truffleredolent

reception for the film, James Beard: America’s First Foodie. Afterward, savor a

full schedule of truffle dinners, truffle hunts, winery luncheons, a four-course dinner at

Domaine Serene winery with renowned Portland chefs Vitaly Paley and Cathy Whims,

and the Newberg Fresh Truffle Marketplace, where guests sample regional wines and

artisan foods, as well as fresh Oregon truffles, of course. Tickets are available for sale at

oregontrufflefestival.org, and a portion of the festival proceeds will be donated to the

Food for Lane County food bank in Eugene.

oregontrufflefestival.org

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT A truffle forager holds up a find. Truffle dog Stella sniffs

out a truffle. Chef Sunny Jin of The Allison Inn & Spa prepares for the Black &

White Dinner Series in 2016. Diners enjoy a winery luncheon at Lady Hill in St. Paul.

32 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


WEEKEND WANDERINGS:

NORTH COAST

food + drink

John Valls

Kathryn Elsesser

Ghostly shipwrecks, iconic movie settings, some

of the state’s richest history, and crispy beerbattered

and fried Pacific Ocean albacore—

Oregon’s North Coast is a true treasure chest of

must-sees and must-eats.

EN ROUTE

It’s but a two-hour trek northwest to Astoria

from Portland, but to fuel your journey, stop

off in Hillsboro at Helvetia Tavern, a no-frills,

cash-only local landmark that specializes in beer,

burgers and bucolic surroundings. A half hour

up Highway 26, brake for a bit of boutique wine

sampling at Wines of Oregon, a tasting room

run by a collective of Oregon wineries hailing

from the Rogue Valley to the Columbia River

Gorge. And if you’ve never met a cinnamon

roll you didn’t fall head over heels for, take a

slight detour to Camp 18 Restaurant in Elsie,

a log-cabin-themed pit stop that advertises its

signature sweet as “huge and delicious.”

EAT + DRINK

Line up with the Astorians for fish ‘n chips

at charming boat-bound Bowpicker, give your

regards to the sea lions that lounge beneath a

glass panel in the floor before bellying up to the

bar at Buoy Beer, and make tough choices at

Frite & Scoop (get both the frites and scoops,

obviously), before working it all off with a brisk

stroll along the Astoria Riverwalk. Taste your

way through Pilot House Distilling’s lineup,

then sober up with oyster chowder poutine and

grass-fed beef burgers at cozy Albatross.

A day of sand castle building, kite-flying and

biking along the historic Seaside prom works

up an appetite, so make your way to Bell Buoy,

a no-nonsense fish market and restaurant

about a mile from downtown. Satisfy your

every seafood whim with some of the coast’s

best clam chowder and fresh Dungeness crab

served with slaw and cheesy bread; if the

weather’s cooperating, eat at the back deck bar

overlooking the Necanicum River. Back in town,

carefully sample the selection before making

your choice at Sea Star Gelato, where many of

the homemade gelatos and sorbets are crafted

with local fruit, then settle into a seat near the

fire pit with a pint of Seaside Brewing Co.’s

Sneaker Wave IPA.

The perennially popular coastal hamlet of

Cannon Beach charms with shingled cottages,

beachy boutiques, old-fashioned candy shops,

local seafood and local spirits. After linguini

and clams and line-caught halibut at Harding

Trading Company, taste award-winning rums

and short-lived seasonal spirits at Cannon

Beach Distillery, or make tough decisions at

new MacGregor’s Whiskey Bar in Manzanita,

which features more than 150 types of scotch,

whiskey, bourbon and rum.

Time stands still in rustic Rockaway Beach,

where locals and passersby alike pile into

Offshore Grill and Coffee House for seafood

omelets and homemade biscuits and sausage

gravy before exploring Nehalem Bay State Park.

After a morning of fishing and clamming in

Nehalem Bay, crack crab at the Jetty Fishery.

Or, enjoy bubbles and freshly shucked local

bivalves at new Source Oyster and Wine Bar

in Garibaldi.

In nearby Tillamook, join the happy herds

at wildly popular Tillamook Creamery for

a self-guided tour, plentiful cheese samples

and oversized scoops of Oregon marionberry

cheesecake ice cream piled high on chocolatedipped

cones. Just down the road, there’s a

little something for everyone at Blue Heron

Creamery—kids will make a beeline for the

petting zoo, while adults will veer toward the

wine bar. Gather picnic provisions from the deli

and head west, passing U-Pick oysters signs en

route to Cape Meares, which offers some of the

most dramatic coastal views in the state.

A haven for surfers, fishing enthusiasts and

beachcombers, Pacific City’s petite patch of

sand a half hour southwest of Tillamook is just

the spot for a relaxing weekend of surf and

suds—stop into friendly beachfront Pelican

Brewing Company for a taster tray and hearty

pub grub like the smoked oyster bruschetta and

Tsunami Stout bacon jam-slathered Backyard

BBQ burger. After a big breakfast at cheery The

Grateful Bread bakery and café, charter a dory,

book a surfing or SUP lesson, climb the famous

Cape Kiwanda dune, or just sit on your hotel

balcony and savor the sea views.

SLEEP WELL

Settle into your river-view room at the

Cannery Pier Hotel & Spa with a bottle of

Fort George Brewery’s barrel-aged imperial

stout and one of the front desk’s copies of

The Goonies, pausing occasionally to watch a

freight ship steam by. Watch the sunset from

your Haystack Rock-facing balcony at the cozy

Stephanie Inn, then head downstairs for a

complimentary port nightcap in the oceanfront

library. If you’ve always been intrigued by the tiny

house movement, try your hand at living light for

a night at Sheltered Nook in Bay City. And come

January, book a long weekend at the luxurious

Headlands Coastal Lodge & Spa, featuring a full

spa, “adventure coaches” in lieu of a traditional

concierge, and the beautifully designed beachfacing

Meridian Restaurant and Bar.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 33


food + drink

BEST PLACES FOR

SWEET SOMETHINGS

HITHER

If your Valentine is more impressed by fried dough than

diamonds, the homemade doughnuts at this charming new

Ashland café and coffeehouse will ensure a smooth start to the

holiday. Puffy, pale gold, stuffed with silken custard and dusted

with sugar, they’re a must-order. On the savory side, don’t

bypass the excellent crème fraîche biscuit sandwich or softscrambled

herbed eggs. After your meal, browse the shop’s

artisan larder, and buy a bundle of flowers to go. Doughnuts

and dahlias? Talk about brownie points.

376 E MAIN ST.

ASHLAND

hithermarket.com

KIOSKO

Love affairs with coffee are de rigueur in Portland, but the

waterfront’s newest caffeine klatsch is taking this romance to

a whole new level by slipping a trio of ahogados, a.k.a coffee

poured over ice cream, onto the menu. Impress a hot date

with the chipotle-spiked chocolate mole ice cream heaped with

cacao nibs and pepitas, dusted with crushed dried raspberries,

and served with a sweet, crunchy waffle chip and a shot of the

house espresso.

1816 SW RIVER DR.

PORTLAND

kiosko.coffee

DOUGH DOUGH BAKERY

Strolling the promenade with your sweetheart on a misty winter

morning is best done post-apple cinnamon scone, so start the

day strong at this bright and bustling Seaside bakery, where

the pastry case is full of surprise twists—moist, flaky chocolate

tahini rolls, chai tea-infused pumpkin scones, and thick slabs of

currant and pecan-studded butternut squash bread.

8 N HOLLADAY

SEASIDE

facebook.com/doughdoughbakery

MAP CHOCOLATE CO.

Former river guide, pastry chef and law student Mackenzie

Rivers found her true calling in chocolate, and her beautiful new

line of small batch bars—infused with everything from toasted

black sesame and dried plums to cardamom and caraway

seed—can now be found in the state’s best specialty markets,

like Eugene’s 5th Street Market, and Portland’s Providore Fine

Foods, Little Nib and The Meadow. Or, treat your favorite cacao

buff to Rivers’ hands-on Bean to Bar 101 classes and weekendlong

Chocolate Camp, which includes instruction on craft

chocolate origins and sourcing, hands-on chocolate making,

and a signature In Pod We Trust T-shirt.

EUGENE

mapchocolate.com

Dining

Proud Mary

written by Jen Stevenson

AROUND THIS TIME of year, wintering in Australia starts to

sound tempting, especially the sun, surf and sparkling ale parts.

But if snowbirding Down Under isn’t in the cards, try the next best

thing: a leisurely brunch at the new Melbourne-born coffee roaster

and café that’s quickly captured the hearts of finicky Portland food

lovers. Although best known for its rigorously sourced and roasted

beans, Proud Mary is equally adept in the dining department, with

a vibrant seasonal menu of brunch dishes that taste as good as they

look, no small feat considering the kitchen’s eye for artistic detail.

The breakfast sashimi is an exquisite tangle of wild-caught Oregon

albacore, soft-boiled egg, heirloom carrot, fennel and fronds, the

mile-high avocado toast puts other versions to shame, and the

ricotta hotcake is an Instagram come to life—a pillow of vanillabean-flecked

cake topped with a soft dollop of lemon curd cream,

shards of meringue, cherry-syrup-macerated berries and edible

flower petals. Serious coffee drinkers would be remiss not to take

advantage of the flawless flat whites and cerebral espresso flights,

but those who eschew Portland’s favorite bean can be assured of an

excellent tea, juice and smoothie selection—whether you’re in the

mood for a Smooth Barney, or a Banana Hammock.

2012 NE ALBERTA ST.

PORTLAND

proudmarycoffee.com

Proud Mary’s Cauli-town, a vegan and gluten-free dish with

warm spiced cauliflower, chickpea dahl puree, sumac onions,

tahini, crispy chickpea and sesame granola.

34 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION:

BARRIO

charlie & katie are

WINEBYJOE.COM


farm to table

Farm to Table

Easy Living

Pachamama Farm takes

free-range to the next level

written by Sophia McDonald

photography by Bradley Lanphear

WHEN YOU FIRST step onto Michael Antoci’s pig farm in

Days Creek, it’s eerily quiet. Light shines through the stands of

fir trees, producing a heady scent of pine. A shaggy white dog

strolls around a cedar-shingled barn, but there are no other signs

of life.

Then a call rings out: “Sooey!” Nearly a hundred pigs come

racing out of the trees and into the barn. They thrust their heads

into troughs and scarf up the slop Antoci has mixed for them.

When it’s gone, he shakes a rattle and cries out again: “Hip hip

hip.” As fast as they appeared, the animals vanish into the trees.

This scene plays itself out twice a day. The rest of the time

the pigs are left to forage for roots and nuts or relax in “pig

palaces” built from pallets and other salvaged materials. This

easy living is very much by design. “Stress is a key indicator in

the pH and quality of the meat,” Antoci said. “The stress-free

environment from birth to harvest is one of the keys in creating a

holistic product.”

Raising happy animals that produce the best-quality

meat was Antoci’s goal when he left the restaurant

industry in California. Ready to leave the pollution

36 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


farm to table

FROM LEFT Zeus surveys the Pachamama Farm property.

The 110-acre farm is located in Days Creek. Pachamama’s

pigs are free to roam the forested property.

and overpopulation in his home state, he started looking just

across the Oregon border for farmland. In Jackson and Josephine

counties, marijuana growers were driving up the cost of land, so he

went north to Douglas County, which doesn’t allow pot growers.

That’s where he found the 110-acre plot that would become

Pachamama Farm.

Antoci planned to raise pigs, sheep, goats and turkeys. Pigs

became the focus when he found an optimal source for their slop:

Umpqua Dairy and Franz Bakery products nearing their expiration

dates. Every Saturday, he takes a truck to their warehouses and

picks up thousands of pounds of ice cream, milk, bread and other

nutrient-dense discards.

This system helps the producers shrink the amount of food

they send to local landfills. It also allows Antoci’s Berkshire,

Gloucestershire Old Spot, Red Wattle, Mangalica and other oldworld

hog breeds develop rich, marbled muscle that high-end

markets and restaurants clamor for. “These are the

original red meat pigs that were common before the

‘Other White Meat’ campaigns in the 1940s and ’50s came

in to try to save the pork industry,” he said. “Suddenly

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 37


farm to table

ABOVE Michael Antoci raises Berkshire, Gloucestershire Old Spot, Red Wattle, Mangalica

and other old-world hog breeds. Twice each day, Antoci calls the pigs in with a “Sooey!” shout.

people didn’t want lard pigs, they wanted pigs for

bacon and lean meat.” The pendulum has finally

swung back. “Now everyone wants fatty, Kobestyle

pork.”

In addition to reducing food waste and saving

heritage breeds, Antoci is fiercely committed to

protecting small family farms and fighting off the

ills of industrial agriculture. He’s helped a few

locals find markets for their pigs and is working

to put together a co-op so they can get a fair price

for their meat.

He sees these actions as the best way to protect

consumers against monocropping and other

problematic practices that exist even on some

organic farms. “Our food is no longer in our

hands,” he said. “Small farms are the only way

for America to keep genetic diversity within our

hands. Without that, if something were to happen

within the common breeds, we wouldn’t have

the genetic diversity to fight off a disease. That’s

what’s so important about small organic farms—

we are protecting the food system in many ways.”

Oregonians raise about 3,000 pigs every

year, putting the state thirty-fifth in total pork

production. One of the reasons the number is so

low is that Oregon lacks a major feed crop such as

corn or soybeans.

The other challenge facing those who do raise

pigs is the shortage of processing plants. “As we

see more of these little niche market producers

get into the business, the lack of USDAinspected

facilities really makes it difficult for

them to expand,” said Gene Pirelli, a professor at

Oregon State University’s Department of Animal

and Rangeland Sciences and an Extension

Service agent.

Should you be lucky enough to procure some

farm-raised Oregon pork, one option for cooking

it is to slow roast it into tender, saucy Kahlua

pork from Wild Pear Restaurant and Catering

in Salem. Co-owner Jessica Ritter serves it on a

cheddar-onion bun with ginger-lime slaw and

marionberry barbecue sauce.

For something simpler, grill pork belly for a

classic BLT. This recipe from Paul Naugle at the

Steamboat Inn in Idleyld Park starts with a coffee

cumin cure on the pork and ends with fresh

tomatoes, crisp lettuce and a lemon-spiked aioli

that add layers of texture and flavor.

VIDEO: See more from Pachamama Farm

at 1859oregonmagazine.com/pachamamafarm

38 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


farm to table

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Raising

happy animals is Antoci’s goal.

Antoci also raises goats, sheep and

other animals. Among other foods,

the pigs feast on leftovers from

Umpqua Dairy and Franz Bakery.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 39


farm to table

Oregon Recipes

Perfect Pork

Kahlua Pork

SALEM / Wild Pear Restaurant and Catering

Pork Belly BLT

IDLEYLD PARK / Steamboat Inn / Paul Naugle

SERVES 20

2 5-pound boneless pork shoulder roasts

⅓ cup kosher salt

¼ cup black pepper

¼ cup liquid smoke

2 large pieces of fresh ginger, thinly sliced lengthwise

¼ cup minced garlic

2 quarts water

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Butterfly each roast lengthwise

and stuff with the sliced ginger and minced garlic. Season with

half the salt and pepper.

Close each roast, fat side up, and place in a 4-inch-deep hotel

pan. Pour 2 quarts of water in the pan. Pour the liquid smoke

evenly over the pork. Season the pork with the remaining salt

and pepper.

Cover tightly with foil and bake for 12 hours. Let roast cool.

Remove ginger from inside of roasts. Place pork in a large bowl

and pull apart with 2 forks.

Strain cooking liquid and add back to pulled pork.

Balsamic Roasted Pork Tenderloin

CARLTON / Carlton Farms

SERVES 10

4 Carlton Farms pork tenderloins, trimmed (approximately

4½ pounds)

4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

8 cloves garlic, cracked

Carlton Farms Papa Jake’s seasoning* (or substitute steak

seasoning, salt and pepper)

4 sprigs fresh rosemary, stripped and chopped

4 sprigs fresh thyme, stripped and chopped

Preheat oven to 500 degrees.

Place tenderloins on a nonstick cookie sheet with a rim. Coat

tenderloins in a few tablespoons of balsamic vinegar, rubbing

vinegar into meat. Drizzle tenderloins with extra-virgin olive

oil, just enough to coat. Cut small slits into meat and disperse

chunks of cracked garlic cloves into meat. Combine Papa Jake’s

seasoning with rosemary and thyme and rub meat with blend.

Do not add extra salt.

Roast in hot oven for 20 minutes. Let meat rest, transfer to a

carving board, slice and serve.

*Papa Jake’s Seasoning is available at Carlton Farms retail store

or online at carltonfarms.com.

40 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

SERVES 4

FOR BELLY CURE

¼ cup sugar

¼ cup salt

(or enough to cover both sides of the belly)

FOR COFFEE-CUMIN RUB

3½ ounces fresh coffee, ground fine

1½ ounces whole cumin, ground fine, toasting optional

2 ounces brown sugar

¼ ounce pepper

½ ounce salt

FOR BLT

1 extra-large fresh farmers market tomato

4 pieces leaf lettuce

8 slices sourdough bread

FOR HERBED AIOLI

½ cup mayonnaise

Zest of 1 Meyer lemon

2 heirloom garlic cloves, minced

3 tablespoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped

1 tablespoon fresh flat leaf parsley, finely chopped

½ teaspoon sea salt

¼ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

Sift equal parts sugar and kosher salt together. Rub the entire belly with

the 50-50 mix, place in a roasting pan fat side up and refrigerate for 6 to

12 hours. Do not leave the belly in the dry brine for more than 24 hours.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Pull the pork belly from the fridge and

remove any liquid that has accumulated in the pan. Mix the coffee-cumin

rub together and press evenly across the top of the pork belly, covering

to the edge. Place the belly in the oven and cook for 1 hour. Turn the oven

temperature down to 250 degrees and cook for another 1 to 2 hours.

Pull the belly from the oven when it is tender, but not falling apart.

Transfer the belly to a cookie sheet or cutting board and place in the

fridge. Pour the fat and black pork “jelly” from the bottom of the roasting

pan into a clear bowl or wide-mouth jar. The jelly will congeal beneath the

fat and can be separated once the fat cools.

Slice the cooled belly in 1/2-inch to 1/4-inch “bacon” slices, 1 to 2 slices

per sandwich. Use the reserved fat to reheat slices of pork belly in a cast

iron pan on medium-high heat until perfectly browned on both sides.

Put bread in a toaster, or into an oven preheated to 450 degrees.

Toast lightly, until slices are barely browned and still soft. Whip the aioli

ingredients together in a small bowl using a fork or small whisk. Spread

the finished aioli across the toasted slices. Wash and de-stem the lettuce

and tomato. Slice tomato and salt both sides. Assemble the BLT, drizzling

a very small amount of pork jelly over each belly piece as a finishing touch.


farm to table

Home Grown Chef

Pork and Recreation

written by Thor Erickson

photography by Jenn Redd

WHEN I WAS 9 years old, my family of six relocated from a

small house in the big city to a big house in a small town in the

country. My father had a dream that we would become a selfsustaining

family commune—raising all our own meat and

vegetables, making our own macramé clothing, and on the cover

of the Whole Earth Catalog.

His first act was buying three steers, which he aptly named

Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner, in hopes that we would not see

them as pets but as our future meals. He would watch them as

they slowly chewed the alfalfa hay, and he would wax about the

great steaks, roasts and burgers that would soon be ours. In the

summer, we picked wild elderberries and with them made jam,

wine and vinegar. In the fall, we grew pumpkins and sold them

for Halloween jack-o-lanterns.

For my tenth birthday, my parents gave me two piglets. One

was brown, the other black. I named them Lenny and Squiggy

after my favorite characters in the show “Laverne & Shirley.” I had

no idea how to raise them. Along with the pigs, my dad gave me a

book, Raising Pigs Successfully, that told me everything I needed

to know—building an escape-proof pen (from which Lenny and

Squiggy escaped dozens of times), proper feeding (they ate a lot

of elderberries and pumpkins), and lastly, how to butcher pigs.

I was apprehensive to read this chapter. I fed, watered and had

daily talks with my two swine friends. Before I knew it, they had

both grown to about 200 pounds. It was not fair to these pigs to

force them to carry around more weight.

I read the chapter on pig slaughtering and butchery. Following

the instructions, I fed them a last meal of raw eggs (from our

chickens, of course) washed down with some of the first vintage

of elderberry wine, and did the deed. It was a few months

before I became detached (and hungry) enough to think about

consuming the meat from the pigs. When I finally bit into one of

the juicy pork chops, I could not believe how great it tasted. All

of the hard work and love I put into caring for these animals was

right there. I was sad that I had to share it with my sisters.

As I grew older and became a cook and then a chef, I took with

me the knowledge that if good food and care go into raising food,

that food will be good as well. This is especially important where

meat is concerned. I like to know how animals are raised before

I cook and eat them. Oregon is host to many wonderful heritage

pork producers. One farm I visit regularly is Piggyback Ranch.

Greg and Hilary Smith’s 54-acre biodynamic farm just outside

of Bend is home to heritage breed hogs such as Gloucestershire

Old Spot and English Large Blacks that are raised with the same

love and care that I used with Lenny and Squiggy. In addition to

pork, Piggyback also raises meat chickens and eggs. They do not,

however, have any plans to make macramé clothes.

42 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


farm to table

Apple Cider-Brined Braised Pork Chops

with Warm Apple Mustard Sauce

Thor Erickson

SERVES 8

2 cups cold water

1 cup Crystal Diamond kosher salt

1 cup packed light brown sugar

2 sprigs fresh thyme

1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns

1 teaspoon whole cloves

4 cups unfiltered apple cider

2 cups ice cubes

8 1-inch or thicker pork chops (thicker chops

increases cooking time)

In a large saucepan over medium-high heat, bring the

water, salt, sugar, thyme, peppercorns and cloves to

a boil. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring occasionally,

or until the sugar and salt dissolve. Remove from the

heat, add the apple cider and ice cubes, and stir well.

Put the meat in a nonreactive pan or extra-large

resealable bag and cover with the cooled brine. Cover

or tightly close the bag and refrigerate for 6 to 12

hours. If you are using a resealable bag, rotate the

pork a few times to make sure all of the meat is

brined. Before roasting, remove the pork and pat dry

with paper towels.

Grill over high heat until the pork is nicely browned,

about 4 minutes per side. Reduce the heat or move

the chops to a cooler part of the grill. Continue

cooking the chops until an instant-read thermometer

inserted in the thickest part of the chops registers

140 degrees for medium, about 10 minutes (a bit

longer for thicker chops). Let the chops rest for 5

minutes, then serve with the warm apple mustard

sauce.

FOR APPLE MUSTARD SAUCE (MAKES 2 QUARTS)

2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and sliced

1 shallot, finely diced

4 ounces Oregon riesling

1 tablespoon whole grain mustard

1 tablespoon butter

Sauté the apple slices and shallots in a tablespoon

of light oil over medium heat until shallots are

translucent. Add the riesling and mustard and reduce

the sauce by half. Don’t worry if the apples fall apart

a bit. Remove sauce from heat and swirl in the butter.

Adjust seasoning and serve with the pork chops.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 43


home + design

One of a Kind

A Portland interior designer helps

homeowners find their personal

style in a historic home

The Huigens' den features painted woodwork

and lotus-printed wallpaper to up the glamour.

David Papazian

written by Melissa Dalton

THE FAÇADE OF Betsy and Brent Huigens’

Portland Foursquare is as traditional as

it gets, with a gracious front porch and

stately oak front door. Inside, there’s a

striking den tucked beyond the living

room. In it, blue-black painted woodwork

frames walls clad in lush lotus-printed

wallpaper. Overhead, the bright coppertoned

tin ceiling shines in the sunlight,

while a snug red leather Chesterfield sofa

beckons passersby to sit. Not immediately

apparent? That the coffee table, a steamer

trunk, has been carefully selected not only

for looks, but because it’s wide enough

to hold a pizza box for family movie

nights. Such is the way the room captures

the Huigens’ approach to living in their

century-old home. The bones remain

traditional, but the décor serves up Great

Gatsby-era glamour combined

with modern function—perfect for

a busy young family.

44 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


LOVING

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home + design

David Papazian

Vicki Simon collected

one-of-a-kind furnishings

with soft lines to juxtapose

with the Foursquare architecture.

Betsy Huigens is trained as a civil engineer and has worked

on substantial infrastructure planning projects over the course

of her career. As such, precision and up-to-date technology are

essential to her professional

life. Yet it’s the reminders of

the past that she celebrates

in her home. “This was

built in 1910, so they didn’t

have the construction

sophistication that they

have today,” she said. She

points to the den’s elaborate

crown molding which,

upon closer inspection, is

not the same width from one end of the room to the other.

Huigens appreciates such quirks. “This room is the epitome of

not square,” she said. “I just think that’s so cool.”

It was this character that Huigens and her husband sought

to preserve when they bought the house in early 2016. While

previous homeowners had made changes to the interior,

including a kitchen remodel and painting the den’s woodwork

white, the Huigens weren’t interested in making further

alterations that might prove out-of-sync. Instead, they restored

all of the old wooden windows and retooled glitchy door

hardware. When it

came time to decorate,

“It’s the treasure hunt. That’s

what makes my job really fun.”

the couple needed an

interior designer who

could help them express

their personal style and

ensure functionality for

their family, while still

respecting the house’s

traditional shell. They

found a kindred spirit in

Vicki Simon, of Vicki Simon Interior Design.

The Huigens’ Foursquare sparked Simon’s imagination on her

very first walk-through. “There was a detail that really struck my

eye,” she said, pointing to the living room’s wooden

baseboard, which cascades up almost 2 feet high and

is crowned with a cap mold. “I was enamored. It just

spoke to me as being so lovely.” Such historic details

—Vicki Simon, on choosing furnishings

for Betsy and Brent Huigens’ home

46 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


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DESIGN

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INTERIOR DESIGN


home + design

David Papazian

David Papazian

FROM LEFT Simon redesigned the kitchen island and hung a custom-made brass pot rack. The powder bath's low ceiling was lifted and an antique table with a vessel sink gives the

small room more space.

inspire Simon’s method: that of pulling together a mix of furnishings,

treatments and accessories that can convey the homeowners’

individuality and still retain the prevailing architecture.

The process took ten months and generally didn’t involve

shopping from catalogs. “There was a lot of digging through

crates at antique stores and flea markets,” Huigens said. “Vicki

introduced me to the joy and appreciation of it.” Simon agrees.

“It’s the treasure hunt,” she said with a grin. “That’s what makes my

job really fun.” Finding one-of-a-kind items means finding unique

sources, whether a booth in a dusty antique mall or the studio of

a local maker. Take the antique map dealer that Simon discovered

in Portland. “It’s the kind of place you expect in New York City,”

Simon said. “His whole house is maps.” The Huigens spent hours

flipping through his wares in order to find pieces that resonated,

such as the 600-year-old map of the Pacific Ocean that’s now

framed in the living room. “[Maps] are an art form that we’ve

always enjoyed, but we also appreciate the science behind them,”

Huigens said.

For items they couldn’t locate, Simon had them custom-made,

such as the copper top on the kitchen table, a bespoke brass pot

rack and the carpet runner on the stairs. “It was very educational

for us,” Huigens said of working with Simon. “I don’t think I’ll ever

enter a furniture shop or an antique store the same way. I used to

hate it, but now it’s a pastime.”

Furnishings from different eras and styles were joined to create

just the right mix, which is Simon’s specialty. In the living room,

she combined a 1970 Italian Hollywood Regency style coffee table

with antique English Jacobean armchairs and a 1960s-era C. Jere

brutalist sculpture. In order to prevent visual chaos, Simon used

strategic contrast. “Everything is strict geometry here,” she said

of the Foursquare’s architecture. So she counteracted it with the

repeated use of soft, sinuous lines, such as in the scroll of a table

leg or the delicate swirl of the lotus wallpaper.

In the case of the kitchen and powder room, Simon needed to

make thoughtful tweaks to ensure the rooms functioned better

and still flowed with the rest of the house. In the kitchen, she

noticed that the scale of the island was off. “It was a very narrow

thing,” she said. “It looked really out of place.” She redesigned it for

a better fit, including an overhang for stool seating and an elegant

end-grain butcher block counter.

In the powder bath, a dropped ceiling crowded the small

window and a too-large vanity blocked the door. Simon raised

the ceiling height, specified new floor tile and redesigned the

woodwork. “I very deliberately mimicked the trim from the rest

of the house in this room,” she said, “so that you can imagine this

being original to the house.” Now, a petite antique table topped

with a vessel sink flatters the small footprint. Walls lacquered with

antiqued champagne gold leaf and a streamlined Art Déco-style

light fixture brings in the Huigens’ style.

Months after the last picture was hung, the couple is discovering

how well their new-old home suits their life, whether it’s catching

up at the end of the day over the new kitchen island or stealing

into the cozy den with a glass of wine. “I really respected and

appreciated the house itself and I wanted to do it right,” Huigens

said. “We looked at zero catalogs and zero retail stores. Everything

is one-of-a-kind. That’s exactly what we wanted.”

48 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


DREAM BIG

Bend,Oregon

In a never-ending effort to serve our clients

better, Vandenborn & Blossey has expanded its

team to include Breanne Brand, who will be an

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home + design

DIY: Mastering

a Personal Mix

THE FOLLOWING five tips offer ideas for crafting

a more personal décor scheme in your home.

1

2

INSTALL SOULFUL LIGHTING

When the Huigens first bought their house, it was outfitted

entirely with reproduction fixtures from a catalog. According

to Simon, lighting is the “jewelry of the house,” which makes it

an opportunity to introduce style and soul. She replaced those

fixtures with vintage pieces from different eras, such as the

1960s brass lotus chandelier, shown here, in the entry vestibule.

MAINTAIN CONSISTENCY THROUGH SUBTLE REPETITION

“Every piece of furniture you see has curves,” Simon said of

the Huigens’ mix. This is true, whether the piece is a 1940

Jansen dining chair with a curved back or a scroll on a 1920s

cigarette table. Additionally, when picking out hardware and

accessories, she and Huigens opted for brass accents to further

unify the space.

BALANCE PAINT WITH ARTFUL WALL FINISHES

In the living room, Simon had the walls painted a “complex

neutral” color to balance the wood tones of the original

woodwork, which were untouched by previous owners. In other

rooms, she suggested artful wall finishes. To that end, the

Portland-based workshop Bravura Finishes lacquered the entry

vestibule in a show-stopping red and applied a shimmering

antique champagne gold leaf to the powder room walls,

bringing in hand-wrought texture.

David Papazian

4

5

MERGE TIME PERIODS

Since Huigens loves Mid-century furniture, it might have been

tempting to outfit the entire home with a sea of Saarinen

tables and Hans Wegner chairs. But by combining pieces

from different time periods, Simon introduces contrast, which

fosters interest and helps the eye move easily around the room.

HANG MEANINGFUL ART AND DISPLAY FAVORITE

COLLECTIONS

Simon and Huigens made sure to choose art and accessories

that would resonate. In the powder room, a small print evokes

a memory of a trip Huigens took to France with her best friend.

In the den, an antique clock from a family collection, shown

here, has pride of place.

50 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


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home + design

Channel Great Gatsby Glamour

Simon sourced the San Pietro sconces over the

fireplace from San Francisco designer Jiun Ho. The

larger San Pietro pendant, shown here, has faceted

glass that lends a bit of opulence and will cast a warm

and sparkling glow to any room at night.

jiunho.com

The Britain-based paint and paper company Farrow &

Ball has a reputation for manufacturing paint colors and

wallpaper patterns that work well with historic properties.

All of the wallpapers, including the Lotus design in the

Huigens’ den, are fabricated using traditional blockand-trough

printing techniques, which gives the paper a

tactile quality perfect for creating cozy rooms.

us.farrow-ball.com

Conjure the everyday glamour of French cafés at

your kitchen counter with Rejuvenation’s Nicolle

Counter Stool, a factory-style stool first designed

in the 1930s and still produced in France today.

Made of powder-coated steel, it comes in a

variety of finishes, including a classic Parisian

red, and can be used indoors or out.

rejuvenation.com

52 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


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mind + body

Not So Par

for the Course

Debby King and Nancy Woodke

change the face of Eugene golf

written by Sheila G. Miller

photography by Kjersten Hellis

IT STARTED SIMPLY. In the wake of her husband’s death in

2008, Nancy Woodke decided it was time to get her golf game

back. The standout high school and college golfer called on

Debby King, who has been the general manager and head golf

pro at Laurelwood Golf Course in Eugene since 2008.

Since then, King and Woodke have started their own golf

school, competed in dozens of tournaments and done their part

to end golf’s boys club reputation.

The sport is not new to these women.

King started playing golf while at a swim practice at age 16—

not much interested in swimming, she saw a group hitting golf

balls, put a towel around herself and took her first golf swing in

a bathing suit.

“I knew that was what I wanted to do from day one,” she said.

‘I wanted to be a golf pro.”

She played in college, learned to teach the game from a

legendary golf instructor, and played on several mini-tours and

in a few LPGA tournaments before turning to coaching, first

at University of Memphis and then at the University of Notre

Dame (“The coldest place I’ve ever lived.”)

Woodke grew up in the area, and remains a kindergarten

teacher in the Eugene School District.

“I got addicted to golf because it was the hardest sport I’d

ever done. It became a passion almost instantly,” she said. “It

was something where I kept improving a little bit. … It’s given

me way more than I could ever give back.”

When, after raising a family and spending a couple decades

away from the links, she returned to the sport, it wasn’t easy.

“Golf isn’t like riding a bike. You can stop riding a bike for five

years and get right back on,” King said. “It was really hard for

her because she had played at such a high level. … To be able

to come back and get her LPGA teaching card was a big deal.”

After moving to Eugene in the mid-2000s to be near her

ailing parents, King discovered Laurelwood Golf Course and

networked her way into a job, eventually taking over as the

general manager and head golf pro.

“What she won’t tell you is, I grew up here, and Laurelwood

was like a daisy farm. It was one of the worst golf courses

around,” Woodke said. “And it was all guys. The only kids who

played there were high schools. Since Debby has been there,

we’ve started teaching women and couples and kids. It’s a huge

transformation from just the guys beer-drinking, to now a

family and kids place.”

For the first seven months King was at the course, she said,

she never saw another woman or children. Today there are

more than 200 kids taking lessons there.

“I was met with a little bit of reluctance from the men’s club,

but it didn’t take long,” King said. “All you have to do is beat

them at playing golf.”

But while they were already breaking ground as one of the

few clubs in the state with two female golf pros, the pair wasn’t

finished. They purchased a property adjacent to Laurelwood

and built Kingdom of Golf out of the home—complete with

a backyard putting green, bunkers and target greens. The duo

lives upstairs.

The golf school offers private lessons and group packages, in

which visitors from all over the country stay in the downstairs

area of the home, receive instruction, play courses and

sometimes even hit up a Ducks football game.

King still competes, usually in about a dozen tournaments

and pro-ams each year. “I want to keep my competitive edge,”

she said.

But that’s not the only way the duo keeps fit. They do CrossFit, a

competitive interval and strength-training program. Kingdom of

Golf’s downstairs includes a golf studio with workout equipment

designed to help students learn golf-specific CrossFit workouts.

“We do a lot of workouts that touch golf muscles,” King said.

“Golf is athletic. Tiger Woods changed that image.”

And at the end of the day, just golfing the hilly, nine-hole

Laurelwood course is a workout in itself.

“This is not just a little jaunt,” King said. “We call it cardio

golf. You are definitely breathing heavy.”

54 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


mind + body

Debby King

Age: 58

Born: Baltimore, Maryland

Residence: Eugene, Oregon

WORKOUT

Cross-Fit 3 times a week,

including golf specific exercises

and general conditioning.

NUTRITION

+Most anything gluten-free

+Creative smoothies

+Clean foods

+Mostly proteinv

INSPIRATION

Life is short; watching my family

members die of cancer right in

a row inspires me to be healthy,

enjoy life and find a fun way to

make a living.

Nancy Woodke

Age: 58

Born: Eugene, Oregon

Residence: Eugene, Oregon

WORKOUT

From the time I was 12 years

old fitness has been a part of

my daily routine: running, core

work, strength and flexibility.

It was part of what I did to

improve as a competitive

golfer; it was my sanity break

as a mom. A year ago I had

a health issue interrupt my

fitness lifestyle and I had

to take a break. I am just

now working back into light

workouts up to 5 days a week:

cardio (usually elliptical), light

weights, core work, stretching

and flexibility.

NUTRITION

I eat a balanced diet with

emphasis on maintaining a

steady level of energy.

+Lots of protein, veggies, fruit

and healthy fats

+Nuts fruit and veggies as

snacks

+Occational dark chocolate,

otherwise no candy and no

chips.

+Gluten-free and very little

processed food

INSPIRATION

An intense desire to be my

best “right now.” It looks

different from day to day,

year to year, even moment

to moment, but a focus on

doing my best and instilling

that in my students is my

driving force.

CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP Debby King and

Nancy Woodke are two of the few female

golf pros in Oregon. They teach golf lessons

to golfers of all ages. The pair’s Kingdom of

Golf offers private and group lessons. King’s

work at Laurelwood Golf Course has made

it more inviting.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 55


artist in residence

Woody Guthrie’s

Masterpiece

For one wild month, Woody Guthrie

was paid to write songs about the

Pacific Northwest

written by Isaac Peterson

The Grand Coulee Dam as Guthrie saw it in 1941.

BIOGRAPHIES OF WOODY GUTHRIE

sometimes include the footnote that he visited

Oregon for a month in the spring of 1941 and wrote

a few songs about the Pacific Northwest during his

brief stay, notably “Roll on, Columbia.”

New research by Bonneville Power Administration

Library & Visitor Center archivist Libby Burke

and 26 Songs in 30 Days, a book by Greg Vandy,

reveal Guthrie’s month-long sojourn in the Pacific

Northwest was more than just a footnote to his

art and legacy. It may have been the folksinger’s

defining moment.

The story begins sometime in the early ’80s when

Bill Murlin was reviewing an old 16mm film in the

Bonneville Power Administration’s media office in

Portland. The film, called “The Columbia,” had been

completed by the BPA in 1948 to communicate the

benefits of hydroelectric power. It was unusual for

a government informational reel. Director Stephen

Kahn’s luminous black and white photography, set to

a sweeping score of orchestral music and folk songs,

revealed the Columbia River as the living heart of

the Pacific Northwest. Murlin knew he had found

the centerpiece for the anniversary celebration.

When the credits began to roll, Murlin had

a moment of revelation that must have been

akin to discovering a Renaissance masterpiece

at a garage sale: Woody Guthrie was credited

as the songwriter. Murlin was an accomplished

folksinger in his own right, and his curiosity was

piqued. He knew federal processes would have

required Guthrie to work as a salaried employee

in order to join the project. Had Guthrie worked

for the federal government under the auspices of

the Bonneville Power Administration? If so, what

were his job responsibilities? The songs used in

the film were well-known and included “Roll on,

Columbia,” but Murlin guessed that learning the

details of Guthrie’s work on the film might reveal

new songs no one had heard. Guthrie was

an incredibly prolific songwriter, creating

more than 1,400 songs in his lifetime.

56 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


artist in residence

“The Pacific Northwest is one of my favorite spots in this world, and I’m one walker that’s stood

way up and looked way down acrost aplenty of pretty sights in all their veiled and nakedest seasons.

Thumbing it. Hitching it. Walking and talking it. Chalking it. Marking it. Sighting it and hearing it.

Seeing and feeling and breathing and smelling it in, sucking it down me, rubbing it in all the pores of

my skin, and the winds between my eyes knocking honey in my comb.

The Pacific Northwest has got mineral mountains. It’s got chemical deserts. It’s got rough run canyons.

It’s got sawblade snowcaps. It’s got ridges of nine kinds of brown, hills out of six colors of green, ridges

five shades of shadows, and stickers the eight tones of hell.

I pulled my shoes on and walked out of every one of these Pacific Northwest Mountain towns drawing

pictures in my mind and listening to poems and songs and words faster to come and dance in my ears

than I could ever get them wrote down ...”

—Woody Guthrie

Bonneville Power Administration

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 57


artist in residence

Bonneville Power Administration

FROM LEFT Woody Guthrie in 1943, a couple years after

leaving Oregon and just before his service in World War II. The original form for

Guthrie’s emergency appointment as information consultant. It shows his yearly salary,

$3,200, of which he received one month’s pay during the duration of the appointment.

Murlin called the U.S. Office of Personnel Management

and learned Guthrie had indeed been a salaried employee

and what’s more, the office had his employment records—in

a cardboard box trundling down a conveyor belt to the inhouse

industrial shredder. Should they pull them from the line

if they hadn’t yet been destroyed?

Guthrie’s federal employment documents, rescued by

Murlin from the shredder, tell a strange story. In early

1941, Stephen Kahn was a BPA filmmaker who wanted a

relatively unknown folksinger, Woodrow Wilson Guthrie, to

write music for his new informational film on the benefits

of hydroelectric power that had been commissioned by

the government. Working from his Portland office, Kahn

carefully navigated the labyrinth of budget requisitions and

federal approvals he would need in order to get a salaried

line-item for a songwriter.

By April 1941, Guthrie was nearly destitute. He had

abruptly left his job at a radio station in New York, refusing

on principle to sing what the advertisers wanted, and had

dragged his young wife and three children across the country

to L.A. Desperate and running out of money, he decided to

deliver documents to Kahn in person at the BPA offices.

“He just showed up at the door of the BPA in Portland,

looking for the job he’d heard about,” archivist Libby Burke

said. “He was living in extreme poverty with his family, and just

the possibility of a job was better than their life in California.”

Kahn took Guthrie into the office and set up an emergency

appointment for the folk singer. The emergency appointment

process was a way of mobilizing extra resources in times of

natural disaster; Kahn had used it to employ a destitute musician

from Oklahoma. Guthrie’s term as “information consultant” was

thirty days. Guthrie was required to account for his hours every

day, so he decided to simply write one song a day, returning to

the Portland office every evening to type up the lyrics

on a typewriter and dutifully perform the music for a

wax-cylinder recording device.

58 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


artist in residence

He was supplied a car and a chauffeur and every day drove

along the path of the Columbia, looking out at the countryside,

the Grand Coulee Dam and the Bonneville Dam, talking with

rural farmers whose economic outlook had radically improved

because of hydroelectric power, drawing and writing songs. In

the afternoon, he’d work out his compositions on guitar and

then return to the office to record and transcribe them.

Kahn’s emergency intervention had given the tumbleweed

troubador a brief respite from his troubles, and provided

a modicum of stability for the Guthrie family in the little

apartment they had rented on Portland’s Southeast 92nd Street.

In Guthrie’s stormy life it was a month of calm and security.

The verdant land surrounding the Columbia in the gentle

warmth of spring seemed like Eden, and during this time he

wrote a song that many view as his masterpiece: “Pastures of

Plenty,” about poor migrant farm workers leaving Oklahoma to

look for work picking fruit in the Pacific Northwest.

It’s clearly drawn from Grapes of Wrath, a book Guthrie read

for the first time in Portland (Kahn had given it to him), but

the fact that he wrote it while tromping around Oregon in the

springtime reveals the masterpiece in a new light.

He’s using what he learned from his time with the migrant

workers in California,” Burke said. “In the song ‘Pastures of

Plenty,’ he’s also singing about the Pacific Northwest. He’s

singing about the part of the country that we live in. The

pastures of plenty are real, and the hope in that song springs

out of the hardships that working people endured, that brought

them here for a chance at a better life.”

Guthrie left Portland three days early thanks to vacation

days he’d earned as “information consultant.” He picked up

his check and hit the road—without his wife and family—and

his first marriage had disintegrated by the time he hitchhiked

back to New York. Back in New York he joined the Almanac

Singers, then served as a Merchant Marine in World War II.

In the ’50s he was diagnosed with Huntington’s Disease, a fatal

genetic brain disorder that left him without the ability to speak

for fifteen years before his death in 1967.

Years later, when Murlin found a letter from Guthrie noting

he had written twenty-six songs for the government, he set

out to find them. An article on Murlin’s discovery sparked a

nationwide search for the missing songs, which would become

known collectively as the Columbia River Songbook. Guthrie’s

original wax cylinders he’d recorded at the Portland office

were long gone, but every day Murlin unwrapped packages

sent to him from dusty New York attics, forgotten studio

archives, and the storage spaces of Guthrie’s friends and

relatives. Gradually Murlin found all the songs. The BPA, in

collaboration with The Smithsonian and The Woody Guthrie

Center in Oklahoma, released the Columbia River Collection

in 1988 with an accompanying book of music called the

Columbia River Songbook.

In 2017, Murlin released a new edition of the songbook to

honor the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Columbia River

Songs. Along with Joe Seamons, he created a new recording

containing all twenty-six songs for the first time, sung by

Northwest artists.

Wheat harvest in Eastern

Oregon, 1940. The dams

created hydroelectric

power and irrigation in the

area, which allowed for

agricultural development.

Guthrie’s task was to

communicate the benefits

of hydroelectric power for

the common good.

Bonneville Power Administration

60 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


CAN YOU

BELIEVE

WHAT YOU

READ?

Sources: 2016 Survey, Pew Research Center; GfK MRI, Spring 2016.

MAGAZINE

MEDIA

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STARTUP 64

WHAT’S GOING UP 66

Peter Mahar

WHAT I’M WORKING ON 68

MY WORKSPACE 70

GAME CHANGER 72

pg. 70

Anna’s Bridal and Bridal Bliss are a family affair.


On exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society

January 15 – June 24, 2018

ohs.org

NEW EXHIBIT

December 15 through april 30

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE GAY RODEO

This is a program of

Made possible by

and The National Endowment for the Arts.

This project has been funded in part by the Oregon Heritage Commission,

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

Blake Little, Bareback Bronc Riding,

San Diego, California, 1992, Archival

pigment printed on Epson exhibition

fiber paper, 15 x 15 inches. © Blake Little 59800 South Highway 97, Bend | 541-382-4754 | www.highdesertmuseum.org


startup

Changing the World,

One Sip at a Time

Making milk from spent grain

written by Mackenzie Wilson

photography by Jenn Redd

EARLY RETIREMENT—IT’S THE DREAM that keeps

most entrepreneurs slogging through the late nights and early

mornings of hustle, and it was at Sarah Pool’s fingertips. After

selling her company, Pacific Superfoods Snacks, in 2014, the

33-year-old could have booked a one-way ticket to a tropical

destination far from her home in Bend. Pool did consider a

permanent vacation from entrepreneurship, but passion pushed

her in a different direction. “At the end of the day, I think I’m

driven,” Pool said, “and what everybody in the world is driven by

is using the most out of this life we have and the opportunity to

make an impact.”

Pool stayed on for three years as CEO with Made in Nature,

the company that bought Pacific Superfood Snacks. She

successfully bridged the perilous gap of bringing her original

product, kale chips, into a highly saturated market. Pool

still remembers the instant rejection she received when she

first asked retailers to carry her product. “We couldn’t have

predicted that two other local kale chip companies launched

the week before ours. Not only were they the first to gain shelf

space in a very small set, but they also had better packaging and

significantly more capital behind them,” Pool said. “But we had

already quit our ‘day jobs’ so our only option was to find a way.

It stoked our fire like never before.”

Not one to shy away from a challenge, Pool is leading a new

charge as the founder of Canvas, a beverage company producing

what she calls a one-of-a-kind product—barley milk. “There’s no

barley milk that exists,” she said. “It’s so funny because for us in

food, we want to be super disruptive and come out with a brandnew

product that’s never existed before. … But people are like,

‘Barley milk? We don’t get it at all.’” Similar to other non-dairy

milk substitutes like rice milk, soy milk or almond milk, Pool

believes it won’t take long for barley milk to find its place on the

shelf. “We’re very data driven, we’ve done a ton of interviews and

surveys with customers directly and in terms of the liquid itself,

people love it,” she said.

Canvas produces barley milk from spent grain from breweries.

“In the beer-brewing process the barley grain goes into the lauter

Sarah Pool and her new line

of barley milk products.

tun and all of the starch is extracted to go into making the beer,”

Pool said. “What’s left over is the nutrient-rich fiber and protein

and it’s absolutely beautiful.”

Pool says spent grain isn’t used in the final beer product because

of its fibrous and dense properties. Traditionally, it either goes to

waste or brewers sell it as livestock feed. “Eight billion pounds of

spent grain are produced all across the globe annually,” Pool said.

That number convinced her to take action. She and a team of

food scientists and engineers in New York and Belgium created a

process that preserves the grain, upcycling it and giving it a second

life as “saved grain.” “We developed a proprietary lactic

acid fermentation process that basically unlocks the

nutritional goodness and preserves the grain to keep it

from going to waste,” Pool said.

64 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


startup

Canvas is partnering with Anheuser Busch to transform its

spent grain into barley milk. “AB InBev produces approximately

3 billion pounds of spent grain annually, so the partnership made

perfect sense from a supply and resources perspective, but most

importantly, we’re aligned in our dream of creating a better future

on a global scale,” Pool said.

Canvas is 100 percent plant-based, dairy-free and contains no

refined sugars or artificial ingredients. The barley milk comes in

artisanal flavors like Cold Brew Latte, Matcha, Cocoa, Original

and Turmeric Chai. “I think of it as the perfect breakfast because

you’re getting 13 grams of fiber and about 10 grams of complete

plant protein,” Pool said. She and her team are “pretty fanatical”

about plant-based food in general, but they don’t expect everyone

to adopt an entirely plant-based diet—they’re striving to provide

people with more options. Ultimately, Canvas hopes to make a

global impact. “In the core of who we are as a company, we believe

adopting more of a plant-based diet and upcycling food waste are

really important in terms of long-term solutions to address climate

change and global warming,” Pool said.

Canvas currently has a team of fewer than five people. Pool said

Canvas plans to go national with the brand and significantly grow

its team in 2018. Although she’s been named Entrepreneur of the

Year in Bend and has one successful acquisition under her belt,

Pool said her new company is a fresh start, a blank canvas. “It’s

starting all over from the ground up and having to prove ourselves

again,” she said. “But we thrive on that type of pressure and there’s

no greater feeling than taking something from ideation to reality

that can positively impact others’ lives.”

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 65


what’s going up?

Date Night

New restaurants around Oregon

written by Jen Stevenson

DATE NIGHT REACHES new heights in 2018, thanks

to these three much-buzzed-about romantic

hotspots. They’re perfect for dinner for two, or a

room with a view.

BEND

In Bend, Bos Taurus steakhouse has quickly

established itself as one of downtown’s top

tables, wooing diners with briny Oregon

oysters, roasted bone marrow, smoky blue

cheese-smothered wedge salads, and for the

couple with a serious appetite, a 36-ounce

Tomahawk rib-eye for two.

bostaurussteak.com

MCMINNVILLE

Historic downtown McMinnville’s reputation as a

bona fide wine country destination continues to grow

with the imminent arrival of the luxurious Atticus Hotel,

featuring thirty-six spacious studios and suites outfitted

with locally crafted furnishings and art, Pendleton robes,

and Flag & Wire coffee. Slated for a spring opening, the

Atticus raises the bar with a full-service concierge, Tesla

charging stations, and Third n Tasty, sister restaurant of

chef John Gorham’s popular Portland eateries.

atticushotel.com

PORTLAND

In Portland, those in the know waited with

bated breath for James Beard-nominated chef

Trent Pierce to reopen his upscale prix fixe

fish house Roe in its new downtown location

in early December. Not one to disappoint,

Pierce’s menu tempts with charcoal-grilled

Kona abalone, porcini-crusted walu, and for

those with seats at the Schnitz, an elegantly

expedited three-”part” pre-theater menu.

roepdx.rest

The Atticus Hotel is raising

the bar in McMinnville.

66 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


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what i’m working on

A Long-Term Look

Nonprofit studies violence and relationships over decades

interview by Mackenzie Wilson

The Oregon Social Learning Center is dedicated to using scientific

research to help strengthen relationships in children, adolescents,

families and communities. Using data collected from analyzing subjects

over short- and long-term studies, the Eugene-based nonprofit helps

make connections between the way people interact and their social and

psychological well-being. The center is in the midst of a two-decade

study revolving around young men and their romantic partners. We

spoke with Dr. Joann Wu Shortt, a senior research scientist at OSLC,

about the impact of the study.

Why does OSLC focus on studies

surrounding relationships?

Relationships matter across the

lifespan. We seek close proximity and

contact with others, which promotes

our well-being and safety and helps

us cope with stress. The family

remains a central relationship context

that shapes our development, and

difficulties within relationships can

signal developmental risk.

OSLC is in the midst of a long-term

study that’s assessing young men

and their romantic relationships.

What’s the significance of this study

and when did it start?

The Oregon Youth Study-Couples

study began more than fifteen

years ago, when the OYS men were

young adults, to examine the couple

relationship quality, specifically

intimate partner violence, between

these men and their romantic

partners and spouses. This study

is one of the most comprehensive

longitudinal examinations of physical

and psychological intimate partner

violence that has been conducted

to date. Our recent work involves

the children of the OYS men and

the children’s biological mothers

(even if the couple has separated),

to examine the impact of child

exposure to intimate partner violence

and parent-to-child aggression on

child adjustment.

How do you think the data collected

from OSLC’s research can help people

improve their own relationships?

Although intimate partner violence has

long been recognized as a complex and

significant public health problem, the

existing intervention programs have

demonstrated limited effectiveness

in reducing intimate partner violence.

The OYS-Couples study increases

the scientific understanding of the

developmental pathways, risk factors

and relationship processes involved

in intimate partner violence in order

to inform prevention and intervention

efforts to effectively reduce intimate

partner violence and the costly physical

and psychological consequences for

couples and their children.

How does OSLC select people to be a

part of a long-term study?

At enrollment, the OYS participants

were from at-risk (by virtue of living

in neighborhoods with relatively high

rates of juvenile delinquency) and lower

socioeconomic backgrounds and in the

fourth grade at local public schools.

What has been most surprising about

the study?

Our approach helped us provide

evidence that a significant proportion

of physical and psychological intimate

partner violence in nonclinical young

couples was bidirectional or mutual, with

partners aggressing against each other,

which has increased the recognition of

intimate partner violence as a public

health problem that involves both men

and women, rather than only men. More

injuries occur in couples when physical

intimate partner violence is bidirectional.

One of my most important papers from

this project provided critical information

on the course of intimate partner

violence and indicated notable decreases

in levels of physical intimate partner

violence across adulthood and higher

stability in intimate partner violence for

men who stayed with the same partners

relative to men who changed partners.

Intimate partner violence may be

prevented by addressing the behavior of

both partners and relationship patterns,

such as coercion and escalation in the

context of conflict.

68 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


H20 TODAY

An exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service

Dive into H20 through interactive

displays and cutting-edge science,

and discover creative ways to steward

our water resources well into the future.

OPENS JANUARY 20, 2018

1680 East 15th Avenue, Eugene | natural-history.uoregon.edu

H2O Today is adapted from an exhibition by the American Museum of Natural History, New York.

Joseph A. Furia

Environmental Law

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my workspace

My Workspace

Better Together

A mother-daughter power team

makes wedding dreams come true

written by Sydney Padgett

photography by Peter Mahar

On a bitter, rainy Oregon day,

the warmth of Anna’s Bridal

spreads across an entire Lake

Oswego street corner. Intricate,

white dresses fill the shop, and

Anna Totonchy’s contagious

laugh rings through the space.

On the other side of a wall of

dreamlike gowns, Totonchy’s

daughter, Nora Sheils, presents

color swatches to an eager

bride. Together, Sheils’ wedding

planning company, Bridal Bliss,

and Anna’s Bridal exude an

unparalleled energy of love and

passion—two essential elements

of any dream wedding.

At its inception, Anna’s Bridal was no

more than a humble home alteration shop.

Almost twenty-five years later, Totonchy

and Sheils run their separate businesses

out of one stunning storefront in Lake

Oswego. “It started from a little bit and

it got bigger and bigger,” Totonchy said.

“Lots of patience and lots of love.”

When Anna came to the United States

from Iraq in 1976, she never expected to

work with wedding dresses. But decades

of hard work brewed an unexpected

passion and highly sought-after alteration

skills. “She is so good at what she does,”

Sheils said. “She is an alterations expert.

… She is truly an angel (crossed) with an

energizer bunny. She has so much energy

she cannot sit.”

70 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


my workspace

“I see the bride happy. And if she is not

happy, we make her happy,” Totonchy

said. “I have been in the business for

over twenty-four years and I know.”

Indeed, beyond alterations, Totonchy

offers a smile and an inexplicable ability

to find the perfect dress for her clients.

Sheils grew up surrounded by dresses

and brides. “I got the bug for weddings

and ever since, I have always been

enamored with them,” she explained. At

22, she started her own wedding planning

company and has since led her Bridal Bliss

team to unprecedented success. This year,

she was named Portland’s Best Wedding

Planner for the eighth year in a row.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 71


game changer

For the Love of Art

Funding passion projects across Oregon

written and photographed by Brittany Norton

THE FIRST THING visitors notice when they walk into the Bill

Will: Fun House art gallery is a large map of the United States

hanging on the wall. The map is fashioned from acrylic mirrors

and brightly reflects everything in the room. The piece seems to

call for a moment of self-reflection as viewers gaze into it and

see their own faces looking back at them. Farther into the Fun

House there are more messages to be found. Art pieces crafted

from tiny plastic soldiers, Oster bread makers powering felt toy

missiles, papier-mâché heads and one garish yellow foam finger

spark themes of war, conformity and prosperity.

This eccentric art gallery is one example of the projects the

Oregon Community Foundation helps fund with its Creative

Heights Initiative. The initiative provides monetary support for

passion projects by artists and other creatives across the state of

Oregon. Since its inception in 2014, the initiative has distributed

more than fifty grants and $4 million. The initiative was meant

to end in 2017 after four years, but OCF has decided to extend

it another three years.

With Creative Heights, the Oregon Community Foundation

found a niche in supporting new ideas.

“One thing that really resonated with us was that need to try

new things. We had folks telling us they wanted to do more than

The Nutcracker. But it’s risky, trying new things. Sometimes

audiences might not be as interested in it, and there was a need

for risk capital,” said Michelle Boss Barba, program officer for

arts and culture at the foundation.

According to the Bill Will catalogue that provides information

on the gallery, Will, a contemporary artist, wanted to create an

interactive art experience that accumulated some of his pieces

from the past ten years.

“Fun House hooks the viewer with his inventions, which

serve as decoys for expressing much deeper and more serious

concerns about the social, political, and economic culture

of the United States,” writes gallery director Linda Tesner in

the catalogue.

Lewis & Clark College received $35,000 from OCF in 2015

to help reconstruct Bill Will’s art pieces for the Fun House.

They are displayed in the Ronna and Eric Hoffman Gallery of

Contemporary Art on campus.

Boss Barba said the Creative Heights initiative gives artists

an opportunity to achieve long-term goals with their work, and

that the care these artists put into the project is clear.

“When someone creates a work, whatever the area is, they are

definitely putting their heart into that. It’s very vulnerable, just

as it is when you fall in love,” she said. “And I think it’s special to

see that love and care that these wonderful creative folks have

for the work they do.”

72 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


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Romance

on the road

Oregon hotels’ best romantic packages

written by Sheila G. Miller

OREGON IS FILLED with romance. Parts of this state are dark

and misty, others bright and cold. The scenery is so stunning,

there isn’t much need for the manufactured machinations of candy

hearts and carnation bouquets. Still, it doesn’t hurt to add a little

something to the background—it could be just what you need to

stoke the fire and heat up the passion.

Black Butte Ranch

There’s an old standby in Central

Oregon that sometimes gets

overlooked by its more modern,

fancy competitors. But Black Butte

Ranch is old-school Central Oregon, done

just right.

Black Butte has all the necessary components

for a great romantic weekend—the mountain

views, the quiet serenity, the horseback rides. The

ranch offers an extensive list of spa treatments,

including a side-by-side massage. And Black

Butte is a perfect jumping-off point for a weekend

of year-round outdoor adventure. Hoodoo is just

up the road, so a ski day is within reach. There are

endless hiking, biking and other opportunities

similarly nearby.

Beyond the usual joys of Black Butte, the

ranch offers a $59 romance package for any

vacation rental. That package includes a bottle

of champagne and two wine glasses, as well as

some local spa products, a box of truffles and, you

guessed it, rose petals spread just so when you

arrive at your rental.

Don’t doubt the power of rose petals, side-byside

massages and a glass of bubbly enjoyed on the

porch during the sunset—sometimes clichés exist

because they are true.

blackbutteranch.com

74 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

Black Butte Ranch is

tucked against the

Cascade Mountains.


1

Best nearby romantic dinner

This one comes with a caveat. First of all,

Kokanee Cafe in Camp Sherman is one of

the best restaurants in Oregon, not just

near Black Butte. But it’s closed in the

winter months. Next up, Cottonwood Cafe

(formerly Jen’s Garden), is a tremendous

restaurant—but the trick is, it’s only

open for breakfast and lunch. So instead

of a romantic dinner, start out your

day with a romantic breakfast and go

from there. Big Tree Benedict, anyone?

(cottonwoodinsisters.com; kokaneecafe.com)

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 75


Best nearby romantic dinner

OK, this will require you entering a

different hotel, which might seem weird.

But just ten-ish blocks away from the

Hotel deLuxe is Departure, which offers up

some of the best, forward-thinking Asian

food in the city. Bonus: If you’re there on

a clear night the view is nigh unbeatable.

For something a little more low key, head

to Clyde Common, a tavern-style spot that

has a tops happy hour. Order the popcorn

and thank me later. (departureportland.

com; clydecommon.com)

Portland’s Hotel deLuxe is all about old Hollywood.

2

Hotel deLuxe

There’s just something about old Hollywood glamour.

It’s everywhere you look at Hotel deLuxe in Portland.

The boutique hotspot in Portland, right in the

bustling urban downtown core, is a great jumpingoff

point for a city date night. It’s also got the kind of amenities

that mean you never have to leave the hotel if you’d rather stay

warm, dry and cozy with your sweetie.

Gracie’s, a popular restaurant with sophisticated American

food, is in the building. Driftwood Room is the kind of dark,

leather-and-wood bar you can melt into for hours of craft

cocktails and old-timey glamour. And the hallways are covered

in Hollywood stills from the height of elegance.

About twice a month, the hotel offers Pop-Up Cinema, free

screenings of old movies with cocktails and snacks available for

purchase. The events are held in the private Screening Room,

which has a 16-foot screen and gold-leaf ceilings—this is no joke.

To up your romantic quotient, have a pint of Salt & Straw ice

cream delivered to your room. Other amenities include Shinola

bikes ready to help you explore the city, rain or shine. There’s a

pillow menu so you can try out different pillows, even a “spiritual

menu” with religious tomes available for you (there’s also a

spiritual menu for your dog, if he’s on hand—that means pet

psychology and dog massage).

hoteldeluxeportland.com

76 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Westcliff Lodge’s glamp sites

Do you like your romance

with a side of adventure?

Check out the Westcliff

Lodge’s glamping sites.

These platform tents come with a fluffy

bed, furniture, and a serious view of the

Columbia River Gorge.

No chocolate and wine specials here—

instead, there are packages to combine a

stay with a river-rafting trip or windsurfing

lesson. You can head out into the gorge for

a day of thrilling experiences, then return

to the creature comforts that make for a

romantic evening. Bonus: the lodge and

glamping sites are just 45 minutes from

Mount Hood, and the property is filled

with greenery and rock walls, with nooks

and crannies along trails that are perfect

for stealing a kiss.

The glamping sites are only available

during the warmer months.

westclifflodge.com

3

Westcliff Lodge’s glamp

sites add some ritz

to regular camping.

Best nearby romantic dinner

In Hood River, go classic farm-to-table

with Celilo, a hotspot that offers up the

classics but also manages to get pretty

interesting with options like paella and

cioppino. Hood River is even better for a

good drink—Full Sail Brewing’s pub has a

great deck for watching the windsurfers

on the Columbia River. (celilorestaurant.

com; fullsailbrewing.com)

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 77


Ashland Hills Hotel & Suites

It’s not news to Oregonians that

Ashland is a great stop for a

romantic weekend. The small town

is a charmer, and it has the added

bonus of fulfilling the culture quotient with

the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

Ashland Hills Hotel & Suites is a classic

spot that has been extensively renovated and

given a very mod feel. The retro furnishings

and the epic lobby décor will put you in the

mood for a Jetsons-like vacation.

The hotel has several packages that will

serve your romantic needs. First, there’s the

Lunar Experience package, which features

the traditional truffles-and-champagne

treats but adds a bouquet of flowers and a

meal voucher to LUNA Cafe + Mercantile.

A Craftmanship Wine and Dine Package

includes wine flights, charcuterie and

cheese boards, and the LUNA meal

voucher. There’s also a package that features

movie tickets, which might be just the thing

to take your romance back to humble high

school beginnings.

ashlandhillshotel.com

4

Retro furnishings are

part of Ashland Hills

Hotel & Suites’ charm.

Best nearby romantic dinner

Ashland is one of those lucky small

towns that overshoots its size with

great restaurants. Larks Restaurant is an

accessible favorite that is fancy but not so

fancy you’ll feel uncomfortable. Another

great option is Alchemy, which goes all in

on the fine dining—steak tartare, pommes

frites, raviolo. (larksrestaurant.com;

alchemyashland.com)

78 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Cannery Pier Hotel & Spa

Romance always seems pretty

natural at the Oregon Coast.

The chill in the air lends itself to

a heavy blanket and an evening

gazing out at the ocean through the rain. The

Cannery Pier Hotel & Spa in Astoria sits out

in the Columbia River, near where the river

meets the Pacific Ocean. It’s on the site of, you

guessed it, an old fish cannery, and the views

are second-to-none—you can watch barges

and boats pass by from a private balcony.

Every room has a fireplace, and the day

spa has a Finnish sauna, which just feels right

in Astoria.

The hotel offers a romance add-on

package, which includes a couples massage,

champagne and chocolates. But beyond

that, there are plenty of options to spice up

your weekend at Cannery Pier—including a

two-hour sunset cruise that includes wine

and hors d’oeuvres, or a Columbia River Eco

Tour if you find environmentalism sexy. Hey,

it’s Oregon—lots of locals are super into the

environment.

cannerypierhotel.com

Views of the Astoria-Megler Bridge complement the coziness of the hotel.

Best nearby romantic dinner

This one is a no-brainer. Bridgewater

Bistro is nestled right up to the Columbia

River by the Astoria-Megler Bridge

that connects Oregon and Washington.

The views are backed up by a seafoodfilled

menu and great wine. Runner-up

status goes to Baked Alaska, a classy

spot that could win clam chowder wars.

(bridgewaterbistro.com; bakedak.com)

5

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 79


Columbia’s

Tough Mother

Finds Techie

OFFSPRING

Gert Boyle and Columbia Sportswear debut a new face

that loves innovation, warmer months and Zac Efron.

Wall Street digs it.

written by Kevin Max

80 1859 OREGON’S MAGZAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Shauna Intelisano

G

ERT BOYLE PEERS AT ME

over those glasses with a halfbent

smile that could go either

way—up and into a witticism pulled from

her 93 years, or down and into an earnest

assessment of the sportswear industry.

Even through her office’s cluttered

mementos of decades of celebrity—a

photo with Nelson Mandela, another with

Phil Knight, Bill Clinton, the cougar from

her Tough Mother-themed commercials,

a snow globe with tiny boots inside—

Gert Boyle is still at the center of this

iconic Oregon sportswear company that

is transitioning to a warmer and younger

demographic.

“Well, I’m not going anywhere,” Boyle

said. “I’ve been here every single day. I’m

available for anyone who wants to come

in the door.”

Boyle is the founder of the homespun

Oregon company that her father, Paul

Lamfrom, started in Portland in 1938

after the family fled Nazi Germany.

Initially a millinery, the newly named

Columbia Hat Company was a traditional

business in a quickly evolving American

outdoors industry.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 81


By the time Boyle took the reins of the faltering company

in 1970, she knew something had to be done to broaden

the product portfolio and reduce its seasonality. Innovation

ensued. Columbia began making weatherproof ski jackets

from Gore-Tex in the mid-70s and branded itself as king of

inclement weather.

In the mid-80s, Columbia applied the same zip-out layer

concept from a hunting coat to a ski parka, in what would

become the Bugaboo and the first design coup for the small

sportswear maker. After a long dry spell, Columbia got the

religion of technology and brought the thermal reflective

Omni Heat out of the lab and into its jackets. In 2015,

Columbia crafted a fresh take on a more breathable Gore-

Tex and created a closed-seam thermal system with extreme

water repellency and much-improved breathability. They

called it OutDry Extreme.

“Innovation is the greatest asset that you have and sets you

apart from the next guy,” said Boyle, as feisty as the day she

was born. “Every coat has two sleeves, a front and a back. It’s

how you make it—that’s the difference.”

Enter Michael “Woody” Blackford, who for the past twelve

years has climbed the ladder of Columbia’s design studios to

earn the title of vice president of design and innovation in

2015. If innovation is the differentiator, a lot of responsibility

lies in the hands of Blackford, who now has more than 200

industry patents from his years at Columbia.

“I became focused on four problems: keeping people warm,

dry, cool and protected from the sun,” Blackford said. “I like

to think of us as a world leader in sportswear functionality.”

We’ve been able to make our technology a part of the

aesthetic,” Blackford said in an interview. “In the past, we

tried to make tech invisible to the consumer. Now we have a

different approach and make a garment’s technology obvious

to the consumer.”

This spring, expect to see a glimmering addition to the

product portfolio. Garments made with the new technology

Omni-Shade Sun Deflector will shimmer under the summer

sun as if it were made of a million tiny mirrors. Rather than

consuming and reducing harmful UV rays, Sun Deflector

garments are adorned with outward-facing micro-dots of

titanium dioxide to reflect the sun, and keep its wearer cool

and sun-protected.

columbia brands

1970 Columbia Brand

2000 Columbia acquires footwear darling, Sorel

2003 Columbia acquires rugged outdoor gear maker

Mountain Hardwear

2014 Columbia acquires yoga apparel leader prAna

1970S

Columbia introduces

a new waterproof

tight weave. It works

well as a water

repellent, but earns

lower grades for the

fabric’s breathability.

gore tex

1980

bugaboo

S

The Bugaboo

brought a zip-in/zipout

fleece insulation.

Now consumers

could wear the outer

shell jacket with or

without the fleece,

with three variations

of full parka, shell or

fleece.

82 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Every coat has two sleeves, a

front and a back. It's how you

make it that's the differencE.

gert boyle

A breathable

warming

technology that

helps regulate

body temperature

with little silver

dots that reflect

heat and retain

your body’s

warmth.

A fused

fabric that is

completely

waterproof

yet breathable.

Used in gloves,

shoes and rain

jackets.

2015outdry

2000

omni heat

S

2018

omni shade

Sun Deflector,

a new fabric

that turns sun

protection

outward with

millions of dots

of reflective

titanium dioxide.

Used for summer

outdoor apparel.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 83


and so does wall street

columbia rising

Columbia Stock price +17% year–to-date as of Dec. 6

S&P Apparel Retail Index +0% year–to-date as of Dec. 6

Net sales +2% for 9 months of 2017

Net income +5% for 9 months of 2017

Meanwhile, Columbia’s corporate

strategy is beginning to heat

up on Wall Street. For the first

nine months of 2017, net sales

jumped 2 percent to a record $1.69 billion,

while net income rose 5 percent for the

corresponding period.

CEO Tim Boyle emphasized on a call

with analysts and investors that sales

of footwear, particularly with its subbrand

Sorel, is the shining star; Columbia

acquired the ailing footwear maker Sorel

2000 and yoga brand prAna in 2014.

“The company has been very focused on

the footwear business, the non-winter

footwear business and the sportswear

business,” he said. “If I look out five years,

I think our fastest-growing and largest

category—if we do everything right—will

likely be footwear.”

Investors cheered the diversification

strategy by pushing the stock (COLM:

Nasdaq) up 17% on the year to $70.43 by

December 7 and just shy of its all-time

high of $71.54 from summer 2015. Over

the same period, Nike’s stock rose 14.8%,

Under Armour plunged 54% and the S&P

YTD, 12 / 6

“The company has been very focused on the footwear business,

the non-winter footwear business and the sportswear business.”

CEO Tim Boyle, Oct. 26, 2017

Apparel Retail Index, which includes a

basket of Columbia’s peers, was flat.

Not all financial news has been polar

fleece and puffies, however. Columbia’s

sales in the U.S., its largest market, have

struggled. Perhaps Columbia is a victim

of its own marketing success of its Tough

Tested branding, in which Gert Boyle

subjects her son and their gear to such

rigors as being sent through a car wash

without a car and deserting him on a

frozen mountaintop to fend for himself.

Not surprisingly, Tim Boyle noted on

the conference call, “Most U.S. consumers

would think about us as an outerwear

company,” while drawing attention to

the seasonality of outerwear. Perhaps in

Europe and Asia—where the Columbia

brand is newer—it’s easier for Columbia to

remake its image as a footwear company

that sells more than winter boots for

Arctic explorers.

Boyle confided with analysts that in

summer 2017, Columbia promoted its

European turn-around architect, Franco

Fogliato, to join the team in Portland and

focus on growing the U.S. market.

76.00

71.03

66.67

57.33

48.00

84 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


age of retail disruption

since the dawn of Amazon, the model of

consumer goods companies has been in

flux between traditional brick-and-mortar

retail and the lean

online consumer-direct

Amazon model. In an

August 2017 report from

the World Economic Forum

entitled “Disruption in

consumer industries: How

the traditional operating

model will be turned inside

out,” authors Oliver Wright

from Accenture and Zara

Ingilizian from the World

Economic Forum predict

an industrial upheaval.

In the so-called Fourth

Industrial Revolution, the

companies that survive

the next ten years, they say,

“will be the ones that embrace the Empowered

Consumer and Disruptive Technologies. They will be

data driven and far more externally oriented, working

seamlessly with new partners, on-demand employees

and (as part of an extended workforce) consumers.”

These kinds of prognostications always seem a

bit dire, presenting do-or-die scenarios built on

disruptive trends, that seem stubbornly linear at the

time. Nonetheless, this commentary is not without

merit and bodes well for Columbia’s nimble wholesale

and direct-to-consumer model.

“We really consider ourselves to be a wholesale

business,” CEO Boyle told investors and analysts

in his conference call. Columbia operates 127

retail stores globally, compared with Nike, which

has 1,142, according to Statistica. Adidas, for

measure, has 1,757 venues and is opening 3,000

more in China by 2020. Without the expense of

maintaining and updating a global bricks-andmortar

distribution network, Columbia can

control and change its image at a lower cost

than its brick-bound competitors. It opens

new accounts with displays

in retail chains instead of

building new stores.

Without branded

stores across the globe,

Columbia is finding new ways

to connect with today’s consumers. In

2015, Columbia launched Project CONNECT, a

multimillion-dollar realignment of its business model

“around a ground-led consumer-first philosophy …

brand awareness and sales growth in our wholesale

and direct-to-consumer channels,” Tim Boyle said.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 85


if i look out five years, i

think our fastest growing

and largest category if we

do everything right will

likely BE footwear.

tim boyle

86 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


connected at the hip

2017 Zac Efron Columbia Sportswear auditioned actor Zac Efron

and his brother on Tough Tested outing with a van-ful of gear.

2017 Chloé Sorel gets chic with a limited-edition Joan of Arctic boot

sold through the retail network of Paris-based luxury fashion house,

Chloé.

2017 Star Wars Columbia hits the big screen with limited edition

jackets that replicate fashion from the Star Wars franchise.

2016 Manchester United Co-branding Columbia teamed up with one

of England’s most storied soccer clubs, Manchester United, as its

official apparel sponsor.

central to this shift is a strategy to

become relevant, even hip, among

younger consumers.

To that end, Columbia Sportswear has

forged savvy partnerships in recent days to

connect with a new generation, for whom

popular endorsement and online shopping

are central. With the Star Wars franchise,

Columbia created garments based on those

worn by Commander Skywalker, Princess Leia

and Captain Solo. Columbia sent Hollywood

hunk du jour, Zac Efron, and his brother on a

gear-testing adventure that might have been

undertaken by Tim Boyle in the past. In a

high-end flair unusual for the brand, Columbia

inserted a $515 Joan of Arctic limited-edition

Sorel boot into the luxury lineup of Chloé, a

chic Paris-based online retailer.

“We’re trying to differentiate ourselves

from the big athletic brands that heavily rely

on athletes to promote their products,” Boyle

said. “But we certainly get the brand awareness

from these unusual connections with popular

brands and personalities.”

Over the course of nearly five decades of

company leadership, Gert Boyle has met

rooms full of personalities. Zac Efron may be

the ephemeral star that brings Columbia to a

new generation, but perhaps no brand, with

the exception of Kentucky Fried Chicken, is

more strongly associated with its founder than

Columbia Sportswear.

Over the next ten years, Columbia’s tough

mother hopes Columbia will stay at the top

of the competitive sportswear industry. “We

will be working on a lot of innovation,” she

promised. “Early to bed, early to rise, work like

hell and advertise.”

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 87

partnerships


A Delicious Art

photography by Emily Green

NOTHING DRESSES UP an occasion like a hand-crafted

cake. At Foxtail Bakeshop in Bend, that’s owner Nickol

Hayden-Cady’s specialty. She landed her first cakedecorating

job at 13, and the rest is history.

With more than twenty years of experience as a cake

decorator and pastry chef, Hayden-Cady and her staff

use innovative methods to make sure their cakes are as

beautiful as they are delicious.

88 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Cady chose a rustic theme for this cake. Using natural

found objects for final accents, she selected dried

pomegranates, fresh holly, fresh rose hips and real

honeycomb from her own beehive. She began with a

bare, pomegranate layer cake and laid out her accents.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 89


Cady connected the layered

cakes with whipped buttercream

frosting and fresh caramel.

90 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


When preparing the fondant for

application, Cady uses powdered

sugar to keep the fondant from

sticking to the roller.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 91


92 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

Applying the Playdough-like

fondant is a tricky process of

gently folding and shaping.

Cady cut strips of navy-colored

fondant for additional abstract

accents. She then applied egg

whites to adhere the edible pearls

and pearlescent powder.


To create a pounded copper look,

Cady used her tool to create

indentations in the fondant. She

then applied edible copper foiling

to create a realistic metallic look.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 93


Cady applied final accents of

honeycomb, rose hips, dried

pomegranates and fresh holly.

Some people wear their hearts

on their sleeves—Cady wears her

passion on her arm in the form of

a vintage mixer tattoo. The final

product was a success.

94 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 95


TRAVEL SPOTLIGHT 98

ADVENTURE 100

LODGING 104

TRIP PLANNER 106

NORTHWEST DESTINATION 112

Curt Peters, Digital Dunes Photography

pg. 104

Get cozy on the coast at Heceta Head Lighthouse Bed & Breakfast.


travel spotlight

Travel Spotlight

Buried Treasure

written by Sheila G. Miller

PENDLETON, LIKE MANY old cities,

has a sordid secret.

Underneath its city streets, it hid

tunnels and a red light district built

at the turn of the twentieth century.

Discovered when potholes started

showing up on the streets in the

1980s, the tunnels were used in the

early 1900s primarily by Chinese living

in Pendleton to avoid interactions

with locals, and other people taking

part in less-than-legal activities.

Pendleton Underground Tours is a

nonprofit that started giving tours of

the tunnels in 1989. The tour provides

historical context to the dark side of

Pendleton, including bootlegging,

prostitution and gambling. It also

tells the story of the Chinese who

lived in Eastern Oregon and helped

build the state to what it is today.

The two-hour tour requires

reservations and runs all days except

Sundays and Tuesdays.

pendletonundergroundtours.com

Courtesy of Pendleton Underground Tours

Dan Parnell

Don Bracker

Don Bracker

98 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


You should curl up here.

Cannon Beach, Oregon

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or call 888.333.8890

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4) USE #VISITRDM TO DOCUMENT YOUR ADVENTURE IN REDMOND!

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adventure

WINTER

WATERFALL

ESCAPES

Finding Oregon’s

Easy-access waterfalls

written by Sam Smargiassi

IT’S THAT TIME of year, when a thick

layer of cloud fills our sky and the

Seasonal Affective Disorder kicks in.

Getaways—especially easy ones—can

remind us why we live in the Pacific

Northwest. It’s cold outside, the ground

is icy, we don’t feel like walking around

for hours and we definitely don’t feel

like camping. So here’s a list of some

easy-access waterfalls to wash away

the winter blues.

Sam Smargiassi

100 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


adventure

Sweet Creek Falls is just a short

detour on your way to Florence.

SWEET CREEK FALLS

MAPELTON, OREGON

(56 MILES WEST OF EUGENE)

Sweet Creek is a quick and easy stop on

your next trip to Florence. It’s an 11-

mile detour off U.S. Highway 99. You

can drive an extra mile and go straight to

the main waterfall, but the better option

is to use the Sweet Creek Homestead

trail, which ends on the main falls. The

special part about the 1.2-mile trail is

that you walk against the current and

come up on multiple waterfalls that get

bigger and bigger as you follow the trail.

It gets intimidating.

Much of the trail has metal

reinforcements for hand railings and to

walk on. Some of the areas would likely

never be accessed by humans if not for

the catwalk bolted into the rock wall

next to the falls.

If you choose to drive up, there is a

small parking area about a tenth of a

mile from the falls. Once there, you can

walk to an upper lookout.

TIPS

1. WEAR WATERPROOF

SHOES WITH GOOD

TRACTION: These trails can

get pretty muddy seeing as

how they’re next to fastmoving

rivers, and you don’t

want to have to drive home

with wet socks.

2. LEAVE EARLY: Daylight

savings time means the sun

sets early, and these are not

roads you want to find yourself

on in the dark.

3. PACK A PICNIC: All of these

locations have benches at the

entrance or even on the trail.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 101


adventure

ALSEA FALLS

ALSEA, OREGON

(20 MILES SOUTHWEST OF CORVALLIS)

At Alsea Falls, the water rushes over a wide bed of

boulders. Watching it, you might find yourself in active

meditation, imagining the water flushing through your

thoughts. The drive is pretty, too, even though it might be

the trickiest of the bunch on winding, forested roads. The

key to this one is to trust the signs. You may think you’re

lost, but as long as you follow the signs and not the GPS,

you’ll find it. If you’re lucky, the sun will poke through the

trees and create a spiral of beams to penetrate your body

with a little extra vitamin D. No promises.

When you arrive at Alsea Falls, you have the choice to

turn left and walk about two minutes to the falls, or cross

a bridge and follow an approximately 5-mile trail which

chases the current of the river.

Overall, this is a pretty easy option, with well-paved

trails and stairs that will place you right in front of the falls.

Sam Smargiassi

SAHALIE FALLS

HIGHWAY OR 126

(56 MILES NORTHWEST OF BEND)

Sahalie Falls is the biggest of a chain of waterfalls along

the McKenzie River and U.S. Highway 126. The two that

follow are Koosah and Tamolitch. If you decide to do the

entire chain, it’s a 4-mile hike along the river that stays

pretty flat. However, snow does fall there and the area

can become icy and dangerous.

Ice is something you should worry about even if you

just pull into the parking lot and look at Sahalie Falls.

Highway 126 is notorious for closing in the winter

because of ice. The parking lot can be full of snow and

walking down the steps to the falls can be risky. There is

a sturdy railing, though, so if you fall, you won’t fall far.

Despite the conditions, Sahalie Falls is an immense

100-foot waterfall. The water spouts out in a huge mass

between walls of lush, green foliage. When I was there,

a rainbow arched over it—a truly magnificent sight.

102 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


ESCAPE

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Sisters, Oregon 541.549.5900

SNEAK AWAY


lodging

The Heceta Head Lighthouse Bed & Breakfast was

once the former assistant lightkeeper’s house.

FAR RIGHT, FROM TOP Soak in the coast on the

inn’s covered front porch. The Queen Anne Room,

one of six rooms at the bed & breakfast. Executive

Chef Michelle Korgan uses seasonal produce and

herbs from the garden to prepare breakfasts at the

inn. Antique furniture adds a cozy feel.

Curt Peters, Digital Dunes Photography

Lodging

Heceta Head Lighthouse Bed & Breakfast

written by Jen Stevenson

DONE PROPERLY, a dark and stormy winter’s night on the

Oregon Coast is something straight out of a storybook. Jagged

bluffs, roiling surf, a lonely cliff-clinging lighthouse, whisperings

of a tragic tale—the historic Heceta Head Lighthouse B&B has it

all, with a sensational seven-course breakfast to top it off.

Once the former assistant lightkeeper’s house, the inn now

serves as a priceless piece of state history, and for guests, a portal

to turn-of-the-twentieth-century living—albeit with most of the

creature comforts of today (wi-fi yes, flat-screen no). The six

rooms are outfitted with antique furniture, hand-sewn quilts,

local artwork, and should you book one of the front-facing

Mariner rooms, sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean. Those

seeking a brush with the resident spirit, Rue, should request

Victoria’s Room, home to many an unexplained happening, from

unruly locks and light switches to the mischievous mishandling

of luggage.

During the day, explore the lush property’s garden and grounds,

visit the namesake lighthouse, or traverse the short trail down

to the beach. Should the weather be fair, curl up in one of the

Adirondack chairs lining the covered front porch and watch the

sun sink into the sea at the day’s end. If a storm’s swirling outside,

retire to the old-fashioned parlor for wine, conversation with

fellow guests, an impromptu piano recital, a game of Scrabble by

the fire or a good ghost story.

92072 HWY 101 SOUTH

YACHATS

hecetalighthouse.com

104 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


lodging

ROOMS

The inn’s six rooms are an antique lover’s

dream, some outfitted with old-fashioned

four-poster beds to sink into after a long day

of tidepool-hopping, others with porcelain

clawfoot tubs perfect for a post-hike soak. If

your sharing-a-bathroom phase sailed long

ago, both Mariners rooms and Victoria’s

Room have private baths; otherwise, prepare

to bundle up in the provided terrycloth robe

and cross the hall. If traveling with little

skippers, book the adjoining Mariners I and

II rooms for more breathing room.

DINING

Worry not about breakfast, because

Executive Chef Michelle Korgan serves

a seven-course morning spread in the

elegantly appointed formal dining room,

using seasonal produce and herbs culled

from the inn’s garden. There is a fully

equipped guest kitchen on-site to make

your own snacks and supper. Otherwise,

head twenty minutes north to tiny Yachats

for fresh-caught Dungeness crab with all

the fixings at Luna Sea Fish House. Or road

trip twenty minutes south to Florence, a

lively fishing village known for its sizeable

Steller sea lion population and towering

sand dunes. Sip a cup of the house blend on

the peaceful riverfront patio at Old Town’s

Siuslaw River Coffee Roasters, pick up roast

turkey and nettle pesto sandwiches and

fudgy homemade brownies at Homegrown

Public House’s adjoining deli for a picnic in

the park, or sit down to a leisurely seafood

supper at local favorite Waterfront Depot

(reservations recommended).

AMENITIES

If your idea of the ultimate amenity is a

ghost, book Victoria’s Room, rumored

to have the most paranormal activity

thanks to Rue, otherwise known as the

Lady in Grey. As the story goes, Rue was

an assistant lightkeeper’s wife driven

to suicide by the anguish of her young

daughter’s accidental drowning. To this day,

she watches over her former home with a

gimlet eye, and the inn’s staff and locals

alike are happy to ply you with tales of her

mild-mannered hijinks.

SPECIAL FEATURES

After unpacking, make the short trek to the

historic Heceta Head Lighthouse, built in

1894. Perched 205 feet above the roaring

surf, the working lighthouse’s first-order

Fresnel lens casts Oregon’s brightest light—a

piercing beam visible up to 21 miles offshore.

Although the docent-led tours cease after

Labor Day, the inn’s guests are privy to a

post-breakfast history talk and gift shop visit.

Curt Peters, Digital Dunes Photography

Curt Peters, Digital Dunes Photography

Curt Peters, Digital Dunes Photography

Tim Mantoani

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 105


trip planner

Oregon

Lighthouses

Beacons at land’s end

written by Kimberly Bowker

THE OCEAN HEAVES against the cliffs as the wind shifts, the sky

darkens and the fog rolls in. Weather can change quickly on the

Oregon Coast, where the vast Pacific Ocean meets the unmovable

earth, and where lighthouses dot the edge of time and eternity.

Most Oregon lighthouses were built in the mid-to-late

nineteenth century, as trade necessitated a place of safety and

guidance for ships in all weather. Many Oregon lighthouses are

open to the public, some still operational, for visitors to catch a

glimpse of steady solace.

To visit the lighthouses that each harbor distinct characteristics,

begin a trip on either the north or south end of the state, and

drive along U.S. Highway 101 through coastal towns. Some

lighthouses are built on ocean rocks, some on the edge of jetties,

and others on forested hilltops, yet they all share the same

purpose—to offer an unwavering source of light.

Day

BOUTIQUES • BREWS

From the south, drive

to the far reaches of the

westernmost lighthouse in

Oregon—Cape Blanco. Stop

in the gift shop to pick up a

lighthouse-themed souvenir

and purchase a tour ticket.

Friendly and knowledgeable

volunteers greet guests at

different stages to share

some of the history of the

oldest operating lighthouse in

Oregon, built in 1870, which

aided shipping for

the lumber and gold

mining industries.

106 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


trip planner

Christian Heeb, courtesy of TravelOregon.com

At 93 feet, Yaquina Head Lighthouse

is the tallest light on the Oregon Coast.

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 107


trip planner

FROM LEFT Cape Blanco, built in

1870, is the oldest operating

lighthouse in Oregon. The Coquille

River Lighthouse helped sailors

navigate the treacherous entrance

to the Coquille River. Grab a drink

with a view at Edgewaters in

Bandon, or satisfy a seafood

craving at Tony’s Crab Shack.

Lois Miller, courtesy of TravelOregon.com

About 200,000 bricks surround visitors

walking into the workroom and up the

chasm of more than sixty spiral steps. The

walls and floors are hollow, as in many

lighthouses, which reduces weight and

helps with ventilation. At the top, stand

next to the lens weighing 1 ton and watch

the world reflected upside down as the glass

rotates within the expansive horizon.

Lights from the towers can extend 21

miles in every direction, making a trip up

the coast perfect to stop at the lighthouses

positioned about 30 to 60 miles apart. Drive

through Port Orford along the coast to the

next stop: Coquille River Lighthouse.

Located on a jetty, the 40-foot-tall

octagonal lighthouse feels the spray of the

ocean as waves hit the rocks just feet below.

The lighthouse, built in 1896, helped to

navigate the historically dangerous entrance

to the Coquille River. The area was named

after the native Coquille tribe, with Hudson

Bay Company trappers here in the 1800s

and the first settlers arriving in 1853.

Each coastal town has its own

personality, so be sure to stroll through the

relaxed rhythm of old Bandon among the

shingled cottages of boutique stores, cafés

and art galleries. Dine on fresh seafood

with a view of the lighthouse at Tony’s

Crab Shack or Edgewaters Restaurant. On

the way out of Bandon, drop by Forget-

Me-Knots for quilt patterns of each unique

lighthouse along the Oregon Coast, or to

pick up some lighthouse fabric for that

next quilt.

Navigating up Highway 101, take a

detour to view Cape Arago Lighthouse.

Standing on an islet off Gregory Point, the

structure is not accessible to the public, but

if you drive a quarter-mile south of Sunset

Bay Campground entrance and pull off

the highway, you can walk the short path

to a bench overlooking a grand view of

the lighthouse. Stationed on a flat piece

of land, it was first lit in 1934, after two

lighthouses in that location buckled under

time and weather.

Highway 101 swings through the

fishing boats waiting in harbor and past

the discarded piles of white oysters in

Charleston. Tall vintage buildings across

from the water in nearby Coos Bay reveal

some history of this old coastal town, as the

road winds to the next landmark.

Umpqua River Lighthouse is stationed

high above the ocean and is still operated by

the U.S. Coast Guard. The museum, housed

in the former Coast Guard station quarters,

recollects history of lighthouses and the lifesaving

agency. In 1939, the U.S. Lighthouse

Service combined with the Coast Guard,

resulting in lighthouse jurisdiction falling to

the Guard.

Take a thirty-minute tour of the lighthouse,

and have the rare chance to see a light from

the inside. Guests can pop their heads into

the middle of the rotating light and catch

a new glimpse of the world as

rainbows reflect onto the floor.

If time permits, stop at

the storybook Heceta Head

108 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


trip planner

WHEN YOU GO

1

Be sure to check updated information, especially in winter months.

Hours are dependent on weather and staffing, with some areas

requiring parking fees.

Bandon Chamber of Commerce

Bandon Chamber of Commerce Bandon Chamber of Commerce

1. TILLAMOOK ROCK LIGHTHOUSE: Not accessible to the public,

but glimpse a view on the Tillamook Head trail between Ecola State

Park and Seaside, or from Indian Beach parking lot at Ecola.

2. CAPE MEARES LIGHTHOUSE: Open May through September,

11 a.m.-4 p.m. for tours.

503.842.2244 or 503.842.3182

3. YAQUINA HEAD LIGHTHOUSE: Open year-round 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Be sure to get to the Interpretive Center early to sign up for a tour

later that day (tours 12-3 p.m. mid-September through mid-June;

tours 11 a.m.-4 p.m. during the summer). In the summer, reserve

a tour online for a small cost. No tours offered Tuesdays and

Thursdays in winter.

541.574.3100, yaquinalights.org

4. YAQUINA BAY LIGHTHOUSE: Open March through

September, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., October through February, 12-4 p.m.

for self-guided tours.

541.265.5679

5. HECETA HEAD LIGHTHOUSE: Open March through October,

11 a.m.-3 p.m., November through February 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Tours

are free.

541.547.3416

5

3

4

2

Lighthouse, just south of Yachats, or make

time for it the following morning. An uphill

winding path hugs the cliff as it cuts through

a coastal forest to the top. Built in 1894, it

is now the brightest lighthouse in Oregon,

illuminating a 1,000-watt bulb through one

of three English-crafted lens in the United

States (with most lighthouse lenses being

first-order Fresnel shipped from Paris).

Experience an intimate lighthouse

getaway, and stay the night at Heceta

Lighthouse B&B. Located near the

lighthouse, the idyllic accommodations

are housed in the old assistant light

keeper’s house finished in 1894. Or

continue to Yachats and relax with local

beer and food at Yachats Brewing, the

neighborhood watering hole filled with

sustainable delicacies. Enjoy a night at

the Overleaf Lodge & Spa, or reserve an

ocean-side campsite at Tillicum

Campground. Let the waves lull

you to sleep and be comforted as

the lights remain turning.

6. UMPQUA RIVER LIGHTHOUSE: Open year-round. Museum

and gift shop open 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and tours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tours

are $8 for adults, $4 for 6-17, under 5 free.

541.271.4631

7. CAPE ARAGO LIGHTHOUSE: Not accessible to the public,

but great views available ¼-mile south of the Sunset Bay

Campground entrance.

8. COQUILLE RIVER LIGHTHOUSE: Open for self-guided

tours mid-May through September, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

541.347.2209

9. CAPE BLANCO: Open for tours April through

October, Monday-Wednesday, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Last

tour tickets sold at 3:15 p.m. $2 for adults, free for 15

and under.

541.332.2207 or 541.332.0521

ALSO: Tour the Lightship Columbia at the Columbia

River Maritime Museum in Astoria. The Lightship,

a floating lighthouse, was operational between 1951

and 1979 marking the mouth of the Columbia River.

Museum hours are 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m., with admission

fees applicable.

503.325.2323

9

8

7

6

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 109


trip planner

FROM LEFT Grab a bite on the beach at Pacific City’s Pelican Brewing Co. Tillamook Rock

Lighthouse, or “Terrible Tilly,” is built on a basalt rock more than a mile from land.

Christian Heeb, courtesy of TravelOregon.com

Day

CLAM CHOWDER • TERRIBLE TILLY

Breathe the fresh ocean air in the morning on the

way to Newport, where two lighthouses are open to

visitors year-round. Yaquina Bay Lighthouse is the

oldest building in Newport, constructed in 1871,

and operated as a lighthouse until 1874. Today it

serves as a museum, where visitors explore what

life was like more than a century ago. Tread with

care, though, as stories of the haunted lighthouse

have circulated since the late 1890s.

Tours of Yaquina Head Lighthouse take visitors

back in time, as interpretative guides in period

costume walk guests over the original marble floors

and up the 114 steps to the lens. The tallest light on

the Oregon Coast, at 93 feet, was lit in 1873. Many

keepers kept the lighthouse wicks going with lard

oil or kerosene until electricity came on the scene

in the 1930s.

Sign up for the tour at Yaquina Head Interpretive

Center and Interpretive Store, and carve out some

time to view the natural and historical exhibits in

the building. See the lighthouse keepers’ logs that

meticulously documented weather and activity,

learn the workings of the intricate lens, or watch

an informational film.

For lunch, drop by Mo’s for famous clam chowder

at its Lincoln City location, or stop for a beer and

a bite at Pelican Brewing Co. in Pacific City. Cape

Meares Lighthouse is near Tillamook, home of

the Tillamook Cheese Factory that provides free

cheese samples and a casual café menu that offers

everything cheese.

To get to Cape Meares Lighthouse, take a path

for about a quarter-mile through moss-laden trees

to the charming 38-foot-tall lighthouse. Unlike

other lighthouses, visitors approach eye-level to

the lens for a new perspective, then drop down to

the base.

Continue the journey to the final and

unforgettable stop, Tillamook Rock Lighthouse.

Nicknamed “Terrible Tilly,” the lighthouse was

built on a basalt rock more than a mile from

land, surrounded by crashing sea and exposed to

the precarious weather. Its dangers were real—a

mason drowned in the ocean on the way to the

island to conduct survey work—and the expensive

construction took more than 500 days to complete.

The lighthouse is one of the most exposed

lighthouses in the United States, and housed four

lighthouse keepers at one time with provisions

lasting six months. The lighthouse was operational

between 1881 and 1957, and can now be viewed

safely from land. It is also a columbarium, acting as

a resting place for ashes of loved ones in the midst

of the sea.

The history of these exquisite and graceful

Oregon lighthouses, each different and vital to

maritime survival, remains an integral part of

coastal communities. Cameron La Follette, author

of articles about lighthouses for Oregon Historical

Society’s Oregon Encyclopedia, reminds us the

importance of preserving lighthouses. They served

as beacons in a place of great danger, and need help

to stay alive.

“They are highly valuable to the communities,”

La Follette said. “As part of history and beauty—

and they are extremely symbolic to everyone.”

OREGON LIGHTHOUSES

EAT

Tony’s Crab Shack

tonyscrabshack.com

Edgewaters Restaurant

edgewaters.net

Yachats Brewing

yachatsbrewing.com

Mo’s

moschowder.com

Pelican Brewing Co.

pelicanbrewing.com

Tillamook Cheese Factory

tillamook.com

STAY

Headlands Coastal Lodge & Spa

headlandslodge.com

Heceta Lighthouse B&B

hecetalighthouse.com

Overleaf Lodge & Spa

overleaflodge.com

Many of the lighthouses are

located on state parks that offer

camping options, so be sure to

check it overnight availability at

oregonstateparks.org.

PLAY

Forget-Me-Knots Quilt Shop

forget-me-knots.net

Hikes along the Oregon Coast

oregonstateparks.org

Sea Lion Caves

sealioncaves.com

110 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


8am

Venture out.

7pm

Dig in.

HEAD OUT. STAY IN.

PACIFIC CITY, OREGON | HEADLANDSLODGE.COM


northwest destination

Ketchum & Sun Valley

Hitting up the best slopes in Idaho

written by Kevin Max

The Limelight Hotel

opened in January 2016.

THE PROBLEM WITH Ketchum and Sun Valley is there are too

many things to get after if you’re on the outdoorsy-to-athletic arc.

Let’s deal with the obvious first—Sun Valley Ski Resort is the

stuff of dreams, reveries that go back to the roots of alpine skiing

in this country and figures as broad as history itself. As mining

was fading in the 1930s and the valley was losing population,

Averell Harriman, of the Union Pacific Railroad and Secretary of

Commerce under President Truman, had an interest in the success

of the Wood River Valley. Harriman recruited Austrian nobility

in the form of Count Felix Schaffgotsch to site a world-class ski

resort in Ketchum. Schaffgotsch declared the surrounding slopes

perfectly suitable for skiing, developed them, built the Sun Valley

Lodge and invited glamorous Hollywood stars out for winter fun.

The dirty little secret is that Count Schaffgotsch counted himself a

Hitler supporter. He soon decamped to fight on the wrong side of

the war and was killed in the Battle of Stalingrad in 1942, as Soviets

crushed the Nazi attack. Permit me this one insensitivity—we got

a nice ski resort out this and one that is Hollywood’s winter home.

Today, the resort is an iconic destination with 3,400 vertical

feet, ten lifts and more than 100 trails. The ski lodges are built for

ages past and future—big wood beams, brass fixtures, massive

chandeliers, stone fireplaces in a collision of comfort and opulence,

Lodge and Jazz eras.

Let’s not forget Wood River Valley’s best skiing. Up the Sawtooth

Scenic Byway heading north from town is the Nordic mecca at

Galena Lodge. North Valley and Galena trails (adult one-day pass

$17; kids 17 and under are free) and Wood River trails are free

and open to the public. The mountains that tilt off the highway

are known as the Boulder Mountains, despite their smooth and

boulderless appearance. One runs out of names, I suppose. A

fairly serious competition of cross-country skiing happens in this

valley each February. In flattering spandex, competitors in the

Boulder Mountain Tour glide 34 kilometers down the Harriman

Trail from Galena Lodge. It’s not for everyone, but a spectacle for

onlookers nonetheless.

Try the full-moon dinners at Galena Lodge December through

March. For $45, you get a four-course dinner served at communal

tables in a remote lodge in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area.

For a surprising bit of culture in this mountain town, check out the

Sun Valley Opera. This is an intimate way to see top musical acts

for a high-browed thrill. The opera takes place at the Community

School Theatre and, now, at the new Limelight Hotel downtown.

Strolling downtown Ketchum is a simple pleasure of its own. On

Main Street, too many places demand the attention of a drink or

two—Pioneer Saloon, Sawtooth Club, Whiskey Jacques, Despo’s

for Mexican and margaritas. My favorites include the Ketchum

Grill, a classic and good for noisy conversation; Il Naso for lively

Italian cuisine in an intimate den; and the newcomer

Town Square for upscale Middle Eastern dishes and

well-traveled wines. Thrifting at the Gold Mine is always

112 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Lunch

Brunch

Dinner

Sightseeing

Charters

Let’s

Celebrate!

local family owned since 1994

Portland Spirit Cruises & Events

503-224-3900 / 800-224-3901

PortlandSpirit.com


northwest destination

208 Images & Media

Dev Khalsa Photography

FROM LEFT Grumpy’s, in Ketchum, is the perfect place to grab a burger. Find stellar nordic trails at Galena Lodge.

KETCHUM AND SUN VALLEY, IDAHO

EAT

Town Square Tavern

ketchumtavern.com

Grumpy’s

grumpyssunvalley.com

Il Naso

ilnaso.com

Ketchum Grill

ketchumgrill.com

Pioneer Saloon

pioneersaloon.com

STAY

Limelight Hotel

limelighthotels.com/ketchum

Sun Valley Lodge

sunvalley.com/lodging/sunvalley-lodge

Camp in Sawtooth National

Recreation Area

fs.usda.gov

PLAY

Zenergy

zenergysv.com

Sun Valley Ski Resort

sunvalley.com

Nordic skiing at Galena Lodge

galenalodge.com

Easley Hot Springs

Trail Running

on the retail menu, too. Of course, there is the

burgher of burgers, Grumpy’s just north on Warm

Springs Road. Hoist a stein of beer, then tipsy-toe

over to Ketchum Cemetery to pay respects to the

writer’s writer, Ernest Hemingway.

In A Farewell to Arms, Hemingway wrote, “If

people bring so much courage to this world the

world has to kill them to break them, so of course

it kills them. The world breaks every one and

afterward many are strong at the broken places.”

This is a good place and state of mind to swear

out loud and then solemnly vow to re-read every

Hemingway book. In a way, Ketchum is a historic

fence line between two of its most remarkable

past residents. Hemingway was fighting against

fascists with words in the Spanish Civil War long

before Schaffgotsch fought with guns for fascists.

Ketchum and Sun Valley are top of mind for

winter vacations but, by Zeus, summer may be

the better season. I’ve been to Ketchum many

times, but these trips were always built around

skiing. Last July, my wife and I rolled into town

over the Galena pass with an Airstream trailer

in tow and down the spine of Highway 75, the

scenic byway. Our daughters had a Nordic skiing

camp there, yes, in summer, giving us time to

play in Ketchum’s other season. We set up at

Easley campground, 14 miles north of town.

Wood River and North Fork campgrounds are

just down the road and are also good options for

camping. Easley, though, has a leg up with the

Easley Hot Springs adjacent to camp. From the

hot springs pool, you can soak in the Sawtooth

National Forest, slow down and start to mend.

From Easley, it’s also a short drive to one of

the most varied and scenic trail runs in the West.

Fox Creek Loop spins out over 6.8 miles through

stunning vistas of the Boulder Mountains,

bombasts of wild flowers, shocks of white aspen

and chars of recent burns. There are some wideopen

stretches of this run that beg you to stop,

walk and take it all in until electrical storms move

in. If you’re spending any time in the area, this is

one of the flagship trails for hiking or running,

along with Adams Gulch and Pioneer Cabin.

We spent the next few nights in town, where

we decamped at the new Limelight Hotel, a

much-needed addition to Ketchum hospitality.

Limelight, which opened in January 2016,

is a destination luxury hotel with a modern,

sustainable and clean vibe. Dogs are equally

pampered guests. Limelight’s pool area is a great

place to unwind with truffle fries, lamb lollipops

and margaritas.

Limelight is just a jog from another spectacular

run. The Bald Mountain trail to the upper station

of the Roundhouse Gondola gains 3,230 feet in

the 5.3 mile-round trip. Run up and ride down.

The ski resort operates the gondola from the end

of June to the middle of September from 9 a.m.

until 4 p.m.

If you want to take a different approach to

recreation, Limelight is connected with Zenergy,

the top fitness and spa in Ketchum, which

has musical guests in the summer. Our night

there, outside in the heat of summer and in the

courtyard of Zenergy, a jazz singer crooned sultry

songs of the soul that healed all broken places.

114 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


1-800-COAST44 / DISCOVERNEWPORT.COM

D I S C O V

E R

M UKI L T E O

Lighthouse Park

www.mukilteochamber.org/discover

Whidbey Island Ferry Japanese Gulch Trails Harbour Pointe Golf Course Paine Field Aerospace Museums


EXPLORE OREGON

eat + stay + play

ANJOU SPA

Nestled between the lush Cascade

mountains and High Desert juniper

and sagebrush, Anjou Spa is a Lifestyle

and Wellness Spa dedicated to the

art of looking and feeling good, both

inside and out. Holistic, results-driven

and inspired by our environment,

we focus on providing memorable,

botanically driven treatments,

experiences and gifts that support

equilibrium to an active lifestyle.

541.241.8454

1835 NW Pence Lane

BEND

anjouspa.com

ARBORBROOK

VINEYARDS

ArborBrook Vineyards is a boutique

producer of exceptional handcrafted

wines. Family-owned and operated, it

is located in the heart of Oregon wine

country in the Chehalem Mountain

AVA. Visit the tasting room for a

relaxing and casual wine tasting

experience. Weekdays, 11– 4:30.

Weekends, 11–5.

503.538.0959

17770 NE Calkins Lane

NEWBERG

arborbrookwines.com

CASCADE LAKES

BREWING COMPANY

On the road to Mt. Bachelor you’ll find

the warm and welcoming Cascade

Lakes Brewing Company Lodge.

Enjoy 16 liquids on draft, a full bar,

pool table and darts. You can also visit

the flagship location in Redmond on

7th Street. A local favorite for Taco

Wednesdays, horseshoes and great

hometown feel. Cheers!

541.388.4998

1441 SW Chandler Ave., #100

BEND

cascadelakes.com

THE CHATEAU AT

THE OREGON CAVES

NATIONAL MONUMENT

Cool cave, warm hearth. En route between

the California Redwoods and Crater Lake,

this national historic landmark offers rustic

charm and a friendly staff. Experience tours

of capacious marble caverns ranging from

family-friendly to adventurous. Explore

hiking trails to alpine lakes and discover

nearby wineries and attractions. Find

lodging, fine dining, a regional artisan gift

gallery and an authentic 1930s-style café.

541.592.3400

20000 Caves Hwy.

CAVE JUNCTION

oregoncaveschateau.com

MOUNT BACHELOR

VILLAGE RESORT

Mount Bachelor Village Resort is

located minutes from downtown Bend

and the Old Mill District shops on the

road to Mt. Bachelor. Nestled among the

pines on the ridge above the Deschutes

River, the resort offers a variety of

nightly accommodations (river view

condominiums, standard hotel-rooms,

ski house condominiums and vacation

homes). Distinguishing features include

access to the Deschutes River Trail,

outdoor hot tubs, seasonal pools and

cruiser bikes and complimentary access

to the Athletic Club of Bend.

877.514.2391

19717 Mt. Bachelor Drive

BEND

mtbachelorvillage.com

116 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018

BLACK BUTTE RANCH

Formerly a working cattle ranch,

Black Butte Ranch is nestled at the

base of the Cascade Mountains with

stunning views of seven mountain

peaks and access to all that Deschutes

National Forest has to offer. The Ranch

encompasses 1,800 pristine acres of

Ponderosa forest, meadows, and lakes.

With two ski areas close by (Hoodoo

ski area is just 15 miles from the Ranch

and Mt. Bachelor is 32 miles), two

recreation centers, indoor pool, spa and

fitness center you can be as busy or laidback

as you want. Book a minimum

three night stay and receive a $50 gift

card for use anywhere on the Ranch.

Reserve your stay today!

541.549.5555

220 S. Ash St., Ste. 8

SISTERS

blackbutte.com


eat + stay + play

EXPLORE OREGON

DANCIN VINEYARDS

2017 Oregon Winery of the Year-

WPNW. DANCIN is a love story

and the marriage of science and art.

Situated in the vineyard and located

just minutes from Ashland, Medford

and Jacksonville, our tasting room and

patio are the perfect setting to drink

in the views of Table Rocks, Mount

McLoughlin and the Rogue Valley while

savoring our award-winning wines

along with our artisan wood-fired pizzas

and much more, served tableside!

541.245.1133

4477 South Stage Road

MEDFORD

dancinvineyards.com

CHRISTMAS TREASURES

A Christmas Experience! Christmas

Treasures brings you the most treasured

ornaments and items for gift giving and

collecting. Start a new family tradition.

Come experience the Old World charm,

and see our unique products not only

during the holiday season but all through

the year. A family business for 24 years.

Featuring: Jim Shore, Dept. 56, Possible

Dreams, German Nutcrackers and

Smokers, Nativities, Charming Tails,

Michel Design Works and so much more.

800.820.8189

52959 McKenzie Hwy.

BLUE RIVER

christmas-treasures.com

MILL INN BED

& BREAKFAST

Mill Inn Bed & Breakfast offers 10

unique rooms in its boutique hotel.

Each room features luxurious linens, its

own theme, beautiful furnishings and

comforts of home, and they’re priced

to fit your budget. Check out the Mill

Inn website for information on your

included homemade hearty breakfast!

541.389.9198

642 NW Colorado Ave.

BEND

millinn.com

Rabbit Tales Georgia Gerber

NW BY NW GALLERY

Original art by regional masters defines

this destination gallery. Celebrating 30

years of excellence with public sculpture

by gallery artists throughout Cannon

Beach. NW By NW Gallery represents

a collector’s selection of bronze

sculpture by renowned public sculptor

Georgia Gerber. Visit the Sculpture

Garden featuring contemporary

sculptor Ivan McLean.

503.436.0741

232 N. Spruce St.

CANNON BEACH

nwbynwgallery.com

OREGON GARDEN

RESORT

Escape to Oregon Garden Resort, a 103-

room, pet-friendly resort set amid an

80-acre botanical wonder showcasing

thousands of plants in more than 20

colorful specialty gardens. There’s

something for everyone! Explore rare

conifers, beautiful water features, garden

art, a 400-year-old Signature Oak tree,

a fun garden just for kids, pet-friendly

plants and more. After exploring, relax

in the resort with a spa treatment, a

gourmet dinner and cocktail and live

music nightly. Fun events happen

throughout the year, including an annual

Brewfest over Father’s Day weekend,

and Christmas in the Garden featuring

lights, ice skating and artisan vendors

each holiday season.

503.874.2500

895 W. Main St.

SILVERTON

oregongardenresort.com

THE OLD MILL DISTRICT

The Old Mill District is Bend’s

most unique shopping, dining and

entertainment experience. The rich

history of the former sawmills is coupled

with spectacular mountain views, scenic

river vistas and an extensive trail system

to enjoy the outdoors. More than 55

local, regional and national retailers and

restaurants call the Old Mill District

home. Riverside restaurants, trails, shops

and shows. Bend is here.

541.312.0131

450 SW Powerhouse Dr.

BEND

theoldmill.com

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 117


1859 MAPPEDThe points of interest below are culled from

stories and events in this edition of 1859.

Live

Think

Explore

32

Oregon Truffle Festival

64

Canvas

98

Pendleton Underground Tours

36

Pachamama Farm

66

Atticus Hotel

100

Sweet Creek Falls

40

Steamboat Inn

68

Oregon Social Learning Center

104

Heceta Head Lighthouse B&B

54

Kingdom of Golf

70

Anna’s Bridal

106

Tillamook Rock Lighthouse

56

Bonneville Dam

72

Lewis & Clark College

112

Ketchum, Idaho

118 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


Pursuing excellence

through fitness

61615 Athletic Club Drive (541) 385-3062


Until Next Time

Showing Me the Way Home

written by Susannah Bradley | illustrated by Allison Bye

THE PICTURE ON the video screen was dark and grainy,

blurry around the edges with three disks at its center. It

might have been a satellite image of planets in a distant

solar system, remote and mysterious as fate. And in a way,

it was. As I lay on the surgical table at Portland’s Oregon

Reproductive Medicine, staring at my three tiny embryos

on the screen, I willed those planets to become my new

world. Fate, luck and nature had all failed me in my quest

to become a mother, and so it was up to science.

The surgical team finalized its preparations, and I

watched in awe as the doctor drew up each microscopic

fertilized embryo in a pipette for transfer back to my

body. I didn’t feel a thing as the transfer took place, but

psychically, it was huge. If the transfer “took,” I would soon

be the mother of a baby … or three.

The embryo transfer is the last step in the arduous IVF

process. After weeks of injections, ultrasounds and blood

tests, eight eggs were retrieved and cultured in ORM’s

lab. By the fifth day, three embryos had formed, and the

clinic prepared them for transfer. After that, there was

an almost unbearable two-week wait to find out if the

process had worked.

I’ve spent most of my life in the Pacific Northwest, but

I came to Portland for IVF because Oregon Reproductive

Medicine’s success rate for people my age was among the

highest in the country. While my husband was working

in Northern California during a brief career detour, I

spent the two-week wait falling in love with Oregon, my

embryos, and ultimately the idea of a home among the

sheltering trees. I made bargains with the universe (“If this

pregnancy takes, I promise to …”) and saw auspicious signs

everywhere I looked. Red-haired twins shouting “Happy

New Year!” on Hawthorne Boulevard in the middle of July.

Clouds shaped like horses gamboling in the sky over Hood

River. And on a quiet morning in Forest Park, the deer who

stopped and watched me watching her on the trail filled

me with a deep sense that everything was going to be fine.

While my embryos were going about the work of

dividing and implanting, I was discovering neighborhoods,

wandering through parks, and eating a lot of pizza, pastry

and ice cream. I was making myself at home.

“Just wait until the rain starts,” people warned. “Everyone

loves Portland when the sun is shining.” But this was love,

and I knew better.

Two weeks later, the call came on a Tuesday morning.

One of the three embryos had implanted, and we were

going to be parents. I joined my husband in California

and made all of the usual preparations for the birth of

our son, but I missed Oregon the way you miss a person.

I looked out our kitchen window at the arid hills of the

Diablo Range and wished for green mountains and lush

forests instead. If home is where a family’s story begins,

then our family’s home couldn’t be anywhere but Portland.

My husband agreed, updated his resume, and before long

we were hunting for a home for our fledgling family.

Now, we’re raising our son—and his two younger

brothers—in a ramshackle treehouse in Portland’s

Southwest hills. Our boys love rain puddles and slugs,

and falling asleep to the calls of coyotes and owls. They

are Oregonians with a deep appreciation for our state’s

natural treasures and a sense of wonder for the beautiful

place we call home. My oldest boy loves to hear about

the month I spent alone, discovering the places we now

explore together, willing him into existence and making

promises to the universe to be the best mom, if given

the chance. I’ll always be grateful to the team at Oregon

Reproductive Medicine for that chance—and for showing

me the way home.

120 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2018


TOGETHER WE CAN

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Freeal, 15, survives in a refugee camp after fleeing her home in Mosul, Iraq.

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