FuturArc September October 2017

susanty

FuturArc September October 2017

Sep-Oct 2017 | volume 56

The Water Issue

Inside: Singapore: Asia’s Little Blue Dot – A socio-ecological paradigm takes

shape | Jack Sim – Founder of the World Toilet Organization and World Toilet College |

Riverfront Developments in China and India – With projects by Morphogenesis and

Turenscape | Vertical Fish Farm – A lesson in designing loops

With projects from Cambodia, China, India, Nepal and Singapore

Hong Kong HKD72 RMB80 Indonesia IDR83,000 Malaysia MYR39 Philippines PHP500 Singapore SGD15 Thailand THB290 Vietnam 190,000


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Letter from the editor

Dear FuturArc Readers,

Your body is about 60 percent water; the surface of our planet, 71 percent. Water is life. It is the conduit for

the many flows and exchanges that keep living systems alive: nutrients, thermal energy, waste, oxygen, etc. It

is home to over 1 million known species of plants and animals.

Water, as a pre-condition for living systems, is the theme of this issue. The cover, in case you wondered,

shows the blue between Singapore and Malaysia. It was inspired by Sylvia Earle, an American marine biologist,

who famously said “no water, no life… no blue, no green”.

The projects ahead speak of the restoration of hydrological landscapes, the remediation of water quality,

the creation of new waterfront places for recreation and contemplation—places with social and cosmological

meaning. Each reminds us that water, from a human perspective, is an instrument of mental and spiritual wellbeing.

And that working with nature is the best design strategy. Of the river projects, the one by Morphogenesis

(A River in Need, page 56) illustrates this best, working with the ebb and flow of tides along the river Ganga,

temporally adjusting human space to hydrological space.

Often, an issue like this leaves us wishing for more, say, projects showing water as habitat. There are two

here—the Lingang Bird Airport (page 52) and Mangrove Tetrapods (page 46)—but there could and should be

others out there. We might also wish for projects that speak to the importance of water as transportation. There

are cities in Asia where water-based mobility has been the cornerstone of development—Ho Chi Minh City and

Bangkok come to mind—where investment in the water transportation is long overdue. Lastly, there are not

enough examples of integration, where a water system simultaneously creates social and ecological value.

A noteworthy exception is Singapore, Asia’s Little Blue Dot (page 16). With a population of 5.5 million and

growing, the small city-state relies heavily on water from Malaysia. The article on four taps tells the story of

diversification, integration and political will. Singapore now has (a) vastly increased its rainwater catchment and

detention areas through land-use policies and urban infrastructure, (b) invested in technologies that recycle

waste water to potable standards, and (c) invested in desalination plants. Imports, by the year 2060, will be

altogether eliminated, making the island self-sufficient.

This, however, is not just an engineering feat. What is remarkable here is that this push for self-sufficiency

is backed by a decision to make water infrastructure more attractive, more people-friendly, and in the process,

making the city more livable. Planners and designers in Singapore are now asked to turn once-hard water

infrastructure into social-ecological spaces. In this issue, we see two examples: Yishun Pond and Sengkang

Floating Wetlands (page 22), which serve both humans and nature.

This then is an argument that is not often heard when experts talk about sustainability: that a solution for

resilience and self-interest should also make for a more beautiful, more inclusive, world.

Happy reading.

Dr Nirmal Kishnani

Editor-in-Chief

n.kishnani@futurarc.com


contents

main feature

16 Singapore: Asia’s Little Blue Dot

the futurarc interview

26 Jack Sim

Founder, World Toilet Organization & World Toilet College

projects

34 Nature Takes Centre Stage

46 Mangrove Tetrapods

52 Lingang Bird Airport

56 A River in Need

60 The Sabarmati Riverfront Development

64 Floating Ponds: A Vertical Aquaculture

Farming Typology

people

70 In Conversation with Nripal Adhikary

happenings

76 BCI Asia Awards 2017

88 Special Focus

92 Milestones & Events

96 product advertorials


main feature futurarc interview futurarc showcase projects people commentary happenings books product advertorials

Singapore: Asia’s

by Heather Marshall Banerd

1 Sengkang Floating Wetland, Punggol Reservoir, Singapore

16 FUTURARC


Blue

Little Red Dot

1

Photo by Heather Marshall Banerd

FUTURARC 17


The FuturArc

Interview

Jack Sim

Founder, World Toilet Organization & World Toilet College

By Dr Ann Deslandes

26 FUTURARC


FUTURARC 27


main feature futurarc interview futurarc showcase projects people commentary happenings books product advertorials

CHINA

34 FUTURARC

1


NATURE TAKES

CENTRE STAGE

In a bid to expand or improve our living settlements, we have been encroaching

the water’s edge along rivers and seas. In recent years, the rise of blue-green

infrastructures has played a vital role in striking a balance between built

structures and natural water bodies. In this section, we showcase two projects

where the waterways were revitalised by incorporating strategies to amplify

the natural elements and building site-sensitive structures and systems while

retaining the original topographies. Not only do these serve as sanctuaries for

the public within metropolises, they also improve the water network to bring

about a healthier ecosystem.

1 The public gathering on a pavilion that overlooks a farm covered with sunflowers

during summer

FUTURARC 35


main feature futurarc interview futurarc showcase projects people commentary happenings books product advertorials

46 FUTURARC

1


MANGROVE TETRAPODS

We have all seen these giant concrete structures by some beaches. Tetrapods—

meaning having four legs in Greek—are those quirky four-pronged armour units

designed to protect the coastline by dissipating the force of incoming waves—the

water flows around, rather than against, it. Although they reduce displacement by

their interlocked web structure, these artificial systems tend to be dislodged over

time by the sheer force of the ocean waves, and have been criticised for marring

the beauty of natural coastlines.

In 2016, based on the function of tetrapods, a group of designers decided

to marry the concepts of artificial and natural sea defences to create a hybrid

structure that is equipped with a planted pot (hence the name TetraPOT).

These hollowed structures, weighing a ton each, house mangrove seeds held in

biodegradable pots that decompose within two to three months as the roots grow

downwards to reach for water. When the sea level goes up, a certain amount of

water will be collected in the recess part inside each pot. As such, the concrete

exterior of TetraPOTs will protect the mangrove saplings as they grow—the

maturing roots can grow out of their pots’ pre-drilled holes and intertwine to

prevent soil erosion, offer water filtration and form a natural habitat. With much of

1 TetraPOTS seek to prevent soil erosion, offer water filtration and

form a natural habitat.

FUTURARC 47


main feature futurarc interview futurarc showcase projects people commentary happenings books product advertorials

INDIA

Government Officer’s Housing

Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel National Memorial

Future Development

Pumping Station

Riverfront East Driveway Police Stadium Riverfront Park, Shahibaug Shahpur Sports Park

Cantonment Area

Proposed Park Narayan Ghat Future Development

Dudheshwar Water Works

Future Development

1

Gandhi Ashram

Ashram Road

Proposed Metro Bridge

Torrent Power Plant

Future Development

Subhash Bridge

Dadhichi Rushi Bridge

Lower Promenade

Riverfront Park,

Usmanpura

Railway Bridge Dandi Bridge Upper Promenade

Gandhi Bridge

Sardar Patel

Stadium

60 FUTURARC


Future Development Exhibition Centre Sewage Treatment Plant

Riverfront Park, Khanpur Tilak Baug Riverfront Market Future Development Laundry Campus

Future Development Future Development Pumping Station Proposed Pirana

Sports Ground

Nehru Bridge

V. S. Hospital

Sanskar Kendra

Sardar Bridge

Vasna Barrage

Boating Station

B. J. Park

Proposed Pedestrian Bridge

Events Ground

Zip-Lining Facility

Proposed Neighbourhood Park

Pumping Station

Riverfront West Driveaway

Ellis Bridge

Flower Garden

Tagore Hall

Proposed Paldi Sports Complex

Dr Ambedkar Bridge

Paldi Urban Forest

The Sabarmati Riverfront Development

by Anshuman Roy

On 15 th August 2012, the 66 th Independence Day of the Republic of India, the

Sabarmati Riverfront in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, was declared open amidst great

celebration. The ceremony was presided over by the prime minister of India (then

chief minister of Gujarat) Shri. Narendra Modi. As a project that had been confined

to the blueprints of architects and planners for decades, the revitalisation of the

riverfront would represent a major achievement for the state of Gujarat. Over the

years, the Sabarmati riverfront had been plagued by the flow of untreated sewage

through its waters, the indiscriminate pumping of industrial waste and unmitigated

slum proliferation. The river was rendered inaccessible and saturated, prone to

frequent flooding, with no infrastructure in place to tackle the problem. Though

a number of proposals over the years sought to revitalise the ailing riverfront

precinct, it was only in 1997 that the Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation (AMC)

formed the Sabarmati Riverfront Development Corporation Ltd (SRFDCL) for the

express redevelopment of a waterfront stretch of over 11 kilometres, a designated

priority project funded by the government of India.

The Sabarmati Riverfront Development (SRFD) project, estimated to cost US$190

million, overcame numerous roadblocks on its journey to fruition, in large part due

to concerns regarding water levels and flooding. Opposition from activists involved

with slum rehabilitation was another issue that made a number of headlines during

the initial phases of this project. At the master planning stage, this was therefore

a matter that merited urgent redressal. To accommodate the affected sections in

the overall proposal, provisions were made not just for housing and rehabilitation,

but also for a reorganisation of the existing informal markets and laundry facilities

for the washing community, therein opening up new opportunities along the river

for the displaced populace. The pre-construction stages of the project also involved

detailed hydrological surveys and feasibility studies, which would all directly

influence the strategising, massing and spatial organisation of the design.

1 Master plan

FUTURARC 61


main feature futurarc interview futurarc showcase projects people commentary happenings books product advertorials

SINGAPORE

1

64 FUTURARC


FLOATING PONDS: A VERTICAL AQUACULTURE

FARMING TYPOLOGY

Space-Based Vertical Fish Farm As A Self-Sustained Urban Typology

by Alakesh Dutta

The productive and operational viability of vertical farming has thus far been

largely restricted to green leafy vegetables. This vertical aquaculture farming

project is one of the pioneering attempts at taking land-based fish farming

vertical. This is significant as the main nutrient yield here is protein, which

also has a higher economic value in comparison to green leafy vegetables. The

success of this typology can considerably boost the planning for future urban

food resilience, both in terms of productivity per unit land area (critical to dense

urban developments) and nutritional value.

The design for this farm is anchored in two fundamental strategies:

• The purpose-engineered closed-system water reticulation system developed

by the owner (Apollo Aquaculture Group) that makes vertical stacking of the

fish raceways functionally possible

• The systems approach to the planning of the farm that helps to create a selfsustained

farming typology

ADOPTING A SYSTEMS APPROACH

The planning is founded on a comprehensive integration of three main systems

that are engaged by the farm: water, nutrients and energy. A systemic integration

of these systems will lead to a scheme that creates a closed-loop farming ecosystem.

The flow chart (see image 6) shows the embeddedness of the systems

in this design scheme, and depicts the flows and exchanges amongst them. The

spatial design of the farm thereafter works towards enabling these exchanges,

and the architecture is thus a facilitator of the system’s interconnections and

coordinates their integration.

2

1 Axonometric diagrams of the vertical fish farm 2 A functioning prototype to test the

vertical stacking and the water reticulation system

FUTURARC 65


main feature futurarc interview futurarc showcase projects people commentary happenings books product advertorials

In Conversation with

Nripal Adhikary

by Bhawna Jaimini

Nripal Adhikary

Architect, designer and painter Nripal Adhikary truly believes in small is

beautiful. He is the founder of ABARI, which he set up in 2006 with the

aim of doing socially and environmentally committed research, design

and construction. He seeks to examine, encourage and celebrate

vernacular architectural traditions by starting a conversation around

adapting traditional materials into the modern context, which was

absent from the architectural narrative of Nepal. After the catastrophic

earthquake that wrecked Nepal in 2015, Adhikary feels that though it is

a mammoth task of rebuilding the country, there is a huge opportunity

to change the course of development towards a more sustainable

model, which is the only way to go. He spoke to Bhawna Jaimini about

the challenges of reconstruction after a disaster, sustainability and his

experiments with bamboo.

BJ: The 2015 earthquake was extremely catastrophic for Nepal, killing more than 10,000

people and destroying an estimated 600,000 homes. How is ABARI, your firm, involved in the

reconstruction process right now?

NA: The earthquake was extremely traumatic for the people of Nepal, and since the reconstruction process

hasn’t fully started yet, the memories of the earthquake are as fresh as they were two years ago. We have

been working a lot on the reconstruction of schools and public spaces, which are important to restore normalcy

in people’s daily lives. There is a lot of focus on building houses for people, which I feel is important, but for

us, we have been focusing on working to improve and reconstruct external infrastructure with bamboo and

earth-based construction techniques. We started with developing prototypes, setting up supply chains for these

materials and techniques, and setting up implementation mechanisms. Currently, many of the buildings are in

the implementation stage.

BJ: What is the overall status of the reconstruction work in Nepal?

NA: The situation on the ground is still pretty grim even after two years. The government took very long to put

the reconstruction policy into place and now that it is finally out, it is so stringent that it is almost impossible to

rebuilt as per the policy in the given budget. Each family is being given a grant of NPR 3 lakh (US$3,000) for

the reconstruction of a house, which is very little money if compared to the way the policy has laid out rules for

building, completely eliminating the use of any earth-based materials or bamboo but allowing only steel and

cement. The government needs to understand that no material in itself is safe or unsafe. Many houses built in

RCC (reinforced cement concrete) collapsed during the earthquake while many buildings made with earthbased

techniques survived.

1 Ample Natural Ventilation 6

2 Insulated Roof

7

3 Inspiring Study Environment 8

4 Ambient Annual Temperature 9

Non-Toxic Natural Finishes

Engineered + Hazard Resistant

Smart Water Collection

Child-Friendly Play Space

5

Locally Sourced Materials

1

2

5

3

9

8

4

6

7

1

70 FUTURARC


Open Source Permanent School Design

The intention of working on an open source permanent school design is

to rethink the existing paradigm of educational spaces for children in Nepal,

post-earthquake. The buildings will be made from locally sourced materials and

constructed using modified vernacular techniques designed to create safer and

inspiring structures. The school, which can transform and expand according

to individual village needs and site conditions, will feature intuitive natural

technologies as well as permaculture values in order to instil a strong sense of

curiosity and thirst for knowledge in the children. It has a play space component

that challenges the typical classroom design prevalent all over Nepal. It is

conceived as a multifunctional space, which will act as a play area, an art centre, a

small theatre and a shared community space.

The materials used in construction will be local and traditional yet constructed

with creative contemporary building techniques. Almost all of the selected

materials will be site specific, budget conscious and will retain their natural

beauty and texture. The structural design for each building will be multi-hazard

resistant and will act as a model for earthquake-resilient structures for the

entire community. The whole structure will be built with community participation,

making the process empowering for the whole community by instilling a sense of

ownership in the project.

1 Sectional diagram 2 Exploded isometric diagram of a school’s design

3 Elevation 4 Proposed rendering of a school

Roofing Material

Purlins

Truss

Wattle and Daub

Reinforced Lintel Beam

Reinforced Masonry Wall

Reinforced Sill Beam

Play Space

Vertical Reinforcement

Hard Flooring

Reinforced Bond Beam

Stone Foundation

Trench

2

3

4

FUTURARC 71


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Next Issue:

FuturArc

November-December 2017

Year-End

We conclude the year with a showcase of

Green projects that have strong social agendas

that seek to improve the environment and

community. These developments aim to

preserve our ecosystems with passive yet

efficient designs and technologies, utilising local

or renewable resources to enhance the ecofriendly

initiatives that are set in place.

If you have projects to nominate, please send

an email with a brief profile and photos to

c.lim@futurarc.com by end September 2017.

We will notify you if your project is shortlisted

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Unit H, 35/F, Legend Tower, 7 Shing Yip Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong • t +852 2538 0011 f +852 2875 0511 e hongkong@futurarc.com MALAYSIA

BCI Asia Construction Information Sdn Bhd Unit 1106, Block B, Phileo Damansara II, Jln 16/11, Section 16, 46350 Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia • t +603

7661 1380 f +603 7661 1381 e malaysia@futurarc.com SINGAPORE BCI Asia Construction Information Pte Ltd 300 Beach Road, #34-01 The Concourse,

Singapore 199555 • t +65 6538 6836 f +65 6538 6896 e singapore@futurarc.com VIETNAM BCI Asia Vietnam Co Ltd Viettel Tower, Block A1, 13th Floor,

285 Cach Mang Thang Tam Street, Ward 12, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam • t +84 28 6256 1010 f +84 28 6256 0880 e hcmc@futurarc.com

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