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January - March 2018 - Ichunes Ent. Magazine - FINAL

IMMIRGATION Alert |

IMMIRGATION Alert | iChunes Ent. Magazine Returning to Trinidad & Tobago…. What you need to know! WHEN one contemplates the concept of Immigration in any country, generally there are two categories that are automatically considered. The first is natural immigration, which occurs when persons usually leave or travel from one country that is less hospitable for a plethora of reasons, such as economic instability, war, strife, persecution (racial, religious or otherwise), to a country that is more welcoming, being positively charged and diametrically opposed to the undesirable reasons outlined before. Further, within the body of natural immigration, there is the concept of reverse migration, which simply deals with persons who have attained in most cases a particular vintage and having made a decision to retire, prefer to do so in their country of birth. For all intents and purposes, I would be exploring this type of immigration as I believe it to be most apt to the readers of this publication. Secondly there is the notion of deportation, that is considered by many as a negative form of migration. Deportation largely consists of persons who have over stayed their regulated time in one country, thereby abdicating any legal right to remain and subsequently, being forcibly returned to their country of origin. Having outlined these two scenarios, the burning question or dilemma, that may be troubling the mind of readers, would be; What am I to do when I return home? It is the objective of this writer to provide a skeletal solution, in the body of this article to the present quandary. REVERSED MIGRATION Before one decides to re-organize their current habitat, in favor of a return to Trinidad and Tobago, after a long hiatus in a foreign country, it is recommended if possible that one visits a Trinidad and Tobago Diplomatic Mission within their jurisdiction. Trinidad and Tobago have twenty (20) diplomatic missions located all over the globe, each providing a healthy amount of information, that can definitely prove useful for an individual who has reverse migration on their mind. Readers should also consider, checking the Immigration Division of Trinidad and Tobago’s Website to get further information about reverse migration. Acquiring information on reverse migration is very important, as it pertains to illuminating the truth on a plethora of misconceptions associated with the action. For example, persons may generally believe that an individual with whom they are married, who is not a Trinbagonian National, can automatically be naturalized as a Trinbagonian Citizen, by virtue of their nuptials. Equally, persons may also hold the belief, that a child born to a Trinbagonian Citizen, currently living abroad, becomes a naturalized Trinbagonian National by birth. These are two falsities that are shared by many citizens living abroad, and can cause persons to be placed in embarrassing and in some remote cases, precarious positions, if left unchecked by the actual Trinidad and Tobago citizen. 16 January / March 2018

Immigration Alert continues| iChunes Ent. Magazine Hence it is imperative, that persons visit the Diplomatic Mission closest to them, or visit the Immigration Division Website to get further information that can elucidate these misconceptions. As always there would be those Trinis who would have the convenience of living near a Diplomatic Mission and not heed the advice of the instant writer, to attend. In any event, upon their return to Trinidad and Tobago, one can simply visit an office of the Immigration Division and ascertain the correct information required to assist in the completion of the reversed migration process pertaining to their loved ones. DEPORTATION As unfortunate as it may sound, deportation exists. Many individuals do, for several reasons, over stay their allotted time. Be it deliberately, flippantly or carelessly, the result remains the same, once caught, subsequent to a form of judicial proceedings, the individual is usually deported. Once deported a person or a deportee as they are called, is still considered a citizen of Trinidad and Tobago. There has been a number of discussions in recent times, regarding the creation of a database and a system, similar to that of a parole office, to treat with and regulate the movements of deportees, but this has not yet been concretized and remains a discussion. Based upon same persons are not required to do anything special or significant, in terms of checking in or registering with any department of the Ministry of National Security. A deportee is simply expected to assimilate themselves back into the norm of Trinbagonian society. CONCLUSION It is the writer’s humble opinion, that for whatever reason one has decided to migrate to Trinidad and Tobago, either willingly or otherwise, one should use the opportunity of being here as a chance to contribute meaningfully and positively to a society and a community that they are now calling home once again. ~ written by Attorney, Sean S.M. Sobers, from Trinidad W.I. ichunes Ent. Magazine Contributing Writer 17 January / March 2018

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