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Selwyn Times: August 01, 2017

2 [Edition datE] Tuesday

2 [Edition datE] Tuesday August 1 2017 30 Latest Christchurch news at www.star.kiwi SELWYN RURAL LIFE SELWYN TIMES Economic impact of weeds far greater than estimated The true cost of weeds to New Zealand’s agricultural economy is likely to be far higher than previous research would suggest, according to a new study funded by AgResearch. AgResearch and Scion scientists worked with economists from Lincoln University’s Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit to review the available published research on the costs of weeds to New Zealand’s productive land (for the pastoral, arable and forestry sectors). That review reached a conservative overall estimate of $1.658 billion a year (based on 2014 costs). “The research on weed costs done previously used differing approaches, and the numbers were sometimes outdated or contained guesswork,” says AgResearch principal scientist Dr Graeme Bourdôt. “In addition, the estimate of $1.658b only covers the few weed species – 10 of the 187 pasture weeds, some arable land weeds and forestry weeds – that have been the subject of research into their impacts. The focus has largely been on the loss of production. The substantial costs of weed control, such as the use of herbicides, was not always considered,” Dr Bourdôt says. “Given all of these limitations, the true cost of the weeds to the agricultural sector is likely to be much higher than the $1.658b estimate.” The study looked at the economic impact of some of the more widespread and destructive weed species such as gorse, broom, yellow bristle grass and Californian thistle. “We also developed a dynamic approach for estimating the potential costs of weeds that have not yet realised their potential range in New Zealand, taking account of possible rates of spread, maximum geographic extent and changes in consumer prices for agricultural products,” Dr Bourdôt says. “This dynamic approach applied to the Giant Buttercup weed in dairy pastures indicates that this weed alone would cost the dairy industry $592 million per year in lost milk solids revenue if it were to spread across its entire range over the next 20 years.” “New Zealand has one of the highest levels of invasion by introduced plant species in the world, and there has always been a shortage of information when it comes to their economic costs on productive land.” The Giant Buttercup is a potential threat to the dairy industry “Knowing more about these costs is important to developing cost-effective ways to tackle weeds, and in quantifying the benefits of research aimed at keeping us ahead of the game.” New Zealand has one of the highest levels of invasion by introduced plant species in the world Diesel Blower Heaters • An industrial diesel powered blower heater, which is ideal for warming a large area. • Clean burning technology and diesel economy allow it to operate for up to 14 hours on a single tank. • Designed especially to keep operation noise to an absolute minimum. • Plug the heater into a standard three pin plug power point and turn the thermostat to the desired heat setting and the burner starts automatically and will continue operation until it reaches the preset heat setting, automatically turning itself off and on as required to maintain the temperature. • A truly powerful, versatile and economical heater 30 kW - $795.00 GST incl 50 kW - $895.00 GST incl Attention all farmers If you’re in need of a resource consent, we can help. • Effluent discharge • Groundwater • Surface water • FEP / Land Use • Due diligence • Monitoring & compliance • Advocacy NEW RELEASE New Benchmark for Recreational Jetboating Hamilton 470 Organic Training College LEARN FROM THE EXPERTS Start a career in organics. Reduce your footprint and produce a regular supply of your own fruit and vegetables. BUY DIRECT FROM THE IMPORTER! Lifestyle Tractors & Machinery Ltd • www.lifestyletractors.co.nz Tel. 03-347-4956 • Mob. 0274 770 070 Email. tractors@lifestyletractors.co.nz COURSES (All fees under $500) Year 1 Introduction to Organics 44 weeks Starts August 2017 (Lincoln campus) Year 2 Applied Organics 46 weeks Starts August 2017 (Lincoln campus) Programme information college@bhu.org.nz | 03 325 3684 | www.bhu.org.nz 92 Williams St, Kaiapoi. Ph: 03 375 5015 www.bowden.co.nz Roundwood Farm posts Deer Fencing Post and Rail Fencing Yarding Timber Oregon Rails Oregon Gates Sheep and Deer Netting Gallagher Strainrite Fencing Systems 20 Lunns Rd, Christchurch Ph: 03 962 0505 Email: john.connelly@hamjet.co.nz www.hamiltonjetnz.co.nz Rural Section HOURS Mon - Fri: 7am - 5pm Saturday: 8am- 12pm Weedons Ross Rd to Rolleston We are here Berketts Rd Trents Rd Main South Rd / SH1 Your Local Timber Merchant Jason Pester 1304 Main South Road, Christchurch jason@cthl.co.nz P 03 3477465 F 03 3477032

SELWYN TIMES Latest Christchurch news at www.star.kiwi Tuesday [Edition August datE] 1 2017 31 3 SELWYN RURAL LIFE New animal welfare regulations being developed Minister for Primary Industries Nathan Guy has confirmed 46 new animal welfare regulations will be developed this year. “Changes we made to the Animal Welfare Act in 2015 have allowed us to create directly enforceable regulations. This has given the Act more teeth, and creates more tools to deal with mistreatment of animals,” Mr Guy says. “These 46 regulations include stock transport, farm husbandry, companion and working animals, pigs, layer hens and the way animals are accounted for in research, testing and teaching. “These follow the Young Calf and Live Animal Export regulations, which we fasttracked and introduced last year. These regulations contributed to a reduction of more than 50 per cent in mortality rates for bobby calves during the 2016 season.” Last year, the Ministry for Primary Industries consulted on 91 animal welfare regulations and received more than 1400 submissions from a wide range of individuals and organisations, all with Minister for Primary Industries Nathan Guy different perspectives on animal welfare. MPI will now focus on having the next 46 regulations ready to be delivered by the end of this year and to come into effect before October 2018. The delayed lead-in time will enable farmers, processors, transporters and others to ensure that their systems are up and running before the new regulations take effect. The remaining regulations that were consulted on last year will be considered in a third package of work in 2018, for introduction in 2019. “In 2014, New Zealand’s animal welfare system was ranked first equal out of 50 countries assessed by the global animal protection charity World Animal Protection,” Mr Guy says. “Animal welfare is extremely important to New Zealanders and to our international consumers. We take good care of our animals but one bad incident can damage our reputation. “That’s why these new regulations are important, providing greater enforcement and helping protect animals.” Horticulture health and safety toolkit launched Horticulture New Zealand has teamed up with WorkSafe New Zealand to create a health and safety toolkit specifically designed for horticulture businesses. “Managing health and safety in the workplace is a critical issue for horticulture businesses,” Horticulture New Zealand chief executive Mike Chapman says. “Keeping up with what is required is something we can help growers with. “Working with WorkSafe, we have been able to customise a toolkit, called Keep Safe, Keep Growing, which includes both a written booklet and an easy-to-workthrough online guide to help growers identify and manage health and safety risks. “The guideline is targeted at those who are responsible for the management of health and safety in a horticulture business. It covers the steps that growers should take to build a health and safety system. “Features include a guide for visitors to a property, tools and training resources for workers and contractors, and the ability to create risk assessments for Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) audits that are part of many horticulture businesses.” Horticulture New Zealand represents 5500 commercial fruit and vegetable growers who employ 60,000 people. A copy of the Keep Safe, Keep Growing guide is being posted to all growers. Additional copies will be available from Horticulture New Zealand on request. GET CONNECTED WITH Scorch Broadband 0800 726 724 www.scorch.co.nz RESTAURANT & CAFÉ We are open from 6.30am Seniors SPECIAL 2 courses Soup/Roast or Roast/Dessert Special available lunch only. Monday - Saturday 12pm - 2.30pm Family Friendly Kid’s 2 course special $20 $10 Grand National Racing Carnival 5, 9, 12 August | Riccarton Park Racecourse We are proud to sponsor 143rd NZ Grand National Steeplechase, Saturday 12th August Start your day with us The Race Day Breakfasts Cooked breakfasts $18 50 RACECOURSE HOTEL & Motorlodge 118 Racecourse Rd, Sockburn, Christchurch. Ph 03 342 7150 www.racecoursehotel.co.nz Selwyn Auto ALL YOUR MOTORING NEEDS › WOF’s › Diagnostics › Repairs › Servicing › Batteries › Tyres › Motorbike WOF’s & Repairs › Courtesy Cars Available Phone 329 5841 | 132 Leeston Road, Springston www.selwynauto.com | office@selwynauto.com new hearing clinic NEW HEARING CLINIC opening OPENING specials SPECIALS We are 6 Hearing open fromAid Batteries only $5 6.30am 60 Hearing Aid Batteries only For $5$40 6 Hearing Aid Batteries 60 Hearing Aid Batteries for $40 FREE Hearing Aid Clean & Check Free Hearing Aid Call today at: 03 974 1658 Clean & Check call today at: 03 974 1658 SHOP 125, THE HUB, HORNBY, CHRISTCHURCH - WWW.HEARAGAIN.CO.NZ shop 125, the hub, hornby, christchurch - www.hearagain.co.nz