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2018 Black History Month Edition

Readers, Please enjoy the Black History Edition of our Envision Equity newsletter. This edition celebrates and recognizes black woman that have shaped and molded our world into a better place. As a reader, you will have access to photos from events that embody the purpose of this newsletter. We hope you enjoy, share, and contribute to the newsletter. Lastly, remember to Envision Equity.

Diversity, Equity, and

Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Programs Celebrates Black History Marie Daly 1921-2003 Future chemist Marie M. Daly was born on April 16, 1921, in Queens, New York. The pioneering scientist was the first African-American woman to receive a Ph.D. in chemistry in the United States, and her groundbreaking work helped clarify how the human body works. Daly came from a family who believed strongly in the power of education. Her father, Ivan C. Daly, had emigrated from the West Indies as a young man and enrolled at Cornell University to study chemistry. A lack of money blocked his path, however, and he was forced to quit college, instead returning to New York City where he found work as a postal clerk. After graduating from Hunter College High School, an all-girls institution in New York City, Daly attended Queens College in Flushing, New York, choosing to live at home in order to save money. Daly graduated with honors in 1942 and, to get around the fact that she didn't have much money for graduate school, landed work as a lab assistant at her old college as well as a hard-earned fellowship. Both were instrumental in helping her to cover the costs of getting a graduate degree in chemistry from New York University. At Columbia, Daly took to the lab, studying how the body's chemicals help digest food. She finished her doctorate—unknowingly making history as the first female African American to receive a Ph.D. in chemistry in the United States—in 1947. 34

Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Programs Celebrates Black History Misty Copeland 1982 - Misty Copeland, (born September 10, 1982, Kansas City, Missouri, U.S.), American ballet dancer who, in 2015, became the first African American female principal dancer with the American Ballet Theatre (ABT). Misty Copeland and her siblings grew up with a single mother whose several failed marriages resulted in financial instability. When young, Copeland moved with her family from Kansas City toSan Pedro, California. Her first formal encounter with dance was on the drill team of her middle school. The team’s coach noticed her talent and recommended that she attend ballet classes taught by Cynthia Bradley at the local Boys & Girls Club. Copeland’s natural ability was quickly recognized by Bradley, and, though age 13 was a late start for a serious dance career, Copeland began taking classes with Bradley at the San Pedro Ballet School. When her training became more intensive, Copeland moved in with Bradley and her family in order to be closer to the studio. In 1998, at age 15, she won first prize in the ballet category of the Los Angeles Music Center Spotlight Awards. That summer she was accepted with a full scholarship into the intensive summer program at the San Francisco Ballet. 35