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10 months ago

PSIFebruary2017

Push Button offerings

Push Button offerings from Safety Technology NEW Interchangeable button colours Broader variety of applications Indoor & outdoor models • • • 12 operating labels supplied Custom labelling available Quick & easy installation Contact us for further information on the StopperSwitch series www.sti-emea.com info@sti-emea.com 01527 520 999 Rely on STI £300 *BUNDLE* 1x 252-0065 120W 6 Channel Mixer Amplifier 4x 251-0063 30W 100V IP66 Horn Speaker 1x 253-0005 Single Zone Gooseneck Mic £130 *BUNDLE* 1x 252-0063 40W 4 Channel Mixer Amplifier 2x 251-0063 30W (Tapped to 15W) 100V IP66 Horn Speaker £230 *BUNDLE* 1x 252-0064 60W 6 Channel Mixer Amplifier 2x 251-0063 30W 100V IP66 Horn Speaker 1x 253-0005 Single Zone Gooseneck Mic * PRICES EXCLUDE VAT, LIMITED TIME OFFER www.qedgroup.co.uk sales@qedgroup.co.uk Call now for more information: 01772 336111

PANEL Licenced to install? Would the UK security industry, the installer and essentially, the customer, benefit from a licensing scheme for the trade? The PSI Panel is in session... For those who weren’t aware, a few years ago the UK manned guarding sector (via a government backed scheme) decided to go down the route of licensing security officers, thus removing the unwanted and untrained from the market. The idea was to improve service and level the playing field. It was also desinged to give the officers the necessary training they would need to carry out their duties and raise the image of the profession to one that could be seen as a vocation rathe than something you did when you left the miltary or police force. The public were also, therefore, treated with the care and attention they deserved and incidents of overzealous bouncers were laid to rest. During the last year or so of PSI Panels the idea of security installers being licensed in the same way as a registered gas fitter is has cropped in more than one comment, so we felt it was time to address the issue. Does the security industry need licenced installers? Would the trade benefit from such a scheme or is it just not a viable proposition? The experts have their say... Kim Loy - Vanderbilt The answer to that question varies depending on the type and complexity of the system being installed - bearing in mind that size and complexity do not necessarily go hand-inhand, as there are some very sophisticated smaller systems with high security requirements. Manufacturers generally maintain training and certification for the more complex systems they sell and they should have training available for all their systems. Rather than try to police this training/certification through additional regulations there's a lot that manufacturers can do to encourage customers to take up that offer of training on all systems at all technological www.psimagazine.co.uk levels in the industry. For instance, training can be tied in with free product support. Or manufacturers can offer incentives if customers participate in on-going on line educational courses. I feel that the practicality of a regulated scheme above what is currently offered through manufacturers and industry associations would be a massive administrative undertaking in order to ensure the training was adequate and to monitor personnel in the field. Kerry Jones - Professional Surveillance Management In one respect, licensing installers would be a great step for the industry to take. Many end users are vulnerable as security is not an everyday purchase. Unless they have had their fingers burnt in the past, they may not have the necessary experience to judge a good quality installer from bad. The consequence of a poor security / fire installation, can be severe and life threatening. Eradicating unskilled and indifferent people from our trade would mitigate this risk. Focussing on detector activated CCTV; as an RVRC, we are frustrated with unnecessary false alarms that could be easily prevented if installers specified the correct detection for the environment and situated them correctly. The more false alarms a system generates, the less secure it becomes. In my experience with inexperienced installers, the false alarm rate is greater. Do they require more training or do they simply not care? Ultimately it is the customer who pays the price. I would welcome a solution to combat this. Looking at it from a different angle, a new (continued over) “Many end users are vulnerable as security is not an everyday purchase. Unless they have had their fingers burnt in the past, they may not have the necessary experience to judge a good quality installer from bad” 29

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