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Opinion 4A Pickens

Opinion 4A Pickens County Courier Wednesday, January 31, 2018 Dr. William Holland Living on Purpose The Pickens County Courier gladly accepts letters to the editor. Letters must be no longer than 500 words. All letters must be signed, including rst and last name, address and phone number, in order to be considered for publication. Only the name and city where you reside will be printed. Submission does not guarantee publication. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. No slanderous or obscene material will be accepted. Letters to the Editor and columns do not necessarily reect the Courier’s opinion. Please send letters to zmauldin@thepccourier.com, fax them to 878-6393, or mail them to PO Box 125, Pickens, SC, 29671. Letters to the Editor Letters to the Editor Pickens County Courier The Pickens County Courier, LLC Standard Postage Permit Paid #125 109 Garvin St., Pickens SC 29671 P.O. Box 125 Phone: (864) 878-6391 Fax (864) 878-6393 www.yourpickenscounty.com Subscription Rates In Pickens County: $21/Year Outside Pickens County: $26/Year Published Weekly Rocky Nimmons Publisher rnimmons@thepccourier.com Iva Shehan Office Manager ishehan@thepccourier.com Mignonne Matheson Ad Director mmatheson@thepccourier.com Emily Towery Graphic Artist etowery@thepccourier.com Vonda Holliday Circulation Director vholliday@thepccourier.com zmauldin@thepccourier.com Zack Mauldin Editor Nicole Daughhetee Staff Reporter nicole@thepccourier.com knimmons@thepccourier.com Kelly Nimmons Webmaster/Receptionist Staff Reporter Life as I know it nicole@thepccourier.com Nicole Daughhetee Opinion 4A Pickens County Courier Wednesday, September 7, 2011 Olivia Fowler For the Courier On The Way ofowler@thepccourier.com Letters to the Editor Thanks for Football Frenzy Dear Editor: I would like to thank the staff at the Courier for publishing the Football Frenzy section. I have two nephews who play for Pickens and I enjoy this very much. The Courier is a great paper and the staff is very nice. Thanks again! Norma Bagwell Pickens Dabo Swinney Clemson head football coach It’s Sam Wyche Food Fight Bowl week, as the annual clash between archrivals Pickens and Easley will kick off this Friday night at 8 p.m. in the last meeting between the two teams at Easley’s historic Brice Field. This is the high school equivalent of our rivalry with the Gamecocks each year. The real winner in this game is Meals on Wheels in Pickens County. All the money raised by each school’s student body will provide daily hot meals and warm smiles for almost 240 shut-ins throughout the county. I hope every Clemson Tiger fan will give by visiting www.pcmow.org and donating via credit card or PayPal. You can also mail your contribution to Meals on Wheels at PO Box 184, Easley, SC 29641. Make sure you do it before kick off! Grasshopper Mowers will make an announcement prior to kick off that will blow you away! Meals on Wheels and Pickens County schools have a new friend in Grasshopper Mowers. Every Tiger player plays each down as if that play might be the one that decides the game. Since we don’t know in advance which play it will be, we play them all at 100 percent. There is no difference in real life. We always have better eyesight when looking back at yesterday’s twists and turns. The winners, however, assume the next act of kindness is the one that will make a real difference in someone’s quality of life. The Green Wave and Blue Flame players are practicing just as hard as the Tigers every week, but this week they need YOU in a very special way. The game’s winner will get to display the Food Fight Bowl Trophy in their new trophy case on their new campus. The halftime presentation of the Ultimate Food Fight Trophy goes to the school who somehow outworks their archrival off the eld. YOU decide that with your giving! Your next decision to give WILL make a difference. Dabo Swinney is the head football coach of the Clemson Tigers. Clemson’s Swinney gives his take on Friday’s game After months of build-up, PHS, EHS square off in Food Fight Bowl this week Hurricane Lee was bad news for some folks but great news for us, as we nally got a little rain. I can’t express how disheartening it is to watch an acre of corn dry up on the stalk or see 300 tomato plants suffer so dreadfully in the unrelenting heat. Growing anything, be it vegetables, owers or children, is fraught with disaster. We plan, select, plant, fertilize, weed and hope for the best. But even with the best environment possible, there are unavoidable risks. Even the hardiest have a hard time surviving drought. Last summer was a tough one, but we planted early enough to benet from the early spring rain. Although plants were looking stressed toward the end of the cycle, they did bear. This year we battled not only drought but a tomato blight which Fowler fought vigilantly and conquered through relentless application of chemical substances that added to the expense of producing healthy tomatoes. We count on tomatoes every summer. They constitute a major part of our diet, as a day without a tomato sandwich is a dark day indeed. When plants are prolic, we eat tomatoes three times a day. We irrigate sparingly, as we don’t have access to a creek or spring as some folks do. But at some point you have to sit down with a calculator and run the gures on costs. If you can sell tomatoes for one dollar a pound, it isn‘t a good thing to spend two dollars a pound to produce them. So at what point do you let them die? Fowler kept the early tomatoes going, but we had both almost given up on the late tomatoes. When the rain began Sunday it was a wonderful gift. We sat out on the front porch and watched it come down and smelled the scent of bone-dry dirt absorbing water. Even the leaves on the dogwood trees seemed to be celebrating. The late tomatoes drank it up, the okra jumped an inch and now the eld of peas may produce. It has been a highly questionable matter. And when I think that aside from the costs of farming, the hundreds of hours of labor, love, and sweat that Fowler pours into the ground, it is a great thing indeed to see the rain come down into the earth and repay threefold the effort he has put in. We are sometimes so busy working the earth that we don’t consider the generosity shown us in all the bounty laid out on a daily basis. We are very grateful to the God who freely showers blessings upon us every day we take breath. I hope we’re never too busy to notice. Thanks for the rain. Who knew wideruled notebook paper was going to be in such great demand this school year? Apparently, I never got the memo. While I have the tendency to be what one might call a procrastinator of sorts, when it come to backto-school shopping, this foot-dragging expert is on her A game. A selfprofessed nerd, I have always loved school supplies. The smell of new plastic binders, the feel of a brand-new crayon in my hand, and the endless organizational possibilities dividers provide transfer me into a blissful nirvana. As soon as the Forest Acres supply list was available, this mom was pushing her cart through Walmart getting all the necessary supplies for Em and Ella to achieve excellence this school year. Meet the teacher night threw me for a loop when I was presented with two new school supply lists, which brings me to my full-scale hunt for wide-rule notebook paper. Emerson’s second-grade class required two packs of this highly coveted supply. Figuring that notebook paper would abundantly line the shelves of stores throughout Easley, I waited until Monday to pick up the few lastminute school items Em and Ella needed for their rst day. Imagine my surprise when I arrived at our new Super Walmart and there was not a single ream of notebook paper to be found. I searched every aisle. I combed every display. There were crayons and rulers and spiral bound notebooks galore! Backpacks and folders and erasers lled schoolbus-yellow cardboard bins. Yet there was not a single package of loose-leaf, wide-ruled notebook paper. Having been eclipsed by the new Super Walmart, Easley’s K-mart seems less trafcked as of late. Thinking I might outsmart the masses at Wally World, I headed over to K-mart, but it wasn’t long before I was scratching my head in disbelief. Amid the plethora of colored three-ring binders, glue sticks, scissors and colored pencils, one important school supply was notably absent. I’ll end the suspense, OK? Notebook paper. There wasn’t any. None. Zip. Zero. Zilch. Nada. Not one package in the entire store. I was beginning to panic. My next stop was Walgreens. They had about 10 packs of college-ruled paper but nothing of the wide-ruled variety. The entire search became surreal. What happened to all of the notebook paper? Who knew that trying to nd this stuff would be like trying to nd a level-headed liberal at a Sarah Palin Tea Party rally? Geez! Just as I was starting to lose all hope of getting my hands on two packages of the ever-elusive wide-ruled notebook paper, I spotted the bright red Staples sign glowing like a beacon through the evening rain. I pulled into the parking lot along with 100 of my closet Easley neighbors and, braving the torrential downpour, I made my way inside. I walked up and down the aisles of ofce supplies — sweat beading up on my forehead and my heart pounding in my chest. When I nally reached the shelf where the notebook paper should have been, I was dumbstruck and undone yet again. College-ruled paper abounded, but in the slot where the wide-ruled paper once sat, there was nothing but a cold, lonely empty space. Was I going to have to admit defeat? Was I going to have to return home without having completed this simple task? I stood, shoulders slumped and head bowed, preparing to exit the store. Walking toward the doors, I scanned each display clinging to the last shred of hope that remained in my heart. Hidden among oodles of bright pink Breast Cancer Awareness clipboards, paperclips, pushpins and calendars, I spotted an object that did not belong with these items. There, on the very bottom shelf, tucked in among everything pink, I found the Holy Grail of school supplies — exactly two packages of wide-ruled, loose-leaf notebook paper. As I plucked them off the shelf I almost braced myself for violent shaking earthquakes signifying that life, as I know it, was coming to an end. Nothing happened. Thirty minutes later (yes — the lines were really that long) I was merrily on my way home with the girls’ school supply lists completely covered and a life lesson afrmed for me once again: In the immortal words of Winston Churchill “Never, never, never give up” no matter how bleak or hopeless a situation might appear. Here’s wishing students, parents, teachers, faculty and administrative personnel throughout Pickens County a wonderful start to what I hope will be an amazing school year! Into every life a little rain must finally fall Channeling Churchill, or a desperate hunt for ever-elusive school supplies Please send letters to news@thepccourier.com, fax them to 878-6393 or mail them to PO Box 125, Pickens, SC, 29671. The Pickens County Courier gladly accepts letters to the editor. Letters must be no longer than 500 words. All letters must be signed, including rst and last name, address and phone number, in order to be considered for publication. Only the name and city where you reside will be printed. Submission does not guarantee publication. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. No slanderous or obscene material will be accepted. Letters to the Editor and columns do not necessarily reect the Courier’s opinion. Please send letters to zmauldin@thepccourier.com, fax them to 878-6393, or mail them to PO Box 125, Pickens, SC, 29671. Letters to the Editor Letters to the Editor Pickens County Courier The Pickens County Courier, LLC Standard Postage Permit Paid #125 109 Garvin St., Pickens SC 29671 P.O. Box 125 Phone: (864) 878-6391 Fax (864) 878-6393 www.yourpickenscounty.com Subscription Rates In Pickens County: $21/Year Outside Pickens County: $26/Year Published Weekly Rocky Nimmons Publisher rnimmons@thepccourier.com Iva Shehan Office Manager ishehan@thepccourier.com Mignonne Matheson Ad Director mmatheson@thepccourier.com Emily Towery Graphic Artist etowery@thepccourier.com Vonda Holliday Circulation Director vholliday@thepccourier.com zmauldin@thepccourier.com Zack Mauldin Editor Nicole Daughhetee Staff Reporter nicole@thepccourier.com knimmons@thepccourier.com Kelly Nimmons Webmaster/Receptionist Staff Reporter Life as I know it nicole@thepccourier.com Nicole Daughhetee Opinion 4A Pickens County Courier Wednesday, September 7, 2011 Olivia Fowler For the Courier On The Way ofowler@thepccourier.com Letters to the Editor Thanks for Football Frenzy Dear Editor: I would like to thank the staff at the Courier for publishing the Football Frenzy section. I have two nephews who play for Pickens and I enjoy this very much. The Courier is a great paper and the staff is very nice. Thanks again! Norma Bagwell Pickens Dabo Swinney Clemson head football coach It’s Sam Wyche Food Fight Bowl week, as the annual clash between archrivals Pickens and Easley will kick off this Friday night at 8 p.m. in the last meeting between the two teams at Easley’s historic Brice Field. This is the high school equivalent of our rivalry with the Gamecocks each year. The real winner in this game is Meals on Wheels in Pickens County. All the money raised by each school’s student body will provide daily hot meals and warm smiles for almost 240 shut-ins throughout the county. I hope every Clemson Tiger fan will give by visiting www.pcmow.org and donating via credit card or PayPal. You can also mail your contribution to Meals on Wheels at PO Box 184, Easley, SC 29641. Make sure you do it before kick off! Grasshopper Mowers will make an announcement prior to kick off that will blow you away! Meals on Wheels and Pickens County schools have a new friend in Grasshopper Mowers. Every Tiger player plays each down as if that play might be the one that decides the game. Since we don’t know in advance which play it will be, we play them all at 100 percent. There is no difference in real life. We always have better eyesight when looking back at yesterday’s twists and turns. The winners, however, assume the next act of kindness is the one that will make a real difference in someone’s quality of life. The Green Wave and Blue Flame players are practicing just as hard as the Tigers every week, but this week they need YOU in a very special way. The game’s winner will get to display the Food Fight Bowl Trophy in their new trophy case on their new campus. The halftime presentation of the Ultimate Food Fight Trophy goes to the school who somehow outworks their archrival off the eld. YOU decide that with your giving! Your next decision to give WILL make a difference. Dabo Swinney is the head football coach of the Clemson Tigers. Clemson’s Swinney gives his take on Friday’s game After months of build-up, PHS, EHS square off in Food Fight Bowl this week Hurricane Lee was bad news for some folks but great news for us, as we nally got a little rain. I can’t express how disheartening it is to watch an acre of corn dry up on the stalk or see 300 tomato plants suffer so dreadfully in the unrelenting heat. Growing anything, be it vegetables, owers or children, is fraught with disaster. We plan, select, plant, fertilize, weed and hope for the best. But even with the best environment possible, there are unavoidable risks. Even the hardiest have a hard time surviving drought. Last summer was a tough one, but we planted early enough to benet from the early spring rain. Although plants were looking stressed toward the end of the cycle, they did bear. This year we battled not only drought but a tomato blight which Fowler fought vigilantly and conquered through relentless application of chemical substances that added to the expense of producing healthy tomatoes. We count on tomatoes every summer. They constitute a major part of our diet, as a day without a tomato sandwich is a dark day indeed. When plants are prolic, we eat tomatoes three times a day. We irrigate sparingly, as we don’t have access to a creek or spring as some folks do. But at some point you have to sit down with a calculator and run the gures on costs. If you can sell tomatoes for one dollar a pound, it isn‘t a good thing to spend two dollars a pound to produce them. So at what point do you let them die? Fowler kept the early tomatoes going, but we had both almost given up on the late tomatoes. When the rain began Sunday it was a wonderful gift. We sat out on the front porch and watched it come down and smelled the scent of bone-dry dirt absorbing water. Even the leaves on the dogwood trees seemed to be celebrating. The late tomatoes drank it up, the okra jumped an inch and now the eld of peas may produce. It has been a highly questionable matter. And when I think that aside from the costs of farming, the hundreds of hours of labor, love, and sweat that Fowler pours into the ground, it is a great thing indeed to see the rain come down into the earth and repay threefold the effort he has put in. We are sometimes so busy working the earth that we don’t consider the generosity shown us in all the bounty laid out on a daily basis. We are very grateful to the God who freely showers blessings upon us every day we take breath. I hope we’re never too busy to notice. Thanks for the rain. Who knew wideruled notebook paper was going to be in such great demand this school year? Apparently, I never got the memo. While I have the tendency to be what one might call a procrastinator of sorts, when it come to backto-school shopping, this foot-dragging expert is on her A game. A selfprofessed nerd, I have always loved school supplies. The smell of new plastic binders, the feel of a brand-new crayon in my hand, and the endless organizational possibilities dividers provide transfer me into a blissful nirvana. As soon as the Forest Acres supply list was available, this mom was pushing her cart through Walmart getting all the necessary supplies for Em and Ella to achieve excellence this school year. Meet the teacher night threw me for a loop when I was presented with two new school supply lists, which brings me to my full-scale hunt for wide-rule notebook paper. Emerson’s second-grade class required two packs of this highly coveted supply. Figuring that notebook paper would abundantly line the shelves of stores throughout Easley, I waited until Monday to pick up the few lastminute school items Em and Ella needed for their rst day. Imagine my surprise when I arrived at our new Super Walmart and there was not a single ream of notebook paper to be found. I searched every aisle. I combed every display. There were crayons and rulers and spiral bound notebooks galore! Backpacks and folders and erasers lled schoolbus-yellow cardboard bins. Yet there was not a single package of loose-leaf, wide-ruled notebook paper. Having been eclipsed by the new Super Walmart, Easley’s K-mart seems less trafcked as of late. Thinking I might outsmart the masses at Wally World, I headed over to K-mart, but it wasn’t long before I was scratching my head in disbelief. Amid the plethora of colored three-ring binders, glue sticks, scissors and colored pencils, one important school supply was notably absent. I’ll end the suspense, OK? Notebook paper. There wasn’t any. None. Zip. Zero. Zilch. Nada. Not one package in the entire store. I was beginning to panic. My next stop was Walgreens. They had about 10 packs of college-ruled paper but nothing of the wide-ruled variety. The entire search became surreal. What happened to all of the notebook paper? Who knew that trying to nd this stuff would be like trying to nd a level-headed liberal at a Sarah Palin Tea Party rally? Geez! Just as I was starting to lose all hope of getting my hands on two packages of the ever-elusive wide-ruled notebook paper, I spotted the bright red Staples sign glowing like a beacon through the evening rain. I pulled into the parking lot along with 100 of my closet Easley neighbors and, braving the torrential downpour, I made my way inside. I walked up and down the aisles of ofce supplies — sweat beading up on my forehead and my heart pounding in my chest. When I nally reached the shelf where the notebook paper should have been, I was dumbstruck and undone yet again. College-ruled paper abounded, but in the slot where the wide-ruled paper once sat, there was nothing but a cold, lonely empty space. Was I going to have to admit defeat? Was I going to have to return home without having completed this simple task? I stood, shoulders slumped and head bowed, preparing to exit the store. Walking toward the doors, I scanned each display clinging to the last shred of hope that remained in my heart. Hidden among oodles of bright pink Breast Cancer Awareness clipboards, paperclips, pushpins and calendars, I spotted an object that did not belong with these items. There, on the very bottom shelf, tucked in among everything pink, I found the Holy Grail of school supplies — exactly two packages of wide-ruled, loose-leaf notebook paper. As I plucked them off the shelf I almost braced myself for violent shaking earthquakes signifying that life, as I know it, was coming to an end. Nothing happened. Thirty minutes later (yes — the lines were really that long) I was merrily on my way home with the girls’ school supply lists completely covered and a life lesson afrmed for me once again: In the immortal words of Winston Churchill “Never, never, never give up” no matter how bleak or hopeless a situation might appear. Here’s wishing students, parents, teachers, faculty and administrative personnel throughout Pickens County a wonderful start to what I hope will be an amazing school year! Into every life a little rain must finally fall Channeling Churchill, or a desperate hunt for ever-elusive school supplies The Pickens County Courier, LLC Standard Postage Permit Paid #125 109 Garvin St., Pickens SC 29671 P.O. Box 125 Phone: (864) 878-6391 Fax: (864) 878-6393 www.yourpickenscounty.com Subscription Rates In Pickens County: $26/Year Outside Pickens County: $31/Year Published Weekly Kerry Gilstrap Photographer kgilstrap@thepccourier.com Mignonne Matheson Ad Director mmatheson@thepccourier.com Pickens County Courier The Pickens County Courier, LLC Standard Postage Permit Paid #125 109 Garvin St., Pickens SC 29671 P.O. Box 125 Phone: (864) 878-6391 Fax (864) 878-6393 www.yourpickenscounty.com Subscription Rates In Pickens County: $21/Year Outside Pickens County: $26/Year Published Weekly Rocky Nimmons Publisher rnimmons@thepccourier.com Iva Shehan Office Manager ishehan@thepccourier.com Mignonne Matheson Ad Director mmatheson@thepccourier.com Emily Towery Graphic Artist etowery@thepccourier.com Vonda Holliday Circulation Director vholliday@thepccourier.com zmauldin@thepccourier.com Zack Mauldin Editor Nicole Daughhetee Staff Reporter nicole@thepccourier.com knimmons@thepccourier.com Kelly Nimmons Webmaster/Receptionist Staff Reporter Life as I know it nicole@thepccourier.com Nicole Daughhetee livia wler r the urier n The Way ofowler@thepccourier.com s r r ank the publishsection. ws who njoy this at paper e. Dabo Swinney Clemson head football coach It’s Sam Wyche Food Fight Bowl week, as the annual clash between archrivals Pickens and Easley will kick off this Friday night at 8 p.m. in the last meeting between the two teams at Easley’s historic Brice Field. This is the high school equivalent of our rivalry with the Gamecocks each year. The real winner in this game is Meals on Wheels in Pickens County. All the money raised by each school’s student body will provide daily hot meals and warm smiles for almost 240 shut-ins throughout the county. I hope every Clemson Tiger fan will give by visiting www.pcmow.org and donating via credit card or PayPal. You can also mail your contribution to Meals on Wheels at PO Box 184, Easley, SC 29641. Make sure you do it before kick off! Grasshopper Mowers will make an announcement prior to kick off that will blow you away! Meals on Wheels and Pickens County schools have a new friend in Grasshopper Mowers. Every Tiger player plays each down as if that play might be the one that decides the game. Since we don’t know in advance which play it will be, we play them all at 100 percent. There is no difference in real life. We always have better eyesight when looking back at yesterday’s twists and turns. The winners, however, assume the next act of kindness is the one that will make a real difference in someone’s quality of life. The Green Wave and Blue Flame players are practicing just as hard as the Tigers every week, but this week they need YOU in a very special way. The game’s winner will get to display the Food Fight Bowl Trophy in their new trophy case on their new campus. The halftime presentation of the Ultimate Food Fight Trophy goes to the school who somehow outworks their archrival off the eld. YOU decide that with your giving! Your next decision to give WILL make a difference. Dabo Swinney is the head football coach of the Clemson Tigers. Clemson’s Swinney gives his take on Friday’s game After months of build-up, PHS, EHS square off in Food Fight Bowl this week as bad e folks s for ly got s how h an e stalk suffer enting s. ve a ght. ough enough spring e lookd of not o blight lantly elentless ubstancnse of es. es every a major without rk day prolic, es a day. , as we ek or u have tor and toes isn‘t a dollars a pound to produce them. So at what point do you let them die? Fowler kept the early tomatoes going, but we had both almost given up on the late tomatoes. When the rain began Sunday it was a wonderful gift. We sat out on the front porch and watched it come down and smelled the scent of bone-dry dirt absorbing water. Even the leaves on the dogwood trees seemed to be celebrating. The late tomatoes drank it up, the okra jumped an inch and now the eld of peas may produce. It has been a highly questionable matter. And when I think that aside from the costs of farming, the hundreds of hours of labor, love, and sweat that Fowler pours into the ground, it is a great thing indeed to see the rain come down into the earth and repay threefold the effort he has put in. We are sometimes so busy working the earth that we don’t consider the generosity shown us in all the bounty laid out on a daily basis. We are very grateful to the God who freely showers blessings upon us every day we take breath. I hope we’re never too busy to notice. Thanks for the rain. Who knew wideruled notebook paper was going to be in such great demand this school year? Apparently, I never got the memo. While I have the tendency to be what one might call a procrastinator of sorts, when it come to backto-school shopping, this foot-dragging expert is on her A game. A selfprofessed nerd, I have always loved school supplies. The smell of new plastic binders, the feel of a brand-new crayon in my hand, and the endless organizational possibilities dividers provide transfer me into a blissful nirvana. As soon as the Forest Acres supply list was available, this mom was pushing her cart through Walmart getting all the necessary supplies for Em and Ella to achieve excellence this school year. Meet the teacher night threw me for a loop when I was presented with two new school supply lists, which brings me to my full-scale hunt for wide-rule notebook paper. Emerson’s second-grade class required two packs of this highly coveted supply. Figuring that notebook paper would abundantly line the shelves of stores throughout Easley, I waited until Monday to pick up the few lastminute school items Em and Ella needed for their rst day. Imagine my surprise when I arrived at our new Super Walmart and there was not a single ream of notebook paper to be found. I searched every aisle. I combed every display. There were crayons and rulers and spiral bound notebooks galore! Backpacks and folders and erasers lled schoolbus-yellow cardboard bins. Yet there was not a single package of loose-leaf, wide-ruled notebook paper. Having been eclipsed by the new Super Walmart, Easley’s K-mart seems less trafcked as of late. Thinking I might outsmart the masses at Wally World, I headed over to K-mart, but it wasn’t long before I was scratching my head in disbelief. Amid the plethora of colored three-ring binders, glue sticks, scissors and colored pencils, one important school supply was notably absent. I’ll end the suspense, OK? Notebook paper. There wasn’t any. None. Zip. Zero. Zilch. Nada. Not one package in the entire store. I was beginning to panic. My next stop was Walgreens. They had about 10 packs of college-ruled paper but nothing of the wide-ruled variety. The entire search became surreal. What happened to all of the notebook paper? Who knew that trying to nd this stuff would be like trying to nd a level-headed liberal at a Sarah Palin Tea Party rally? Geez! Just as I was starting to lose all hope of getting my hands on two packages of the ever-elusive wide-ruled notebook paper, I spotted the bright red Staples sign glowing like a beacon through the evening rain. I pulled into the parking lot along with 100 of my closet Easley neighbors and, braving the torrential downpour, I made my way inside. I walked up and down the aisles of ofce supplies — sweat beading up on my forehead and my heart pounding in my chest. When I nally reached the shelf where the notebook paper should have been, I was dumbstruck and undone yet again. College-ruled paper abounded, but in the slot where the wide-ruled paper once sat, there was nothing but a cold, lonely empty space. Was I going to have to admit defeat? Was I going to have to return home without having completed this simple task? I stood, shoulders slumped and head bowed, preparing to exit the store. Walking toward the doors, I scanned each display clinging to the last shred of hope that remained in my heart. Hidden among oodles of bright pink Breast Cancer Awareness clipboards, paperclips, pushpins and calendars, I spotted an object that did not belong with these items. There, on the very bottom shelf, tucked in among everything pink, I found the Holy Grail of school supplies — exactly two packages of wide-ruled, loose-leaf notebook paper. As I plucked them off the shelf I almost braced myself for violent shaking earthquakes signifying that life, as I know it, was coming to an end. Nothing happened. Thirty minutes later (yes — the lines were really that long) I was merrily on my way home with the girls’ school supply lists completely covered and a life lesson afrmed for me once again: In the immortal words of Winston Churchill “Never, never, never give up” no matter how bleak or hopeless a situation might appear. Here’s wishing students, parents, teachers, faculty and administrative personnel throughout Pickens County a wonderful start to what I hope will be an amazing school year! every a little must lly fall Channeling Churchill, or a desperate hunt for ever-elusive school supplies Iva Stratton Office Manager ishehan@thepccourier.com Zack Mauldin Editor zmauldin@thepccourier.com Rocky Nimmons Publisher rnimmons@thepccourier.com Letters to the Editor Letters to the Editor Pickens County Courier The Pickens County Courier, LLC Standard Postage Permit Paid #125 109 Garvin St., Pickens SC 29671 P.O. Box 125 Phone: (864) 878-6391 Fax (864) 878-6393 www.yourpickenscounty.com Subscription Rates In Pickens County: $21/Year Outside Pickens County: $26/Year Published Weekly Rocky Nimmons Publisher rnimmons@thepccourier.com Iva Shehan Office Manager ishehan@thepccourier.com Mignonne Matheson Ad Director mmatheson@thepccourier.com Emily Towery Graphic Artist etowery@thepccourier.com Vonda Holliday Circulation Director vholliday@thepccourier.com zmauldin@thepccourier.com Zack Mauldin Editor Nicole Daughhetee Staff Reporter nicole@thepccourier.com knimmons@thepccourier.com Kelly Nimmons Webmaster/Receptionist Staff Reporter Life as I know it nicole@thepccourier.com Nicole Daughhetee livia wler r the urier n The Way ofowler@thepccourier.com s r r ank the publishsection. ws who njoy this at paper . Dabo Swinney Clemson head football coach It’s Sam Wyche Food Fight Bowl week, as the annual clash between archrivals Pickens and Easley will kick off this Friday night at 8 p.m. in the last meeting between the two teams at Easley’s historic Brice Field. This is the high school equivalent of our rivalry with the Gamecocks each year. The real winner in this game is Meals on Wheels in Pickens County. All the money raised by each school’s student body will provide daily hot meals and warm smiles for almost 240 shut-ins throughout the county. I hope every Clemson Tiger fan will give by visiting www.pcmow.org and donating via credit card or PayPal. You can also mail your contribution to Meals on Wheels at PO Box 184, Easley, SC 29641. Make sure you do it before kick off! Grasshopper Mowers will make an announcement prior to kick off that will blow you away! Meals on Wheels and Pickens County schools have a new friend in Grasshopper Mowers. Every Tiger player plays each down as if that play might be the one that decides the game. Since we don’t know in advance which play it will be, we play them all at 100 percent. There is no difference in real life. We always have better eyesight when looking back at yesterday’s twists and turns. The winners, however, assume the next act of kindness is the one that will make a real difference in someone’s quality of life. The Green Wave and Blue Flame players are practicing just as hard as the Tigers every week, but this week they need YOU in a very special way. The game’s winner will get to display the Food Fight Bowl Trophy in their new trophy case on their new campus. The halftime presentation of the Ultimate Food Fight Trophy goes to the school who somehow outworks their archrival off the eld. YOU decide that with your giving! Your next decision to give WILL make a difference. Dabo Swinney is the head football coach of the Clemson Tigers. Clemson’s Swinney gives his take on Friday’s game After months of build-up, PHS, EHS square off in Food Fight Bowl this week as bad e folks s for ly got how h an e stalk suffer nting s. ve a ht. ough enough spring e lookd of not o blight lantly elentless ubstancnse of es. es every a major without rk day rolic, es a day. , as we ek or u have tor and oes isn‘t a dollars a pound to produce them. So at what point do you let them die? Fowler kept the early tomatoes going, but we had both almost given up on the late tomatoes. When the rain began Sunday it was a wonderful gift. We sat out on the front porch and watched it come down and smelled the scent of bone-dry dirt absorbing water. Even the leaves on the dogwood trees seemed to be celebrating. The late tomatoes drank it up, the okra jumped an inch and now the eld of peas may produce. It has been a highly questionable matter. And when I think that aside from the costs of farming, the hundreds of hours of labor, love, and sweat that Fowler pours into the ground, it is a great thing indeed to see the rain come down into the earth and repay threefold the effort he has put in. We are sometimes so busy working the earth that we don’t consider the generosity shown us in all the bounty laid out on a daily basis. We are very grateful to the God who freely showers blessings upon us every day we take breath. I hope we’re never too busy to notice. Thanks for the rain. Who knew wideruled notebook paper was going to be in such great demand this school year? Apparently, I never got the memo. While I have the tendency to be what one might call a procrastinator of sorts, when it come to backto-school shopping, this foot-dragging expert is on her A game. A selfprofessed nerd, I have always loved school supplies. The smell of new plastic binders, the feel of a brand-new crayon in my hand, and the endless organizational possibilities dividers provide transfer me into a blissful nirvana. As soon as the Forest Acres supply list was available, this mom was pushing her cart through Walmart getting all the necessary supplies for Em and Ella to achieve excellence this school year. Meet the teacher night threw me for a loop when I was presented with two new school supply lists, which brings me to my full-scale hunt for wide-rule notebook paper. Emerson’s second-grade class required two packs of this highly coveted supply. Figuring that notebook paper would abundantly line the shelves of stores throughout Easley, I waited until Monday to pick up the few lastminute school items Em and Ella needed for their rst day. Imagine my surprise when I arrived at our new Super Walmart and there was not a single ream of notebook paper to be found. I searched every aisle. I combed every display. There were crayons and rulers and spiral bound notebooks galore! Backpacks and folders and erasers lled schoolbus-yellow cardboard bins. Yet there was not a single package of loose-leaf, wide-ruled notebook paper. Having been eclipsed by the new Super Walmart, Easley’s K-mart seems less trafcked as of late. Thinking I might outsmart the masses at Wally World, I headed over to K-mart, but it wasn’t long before I was scratching my head in disbelief. Amid the plethora of colored three-ring binders, glue sticks, scissors and colored pencils, one important school supply was notably absent. I’ll end the suspense, OK? Notebook paper. There wasn’t any. None. Zip. Zero. Zilch. Nada. Not one package in the entire store. I was beginning to panic. My next stop was Walgreens. They had about 10 packs of college-ruled paper but nothing of the wide-ruled variety. The entire search became surreal. What happened to all of the notebook paper? Who knew that trying to nd this stuff would be like trying to nd a level-headed liberal at a Sarah Palin Tea Party rally? Geez! Just as I was starting to lose all hope of getting my hands on two packages of the ever-elusive wide-ruled notebook paper, I spotted the bright red Staples sign glowing like a beacon through the evening rain. I pulled into the parking lot along with 100 of my closet Easley neighbors and, braving the torrential downpour, I made my way inside. I walked up and down the aisles of ofce supplies — sweat beading up on my forehead and my heart pounding in my chest. When I nally reached the shelf where the notebook paper should have been, I was dumbstruck and undone yet again. College-ruled paper abounded, but in the slot where the wide-ruled paper once sat, there was nothing but a cold, lonely empty space. Was I going to have to admit defeat? Was I going to have to return home without having completed this simple task? I stood, shoulders slumped and head bowed, preparing to exit the store. Walking toward the doors, I scanned each display clinging to the last shred of hope that remained in my heart. Hidden among oodles of bright pink Breast Cancer Awareness clipboards, paperclips, pushpins and calendars, I spotted an object that did not belong with these items. There, on the very bottom shelf, tucked in among everything pink, I found the Holy Grail of school supplies — exactly two packages of wide-ruled, loose-leaf notebook paper. As I plucked them off the shelf I almost braced myself for violent shaking earthquakes signifying that life, as I know it, was coming to an end. Nothing happened. Thirty minutes later (yes — the lines were really that long) I was merrily on my way home with the girls’ school supply lists completely covered and a life lesson afrmed for me once again: In the immortal words of Winston Churchill “Never, never, never give up” no matter how bleak or hopeless a situation might appear. Here’s wishing students, parents, teachers, faculty and administrative personnel throughout Pickens County a wonderful start to what I hope will be an amazing school year! every a little must lly fall Channeling Churchill, or a desperate hunt for ever-elusive school supplies Emily Wright Graphic Artist ewright@thepccourier.com Pamela Dodson Receptionist pdodson@thepccourier.com Inside Pickens County: $31/Year Outside Pickens County: $36/Year Jason Evans Staff Reporter jevans@thepccourier.com Do you have something to say? Follow the instructions below to send a letter to the editor! The Pickens County Courier gladly accepts letters to the editor. Letters must be no longer than 500 Letters to the Editor Letters to the Editor Pickens County Courier The Pickens County Courier, LLC Standard Postage Permit Paid #125 109 Garvin St., Pickens SC 29671 P.O. Box 125 Phone: (864) 878-6391 Fax (864) 878-6393 www.yourpickenscounty.com Subscription Rates In Pickens County: $21/Year Outside Pickens County: $26/Year Published Weekly Rocky Nimmons Publisher rnimmons@thepccourier.com Iva Shehan Office Manager ishehan@thepccourier.com Mignonne Matheson Ad Director mmatheson@thepccourier.com Emily Towery Graphic Artist etowery@thepccourier.com Vonda Holliday Circulation Director vholliday@thepccourier.com zmauldin@thepccourier.com Zack Mauldin Editor Nicole Daughhetee Staff Reporter nicole@thepccourier.com knimmons@thepccourier.com Kelly Nimmons Webmaster/Receptionist Staff Reporter Life as I know it nicole@thepccourier.com Nicole Daughhetee Opinion 4A Pickens County Courier Wednesday, September 7, 2011 Olivia Fowler For the Courier On The Way ofowler@thepccourier.com Letters to the Editor Thanks for Football Frenzy Dear Editor: I would like to thank the staff at the Courier for publishing the Football Frenzy section. I have two nephews who play for Pickens and I enjoy this very much. The Courier is a great paper and the staff is very nice. Thanks again! Norma Bagwell Pickens Dabo Swinney Clemson head football coach It’s Sam Wyche Food Fight Bowl week, as the annual clash between archrivals Pickens and Easley will kick off this Friday night at 8 p.m. in the last meeting between the two teams at Easley’s historic Brice Field. This is the high school equivalent of our rivalry with the Gamecocks each year. The real winner in this game is Meals on Wheels in Pickens County. All the money raised by each school’s student body will provide daily hot meals and warm smiles for almost 240 shut-ins throughout the county. I hope every Clemson Tiger fan will give by visiting www.pcmow.org and donating via credit card or PayPal. You can also mail your contribution to Meals on Wheels at PO Box 184, Easley, SC 29641. Make sure you do it before kick off! Grasshopper Mowers will make an announcement prior to kick off that will blow you away! Meals on Wheels and Pickens County schools have a new friend in Grasshopper Mowers. Every Tiger player plays each down as if that play might be the one that decides the game. Since we don’t know in advance which play it will be, we play them all at 100 percent. There is no difference in real life. We always have better eyesight when looking back at yesterday’s twists and turns. The winners, however, assume the next act of kindness is the one that will make a real difference in someone’s quality of life. The Green Wave and Blue Flame players are practicing just as hard as the Tigers every week, but this week they need YOU in a very special way. The game’s winner will get to display the Food Fight Bowl Trophy in their new trophy case on their new campus. The halftime presentation of the Ultimate Food Fight Trophy goes to the school who somehow outworks their archrival off the eld. YOU decide that with your giving! Your next decision to give WILL make a difference. Dabo Swinney is the head football coach of the Clemson Tigers. Clemson’s Swinney gives his take on Friday’s game After months of build-up, PHS, EHS square off in Food Fight Bowl this week Hurricane Lee was bad news for some folks but great news for us, as we nally got a little rain. I can’t express how disheartening it is to watch an acre of corn dry up on the stalk or see 300 tomato plants suffer so dreadfully in the unrelenting heat. Growing anything, be it vegetables, owers or children, is fraught with disaster. We plan, select, plant, fertilize, weed and hope for the best. But even with the best environment possible, there are unavoidable risks. Even the hardiest have a hard time surviving drought. Last summer was a tough one, but we planted early enough to benet from the early spring rain. Although plants were looking stressed toward the end of the cycle, they did bear. This year we battled not only drought but a tomato blight which Fowler fought vigilantly and conquered through relentless application of chemical substances that added to the expense of producing healthy tomatoes. We count on tomatoes every summer. They constitute a major part of our diet, as a day without a tomato sandwich is a dark day indeed. When plants are prolic, we eat tomatoes three times a day. We irrigate sparingly, as we don’t have access to a creek or spring as some folks do. But at some point you have to sit down with a calculator and run the gures on costs. If you can sell tomatoes for one dollar a pound, it isn‘t a good thing to spend two dollars a pound to produce them. So at what point do you let them die? Fowler kept the early tomatoes going, but we had both almost given up on the late tomatoes. When the rain began Sunday it was a wonderful gift. We sat out on the front porch and watched it come down and smelled the scent of bone-dry dirt absorbing water. Even the leaves on the dogwood trees seemed to be celebrating. The late tomatoes drank it up, the okra jumped an inch and now the eld of peas may produce. It has been a highly questionable matter. And when I think that aside from the costs of farming, the hundreds of hours of labor, love, and sweat that Fowler pours into the ground, it is a great thing indeed to see the rain come down into the earth and repay threefold the effort he has put in. We are sometimes so busy working the earth that we don’t consider the generosity shown us in all the bounty laid out on a daily basis. We are very grateful to the God who freely showers blessings upon us every day we take breath. I hope we’re never too busy to notice. Thanks for the rain. Who knew wideruled notebook paper was going to be in such great demand this school year? Apparently, I never got the memo. While I have the tendency to be what one might call a procrastinator of sorts, when it come to backto-school shopping, this foot-dragging expert is on her A game. A selfprofessed nerd, I have always loved school supplies. The smell of new plastic binders, the feel of a brand-new crayon in my hand, and the endless organizational possibilities dividers provide transfer me into a blissful nirvana. As soon as the Forest Acres supply list was available, this mom was pushing her cart through Walmart getting all the necessary supplies for Em and Ella to achieve excellence this school year. Meet the teacher night threw me for a loop when I was presented with two new school supply lists, which brings me to my full-scale hunt for wide-rule notebook paper. Emerson’s second-grade class required two packs of this highly coveted supply. Figuring that notebook paper would abundantly line the shelves of stores throughout Easley, I waited until Monday to pick up the few lastminute school items Em and Ella needed for their rst day. Imagine my surprise when I arrived at our new Super Walmart and there was not a single ream of notebook paper to be found. I searched every aisle. I combed every display. There were crayons and rulers and spiral bound notebooks galore! Backpacks and folders and erasers lled schoolbus-yellow cardboard bins. Yet there was not a single package of loose-leaf, wide-ruled notebook paper. Having been eclipsed by the new Super Walmart, Easley’s K-mart seems less trafcked as of late. Thinking I might outsmart the masses at Wally World, I headed over to K-mart, but it wasn’t long before I was scratching my head in disbelief. Amid the plethora of colored three-ring binders, glue sticks, scissors and colored pencils, one important school supply was notably absent. I’ll end the suspense, OK? Notebook paper. There wasn’t any. None. Zip. Zero. Zilch. Nada. Not one package in the entire store. I was beginning to panic. My next stop was Walgreens. They had about 10 packs of college-ruled paper but nothing of the wide-ruled variety. The entire search became surreal. What happened to all of the notebook paper? Who knew that trying to nd this stuff would be like trying to nd a level-headed liberal at a Sarah Palin Tea Party rally? Geez! Just as I was starting to lose all hope of getting my hands on two packages of the ever-elusive wide-ruled notebook paper, I spotted the bright red Staples sign glowing like a beacon through the evening rain. I pulled into the parking lot along with 100 of my closet Easley neighbors and, braving the torrential downpour, I made my way inside. I walked up and down the aisles of ofce supplies — sweat beading up on my forehead and my heart pounding in my chest. When I nally reached the shelf where the notebook paper should have been, I was dumbstruck and undone yet again. College-ruled paper abounded, but in the slot where the wide-ruled paper once sat, there was nothing but a cold, lonely empty space. Was I going to have to admit defeat? Was I going to have to return home without having completed this simple task? I stood, shoulders slumped and head bowed, preparing to exit the store. Walking toward the doors, I scanned each display clinging to the last shred of hope that remained in my heart. Hidden among oodles of bright pink Breast Cancer Awareness clipboards, paperclips, pushpins and calendars, I spotted an object that did not belong with these items. There, on the very bottom shelf, tucked in among everything pink, I found the Holy Grail of school supplies — exactly two packages of wide-ruled, loose-leaf notebook paper. As I plucked them off the shelf I almost braced myself for violent shaking earthquakes signifying that life, as I know it, was coming to an end. Nothing happened. Thirty minutes later (yes — the lines were really that long) I was merrily on my way home with the girls’ school supply lists completely covered and a life lesson afrmed for me once again: In the immortal words of Winston Churchill “Never, never, never give up” no matter how bleak or hopeless a situation might appear. Here’s wishing students, parents, teachers, faculty and administrative personnel throughout Pickens County a wonderful start to what I hope will be an amazing school year! Into every life a little rain must finally fall Channeling Churchill, or a desperate hunt for ever-elusive school supplies Olivia Fowler On The Way For the Courier ofowler@thepccourier.com See LOVE on page 5A During the Nixon- Kennedy debates — back in the olden days when intelligent, educated candidates debated on issues and were courteous and respectful of each other — a survey was conducted as to who won the debate. Those listening to the radio thought Nixon won. But those watching the debate on television thought Kennedy won. I was a child, and my family watched it. They thought Kennedy came out ahead, except for Grandmama, a staunch Republican. She said we should listen with our eyes closed so we weren’t distracted by the physical differences between the candidates. Nixon had a five o’clock shadow and lacked charisma. Kennedy was handsome and charismatic. You wanted to believe in him. But with eyes closed, listening to their responses, you had to judge just the content. It was an interesting way to watch a debate. Nowadays candidates can be rude, crude, boorish and free of integrity and what used to be called character. They don’t debate. They brawl. Whoever is loudest gets heard. It’s fine to interrupt, insult, degrade and lie. If this is reality television, I’m turning it off. I’m tired of it, and I’m not the only one. I don’t care how shiny your teeth are or how much you spend on your haircut, comb-over or dye job. I don’t care how much your suit cost. But I do care if you behave shabbily and speak like an irate parent at a little league baseball game when your side is losing. No system is perfect. But we all know we can do better. One common-sense idea is to withhold pay from Congress when they shut the government down. This might encourage them to be more effective and come up with solutions. It isn’t an unrealistic expectation. And certainly, in a country this large and with this many people, there must be people out there who can do a better job with their hands tied behind their backs. There are people out there who want to help. Who can speak without lying, misrepresenting and without dispersing hatred. There’s nothing wrong with disagreeing. But it isn’t necessary to be disagreeable. We can’t always spot a liar, but we usually can. Anyone who has brought up children knows when they’re not being completely honest. And there are a few in the political arena who’d just as soon climb a tree to tell a lie than stand on the ground and tell the truth. Meanwhile, we all suffer. It was heartening last week to see thousands of Americans take to the streets across this country to ask for a better way. And it was encouraging to see so many women becoming involved. Women make up 52 percent of the population, but are certainly not proportionately represented in government. We need balance in our government with diversity of gender, race and economic background. This might not eliminate corruption, greed and injustice. But it certainly wouldn’t hurt. Stand up, we the people Letters to the Editor Dear Editor, I just read an article in the Post and Courier Palmetto Politics dated Jan. 24 titled “Museum not seeking money for displaying last Confederate flag on Statehouse grounds” written by Seanna Adcox, which infuriated me to action, and I hope it motivates you to action as well. The gist of the article is this: the Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum in Columbia is still not displaying the last Confederate flag that flew on our Statehouse grounds. And not only that ... the museum is refusing to ask for any money to properly display it. Allen Roberson, the director of the museum, claims the flag “wouldn’t fit” in the museum, and it would cost $300,000 to renovate in order for it to be properly displayed ... but he won’t ask legislators to appropriate the funds. He shouldn’t have to — our S.C. legislators should have already appropriated the funds needed more than two years ago. Wow ... the law clearly states in S.C. Code of Laws Chapter 10 2015 Act No. 90 Section 2 that the SC Infantry Battle Flag of the Confederate States of America after being permanently removed from the Confederate Soldier Monument in 2015 “shall be transported to the Confederate Relic Room for appropriate display.” Why are our S.C. legislators not enforcing the law they passed? It is interesting to note that our S.C. legislators have committed to awarding $25 million taxpayer dollars to the Charleston African-American Museum, of which they have already received $14 million. But yet these same legislators are not ensuring the funds needed to display our Southern heritage flag appropriately? This is unacceptable. The law S.C. legislators passed is clear ... they are ignoring their own law. Are you going to act and contact the legislators on this issue? Here’s the link to email all of them at one time: http:// www.scstatehouse.gov/email. php?T=M&C=SMEMBERS. Johnnelle Raines Pickens ‘Infuriated’ over flag’s treatment Bonnie: I’m quite sure my husband has Alzheimer’s disease. However, he refuses to go to a doctor to get diagnosed. If fact, he throws a loud tantrum if I bring up the subject. I know that there are several programs, vouchers and resources available if his Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed. What do you suggest? Answer: So often when a loved one is ill, and we are caregiving, we want to take over and tell him or her what must be done. Just like you and I would rebel — if the situation were reversed — your loved one will also rebel. In fact, as we get older and start losing freedom because of limitations of our body or mind, our tendency is to grab opportunities to exert our independence — if only to say no. Try a new approach. Instead of using the word “you,” use the word “I.” For example, “I am concerned about your health,” or “I want to make sure you are well.” We are not doctors. Your loved one may have a health problem that simulates the Alzheimer’s disease due to the wrong medication, depression, lack of vitamins, etc. Only a doctor can determine the problem(s) and the solution(s). If you can discuss the symptoms your husband is experiencing without labeling it, you might be able to lead your husband to use his wisdom to go to the doctor. You’re not telling him, he is telling you. That’s a win/win situation. Bonnie: I’ve watched my mom struggle trying to care for my dad. He has some form of dementia — he has had two strokes. My family does not have the money to purchase help from home health care. My mom has her own health issues. She has aged tremendously taking care of my dad. I have mentioned the resources and free respite programs you have written about, but Mom refuses to let anyone else help. What do you suggest? Answer: “In sickness and in health.” These are the vows many older people take seriously. Some men and women feel it is their mission to take care of their spouse. They know it is seriously affecting their health, however, they wouldn’t have it any other way. Here are some thoughts: (1) First, honor your mom’s feelings. (2) Family, neighbors, good friends and church family would welcome the opportunity to come and reminisce with your dad. It would be a blessing to both. The time your dad and his visitor spend alone is quality time that should not be denied. It is also a time your mom can take a break and do something for herself. (3) The Golden Corner Respite program is a resource that your mom and dad could visit on a trial basis. They offer many good activities that stimulate the mind and body. If your mom and dad like the program, your dad could apply, and your mom can have some time to herself. Nothing should be forced. Suggestions could be made, and then your mom and dad’s reactions should be honored. If nothing is forced, a suggestion made today may be accepted later. Bonnie Holmes is president of Loving Health Care Inc. Although the well-qualified caregivers care for clients with many different types of needs, the specialty of the company is clients with dementia. For more information, call (864) 916-9204. Email your questions concerning dementia to Bonnie at askbonnie@outlook. com. Questions are answered by Bonnie and her advisory committee from the local community. Bonnie L. Holmes Dealing with Dementia How can I ... ? I’ve mentioned before about how most small towns have unusual characters who are disrespected and mocked as an embarrassment to the community. Like folklore legends, these outcast individuals are remembered for their strange behavior, while it’s hardly ever mentioned about who they really are. Recently the subject came up again about these odd men and women, and I thought that instead of just feeling sorry for them, I could learn a valuable lesson about treating others with dignity. The notable recognition list included a few such celebrities as shopping buggy man, barbershop man, dancing girl, Ahab the Arab and a man they called “Eggs,” who would sit on Main street day and night and just quietly watch the traffic. I’ve spoken with some of these people in the past and discovered they are not homeless or penniless — they just enjoy walking around and doing what makes them happy. They wave when people honk their horns and will gladly take a sandwich if you bring them one. I read a story a while back about two young girls who were playing on the front porch. As one of them raised up, she spotted an older woman coming down the sidewalk pushing a tattered baby carriage. She was wearing old, wrinkled clothes but was not doing anything wrong. Most people around town knew her as “crazy Mary,” the lady who picked up odds and ends from the trash. As she quietly passed by the front of the house, the girls started mocking her and calling her names, laughing and giggling. Even after the woman was out of sight, they continued talking about her and judging her harshly until they looked up to see the father of the girl who lived there staring at them. He sent the friend home and calmly told his daughter to go upstairs and change into her church dress. She did as he said without saying a word and soon returned. He said they were going for a walk and on the way he wanted her to think about what she had done and to prepare an explanation about how sorry she was for being cruel. God’s love makes everyone unique

Margaret Emmie Burgess SENECA — Margaret Emmie Burgess went to be with her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on Friday, Jan. 26, 2018. She is a daughter of the late Bryan and Ethel Anthony, formerly of Pickens. Mrs. Burgess is survived by her husband of 50 years, Kenneth Wade Burgess; daughter, Phyllis Rampey (Dan); son, Rick Reeves (Marsha); sisters, Rose Youngblood (Jack) and Gail Holcombe; brothers, Wallace Anthony (Deb), Harold Anthony and Jimmy Anthony (Loraine); eight grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her parents; a brother, B.F. Anthony; sister, Neva Jean Cutler; a son, Arnold “Chipper” Reeves; and a daughter, Tammie Reeves Burgess. Visitation will be from 2-3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 4, at Davis Creek Baptist Church, with the memorial service to immediately follow. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be to Interim Healthcare Hospice, 16 Hyland Road, Greenville, SC 29615. Mountain View Funeral Home is serving the Burgess family. Tommie Dwain Yates PICKENS — Tommie Dwain “Hot Tom” Yates, 82, formerly of Liberty, went to be with his Lord and Savior on Sunday, Jan. 28, while residing at Richard Campbell Veterans Nursing Home in Belton. He died of natural causes after suffering from Lewy body dementia. He was a retired employee of BASF in Clemson and a veteran of the United States Air Force during the Korean War. He was a faithful member of Blue Ridge View Baptist Church. Surviving are his wife, Mary Stewart O’Bryant Yates of the home; his two sons, Anthony “Andy” Yates (Nancy) of Liberty and Phillip Yates (Tammie) of Ware Place; a daughter, Benita Yates Kirkland (Paul) of Powdersville; two step-daughters, Karen O’Bryant Womack (James) of Easley and Donna O’Bryant Holder (Scott) of Pickens; a step-son, Daniel “Dan” O’Bryant (Genia) of Pickens; his two brothers, Doyle Yates (Honey) of Greenville and Dwight Yates (Robbie) of Liberty; and a sister, Martha Ann Baldwin of Easley. He was the loving grandfather to Jamey Yates (Kristen), Mitchell, Matthew and Maddison Yates; Caroline, Tripp, Elizabeth and Olivia Kirkland; Brandon and Alex Womack; Erin and Austin Holder; Camden and Josie O’Bryant; Brandi Wilson and Logan Gwinn. He was predeceased by both of his parents, Tom and Edna Cannon Yates, his first wife, Betty Faye Hitt Yates, and a brother-in-law, Howard Baldwin. In celebration of Tommie’s life, receiving friends will be held, Thursday, Feb. 1, from 6-8 p.m. at Liberty Mortuary. The family would like to thank the staff of Richard Campbell Veterans Nursing Home and Patriot Hospice for the attentive and loving care they provided Tommie Dwain and his family during his stay. Memorials may be made to Blue Ridge View Baptist Church, 745 Wolf Creek Road, Pickens, SC 29671. The family will be at their respective homes. Online condolences may be sent to the family by visiting libertymortuary.com. Liberty Mortuary and Cremation Services are handling arrangements. Larry Eastel Shead SIX MILE — Larry Eastel Shead, 44, husband of the late Misty Shead passed away Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018 at his home. Eastel was born in Anderson County, the son of the late Ann Ellenburg Shead. He was a member of Pine Grove Baptist Church. Survivors include his father, Larry W Shead of the home; one brother, John Shead (Kim) of Six Mile; a sister, Crystal Powell of Kingstree; and a special niece, Andrea Shead. Graveside services were held on Jan. 26 at Red Hill Baptist Church cemetery. Mountain View Funeral Home is serving the Shead family. James R. Morton Easley — James Ray Morton, 84, husband of the late Martha Ann Black Morton, passed from this life on Saturday, Jan. 27, 2018. Mr. Morton was born in Pickens County, a son of the late Amon and Pauline Spearman Morton. He was retired as a contractor and painter. Survivors include two daughters, Sharon Nalley (Bill) of Easley and Tina Langston (Danny) of Liberty, and a son, Steve Morton (Sandra) of Greenville. Also surviving are four grandchildren, Ashley E. Nalley, William Bryan Nalley, Caylyn V. Langston and Ashton M. Langston, and a sister, Ershal Williams of Pickens. In addition to his wife and parents, Mr. Morton was predeceased by a sister, Gladys Holden, and a brother, Ray Morton. Funeral services will be private. A message of condolence may be expressed to the family by visiting dillardfunerals.com. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the American Heart Association, heart. org/ Ḋillard Funeral Home is assisting the family in making arrangements. Carolyn Ernestine Michael LIBERTY — Carolyn “Tine” Michael, 71, passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018. She was the wife of George Michael and the daughter of Aileen Rowland and the late Ernest Rowland. Mrs. Michael was a retired hairdresser and a member of Deliverance Tabernacle Church of God. Survivors include her mother and husband, George, of 38 years, as well as four sons, Gene Duncan of Norris, Bobby Duncan of Norris, Brad Michael of Liberty and David Michael (KaRon) of Manchester, Ga.; two daughters, Sheryl Shankles (Gary) of Kansas City, Kan., and Vannetta Bird of Bayanne, N.J.; and a sister, Cindy Dabbs (Tim) of Laurens. Mrs. Michael also leaves eight grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her father and sister, Vickie Parson. A visitation was held Jan. 26, with a service following Jan. 27 in the Dillard Funeral Home chapel. Entombment followed at Hillcrest memorial Park and Gardens. Memorials may be sent to the American Cancer Society. Online condolences may be sent to dillardfunerals.com. Dillard Funeral Home is assisting the Michael family. Hazel L. Duncan EASLEY — Mrs. Hazel Louise Murphy Duncan, 70, wife of Donald Franklin Duncan, went to be with her Lord and Savior Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018 Ḃorn in Pickens County, a daughter of the late William “J.T.” and Ida Maebell Gibson Murphy, Mrs. Duncan was a homemaker and a member of Jones Avenue Baptist Church. Surviving, in addition to her husband of 56 years, are two sons, Randall Duncan of Gastonia, N.C., and Rodney Duncan and his wife, Michelle, of Greenville; three daughters, Darlene Ramlogan and her husband, the Rev. Peter Ramlogan, of Easley, Donna Smith and her husband, the Rev. Randall Smith, of West Pelzer, and Shana Bullard and her husband, the Rev. Andrew Bullard, of Moncks Corner; four sisters, Viola Duncan of Easley, Brenda Lollis of Sunset, and Judy Brissey and Diane Kay, both of Easley; and nine grandchildren. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Duncan was predeceased by a son, Tony Duncan. Funeral services were held Jan. 27 at Jones Avenue Baptist Church. Burial followed at Hillcrest Memorial Park. Condolences may be expressed online at robinsonfuneralhomes.com or in person at Robinson Funeral Home- Downtown Easley, which is assisting the family. Lois Hamlin Hayes EASLEY -— Mrs. Martha Lois Hamlin Hayes, 93, wife of the late Allen Willie Hayes, went to be with her Lord and Savior Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018. Born in Liberty, a daughter of the late Harlow Judson and Mary Alice Tinsley Hamlin, Mrs. Hayes was a graduate of Liberty High School and retired from Belk. She was a member of Geer Memorial Baptist Church, where she belonged to the Joy Sunday school class. Surviving are a son, Terry Hayes (Jerri) of Easley; a daughter, Karen H. Tilson (Tom) of Anderson; one brother, Wayne Hamlin (Brenda); five sisters, Dot McCall, Mary Hester (Carroll), Janet Wilson (Herb), Shirley Stephens (Doug), and Antha James; a brother-in-law, the Rev. Wallace Hughes; a sister-in-law, Carolyn Hamlin; three grandchildren, Matthew Hayes (Donna), Russell Hayes (Becki), and Rebekah T. Klempin (James); and three great-grandchildren, Mattison, Sophia and Chance Hayes. In addition to her husband and parents, Mrs. Hayes was predeceased by two brothers, Fred and Talmadge Hamlin; and three sisters, Nell Gibson, Gracie Hamlin and Donnie Hughes. Funeral services were held Jan. 26 in the chapel of Robinson Funeral Home-Downtown Easley. Burial followed at Greenlawn Memorial Park. Condolences may be expressed online at robinsonfuneralhomes.com or in person at Robinson Funeral Home- Downtown Easley, which is assisting the family. Wednesday, January 31, 2018 Pickens County Courier 5A BUILD THE BUSINESS YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED. FOR YOURSELF. FOR YOUR FAMILY. Liberty Tax Service is the affordable way to reach your potential and enjoy ongoing success. For Your FREE Franchise Information Package, Visit libertytaxfranchise.com or Call 1.800.545.1028 Today! Reduce the initial costs of starting your own business. Franchise $0 Fees!* *Franchise Fee is $0. Liberty Tax Service location must be established in an unowned, undeveloped territory. Franchisee will pay a $2,500 security deposit to be refunded upon the completion of a 5-year franchise agreement or sale of the territory. Territory must be open for operation by 1/8/2012. Offer expires 12/31/2011. Available in select areas. Other limitations apply. Minnesota state franchise numbers F-4418 and F-3918. 6A Pickens County Courier Wednes Obituaries The Pickens County Courier runs in-county obituaries free of charge. Please ask your funeral home about this service. Making Lasting Impressions Since 1955 Join us every month for a different topic, a tas the wisdom of a featured physician from our m Baptist Easley Hospital’s Brahnam C Center. Call 442.7621 to regis — required 48 hours in advan Tuesday, September 13th @ 12:3 Dr. Michelle Tucker ~ Mountainview OBGYN “No Bones About It” - - - Information on Os PUBLIC NO The Pickens County Sheriff's Office is on-site assessment from September 1 September 13, 2011, as part of a prog accreditation by verifying it meets pro Administered by the South Carolina L Accreditation, Inc., the accreditation p agencies to comply with state-of-the-a basic areas: policy and procedures, a operations, and support services Anyone wishing to submit written com Pickens County Sheriff's Office ability standards for accreditation may send South Carolina Law Enforcement c/o South Carolina Sheriff’s 112 Westpark Boulevard, Colu ATTN: SCLEA Program Ad JOHN (JACK) THOMAS GILLILAND EASLEY — John (Jack) Thomas Gilliland, 80, of Easley, husband of Helen Brooks Gilliland, died Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 at St. Francis Regency Hospital. Mr. Gilliland was born in Richmond, Va., the son of the late William Oscar and Iona Estella Bagwell Gilliland. Mr. Gilliland was a self-employed mechanic, served in the U.S. Army and was of the Baptist faith. Surviving, in addition to his wife, are a step-son, Jimmy Ramey (Priscilla) of Monroe, N.C.; a brother, Robert Gilliland; two grandchildren, Jimmy J. Ramey and Helen M. Warren, both of Monroe, N.C.; four great-grandchildren and a stepgranddaughter, Tony R. Igloo, an active Marine of Fayetteville, N.C. Funeral was 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3 in the chapel of Robinson Funeral Home-Powdersville Road. Burial followed in Robinson Memorial Gardens. Condolences may be expressed online at www. robinsonfuneralhomes.com or in person at Robinson Funeral-Powdersville Road, which is assisting the family. EUGENIE MABRY PICKENS - Eugenie Beckman Mabry, 82, of 176 Dove Haven Drive, died Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 at Manna Health & Rehab. Born in Middletown, Ohio, a daughter of the late Earl and Rose Williams Beckman, Mrs. Mabry retired from the banking industry and was a member of Easley First United Methodist Church. Surviving are a son, Alan Mabry (Cyndi) of Jacksboro, Tenn.; a daughter, Tracy Marlow (Dale Green) of Rutherfordton, N.C.; three sisters, Pat Vitatoe of Ohio, Carol Strickland of Alabama and Marilyn Moulton of Virginia; two granddaughters, Heather Walsh and Melonie Morrison; and a great-granddaughter, Kylie Morrison. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Mabry was predeceased by her rst husband, Howard Mabry and by her second husband, Richard Robbins. Memorial services were 4 p.m. Saturday in the chapel of Robinson Funeral Home-Downtown with the Rev. Jim Correll ofciating. In lieu of owers, memorials may be made to First United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 582, Easley, SC 29641. Condolences may be expressed online at www.robinsonfuneralhomes.com or in person at Robinson Funeral Home- Downtown, which is assisting the family. RICKY G. DONALD SIX MILE — Ricky George Donald, 50, of 238 Stewart Road, died Tuesday at his home. Born in Pickens, he was a son of Ruth Crawford Donald Kelley of Six Mile and the late Alonzo Donald. He was a former carpenter and was of the Baptist faith. Surviving in addition to his mother are two sons, Chris Donald of Charleston and Travis Donald of Clemson; two sisters, Sandra Bryant of Six Mile and Lenora Arnold of Easley; and one granddaughter. In addition to his father he was predeceased by two brothers Douglas Donald and Lewis Donald; and a sister Brenda Lewis. Funeral services were 5 p.m., Saturday in the chapel of Duckett-Robinson Funeral Home in Central. Condolences may be expressed online at www.robinsonfuneralhomes.com or at the funeral home. SCOTT SMITH LIBERTY — Lewis Edward Smith, II, known by his family and many friends as “Scott” or “Smitty” died Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011. Born in Greenville he was a son of Norma Jean Fuller and the late Lewis Edward Smith. He was employed by Liberty Denim and attended Five Point Fellowship in Easley. Surviving in addition to his mother of Easley are his wife, Lisa Taylor Smith of the home; a daughter, Jordan Sarae Smith of Dacusville; two sons, Ryan Nix and Logan Gauge Wilson both of Easley; a sister, Pam Allison and her husband Ron of Piedmont; a brother, Bronson Smith of Anderson; a grandfather, Palmer Fuller of Liberty. He was predeceased by three grandparents, Maxie Sanders Fuller, and Ladell & Gladys Smith. Funeral services to honor Scott’s life were 2 p.m. Saturday in the Liberty Mortuary Chapel. Burial was at Greenlawn Memorial Park. Memorial messages may be sent to the family by visiting www.libertymortuary.com Liberty Mortuary is handling arrangements. JAMES (JIM) WHITWORTH PICKENS — James Cleveland (Jim) Whitworth, 82, of 1822 Belle Shoals Road, died Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011. Born in Atlanta Ga., he was the son of the late Glover and Edna Camp Whitworth. Mr. Whitworth was a graduate of the University of Georgia, School of Pharmacy. He was the co-owner of The Pickens Drug Company and The Medical Center Pharmacy in Pickens. He was a member of Pickens First Baptist Church where he was a former Chairman of the Deacons, Sunday School Teacher, and Choir Member and was also a mason and member of the Lions Club. Surviving is his wife of 59 years, Ann Willis Whitworth of the home; two sons, Jeff Whitworth and his wife, Nancy, of Greenville, and Victor Whitworth and his wife, Sharon, of Pickens; three grandchildren, Erin Chilton and her husband, Jon, of Columbia, Luke Whitworth and Gil Whitworth both of Pickens; and two great grandchildren, Reynolds and Mary Willis Chilton; and four brothers, Dr. Clyde Whitworth of Athens, Ga., Johnny Whitworth of Conyers, Ga., Don Whitworth of Liberty, and Lamar Whitworth of Macon, Ga. A service to celebrate Mr. Whitworth’s life was held on Sunday, Sept. 4 at 3 p.m. at Pickens First Baptist Church. Burial followed in Hillcrest Memorial Park. In lieu of owers, memorials may be made to Pickens First Baptist Church, 406 E. Main Street, Pickens, SC 29671 or Hospice of the Upstate, 1835 Rogers Rd., Anderson, SC 29621. Online condolences may be expressed by visiting DillardFunerals.com. GEORGIA ANN CHAMBERS EASLEY — Georgia Ann Durham Chambers, 91, of 715 North Fish Trap Road, wife of the late Clarence Harlon Chambers, Sr., died Friday, Sept. 2, 2011 at her home. Born in Greenville County, a daughter of the late Alic and Ollie Mae Whitson Durham, Mrs. Chambers retired from Southern Weaving and was a member of Brandon Baptist Church. Surviving are two sons, David F. Chamber and Clarence H. “Buddy” Chambers, Jr., both of Easley; three daughters, Marjorie Hoffman and Shirley Burdette, both of Easley, and Doris Ragan of Travelers Rest; a daughter-inlaw, Sarah Chambers of Easley; 11 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren and three great-greatgrandchildren. In addition to her husband and parents, Mrs. Chambers was predeceased by a son, Eddie Chambers, and by several brothers and sisters. Funeral services were 2 p.m. Monday in the chapel of Robinson Funeral Home-Downtown. Burial followed in Hillcrest Memorial Park. Condolences may be expressed online at www.robinsonfuneralhomes.com in person at Robinson Funeral Home-Downtown, which is assisting the family. STEVE HALE EASLEY — Richard Stephen “Steve” Hale, 75, of 404 Cobble Stone Trace, husband of the late Julia Gilley Hale, died Friday, Sept. 2, 2011 at Baptist Easley Hospital. Born in Fulton County, Ga., the son of the late Truman and Anna Rene Milam Hale, Mr. Hale retired as general manager of Easley Combined Utilities. He was on the Board of Directors of Piedmont Municipal Power Agency and was a volunteer with the Easley Fire Department for over 23 years. Mr. Hale was a member of Rock Springs Baptist Church and a veteran of the United States Coast Guard. Surviving are three sons, James Davidson “Jim” Hale (Penny) of Greenville, Richard Brian Hale (Diana) and Paul Bradley Hale (Meshelle), all of Easley; two sisters, Harriet Sparks of Snelleville, Ga., and Jenea Townsend of Jackson Co., Ga.; and nine grandchildren. In addition to his wife and parents, Mr. Hale was predeceased by a daughter, Donna Allison Hale. Funeral services were 2 p.m. Sunday at Rock Springs Baptist Church with the Rev. Dr. David Gallamore ofciating. Burial followed in Hillcrest Memorial Park. Memorials may be made to Christian Learning Centers, (Released Time Program) 210-A, Mt. Airy Church Road, Easley, SC 29642. Condolences may be expressed online at www.robinsonfuneralhomes.com or in person at Robinson Funeral Home- Downtown, which is assisting the family. CAROL COKE EASLEY — Carol June Littlejohn Coke, 58, died surrounded by the love of her family on Sept. 3, 2011. Born in New Orleans, La. on April 22, 1953, she was the daughter of the late Lee Smith Littlejohn, Jr. and Avanelle Holliday Littlejohn of Six Mile. She was a beloved wife, mother, grandmother, sister, aunt, and friend. Carol was of strong Baptist Faith. Carol has made Easley her home for the past 12 years, but grew up in Six Mile where her heart remained. She attended Southern Wesleyan University and earned her BS degree in 1987, then went on to earn her M.Ed. in Instructional Technology in 2005. She was also a National Board Certied teacher as of 2001. Carol was an educator in Pickens County for 25 years and would have continued if her illness had not forced her retirement. She was a Pickens County School District “Teacher of the Year” in 2001 and in the same year American Legion Teacher of the Year. Carol was awarded ‘Teacher of the Year” in 2000 for Pickens Middle School and also in 1996 for Morrison (Clemson) Elementary School. She began her teaching career at Morrison Elementary, then taught at Pickens Middle, went on to work as Coordinator of Professional Development for Curriculum at Pickens County School District ofce, and - nally she was a master teacher, instructional coach, and technology resource teacher at Ben Hagood Elementary. She loved her students and colleagues and continued to mentor new teachers even beyond her retirement. Her passion has always been the history of her much loved family and of Pickens County. Carol served on the Six Mile Centennial Committee celebrating 100 years for the Town of Six Mile. She also wrote the anniversary edition of the “Commemorative Collection of Memories” for Six Mile. Throughout the years she has written several books documenting Pickens County history. Her gift to her family was her last book “Legacy of Love – Our History”, about the Hollidays and their kin and she had done extensive research of the Littlejohns. She is survived by her loving husband Dan Coke, daughter Tara Coke McMullen (Danny), and granddaughter Lexi Mc- Mullen, her two brothers Lee S. Littlejohn, III (Sharon) and Mark H. Littlejohn (Cherie), and her nieces and nephews that she dearly loved. A memorial service will be held 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7 at the First Baptist Church of Easley with the Rev. Doctor Ray Allen and the Rev. Doctor John Adams ofciating. Burial will be private. The family will receive friends following the service at the church. A message of condolence may be expressed to the family by visiting www.dillardfunerals. com. In lieu of owers, the family requests that memorials be made to Hospice of The Upstate, 1835 Rogers Road, Anderson, SC 29621. The family is at the home of her daughter, Tara. Dillard Funeral Home is serving the family. EVELYN WILSON EASLEY — Evelyn Sullenbarger Wilson, 74, of Easley, wife of David J. Wilson, died Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011 at Greenville Memorial Hospital. Mrs. Wilson was born in Darke Co, Ohio, a daughter of the late George Sullenbarger. She was a retired bookkeeper, a volunteer for Hospice of the Upstate and a member of St. Andrews United Methodist Church in Easley. Surviving, in addition to her husband, are her mother, Dorothy Whittaker Sullenbarger; two daughters, Vicki Ward (Jeff) and Lynnette Long; a son, Bill Long; a step-daughter, Anna M. Wilson and ancé, (Fred); a sister, Reda Sullenbarger and special nephew, Brandon; two brothers, Jim Sullenbarger (Michelle) and Dan Sullenbarger (Donna); and special friend Susie Norton. Memorial service will be 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7 in the chapel of Robinson Funeral Home-Powdersville Road. The family will receive friends from 3 until 4 p.m. Wednesday, prior to the service at the funeral home. Flowers are accepted or memorials may be made to St. Andrews United Methodist Church, 309 Pelzer Highway Easley, SC 29642. Condolences may be expressed online at www.robinsonfuneralhomes.com or in person at Rob dersvil the fam E son, 77 on Sep ed illne B she wa James was a vary B ent m Church Su Tomm one gr two gr and H ter Lo ous ni is also friends two gi whom Sh by two and P. and th Fu Thursd the C Home Pleasan Cemet T friends from 2 home. In als ma tist Ch Siloam O left at NEED STORAGE SPACE? “We treat your belongings with care.” Humidity Controlled Exterminated Security cameras Well-lit indoor & outdoor areas Private locked rooms in varying sizes CALL STORAGE ON MAIN 864-414-5084 AGE SPACE? belongings with care.” Humidity Controlled Exterminated Security cameras Well-lit indoor & outdoor areas Private locked rooms in varying sizes N MAIN 864-414-5084 Because There Is a Difference At Liberty Mortuary, Affordability Includes Quality. 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Jan. 31, Feb. 7, 14, 21 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- NOTICE TO THE HEIRS OF JON ALAN MEEKS Notice is hereby given that an Application for Distribution of Real Property of the Estate of Jon Alan Meeks, Deceased, is pending in the County Court, Lubbock County, Texas, in Cause No. 2017-780,750. All heirs of Jon Alan Meeks, deceased, including David A. Taylor, Sr., are hereby requested appear and show cause why the estate should not be partitioned and distributed or in the alternative contact the following attorney: Steve A. Claus Attorney at Law 4412 74th St., Suite B101 Lubbock, TX 79424 (806) 793-3397 Be advised that time is of the essence, as a hearing on said Application of the above named Estate is set for the 22nd day of February, 2018, at 10:00 a.m. at the Lubbock County Courthouse, 904 Broadway Street, Lubbock, Texas 79403. DATED the 30th day of January, 2018. Steve A. Claus Attorney for Betty Ann Meeks State Bar No.: 00793160 4412 74th St., Suite B101 Lubbock, TX 79424 Telephone: (806) 793-3397 Facsimile: (806) 791-4477 E-mail: steve@clauspc.com Jan. 31 Legals AREA’S LARGEST YARD SALE! 1449 Walhalla Hwy. | Pickens OPEN EVERY WEDNESDAY 5 AM - 2 PM Office Hours: Tuesday 9 - 4pm BARGAIN E XCHANGE FLEA MARKET 864.878.4762 bargainexchangefleamarket.com THANK Y OU V ENDORS AND S HOPPERS FOR A GREAT YEAR! World’s Best Wednesday Market Crafts – Collectibles – Antiques Treasures – Farmer’s Market Pickens County Courier 9B Answers to puzzles from page 9A E T k NG ions - ED 502 MICHAEL THOMAS E BE CHE 864.898.1777 www. ThomasRealtySC.com 500 W. Main St., Pickens, SC 29671 E-mail: thomas_realty@bellsouth.net Property Management & Appraisals Services EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY Windwood Apartments - 1,2 & 3 BRs starting @ $350/month. 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NFL SUNDAY TICKET Free - Choice Ultimate|Premier – Pkgs from $29.99/mo. Call by 9/30! 1-800-380-8939. SW more than 2.7 million South Carolina newspaper readers. Your 25-word classied ad will appear in 108 S.C. newspapers for only $375. Call Jimmie Haynes at the South Carolina Newspaper Network at 1-888-727-7377. SW TION in 111 S.C. newspapers for only $375. Your 25-word classied ad will reach more than 2.6 million readers. Call Jimmie Haynes at the S.C. Newspaper Network, 1-888-727-7377. SW ---------------------------------------------------------- AUCTION: Storage Unit, Saturday, Sept. 10 at 1 p.m. (Vance) Tvs, furniture, oxygen tanks, clothes and much more. 924 Five Forks Rd., Ph. 442-3295 for update. 8/31, 9/7 After a while of awkward silence with only the sound of their footsteps on the sidewalk, they came to a little shack, and the little girl knew they were at the right place when she saw the baby carriage sitting next to the front door. They both approached reverently, and he knocked on the door. The lady inside slowly opened the door, and the girl’s father said they had come to say hello if it was alright. She graciously invited them inside. The little girl looked around as her eyes tried to adjust to the darkness. It was a small room filled with trinkets and the basics of living, and she watched nervously as the woman proceeded to make tea. Finally, in the awkwardness of the moment, the father spoke up and said that before they could partake in her generosity, his daughter had something she wanted to say. The little girl presented a seemingly sincere apology that passed his approval, and he took the tray from Mary and placed it on the only table in the room. The conversation was about the weather and other topics of small talk until suddenly the father stood and thanked her for her kind hospitality. The walk home was again uncomfortable as the little girl’s mind was swirling with so many questions about not only what had just happened, but also about all the other people in the world who live like this. Did something happen in Mary’s life that caused her to be this way? And then she thought about how people condemn this woman just because she’s poor (like her and her friend had done earlier). When they arrived home, she went up to her room and stared out the window as if it were a portal to the unknown mysteries of life. She thought about how things are not always the way they seem and how everyone walks a different path within their journey. We are unique in our own way, but just because we’re different does not mean we are bad or deserve to be treated harshly. Her dad never mentioned it again, and neither did she. There was no reason to. Dr. Holland is a Christian author, outreach minister and community chaplain. Learn more at billyhollandministries. com. 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