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Clarksville- Main File

FIGURE 28: Education Gap

FIGURE 28: Education Gap by Top Occupations Requiring Some College and Above (>$15/hr), 10-county Region (gaps and surpluses are the difference between openings and completions) Surplus/Avg. Annual Openings (2011–2016) Regional Completions (2016)/Gap General and Operations Managers –131 184 315 Managers, All Other –230 115 345 Business Operations Specialists, All Other 87 87 Accountants and Auditors 71 66 5 Education Administrators, All Other 47 37 10 Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education 220 111 109 Middle School Teachers, Except Special & Career/Tech. Ed. 66 4 62 Secondary School Teachers, Except Special & Career/Tech. Ed. –34 89 123 Teachers and Instructors, All Other 222 204 18 Registered Nurses –54 183 237 Licenses Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses –191 115 306 Dental Assistants 63 16 47 Automotive Service Technicians and Mechanics 126 97 29 Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers 312 185 127 Source: Emsi Dataset 2017.3 Similar to the graph above, the graph below illustrates the gap in regional education completions and annual average openings for those occupations that have a median pay between $11 and $15 per hour and typical entry level of education that requires some college or above. Positive numbers in green represent the gaps while negative numbers indicate surplus of graduates over number of annual average job openings available within the 10-county region. FIGURE 29: Education Gap by Top Occupations (between $11-$15/hr), 10-county Region (gaps and surpluses are the difference between openings and completions) Surplus/Avg. Annual Openings (2011–2016) Regional Completions (2016)/Gap Education Administr., Preschool & Childcare Center/Program Library Technicians Teacher Assistants Coaches and Scouts –5 5 10 16 16 173 173 –181 41 222 Emergency Medical Technicians & Paramedics Dietetic Technicians Nursing Assistants Medical Assistants Medical Transcriptionists Phlebotomists Veterinary Technologists and Technicians Barbers Hairdressers, Hairstylists, and Cosmetologists Skincare Specialists Source: Emsi Dataset 2017.3 –153 276 17 7 10 –4 3 83 –17 16 9 7 31 245 7 2 11 11 11 7 4 33 236 134 115 19 –140 8 148 56 COMPREHENSIVE LABOR ANALYSIS: CLARKSVILLE-MONTGOMERY COUNTY

MEETING THE NEEDS OF INDUSTRY Some occupations show the oversaturation in the regional market—meaning institutions should not focus so heavily on these occupations. The previous section analyzed which military occupations translated into civilian employment. The resulting civilian occupations that are also mentioned above are included in Table 14, on the next page. While some have a surplus of completions each year, on average, exiting military with experience and reasonable expectations have a good chance at these more competitive jobs. There have been great strides with involvement from education institutions and trying to meet the needs of industry. APSU’s Engineering Technology Department has a history of graduating individuals to help meet the manufacturing needs for the region. HCC and APSU have partnered to expand the Kentucky Federation for Advanced Manufacturing Education (FAME) program. This apprenticeship-style program addresses a need for more technically skilled workers in advanced manufacturing, while also providing an avenue to high-wage/high-demand careers for military veterans and other residents. This provides students a work-and-learn format and offers articulation to APSU higher degree programs. Tennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT) has an established mechatronics program and has recently partnered with APSU and the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System (CMCSS) to include on-campus learning experiences to provide mechatronics certificates to entry level freshmen continuing on to earn an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. The dialogue must continue to flow between industry and education and more frequently. APSU, HCC, TCAT, and other regional higher education institutions must continue to work with high schools and employers to ensure alignment between employer needs and educational program development. Although Clarksville-Montgomery County School System have improved in all state metrics over the past several years, employers are still saying that entry level applicants are lacking in math skills. With the growth of manufacturing in Clarksville and Montgomery County, the need for bachelor’s degree holders by manufacturers is lower than in an environment where there are more advanced manufacturing opportunities. While APSU does offer associate’s degrees in manufacturing-related fields (mechatronics, for example), 70% of degrees at APSU are bachelor’s level or above and are relevant to areas other than manufacturing, such as business, education, healthcare, information technology, etc. However, there is substantial opportunity to work with APSU, HCC, TCAT, and area high schools to ensure the program development and workforce preparedness are more aligned with the economic and job development priorities of the community. A council or team assigned to assess and explore these opportunities and the development of programs may be advisable. Education & Training Demand 57

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