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Practical_modern_SCADA_protocols_-_dnp3,_60870-5_and_Related_Systems

Fundamentals of

Fundamentals of distributed network protocol 85 In the diagram the designated master station initiates a communication with a nonmaster station. The request message itself is contained in the application layer information within the message. The designated master station has initiated this communication and is therefore the primary station. A response is required to this message at the data link level, ie a confirmation of receipt is expected. The non-master station sends an acknowledgment. This is a secondary message, ie a data-link response to the primary message. Note that at the data link level, this transaction is now completed. Because the last transaction contained an application level request for the transmission of data, the non-master station then initiates a communication with the requested data. Now the non-master station is initiating the communication, and it is the primary station for this transaction. This is a new communication sequence, or transaction, at the data link level. Although it is related to the prior transaction at the application level, it is unrelated at this level. It can be seen from this example that the terms primary and secondary relate to the station initiating a transaction at the data link level, and not to whether the stations are master or non-master. Although the communications are balanced, and therefore any station can be a primary station and initiate messages, it is incorrect to believe that the terms master and non-master have no meaning. In DNP3 stations may be defined as either master or non-master. This information is used at the link level to determine the setting of a message direction bit, the DIR bit. The direction bit is set for messages from a master, and cleared for messages from a non-master station. A final definition that is important to understand is the ‘data link’ or just ‘link’. The link refers to the logical connection between a primary station and a secondary station. It is therefore a one-way communication path. To establish two way communications between two devices, it is necessary to establish the links in each direction. The logic in this may be better understood by recognizing that a communication channel between two devices can be duplex, using two entirely separate physical media, one in each direction. The simplest example of this is of course a four-wire connection. MASTER STATION A F1 F2 F2 F1 MASTER STATION B DTE CH1 DCE DCE CH1 DTE DTE CH2 Data Radio Full-Duplex Radio Link Data Radio CH2 DTE DCE PSTN Link DCE Modem Modem Half-Duplex Over Phone Link Figure 5.8 Example of communication channels

86 Practical Modern SCADA Protocols: DNP3, 60870.5 and Related Systems The drawing shows two communication channels between the master and non-master stations. The first channel uses a data radio, and is full-duplex. The second channel is a backup using modems and the public switched telephone network. The second channel is half-duplex, although parts of it are in fact full-duplex. In this example there are four links, as follows: 5.4.4 How it does it • Channel 1 A to B • Channel 1 B to A • Channel 2 A to B • Channel 2 B to A DNP3 controls transmission at the link layer level by using defined transmission procedures. These procedures make use of a control byte contained within the message frame to control transmission. It is important to realize that neither the control byte nor the procedures can by themselves do this. The procedures define what actions are taken at each end, and the control byte provides the coordination between them. It defines what type of transmission is being sent, ie the frame type, and where in the process the frame fits. In order to understand how the overall process works, it is necessary to examine the structure of the frame, the meaning of the information in the control byte, and finally the procedures themselves. The FT3 frame format The LPDU or frame format was based on the FT3 format specified by IEC 870-5-1. This was one of four possible frame formats specified by IEC 870-5-1. The others are FT1.1, FT1.2 and FT2. These will be discussed further when comparing DNP3 with IEC 870. The format specifies a 10 byte header, followed optionally by up to 16 data blocks. The overall message size is limited to 292 bytes, which provides for a maximum data capacity of 250 bytes. Thus a fully packed frame will comprise the header plus 16 data blocks, with the last block containing 10 data bytes. Start Length Control Block O Destination Address 2 Source Address 2 CRC User Data 16 Block 1 User CRC Data 2 2 2 1 1 2 1-16 Fixed Length Header 10 bytes Body 0 - 282 bytes Block n CRC Overall Message Size in Bytes: Header Body - Data - CRC 10 250 32 292 Maximum of n = 16 blocks Maximum Data 250 bytes Figure 5.9 FT3 frame format • START 2 bytes: 0564 (hex) • LENGTH Count of user data in bytes, plus 5, not counting CRC bytes. This represents all data, excluding CRC codes following the LENGTH count byte. Its range is

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    Practical Modern SCADA Protocols: D

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    Practical Modern SCADA Protocols: D

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    Contents Preface ..................

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    Contents vii 12.6 Frame reception .

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    Preface ix Chapter 3: Open SCADA pr

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    1 Introduction Objectives When you

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    Introduction 3 Figure 1.2 PC to IED

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    Introduction 5 The interconnection

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    Introduction 7 a number of sub-path

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    Introduction 9 The Internet protoco

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    Introduction 11 Outside the utiliti

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    Fundamentals of SCADA communication

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    Fundamentals of SCADA communication

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    Key features of SCADA software incl

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    Fundamentals of SCADA communication

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    2.2.2 Control processor unit (or CP

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    Fundamentals of SCADA communication

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    Fundamentals of SCADA communication

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    Fundamentals of SCADA communication

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    2.5.2 Multi-point architecture (Mul

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    2.6 Communication philosophies Fund

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    Fundamentals of SCADA communication

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  • Page 74 and 75: 3 Open SCADA protocols DNP3 and IEC
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    Fundamentals of distributed network

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    Fundamentals of distributed network

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    Fundamentals of distributed network

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    Fundamentals of distributed network

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    6 Advanced considerations of distri

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    Advanced considerations of distribu

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    Advanced considerations of distribu

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    Advanced considerations of distribu

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    Advanced considerations of distribu

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    6.2 Interoperability between DNP3 d

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    6.3.2 Data classes and events Advan

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    Recommendations: 6.3.9 Multiple obj

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    6.3.15 Time-tagged binary input eve

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    Advanced considerations of distribu

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    Advanced considerations of distribu

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    Advanced considerations of distribu

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    Advanced considerations of distribu

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    Advanced considerations of distribu

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    Preview of IEC 60870-5 171 7.2 Stan

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    Preview of IEC 60870-5 173 Under IE

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    Preview of IEC 60870-5 175 over cor

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    8 Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 8.1 T

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 179 8.1

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    8.1.9 IEC 60870-5-101 1995 Fundamen

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 183 pro

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 185 MAS

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    8.4 Data link layer Fundamentals of

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    8.4.2 Order of information Fundamen

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    8.4.5 Unbalanced and balanced trans

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 193 Sta

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    Station/link initialization, balanc

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 197 The

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 199 To

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    Function codes from secondary stati

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 203 is

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    The following notes apply to these

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 207 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 209 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 211 Whe

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 213 8.5

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 215 to

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 217 Mas

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 219 Qua

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 221 Key

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 223 SVA

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 225 Key

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 227 DCO

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    8.6.4 Qualifier information element

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    Key - QOC Qualifier of command QU Q

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 233 SCQ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 235 LOF

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 237 FBP

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 239 In

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 241 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 243 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 245 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 247 Val

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    Type 11 Measured, scaled value Fund

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 251 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 253 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 255 Val

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    Type 20 Packed single-point with st

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 259 Pro

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 261 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 263 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 265 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 267 8.7

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 269 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 271 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 273 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 275 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 277 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 279 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 281 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 283 Typ

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    Fundamentals of IEC 60870-5 285 Val

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    9.1.1 Station initialization Advanc

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    9.1.2 Data acquisition Advanced con

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    Advanced considerations of IEC 6087

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    Advanced considerations of IEC 6087

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    In Figure 9.4 the following time sy

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    Advanced considerations of IEC 6087

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    Basic application functions: 9.2.3

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    Advanced considerations of IEC 6087

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    Advanced considerations of IEC 6087

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    Advanced considerations of IEC 6087

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    10 Differences between DNP3 and IEC

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    Data objects: Differences between D

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    10.2 Which one will win? Difference

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    Intelligent electronic devices (IED

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    11.2.5 Communications Intelligent e

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    Ethernet and TCP/IP networks 317 tr

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    Ethernet and TCP/IP networks 319 Th

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    Ethernet and TCP/IP networks 321 Fi

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    12.2.5 10Broad36 12.2.6 1Base5 Ethe

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    Ethernet and TCP/IP networks 325 si

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    Ethernet and TCP/IP networks 327 As

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    12.8.4 Length Ethernet and TCP/IP n

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    Ethernet and TCP/IP networks 331 To

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    12.11.8 Fast Ethernet Ethernet and

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    12.12 TCP/IP Ethernet and TCP/IP ne

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    Ethernet and TCP/IP networks 337

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    Ethernet and TCP/IP networks 339 Fi

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    Here follows a brief description of

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    Unicast addresses Ethernet and TCP/

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    The three common fields are: Ethern

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    Ethernet and TCP/IP networks 347 Th

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    13 Fieldbus and SCADA communication

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    Fieldbus and SCADA communications s

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    Fieldbus and SCADA communications s

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    • Programmable logic controllers

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    Fieldbus and SCADA communications s

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    Three such ‘services’ are readi

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    Figure 13.9 High speed Ethernet and

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    14.2 UCA development UCA protocol 3

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    14.3.1 Uniform communications infra

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    UCA protocol 367 14.3.4 Uniform app

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    14.3.5 Uniform data model UCA proto

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    Figure 14.6 Device object model ove

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    UCA protocol 373 An excellent refer

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    Applications of DNP3 and SCADA prot

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    Applications of DNP3 and SCADA prot

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    Applications of DNP3 and SCADA prot

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    PDS 500 Data Map Applications of DN

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    Applications of DNP3 and SCADA prot

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    Applications of DNP3 and SCADA prot

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    Applications of DNP3 and SCADA prot

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    Applications of DNP3 and SCADA prot

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    16 Future developments Objectives W

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    Appendix A Glossary 3GPP 10Base2 10

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    Appendix A: Glossary 395 ATM Attenu

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    Appendix A: Glossary 397 Capacitanc

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    Appendix A: Glossary 399 Decibel (d

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    Appendix A: Glossary 401 ESS Etherl

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    Appendix A: Glossary 403 I/O addres

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    Manchester encoding Appendix A: Glo

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    Appendix A: Glossary 407 Packet PAD

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    Appendix A: Glossary 409 RFI Ring R

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    Appendix A: Glossary 411 TDMA TDR T

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    Appendix A: Glossary 413 X.25 CCITT

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    Appendix B: Implementers of DNP3 41

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    Appendix B: Implementers of DNP3 41

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    DNP3 device profile Appendix C: Sam

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    Appendix C: Sample device profile d

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    Appendix C: Sample device profile d

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    Appendix C: Sample device profile d

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    Appendix C: Sample device profile d

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    Software setup Appendix D: Practica

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    Appendix D: Practicals 431 1. Set u

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    Objectives • To show how a basic

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    Implementation/setting up TCP/IP Cl

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    Appendix D: Practicals 437 Click on

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    Appendix D: Practicals 439 Click on

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    Appendix D: Practicals 441 Now rese

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    Appendix D: Practicals 443 Practica

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    Appendix D: Practicals 445 This sho

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    Appendix D: Practicals 447 Once you

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    IMPORTANT NOTICE: Appendix D: Pract

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    Appendix D: Practicals 451 (This is

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    Appendix D: Practicals 453 PRACTICA

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    Click on the Diags button and the f

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    Appendix D: Practicals 457 The scre

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    Appendix D: Practicals 459 Assume t

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    Appendix D: Practicals 461 Problem

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    Network Loading Assumptions Item Da

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    2. IEC 60870-5-101 Packet Analysis

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    3.1.1.1.1 Appendix D: Practicals 46

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    Appendix D: Practicals 469 Valid Ca

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    3.1.1.1.7 Type 14 INFORMATION OBJEC

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    Appendix D: Practicals 473 3.1.1.1.

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    Appendix D: Practicals 475 QDS Qual

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    Appendix D: Practicals 477 7 6 5 4

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    3.1.1.1.11 Communication 1 Appendix

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    Communication 1 Answer Appendix D:

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    CITECT PRACTICAL For Citect Version

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    Appendix D: Practicals 485 Next cli

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    Appendix D: Practicals 487 (3) Defi

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    Appendix D: Practicals 489

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    Appendix D: Practicals 491 (4) Crea

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    Appendix D: Practicals 493 Use the

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    Appendix D: Practicals 495 Click on

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    Appendix D: Practicals 497 When fin

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    Appendix D: Practicals 499 What is

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    Communication 2 05640DC405001A00637

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    05640DC405001A006378C6C601010200003

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    Appendix D: Practicals 505 What are

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    Appendix D: Practicals 507 01 01 01

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    Appendix D: Practicals 509 E2 81 00

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    Appendix D: Practicals 511 At fist

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    Appendix D: Practicals 513 Then rem

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    Appendix D: Practicals 515 The next

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    Packet Interpretation Practical App

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    056408C40300A200EA80C5C5171E4405641

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    Appendix D: Practicals 521 Communic

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    05640DC405001A006378C6C601010200003

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    Appendix D: Practicals 525 What is

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    01 01 01 01 01 01 01 crc:BB crc:C3

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    Appendix D: Practicals 529 Read Dat

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    Index 531 Carrier sense with multip

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    Index 533 support for protocol, 310

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    Index 535 process related, 220 bina

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    Index 537 signal quality detector,

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