ESE Christmas 2017

joanne10813

CHRISTMAS 2017

Prayer-Centered page 4-7

Mission-Shaped page 10-13

a publication of the Episcopal Diocese of Easton


Contents:

In This Issue:

06

Finding Meaning

and Community

“It is our questions that define us. It’s

also our questions that drive us.”

10

The Restoration of the

Year the Locusts Ate

“And when are you going to do what

you KNOW you are supposed to be

doing?”

01 Bishop’s Letter

02 Bishop’s Christmas Message Divine Hope in the Midst of

a Broken World

04 Prayer-Centered Church Francie Thayer contemplates

what it means to be a prayer-centered church

06 Prayer-Centered Church Christ Church Easton’s Alpha

program builds community

07 Prayer-Centered Church St. Paul’s Centreville opens

prayer garden

08 Snapshots Pictures from around the Diocese

10 Mission-Shaped Diocese Wicomico Churches work

together on community VBS

11 Mission-Shaped Diocese Christ Church Denton expands

partnership with local Shelter

12 Mission-Shaped Diocese The Rev. Barbara Fisher reflects

on her journey to ordination

14 Camp Wright Registration Open

16 Diocesan Events & Announcements

THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH ON THE EASTERN SHORE OF MARYLAND

Nine counties, 42 worshiping

communities, and more than

5,000 people engaged in living

out our call to welcome all, share

Jesus love, and serve the world.

BISHOP

The Rt. Rev. Santosh Marray

Welcome All

Share Jesus Love

Serve the World


A Note from your

Friend and Bishop

My Beloved in Christ,

We are fulfilling a very important

commitment made to Diocesan

Convention 2017 to revamp

and redesign the publication of

the Eastern Shore Episcopalian.

This is the first edition of our

new publication and I wish to

welcome you to what I believe

will be an exciting and helpful

addition to our growing and

diverse communication efforts

in the Diocese of Easton. It is my

sincere hope that you will find the

articles and announcements in this

magazine to be informative and

helpful in your life as a member of

the Jesus Movement and Christ’s

evangelists and missionaries in this

part of the Episcopal Church family.

My dream and one that was

embraced and confirmed by

convention is for a diocese that

aligns itself into what it means to

be a Prayer-Centered Church +

Mission-Shaped Diocese.

To be a Prayer-Centered Church

means to focus our attention on

God in our daily lives. When we

take the time to invite God into

our lives, we become much more

aware of the multitude of blessings

that God has bestowed upon us.

We confess that we are living in a

lovely part of the world, surrounded

by the beautiful water, green

vegetation and diverse wildlife. We

are blessed to be able to look

to the generations of faithful

people who have lived on

our shores and who have

gifted us with a rich heritage and

culture. When we enter into prayer,

we become a part of this great cloud

of witnesses who have called the

Eastern Shore home.

To be Mission-Shaped means that

we are open to the work of the

Holy Spirit. The very act of serving

our neighbors changes us. When

we meet other people, we can’t

help experiencing the feeling that

we knew them before, especially

in hearing their stories and being

influenced by their presence. A

mission-shaped people means that

we are living into our Baptismal

Covenant, that we are ‘seeking and

serving Christ’, and with God’s

help, we will continue to see him in

everyone we encounter.

I have been blessed to be called to

be your bishop; I am blessed to live

and minister among you; I pray that

I may be as much of a blessing for

this diocese as you have been for me

and my family.

With much love and affection!

Together in Christ’s service,

+ San

PUBLICATION INFORMATION

A publication of the Bishop and Diocese of Easton

Copyright 2017 The Bishop and Diocese of Easton

Published Quarterly

SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO:

Eastern Shore Episcoplian (ESE)

314 North St., Easton, MD 21601

OFFICE AND MAILING ADDRESS

314 North St., Easton, MD 21601

410-822-1919 dioceseofeaston.org

joanne@dioceseofeaston.org

The Right Reverend Santosh Marray

Bishop of Easton

Joanne Fisher

Director of Communications, Senior Editor

The Reverend Loretta Collins

Deacon, Editor

1


Divine Hope

in the Midst of a

Broken World

By Bishop Santosh Marray,

PHOTO: Used with permission, Jill & Gordon Muirhead, Rivendell Alpacas


Bishop’s Christmas Message

“They shall name Him Emmanuel”

which means, “God is with us”.

(St. Matthew 1:23)

The word “Christmas” is a shortened version of the

words “Christ-Mass”. It is the great gathering of the

faithful to celebrate the birth of the Savior and Messiah

of the world. As we commemorate his birthday, I feel

obliged to quote one the Church’s most inspired and

spiritual Fathers of the fourth century, West African

early church Father, Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo.

In one of his Christmas sermons to the faithful he said,

“Beloved, our lord Jesus Christ, the eternal creator of

all things, today became our Savior by being born of

a mother. Of his own will he was born for us today, in

time, so that he could lead us to his Father’s eternity.

God became human like us so that we might become

God. The Lord of the angels became one of us so that

we could eat the bread of angels”. What a beautiful and

profound way to sum up the Christmas message.

The center of attraction in the manger, the child Jesus,

by coming among us offers God’s healing and love to

our broken and hostile world. Believing and receiving

him means putting him first, far ahead of the fading

glory and shifting hopes offered by this world.

Christmas is the bridging of two realities reminding

us that God is not just the God of heaven but Lord and

Creator of the universe. Christmas is God’s incarnation,

that is, God taking human flesh and becoming one like

us. God became human, not just to save the world, but

to bless the world, to bless being human, to endorse

being human, to join us in our humanness. Jesus invites

us to come to him as a child.

When we look around, and see the children in their

many Christmas presentations, that excitement and

thrill goes a long way in helping to lay aside, even for a

moment, the realities of daily struggle. For children, all

the experiences of life are new and thrilling adventures.

They take them in and take them on willingly and

eagerly. Adults will do well to adopt this attitude of

childlike innocence at Christmas, and allow the gift of

this sacred birth we celebrate a chance to fill us with

PEACE! JOY! and LOVE!

Gifts are a major focus on Christmas - the many gifts

that we have been buying for one another, the gifts that

we have been hoping for and hinting at, but most of

all, the great gift of God, the baby born in Bethlehem.

Beloved, the birthday of Jesus marks our own birthday

since we all share his life in baptism. This accounts for

the reason why over the centuries the practice of gift

sharing had become so popular. In essence, all of us are

celebrating our birthday with Jesus, hence the exchange

of gifts.

However, as we do so let us spare some time in our

celebration to invite the Christ child of Bethlehem

stable, Jesus the Lord and Savior, into our lives. Let

us give him the freedom to lead us where he wishes,

recommitting ourselves to the guiding principles of love

for all, peace, joy and Christian harmony.

Every blessing on this Christmas from your friends!

+San & Lynn

3


BEING

The Spiritual

Practice of

By Francie Thayer

Here in the Diocese of Easton, we are in the midst

of a journey of discernment to name who we are.

The current descriptor under consideration is a

prayer-centered church and a mission-shaped

Diocese. This is a lovely description, but what does

it actually mean? Honestly— how might these

words shape who we are? Since the whole is made

up of its many parts, the question really becomes:

how might these words shape who I am? What

would it mean in my life if I actually lived into this

description?

Through one lens, in a culture that values what

you do, the mission part is the more accessible

part. “Mission” draws our attention to projects:

outreach, feeding, clothing, visiting; helping the

marginalized. All of this is really good work, work

that Jesus did, that God calls us to do today…

important… central to who we are.

What about that prayer-centered part? Because

prayer, in our culture, really doesn’t fall

resoundingly into the category of “doing”… it’s

more about “being.” Yes, we “do” Morning Prayer,

or we “do” Sunday morning worship. But I would

suggest that being prayer-centered is more than

“doing” liturgy. Don’t get me wrong: “doing”

liturgy is beautiful, grounded prayer. It holds

communities together and is essential and good. It

supports a prayer-centered life. But there is a lot

of life that we live when we are engaged in things

other than liturgy. So what does a prayer-centered

life look like?

1Thessalonians 5:16-18 says: Rejoice always, pray

without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances;

for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.

These verses are just a little overwhelming for me.

I mean, if I am to pray without ceasing, how will I

get anything else done? I’ve got this massive list...

it’s Christmas, you know?


PRAYER-CENTERED CHURCH + MISSION-SHAPED DIOCESE

Whenever I get into a tight spot like this with

scripture, I return to my favorite Go-To Wise

One… Barbara Brown Taylor. An Episcopal

priest and now a professor in Georgia, BBT (as we

fondly call her) has books and books of sermons,

powerful writings on living as a child of God and

much wisdom to share. In her book An Altar in

the World, in the chapter on prayer, she writes

of Brother David Stendl-Rast who “was the first

person to tell me that prayer is not the same thing

as prayers… Prayer, according to Brother David, is

waking up to the presence of God no matter where

I am or what I am doing.” (pg. 178)

Let’s hold that next to our potential Diocesan

descriptor. Prayer is waking up to God’s presence…

everywhere at every moment. So to be prayercentered—to

“pray without ceasing”—invites me

to notice God in every thing, all the time. Notice

God while commuting to work… while doing

the dishes… while in a meeting, on the internet,

having a meal. Wake up to God’s presence in every

thing and every one. We are invited to be open to

God’s Love in all we do, say, see, hear, touch, know.

To be prayer-centered is a life-style, not a practice.

It’s who we are, not what we do.

If we choose to describe ourselves as a Diocese

that is prayer-centered, we are holding out an

invitation to all of us to wake up to God here and

now. There are practices we can embrace to help

with that, but it is also a gift God gives each one

of us when we ask for God’s help to grow into that

life-style. To be prayer-centered is to be grounded

in God’s Presence, God’s Love and to walk into the

Diocese—into the world—with a heart open to

God.

Francie Thayer is the Director of the Retreat House

at Hillsboro, a ministry of the Diocese of Easton.

5


PRAYER-CENTERED CHURCH + MISSION-SHAPED DIOCESE

Finding Meaning and Community

By Michael Valliant

Life can be rough. That’s not even worth a bumper

sticker, it’s just a given. Even the most positive

people have dark nights of the soul. And we all run

up against questions we can’t answer. I think Fr.

Bill Ortt is on to something when he says it is our

questions that define us. It’s also our questions that

drive us.

“Is there more to life than this?” That’s one of the

first ones we come across in the Alpha Course.

Alpha is a phenomenon that took off in London

under the leadership and vision of Nicky Gumbel.

The notion was and is to take people who aren’t

church-goers, but who wonder about life’s big

questions, bring them together, to eat a meal, to

enjoy each other, to watch some short films and

talk. No judgment, no pressure, but plenty of

laughter, connection, and fun. And funny things

begin to happen when you put like-minded seekers

together, no matter how different they may seem.

Last winter and spring,

approximately 60

adults and 40 youth

went through Alpha at

Christ Church Easton.

It was a transformative

experience for just

about all involved. I

went from feeling like a

newcomer to knowing

I was a part of a

community of people.

And I saw the same thing happen to other people.

It wasn’t about “church,” it was about relationships,

conversations, and connections. The weekend away

itself left me reeling and inspired.

It seems a rare thing today to make the time to

sit down with people, to eat together, to have

meaningful discussion about things that matter, to

admit we don’t have all the answers, but we have

plenty of questions, and to put that on the table.

The humor, the honesty, the laughs that follow are

amazing.

There are different ways to find meaning and

community. Alpha is a great beginning.

Michael Valliant is the Minister for Christian

Education and Small Groups at Christ Church

Easton. His blog can be found at www.

michaelvalliant.com.


A Place for Generations

By Reed Hazuda

On Nov 12, 2017 at St. Paul’s Parish, Centreville

Bishop Marray blessed and dedicated a Prayer

Garden that was constructed by lifelong member

and Boy Scout, fourteen year-old Reed Hazuda.

Bishop Marray, Reverend Mary Garner, and Reed

Hazuda, along with the entire congregation were

present for the blessing. Reed created his Eagle

Scout Project Idea and presented it to his church

family for fundraising. Reed executed the physical

aspects of the project with the help of fellow scouts

and his church family. Reed is a Life Scout with

Troop 464 out of Ruthsburg, MD and a freshman at

QACHS. He will sit for his Eagle Board of Review

sometime in 2018. Reed’s favorite part of the

service was unveiling the Jesus statue to his church

family, and seeing their joyful reactions!

7


SNAPSHOTS...

A joyous gathering of diocesan

leaders, planning for the future –

together.

The poignant Farewell liturgy for graduating

Agape campers.

A New Beginning at St. Paul’s by the Sea, Ocean

City as they break ground on their new building.

Clergy from around the diocese gathered

in retreat for a time of continuing

education.

8


Can you find our 11 youth and 3 adult leaders

in this Province 3 group photo taken at the

Episcopal Youth Event 2017? Hint:

they are wearing purple

The members of St. Paul’s, Centreville make a

statement on Refugee Sunday.

A playful moment with Bishop San and

Julia Connelly celebrating the building of

the Sudlersville Cabin.

A committed group of volunteers gather to begin

planning for our joyous 150th (sesquicentennial)

celebration.

9


PRAYER-CENTERED CHURCH + MISSION-SHAPED DIOCESE

Working Together

Wicomico Episcopal Cluster’s Vacation Bible School

By Leighann Yackel, St. Alban’s Salisbury

Vacation Bible School is a special time in the life

of a child and the church. It puts a focused lens

on what living into the baptismal covenant can

look like. Adults of all ages combine their time

and talents to “do all in their power to support

[children] in their life in Christ.” At the end of the

week, the hope is that it leaves everyone wanting

more – more time together to seek and serve

Christ in one another and the world. Our churches

seek to be that place.

The Episcopal churches of Wicomico county

combined resources to have just such a week of

Vacation Bible School (VBS) for children in the

community. The organizers attribute the success

to the volunteers, coordinators and helpers who

shared their time and talents.

Bible lessons were shared through puppets, crafts,

songs, and snacks. The daily Bible memory verses

included “Live in harmony with one another”

(Romans 12:16), and “Whether you eat or drink,

or whatever you do, do everything for the glory of

God” (1 Corinthians 10:31). Teaching focused on

how one’s voice and actions can hurt another on

10

the inside as well as learning how to help others

through ministries…

The Society of St. Andrew taught a lesson about

how food that isn’t sold in grocery stores can still

be used to feed others by gleaning the fields for the

imperfect fruits, vegetables and grains and using

those to feed people in need through food banks,

soup kitchens and more.

During the week they collected non-perishable

food and canned items. On Friday a visitor from

the Maryland food bank talked to the children. He

told them how the Maryland food bank works, as

well as the process of getting the food and sorting

it and sending it to where it is needed in Maryland.

In all, the VBS children and staff collected 72

pounds of food which the Food Bank equates to

60 meals. The children also collected $55.35 in

coins to send to the Society of St. Andrew for their

mission to end hunger.

All in all, it was a busy, fun filled week of learning

about the Bible and learning about ways to help

others.


Community Partners

Christ Church Denton & His Hope Haven

by the Rev. Blake Wamester

All it took was a spark and willing hearts. This is how it all began for Christ

Church, Denton, and its involvement with His Hope Haven.

His Hope Haven, a ministry of the North Caroline Clergy Association, has been

around for a while operating a shelter program for those who are homeless in the

area. It receives support for this program from community agencies and groups.

This shelter serves Caroline and four surrounding counties in Maryland as well

as two counties in Delaware. This past year His Hope Haven shelter has provided

16,391 meals and 4,358 safe and secure nights of shelter for people in need. They

have sheltered 100 people, including 47 children; ranging in age from 3 months

to 83 years old. 68 people have been placed into permanent housing through this

ministry, and 8 more were able to remain in their homes through the His Hope

Haven Rapid Rehousing Program.

Although a small church with relatively limited resources, we at Christ Church,

Denton, nevertheless realized that we were being called to serve the needs of

our community in a more specific way. Starting in 2015, while working through

prayer and spiritual direction, we saw that the Spirit was calling us to reach

out to the “least of these.” Through goal setting activities, with consultants

recommended by the Diocese, and guidance from the Spirit, we embarked on a

new focus in ministry.

Together with His Hope Haven and Lynn Keckler, the ministries leader, a dream

of theirs and ours was visualized: the His Hope Haven Resource Center. Utilizing

the downstairs area of the Christ Church parish hall, Monday through Thursday

from 9:15am-5:15pm, guests from the shelter are now able to access case

management services, engage in housing and employment searches (including

learning how to write a resume), participate in workshops designed to increase

self-sufficiency (particularly financial literacy), learn to shop for food on a

budget, become involved in smoking cessation programs and so much more.

As a symbol of our commitment to this ministry: once a month, we the members

of Christ Church use our own gifts and talents to provide and share a meal with

the entire shelter community from our kitchen and parish hall.

11


PRAYER-CENTERED CHURCH + MISSION-SHAPED DIOCESE

The Restoration of the Year

the Locusts Ate

By The Rev. Dr. Barbara Anne Fisher, Deacon

“I will repay you for the years that the swarming fourteen years before I would once again pursue

locust has eaten, the other locusts and the locust an ordained call to ministry, and it would be a

swarm….Then you will know that I am in Israel, calling recognized by an LGBTQIA ministry that

that I am the Lord your God, and that there is no had no problem that I was either woman or samegendered.

other; never again will my people be shamed.”

(Joel 2: 25, 27)

It was a query by my Dad in June of 2008, that

A number of years ago, at a time when I doubted I would once again light the Episcopal-fired calling

ever would be found worthy to be ordained in the within me. As he looked deeply into my eyes

Episcopal Church, I received a “prophetic word” he asked, “And when are you going to do what

from the pastor who was a founder of the group you KNOW you are supposed to be doing?”

by which I was originally ordained. It was the That piercing question moved me to retire from

promise of God, given through Joel to Judah, that teaching, accept a lay ministry position and move

the years of hardship would not only come to an to the Eastern Shore, and be accepted into the

end – but that there would be restoration of that Doctor of Ministry in Educational Leadership

which was lost. What has always been difficult program at Virginia Theological Seminary. It

for me is to believe that prophetic words are the was also my Dad’s query which would lead to the

fore-telling of God’s actions in the future, and that most important conversation of my life: It was the

means one must watch – and wait – for them to initial conversation with Bishop Henry Parsley,

come to fruition. I had been waiting almost fifteen at the reception of the Rev. Mary Garner for her

years at that time, but little did I suspect then there Installation at St. Paul’s, Centreville, that he was

would be another seventeen to go!

establishing a discernment process by which to

assess my calling to the priesthood.

At the time that the Philadelphia Eleven and the

Washington Four women were being “irregularly” In June 2015, I began the formal discernment

ordained, I was in the throes of wrestling with process with a wonderfully prayerful and sincere

my own call to ministry. It became a call that was team. I completed my Clinical Pastoral Education

to be denied in the mid-80s when I was “outed” (CPE) during the winter/spring of 2016, and began

during seminary. I ended up graduating with a my year of Anglican Studies at Virginia Theological

Masters of Christian Education degree instead of Seminary in August 2016. While there, I moved

a Master of Divinity degree. It would be another through the postulancy and candidacy process for

12


Holy Orders. After graduating with the Anglican

Studies Diploma on May 18, I was ordained to the

transitional diaconate June 24, 2017. Even that

moment in time had its own wrinkles: Due to

Bishop Santosh’s health issues which surfaced just

the week before my ordination, I was ordained by

Bishop Chilton Knudsen, Diocese of Maryland.

October 26, 2017, the knowledge the prophecy

finally was coming to fruition was confirmed

when the Standing Committee of the Diocese of

Easton gave their letter to Bishop Santosh Marray

which supported my ordination to the priesthood.

Awaking in the wee hours each morning since

that date, I breathe deeply in humbleness and

awe the reality granted me: God willing, and

the people assenting, on Saturday, December 16,

2017, at 11:00 a.m., in Trinity Cathedral, Easton,

Maryland, I will be ordained to the priesthood of

the Episcopal Church by Bishop Santosh Marray.

And, in the true depth of restoring the years the

locusts ate, it will be the Rev. Carter Heyward, one

of the Philadelphia Eleven, who will be preaching

at my ordination to the priesthood.

The Rev. Dr. Barbara Fisher currently serves as

Assistant to the Rector at St. Alban’s Episcopal

Church – Salisbury, Maryland. Her ordination to the

priesthood will be held on December 16th at Trinity

Cathedral.

13


14

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15


Opening the Ordination Process

Process Opens January 1st

By The Rev. Michael Moyer, Commision on Ministry

At the end of his tenure as Bishop of Easton,

Bishop Shand decided it was prudent to close the

ordination process. During his time as Bishop

Provisional, Bishop Parsley opened the ordination

process for those feeling a call to the priesthood.

This process was open for one year. That year we

had one applicant, Barbara Anne Fisher. She is

being ordained to the priesthood on December

16th.

During the time when Bishop Parsley was Bishop

Provisional the Commission on Ministry spent

time clarifying the ordination process and began

having conversations about many aspects of

ministry, both ordained and lay. Included in

this discussion was a conversation about what

Vocational Diaconate would look like in our

diocese.

Now that Bishop Marray’s episcopate has been

established for more than a year, he has decided

to open the ordination process for those called to

both the Vocational Diaconate and the Priesthood.

The November Clericus was presented by the

Commission on Ministry and focused primarily on

local clergy as the first step in the discernment of a

call. The majority of the time was focused again on

the Vocational Diaconate stressing that this order

of ordained ministry acts as a bridge between the

Church and the world.

If you have been feeling a sense of call, the

Commission on Ministry encourages you to have a

conversation with the priest serving your Church.

The Commission on Ministry looks forward to

seeing who the Lord has called to serve this part of

the Kingdom.

A Gift Idea that Transforms Lives!

From Episcopal Relief and Development

By The Rev. Mary Garner and Kit Bainbridge

The Christmas season is upon us. A simple gift can

bring great joy. Send “Gifts of Life” from Episcopal

Relief and Development (ERD) this Christmas and

give people in need the chance to transform their

lives in lasting ways. Gifts include animals and

agriculture, basics for life, “green” gifts, health and

wellness and economic opportunities. Shopping

from the “Gifts for Life” catalog means that your

tax-deductible gift will support ERD’s mission

to fight poverty, hunger and

The angel said to

disease worldwide. You can

them, “Do not be

send a personalized card to

your friends and loved ones

afraid; for see, I am

to tell them about the life

bringing you Good

changing gift made in their

News of great joy

honor. You can order online

for all the people: to

at episcopalrelief.org/gifts or

you is born this day

from a catalog.

in the city of David

This year, ERD is launching a

a Savior, who is the

$760,000 Holiday Matching

Messiah, the Lord.”

Gift Challenge. All donations,

Luke 2:10-11

including “Gifts for Life”, will

be matched, dollar for dollar,

until December 31. What a wonderful way to

celebrate the true meaning of Christmas!

For over 75 years, ERD has served as a

compassionate response to human suffering in

the world. The agency works with more than 3

million people in nearly 40 countries worldwide

to overcome poverty, hunger and disease. An

independent 501 (c) (3) organization, ERD works

closely with the Anglican Communion and

ecumenical partners to help communities create

long-term development strategies to rebuild after

disasters.


EVENTS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

Bishop’s Christmas Appeal

Hurricane Relief for Our Island Neighbors

Not too long ago, and for many years, the Diocese

of Easton had a Companion Diocese relationship

with the Diocese of North Eastern Caribbean

and Aruba. Of the 12 islands that make up

their Diocese, six were decimated by hurricane

Irma leaving much of those islands in ruin. On

the island of Barbuda alone over 95% of the

homes were destroyed, leaving almost the entire

population homeless.

The Diocese of North Eastern Caribbean and

Aruba has embarked upon an unimaginable effort

to bring comfort, dignity and hope to the people

of these islands. Property, human life, and the

spiritual well-being of God’s people in the diocese

are a priority.

Bishop Errol Brooks of the Diocese of North

Eastern Caribbean and Aruba has reached out

to us for assistance in achieving their goal for

restoration. In response, this year’s Bishop’s

Christmas Appeal will go toward the rebuilding

efforts of our former Companion Diocese, as a sign

of our commitment and empathy with their efforts.

In this season of gift giving, the gospel is clear and

poignant in its admonition to “love our neighbors

as ourselves” and reach out with a ‘helping hand’ to

those who need our assistance. When we do so for

‘the least of these’ we are doing so for Christ.

We invite you share the hope of Christ this season

through a gift to this noble and hopeful cause. You

may do so through your parish or send checks to

Bray House, 314 North Street, Easton, MD 21601,

with a notation indicating “Bishop’s Christmas

Appeal”.

NOTABLE DATES

January 5-7

OCEAN CITY YOUTH RALLY

Youth in Middle and High School are gathering from

around the Diocese and Province to enjoy a weekend of

worship, workshops, and fun.

February 5

NORTHERN CONVOCATION MEETING

St. Paul’s Kent at 7pm. A preview of convention business

for clergy and delegates.

February 6

MIDDLE CONVOCATION MEETING

A preview of convention business for clergy and delegates.

February 8

SOUTHERN CONVOCATION MEETING

A preview of convention business for clergy and delegates.

February 23-24

DIOCESAN CONVENTION

The annual meeting of the Diocese of Easton including

elections and voting. Young people are also invited to

attend the coinciding “Youth at Convention” event.

The Bray House (Offices of the Bishop) will be closed on

12/22 (half day), 12/25, 12/26, 1/1, 1/15, 2/19, and 2/26.

SIGN UP FOR THE WEEKLY ENEWS

dioceseofeaston.org

and stay up-to-date on:

Diocesan-Wide Events

Parish Events

Camp Wright Corner

Retreat House Happenings

Bishop’s Blog & Spotlight

Diocesan Cycle of Prayer

Diocesan Prayer List

National Church and Wider Events

Submit Your Event to joanne@dioceseofeaston.org


DIOCESE OF

E P I S C O PA L

E A S T O N

ESTO FI DELIS

CHURCH USA

The Episcopal Diocese of Easton

314 North Street

Easton, MD 21601

410-822-1919

dioceseofeaston.org

DIOCESAN CONVENTION

February 23 rd & 24 th 2018

Hya Regency, Cambridge, MD

Our theme this year will be: “Faith Healing

Fate” and our Chaplain will be The Right Rev.

Clion “Dan” Daniel 3 rd , the 7 th Bishop of East

Carolina (ret.) and the rered Provisional Bishop

of Pennsylvania. We look forward to seeing the

clergy and delegates from each parish. Visitors

are welcome! If you are not a delegate and wish

to be present at Convenon, please contact Lynn

Ansta at Bray House – 410.822.1919 or lynn@

dioceseofeaston.org for costs and registraon

informaon.

150 TH CELEBRATION EUCHARIST

with The Most Rev. Michael Curry

Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church

Sunday March 3 rd , 2019

Hya Regency, Cambridge, MD

Please mark your calendar now for this very

important event in the life of our diocese. We are

all invited to come together as a diocesan family for

this celebraon to remember our first 150 years as

a diocese and kick off the next 150 years. You won’t

want to miss this diocesan-wide Sunday morning

fesve event.

“GROWING YOUNG” COHORT REACHING ACROSS GENERATIONS

March 3rd, May 5th, July 7th, and September 8th - Hillsboro Retreat Center 9am-3pm

We are passionate about reaching young people and young families with Jesus’ message of hope and love.

Bring a team from your church to the table in 2018 as we explore innovave and effecve ways to share faith

across generaons. Facilitated by Ministry Architects and in partnership with Fuller Youth Instute.

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