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Opportunity Youth: Disenfranchised Young People

Opportunity Youth: Disenfranchised Young People

6. 1 We disseminate

6. 1 We disseminate Quarterly publications, like our e-Advocate series Newsletter and our e-Advocate Quarterly electronic Magazine to all regular donors in order to facilitate a lifelong learning process on the ever-evolving developments in the Justice system. And in addition to the help we provide for our young clients and their families, we also facilitate Community Engagement through the Restorative Justice process, thereby balancing the interesrs of local businesses, schools, clergy, elected officials, police, and all interested stakeholders. Through these efforts, relationships are rebuilt & strengthened, local businesses and communities are enhanced & protected from victimization, young careers are developed, and our precious young people are kept out of the prison pipeline. This is a massive undertaking, and we need all the help and financial support you can give! We plan to help 75 young persons per quarter-year (aggregating to a total of 250 per year) in each jurisdiction we serve) at an average cost of under $2,500 per client, per year.* Thank you in advance for your support! * FYI: 1. The national average cost to taxpayers for minimum-security youth incarceration, is around $43,000.00 per child, per year. 2. The average annual cost to taxpayers for maximun-security youth incarceration is well over $148,000.00 per child, per year. - (US News and World Report, December 9, 2014); 3. In every jurisdiction in the nation, the Plea Bargain rate is above 99%. The Judicial system engages in a tri-partite balancing task in every single one of these matters, seeking to balance Rehabilitative Justice with Community Protection and Judicial Economy, and, although the practitioners work very hard to achieve positive outcomes, the scales are nowhere near balanced where people of color are involved. We must reverse this trend, which is right now working very much against the best interests of our young. Our young people do not belong behind bars. - Jack Johnson 1 In addition to supporting our world-class programming and support services, all regular donors receive our Quarterly e-Newsletter (The e-Advocate), as well as The e-Advocate Quarterly Magazine. Page 8 of 72

The Advocacy Foundation, Inc. Helping Individuals, Organizations & Communities Achieve Their Full Potential …a collection of works on Opportunity Youth Disenfranchised Young People “Turning the Improbable Into the Exceptional” Atlanta Philadelphia ______ John C Johnson III Founder & CEO (878) 222-0450 Voice | Data | SMS www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org Page 9 of 72

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  • Page 16 and 17: Analysis has also examined the econ
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  • Page 30 and 31: they will be on the way to a hopefu
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  • Page 36 and 37: In 2006 the Commonwealth Youth Prog
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  • Page 42 and 43: who exhibit other problem behaviors
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  • Page 48 and 49: MDRC Working Paper What Works for D
  • Page 50: Overview This paper was commissione
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    Public Schools The public school sy

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    In 2014, the company offering the G

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    their education and move up the car

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    terest in city-level Reengagement C

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    social development, mental health,

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    tials. 36 These numbers indicate th

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    focus on recruiting young people wh

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    they were considering pursuing. 49

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    evaluation of CEPS also found that

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    Behavioral Interventions Many menta

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    • Strong links among education, t

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    participation, and many communities

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    y the end of the reporting period.

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    these disincentives, however, a num

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    programs specifically target the mo

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    Appendix Selected Evaluations of Pr

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    Findings expected in 2016 Findings

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    2009-2012 Varies Program 2012-2014

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    References American Institutes for

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    Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initi

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    Sparks, Sarah D. 2015. “Many Drop

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    About MDRC MDRC is a nonprofit, non

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    Attachment B Disconnected Youth: A

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    Disconnected Youth: A Look at 16 to

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    2/9/2018 Disconnected Youth: Out of

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    2/9/2018 Disconnected Youth: Out of

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    2/9/2018 Disconnected Youth: Out of

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    2/9/2018 Disconnected Youth: Out of

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    Advocacy Foundation Publishers Page

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    Issue Title Quarterly Vol. I 2015 T

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    Issue Title Quarterly Vol. V 2019 O

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    LI Nonprofit Confidentiality In The

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    Vol. XVIII 2032 Public Policy LXXVI

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    Legal Missions International Page 6

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    XVII Russia Q-1 2019 XVIII Australi

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    The e-Advocate Newsletter Genesis o

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    Extras The Nonprofit Advisors Group

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    www.TheAdvocacyFoundation.org Page

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