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02.09.18 -- yumpudigipubtest

02.09.18 -- yumpudigipubtest

Introductory Activity:

Introductory Activity: Using Primary Sources Grade Level: 9-12 Lesson Time: Two class periods Vocabulary: Archives or Archive- 1) Materials created or received by a person, family or organization. 2) An organization that collects archival material. 3) The building housing archival collections. Primary Source-Material containing firsthand accounts of events which was created during the event or recalled by an eyewitness. Secondary Source-A work that is not based on direct observation of the subject but on sources of information. Finding Aid- 1) A tool that helps to locate information within an archival collection of records. 2) A description of records that gives the location and permission to the user to access materials. Materials: Ruffin Family newspaper clippings booklet Worksheet # 3: Written document analysis Computer/ projector Pencil Procedure: As an introduction, ask the students what they know about archives or an archive. If the students are already familiar with archives ask them to talk about the uses of an archive or what an archival document is. After a few responses, introduce the following vocabulary words: Archives or Archive- 1) Materials created or received by a person, family or organization. 2) An organization that collects archival material. 3) The building housing archival collections. Primary Source-Material containing firsthand accounts of events which was created during the event or recalled by an eyewitness. Secondary Source-A work that is not based on direct observation of the subject but on sources of information. After introducing the vocabulary explain to the students the relationship between archives, a primary source and a secondary source: When students and researchers want a firsthand account of an event, they go to an archive to view the primary source. Often times, researchers write books based on primary sources that they find at archives. Students and others then read these books as secondary sources. 8

Introductory Activity: Using Primary Sources People who work at archives are archivists. Their job is to acquire, organize and preserve rare items to make them available for the public to view and study. Once the archives are organized, researchers and students can use finding aids to help with the research process. Share the following vocabulary word: Finding Aid- 1) A tool that helps to search information within a collection of records. 2) A description of records that gives the location and permission to the user to access materials. Since one archive can hold thousands, even millions, of items and documents, the collections are organized and items can be researched and found using a finding aid. Using a projector visit the Amistad Research Center website and show the students how the finding aid works: 1. Find the Archival Finding Aid Database button at the bottom of the site under the banner. 2. Click on the button and search for a topic, such as “civil war” or “civil rights” in the search box. 3. Search results will appear such as Records and Manuscripts, Books Collection, Unprocessed Materials, etc. 4. Select the Records and Manuscripts category and then select one of the collections. 5. Once a collection is selected the next page that appears contains the title of the collection on the left and the Scope and Contents on the right. Select either “[read more]” or Detailed Description to see the full background of the collection. 6. Explain to students that they can use this information to help research an item or document they are studying. This is how to appropriately use a finding aid. Divide the students into groups. Hand out the Ruffin Family newspaper clippings booklet and one Worksheet # 3 Document Analysis page for each group. Tell the students they are to fill out the document analysis sheet and if necessary, use use Amistad’s online finding aid for the Heslip-Ruffin Family Papers to help you understand your document. They can then, as a class-wide discussion, address their group’s document by proving or disproving the following thesis: Boston was not a good place for African Americans to live in the 1800s. It was dangerous and did not have many opportunities. SLAVERY & ABOLITION CURRICULUM GUIDE 9

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