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110 EVERGREEN Autumn

110 EVERGREEN Autumn Tennessee Two. Carl later commented on the Presley phenomenon: “When I’d jump around they’d scream some, but they were gettin’ ready for him. It was like TNT, man, it just exploded. All of a sudden the world was wrapped up in rock.” And so to that night on stage in Jackson. As the group played and the couples danced, Carl heard a young man say to his girlfriend: “Don’t step on my suedes!” Surprised that the man should be more concerned with his footwear than the feelings of his pretty companion, Carl looked down and saw that they were blue suede shoes. In the early hours of the next morning, unable to sleep, Carl got up and, clutching his guitar, began writing the song, scribbling the words down on an old brown potato sack: Well, it’s one for the money, Two for the show, Three to get ready, Now go, man, go… At the suggestion of Sam Phillips the fourth line was subsequently changed to “go, cat, go” and “Blue Suede Shoes” (backed by “Honey Don’t”) was released as a single on 1st January 1956. The record’s success was astonishing and during one period during the following weeks the sales amounted to 20,000 copies per day. Not only that, but it climbed the US charts for three different categories of music: blues, country and pop. This was unheard of at the time, and perhaps it was those different elements coming together in “Blue Suede Shoes” that, like alchemy, actually created rock and roll. The record reached number 10 in the United Kingdom. By this time, Elvis Presley had joined RCA, but so as not to spoil Carl’s success deliberately delayed releasing his own version of the song. Since then, “Blue Suede Shoes” has been covered by countless artists and included on numerous lists of the most influential songs of all time. Perhaps the importance of the song, and of Carl Perkins, was best encapsulated in October 1985 when George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton and Dave Edmunds joined Carl Perkins on stage for Suede Shoes: A Rockabilly Session at the Limehouse Studios in London. The concert finished with a rousing version of the signature song. Carl Perkins died in 1998, but as long as rock and roll is performed, “Blue Suede Shoes” will be top of every singer’s play list. Now go, cat, go!

A celebration of the TRADITIONAL COUNTIES OF ENGLAND From Northumberland, Yorkshire and Cumberland, through Staffordshire, Leicestershire and Shropshire, to Devon, Cornwall, Sussex and Kent, England’s 40 traditional counties are a colourful patchwork, a tapestry created over hundreds of years by geography, history and the men and women who have lived and worked within their boundaries. Just £6.99 to UK This new 100-page magazine is a celebration of England’s historic counties, with a feature devoted to each one, and illustrated throughout with stunning colour photographs. Descriptions of the main characteristics of the county are accompanied by details of the major towns and cities, historic sites, local customs and curiosities, regional food and drink, and a calendar of events. There are also panels highlighting some of the famous people who hail from each county and a series of “county quotations” from writers and poets. (100pp, softback) One copy: Code: TECOU Just £6.99 to UK, overseas £9.99. US $20; Can $21; Aus $22; NZ $26. Two copies: Code: TECO2 Just £12 to UK, overseas £16. US $32; Can $34; Aus $36; NZ $41. 0800 074 0188 (FREE from UK landlines) Mon-Fri 8am-6pm, Sat 9am-5pm. Overseas: +44 1382 575052 This England Publishing Ltd., P.O. Box 814, Haywards Heath, Sussex RH16 9LQ. E-mail:

Evergreen Autumn 2017 online
Evergreen Autumn 2017 online
Evergreen Autumn 2017 online
Evergreen Autumn 2017 online
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