2 months ago


Brett and Kate McKay

Brett and Kate McKay Posture While Standing 1. Feet should be shoulder-width apart, thigh muscles elongated without locking the knees back. Maintain most of your weight on the balls of your feet and not on your heels. When you put your weight on your heels, you create misalignment with your body. A quick test to see if your weight is properly distributed is to have someone gently push on your sternum. If you lose balance easily, then your weight is on your heels. Now try putting more of your weight on the balls of your feet and have someone push you again. You’re probably more stable this time because your body is better aligned. 2. Maintain a small hollow in your lower back, but avoid the tendency for too much arching or leaning back, especially with prolonged standing. The “tail” should remain slightly tucked down. 3. Lift your chest. Your shoulder blades should move down and back. This will create a good distance from your hip bone to your rib cage. 4. Make your chin level. The highest point of your body should be the top back region of your head. Relax your jaw and neck muscles. 5. Perform the wall test if needed to ensure your posture is good. 141

30 Days to a better man Posture While Sitting at a Desk 1. Feet should be resting on the floor with knees and hips bent 90 degrees. While it may seem more comfortable to cross our feet, this actually screws up our body’s alignment and causes unneeded stress on joints and muscles. 2. Maintain an arch in the lower back. If you are unsure how much arch is “good,” go from a slouched position up to the extreme end of erect posture. Now back off 10-15%. This is the neutral position for your lower back. 3. Lift your chest. Picture a string tied to the 2nd or 3rd top button on a shirt pulling straight up to the ceiling. 4. Make your chin level. If it helps, picture a book on your head. The highest point of your body should be the top back region of your head. 5. Avoid slouching or leaning forward, especially when tired from sitting in the office chair for long periods. 6. Take frequent breaks. At first, trying to sit up straight in a chair can be tiring. After years of slouching, your body has probably created a new “bad” posture for itself, and it’s going to take some work to get it back to the way it should be. Take it slow from the beginning. Sit 142