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How Fiber Direction Influences Tube and Plate Properties

https://www.rockwestcomposites.com/round-tubing/fiberglass-tubing - Take a close look at a section of carbon fiber or fiber glass tubing or plate and you will see that the fibers go in different, specific directions. Comparing different styles of tubing you might notice that fiber direction, also known as orientation, is not always uniform. Composite tubing and plate manufacturers use different orientations depending on what they want to accomplish with the finished product.

How Fiber Direction Influences Tube and Plate

How Fiber Direction Influences Tube and Plate Properties Take a close look at a section of carbon fiber or fiber glass tubing or plate and you will see that the fibers go in different, specific directions. Comparing different styles of tubing you might notice that fiber direction, also known as orientation, is not always uniform. Composite tubing and plate manufacturers use different orientations depending on what they want to accomplish with the finished product. In this post, we will explain how fiber direction influences the properties of carbon fiber and fiberglass tubing. Specific properties are often ideal for specific applications. By the end of this post you’ll know how fiber orientation affects the tube and how to pick the right fiber orientation for your project. Top Three Fiber Orientations Fibers can be oriented in any direction between 0° and 180°, although fiber orientation beyond 90° is usually referred to as a negative angle value. For example, a 135° fiber angle is equal to a -45° angle. Most carbon fiber and fiberglass tubing on the market today utilizes a combination of two or more of these orientations: 0° - Zero-degree fiber angle is the most frequently used orientation. When fibers are oriented in the direction of the load they are the strongest and stiffest. On tubing, the zero-degree direction is along the length of the tube and contributes to bending stiffness strength. 90° - Ninety-degree fiber angle is used when bending both directions is required. In a tube the ninetydegree fibers are oriented in the circumference of the tube. They help keep the tube from crushing or buckling when loaded. ±45° - Forty-five-degree angles are often used in conjunction with zero and ninety-degree plies to create a quasi-isotropic layup. A positive forty-five-degree layer is almost always paired adjacent to a negative forty-five-degree layer. When used on a tube, forty-five-degree layers contribute to twisting stiffness and strength. Woven fiber is often referred to as having a 0/90 degree fiber angle since there are fibers in both directions, but in a single piece. Some woven materials can contain even more fiber directions; for example, triaxial weaves have fiber in three directions and are usually quasi-isotropic by themselves.

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