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Chapelwood Foundation Summary Report 2016

Chapelwood Foundation Summary Report 2016

Generation One and

Generation One and Cornerstone Family Ministries The Chapelwood Foundation believes in education. We believe in ending generational poverty. We believe in supporting organizations that are effectively responding to the critical needs of the underserved, vulnerable and neglected in our community. With that in mind, the Foundation granted a combined $10,000 to Generation One in the Third Ward and Cornerstone Family Ministries in Spring Branch to help empower students and their families both in our own backyard and across the city, effectively helping to stop the cycle of poverty through education and empowerment. Generation One espouses these tenets: • Education is essential to a successful life. • Every child is able to learn when obstacles to relevant instruction are overcome. • Love, encouragement, trust, discipline, respect, responsibility, and vision are foundations for healthy relationships and for a successful life. Generation One provides case management for families in generational poverty that builds skills and helps them access community resources to meet their family’s needs. At their tuition-free, private Generation One Academy, their mission is to “provide an individualized education that fosters hope, builds confidence, and includes the entire family.” In a small classroom with a 14:1 student-to-teacher ratio, academic instruction, spiritual guidance, and character development play a critical role in the curriculum. Ensuring “at-risk” children receive this balance of instruction increases their ability to be successful throughout their academic careers. The Chapelwood Foundation also believes in families. Strong families = strong communities and strong communities = good communities working together and loving each other. Cornerstone Family Ministries agrees with these values. Spring Branch’s low-income subsidized apartment complexes are rife with gangs, dilapidation, drug dealers, and violent crime. Bussing children and parents from 39 Spring Branch apartment complexes to programming at five sites a week (The Branch on Tuesday nights), CFM is effectively serving as the church for many of these families. CFM acts as a light shining the way to a better present and a hopeful future. CFM connects students with caring volunteers who help at-risk youth chart a stable course for the years ahead, while also helping their parents improve their family circumstances. Family Night features Bible classes for Pre-K-12th grade students with mentoring/discipleship, recreation, crafts, and the opportunity to connect with friends and share dinner with their families in a safe environment. Empowering students. Equipping, nurturing, and educating families. Our partners Generation One and Cornerstone Family Ministries believe in these tenets and share the same goals as the Chapelwood Foundation. 12

Noah’s House Martha was a mentally challenged, 48-year-old who had lived in a group home since her parents had become too frail to care for her. Martha was relatively happy in her group home and had a job sacking groceries at the nearby grocery store. In July of 1998, the facility which ran her group home announced it would be closing by the end of the month. What would she do? Where would she live? Martha’s mild intellectual and developmental disabilities made her ineligible for help from governmental organizations, yet she still needed assistance to live a satisfying, independent, and fulfilling life. Would she be forced by these circumstances to move back in with her parents? If so, Martha assumed she would have to quit her job because her parents’ driving was very limited. Leonard, one of Martha’s friends at the home, also had nowhere to go as his parents had passed away and there was no one to care for him. Seeing this desperate situation through the loving eyes of caregivers, three of the dedicated women who worked at the home decided to address this problem head on. They combined their sparse resources along with their considerable courage and created a new organization called Noah’s House. Initially using rented apartments in southwest Houston, 45 former residents joined them as charter residents of Noah’s House. Today, Noah’s House is a happy and thriving community of 50 gentle souls living in a purpose-built home constructed specifically for them in 2009. Noah’s House is located in close proximity to churches, the fire department, and a police station. Residents live in one-person private staterooms with shared connected bathrooms. The staterooms are well furnished and washers and dryers are provided. Common recreation and dining facilities promote social interaction and a family atmosphere. Trained staff is on duty 24 hours a day to provide life skills training such as laundry, housekeeping, safety, checkbook maintenance, and budgeting support for all residents. Outside professional services are available for emergency usage as well as routine care. Transportation is provided for all residents to and from their places of employment, to medical appointments, and for shopping and entertainment outings and community activities. Both Martha and Leonard now live at Noah’s House, where they are content and still working at their respective jobs. The Chapelwood Foundation has awarded grants to Noah’s House for several years, earmarking funds to improve the social development of the residents including outings to movies, sporting events and cultural activities. Studies have shown that these social activities are directly linked to better overall mental health which is a huge benefit to the Noah’s House residents. Although Noah’s House receives no government funding, they are able to offer residents all of the above mentioned amenities and a fully engaged lifestyle for only $1,100 per month, per resident. The Chapelwood Foundation is proud to be a part of the solution that Noah’s House is providing by making such a big difference in the lives of these unique and special people. 13