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Tradewinds Feb 2014 Web OPT

February 2014

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Free Classified Ad See more at atpnc.com Outer Banks Entrepreneurs BY KATIE BEDARD-GOYTOWSKI French Provincial China Cabinet. Come check it out at 112 North Road Street. Across from Muddys, downtown Elizabeth City NC Phone # : 2527226078 Free Classified Ad See more at atpnc.com PRICE DROP! Precision Screen Machines 6 color, single station Manual printing press (T-Shirts) Multiple print pallets, Adult, Oversize Adult, Sleeve and childrens size. Also Jacket hold down, very good condition. Excellent printing manual press. 252-489-8667 $1050.00 She wanted to meet some new people. In February 2012, Kim Twiddy was looking for a change. “It started as a dream back in 2003, when I was locked behind a double set of doors in the Dare County 911 Communications Center, working 12-hour shifts, four days in a row, with the same people, day in and day out,” she said. “I needed an additional outlet of people to network and share my businesses with.” Twiddy had been studying other national networking groups, but thought she could come up with a more affordable program, so after nearly 10 years of observing other programs, she came up with one of her own, and Outer Banks Entrepreneurs was born. “Outer Banks Entrepreneurs is a women’s mastermind, networking and referral group comprised of women business owners, business professionals, service providers and direct salespersons,” Twiddy said. “Some of our members are independent professionals or represent family-owned businesses, while others represent large corporations. Each member is the only representative of her business.” Businesses include a private investigator, a DJ, a writer, a house cleaning service, a make-up art-ist, a dance company, a gift wrap and delivery service, a soap maker, a scrapbook store, an alco-hol and drug addiction recovery counseling service, a computer consulting business, and numer-ous direct salespersons involved with companies like Mary Kay, Tupperware, Scentsy, SendOutCards, Premier Designs, Avon and Pure Romance. The OBE meets twice a month to share ideas, discuss marketing strategies and offer referrals, Twiddy added. “It brings women across many social circles that may have never come in contact with each other. The whole point of a networking group is to gain exposure to as many different spheres of influence as you can. OBE does this, as we ask our members not to recruit their friends into the group, but to bring in women from the community that do an outstanding job with their business, that are customer service friendly, that go the extra mile.” The group helps each member grow, by helping its members to grow comfortable with public speaking through discussions and presentations. “By being part of a mastermind group, you are being exposed to new business and marketing ideas, along with exposure to resources other members are using,” Twiddy said. “We are creating a group of supportive women who will brainstorm together to move your business to new heights.” And Outer Banks Entrepreneurs doesn’t just work for its members, it works for the community as well. “OBE supports many different events, charities, groups and organizations by donating individual gifts or large gift baskets full of products, services and gift certificates,” Twiddy said. “In the past, we have donated to events like Flights of Fancy, the Festival of Trees, the Kitty Hawk Ele-mentary Fall Carnival, Trunk or Treat and countless others throughout the year. We are also cre-ating community awareness with OBE by letting the public know that there is a local organiza-tion designed specifically for women to help them promote their business. We have also part-nered with Outer Banks Hotline as our selected charity, and we try to raise money for them when we host our two main events each year.” What started out as a daydream has grown into a three-chapter organization with nearly 90 members - in March 2013, the sister chapter Outer Banks Entrepreneurs - of the Albemarle was formed, and in May 2013, Outer Banks Entrepreneurs - Tidewater began. “Sister chapters were started because we had many women from areas other than Dare and Cur-rituck counties that wanted to be involved in our group,” Twiddy said. “I saw a huge demand and a need to grow this concept in other areas with women helping women succeed in business and to share their ideas with others.” For details, visit OBE’s Facebook pages at https://www.facebook.com/OuterBanksEntrepreneurs, https://www. facebook.com/OuterBanksEntrepreneursoftheAlbemarle or https://www.facebook.com/OuterBanksEntrepreneursTidewaterChapter.

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY AN INTRODUCTION When Mr. Perry first proposed to me a series of articles to present Orthodox Christianity to a general American audience, I had a déjà vu moment—a remembrance of standing on a dune one evening and gazing out across the ocean; feeling a vastness, an unfathomable depth; recollecting the terror of a black night in a small boat on an angry, wild sea; knowing a wonder, an unspeakable beauty, a fear, an awe. For what is religion? In its superficial levels, it’s many things to many people. But in the end, in the deep places, it cones down to a point. And as we approach that point, the questions become few and elemental: What of suffering? What is it, this thing, to exist? In the words of Pushkin, “Life, unsolicited gift, random chance…Why have you been given me?” The man whose heart is not drawn by these aching questions lacks a measure of humanity; his humanity is as yet in a nascent, a potential state. And to him, religion will be something different than it is for the one who feels noetically the grief, the wonder, the terror, the unendurable beauty of this incomprehensible thing we term existence. Poem by Emmanuel Ngwainmbi engwainbmi@gmail.com A soldier’s Regrets in Syria And so I looked on Mr. Perry’s proposal with bewilderment: where does one begin, to convey the encounter with elemental existence? Well, any beginning will be, necessarily, incomplete. I pick a place and start. Historically, Orthodox Christianity is the original, ancient Christianity—doctrinally and liturgically intact, contiguous and undistorted since the year 33. Each of her bishops can trace his lineage, unbroken, from an Apostle. Her liturgy is in direct continuity with the Tabernacle in the desert, the Temple of Jerusalem, the synagogues of the first century, the catacombs of the persecutions of the early centuries. A first century Christian would recognize and follow an Orthodox liturgy as it is offered today. The New Testament scriptures are an expression of this ancient Christian tradition, recorded by Orthodox Christian pens in the first and second centuries, out of an already established tradition. Numerically, Orthodoxy is the second-largest doctrinally distinct Christian group, only Roman Catholicism being professed by more persons. Geographically, Orthodoxy has been the Christianity of Russia and Eastern Europe, Greece, and the Middle East and North Africa. There are significant Orthodox Christian minorities in many Arab lands, and in Turkey and Iran. In North America, Orthodox Christianity, until recent years, has principally been limited to ethnic enclaves in big cities, where its churches have sometimes been viewed as “ethnic clubs.” But with the insidious infiltration of humanism into contemporary western Christianity, many disaffected westerners, seeking a purer expression of the Faith, have been discovering their Christian roots in Orthodoxy, and she is one of the fastest-growing churches in North America—and particularly in the Southeast. Stay Tuned for Part 2 Next Month Did you know? Known for its fearless hunting style and loyalty to owner, the Plott Hound was bred in North Carolina, and is one of four breeds originating in America. In 1989 the North Carolina General Assembly named the Plott Hound the official State Dog. There are no more guns in this village: Al Qaeda paid off muscled black boys, who had denied school, to shoot white moving things and pray. There are no huts in the village: Black boys raced in carrying fire flames, Lit the roofs and disappeared into the dark While they burned, caking the villagers’ bodies and souls. Now, the Syrian army chief plods the broken cities, gaping windows, roofless houses and dismantled streets alone pleading for Jesus to return, begging the gods to give him a second chance, while Iranian immigrant children and their mothers lying in blood bathtubs scream for the West to rescue them. Will they?