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10 months ago

If the evil is coming, shut the door...

Approximately three million small arms are circulating in Sudan and South Sudan. In the fourth edition of The Niles, our correspondents from both countries take a closer look: Where do the weapons come from? What societal role do they play? But most importantly: How many weapons are needed to establish peace and to ensure that the door on evil no longer has to be shut, as the above proverb suggests? A Darfuri fighter (photo), has a practical answer – a collection of talismans meant to protect him from bullets. But will it protect him from the person with his finger on the trigger? Albert Einstein, whose Theory of Relativity was proven in a 1952 experiment carried out in Sudan said: “The world will not be threatened by evil people rather by people who permit it.” Those words ring true here and will hopefully open another door and allow something good to slip in.

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Horns The hat was worn by a Sudanese Armed Forces fighter celebrating the recapturing of the Daldako area, about 20 kilometres northeast of South Kordofan’s state capital Kadugli on 20 May 2014. Rebels have been fighting government forces there for three years in a largely hidden war which the UN says has affected more than one million people. UN Helmet Private possession of guns SALW Analysis | The Niles 5 The United Nations Mission in the Sudan (UNMIS) was created in 2005 to support the Comprehensive Peace Agreement between the government of Sudan and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement. When South Sudan gained independence on 9 July 2011, it was superseded by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS). Face A child soldier and member of a Darfuri rebel group which fought against the Sudanese government in 2005. South Sudan’s current conflict, which dates from last December, involves around 9,000 child soldiers on all sides, according to the United Nations. British Military Uniform Between 1881 and 1899 British Forces fought in the Madhist War, a colonial conflict between the Madhist Sudanese and the Anglo- Egyptian invaders. The British dubbed their part in the conflict “The Sudan Campaign”. Nuba Shorts The right to private gun ownership in Sudan and South Sudan* is not guaranteed by law. Only licensed owners may lawfully acquire, possess or transfer a firearm or ammunition. Carrying guns: Carrying a concealed firearm in a public place is allowed, subject to a valid permit. Minimum Age: 30 years (for a firearm) / 25 years for an air weapon Limit of number of guns: two firearms per authorisation and a limited quantity of ammunition Requirements for license: - prove genuine reason to possess a firearm (hunting, target shooting, collection, security). - pass a background check (considers criminal and mental records) - pass a test in a theoretical and /or practical training course to prove his understanding of firearm safety and the law. - re-apply and re-qualify for their firearm licence every year. The penalty for the possession, use or carrying of an arm without licence is imprisonment, for a term not less than two years, and a fine. Or death, or imprisonment, for a term not less than ten years, in such areas, as the President of the Republic, by an order thereof, may specify. (a) “Small arms” are, broadly speaking, weapons designed for individual use. They include, among others, revolvers and self-loading pistols, rifles and carbines, as well as automatic sub-machine guns, assault rifles and light machine guns; (b) “Light weapons” are, broadly speaking, weapons designed for use by two or three persons serving as a crew, although some may be carried and used by a single person. They include, among others, general purpose or universal machine guns, medium machine guns, heavy machine guns, rifle grenades, under-barrel grenade launchers and mounted grenade launchers, portable anti-aircraft guns, portable anti-tank guns, recoilless rifles, man portable launchers of anti-tank missile and rocket systems, man portable launchers of anti-aircraft missile systems, and mortars of a calibre of less than 100 millimetres. Source: UN: International Instrument to Enable States to Identify and Trace, in a Timely and Reliable Manner, Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons; II, 4. These are the traditional trousers of a Nuba wrestler. The sport hails from the Nuba Mountains in South Kordofan and wrestlers aim to slam their opponent to the ground. * In the Republic of South Sudan, a law that defines the mechanisms of, conditions or penalties for the possession of arms has not been formulated and adopted yet. According to legal experts, however, the law of the Republic of the Sudan is valid until a new national law has been passed. Left leg This is the leg of a peacekeeper from the African Union - United Nations Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) in the North Darfur state capital of El-Fasher, photographed on17 June 2010. He was attending the opening session of the two-day ‘retreat’ by Sudan envoys of foreign governments. Right leg This belongs to a female Southern Sudanese military police officer who stood guard outside a registration centre on 15 November 2010, the first day of voter registration in Juba, ahead of the referendum on the secession of Southern Sudan.

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