CPFMagazine SPRING 2018 Vol5 Issue2

cpfnational

A national network of volunteers, parents and stakeholders who value French as an integral part of Canada. CPF Magazine is dedicated to the promotion and creation of French-second-language learning opportunities for young Canadians.

Magazine

VOL 5 ISSUE 2 | SPRING 2018

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

$6.95 • FREE FOR MEMBERS

SALUTING THE

EXCELLENCE OF

FSL EDUCATORS

ACROSS CANADA

THEN & NOW:

WHAT HAS

CHANGED?

INVESTING IN

CANADA’S FUTURE:

YOUNG CANADIANS

SPEAK UP!

BUILDING EMPATHY

THROUGH BILINGUALISM:

ANOTHER BENEFIT TO

LEARNING FRENCH


PORTES OUVERTES

SAMEDI ET DIMANCHE

2 ET 3 JUIN 2018

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Magazine

CANADIAN PARENTS FOR FRENCH

SPRING 2018 | VOL 5 ISSUE 2

www.cpf.ca

EDITORIAL COMMITTEE

Michael Tryon, Nicole Thibault

EDITORIAL MANAGER

Maryanne Bright

CONTRIBUTORS

Nancy McKeraghan, Maryanne Bright,

and other authors and organizations,

as noted in their articles.

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Canadian Parents for French

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CPF Magazine is published three times per

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French. Our readership includes parents

of students learning French as a second

language, French language teachers,

school board or district staff, and provincial,

territorial and federal government staff

responsible for official languages education.

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SPRING 2018

Table of Contents

FEATURES

3 Saluting the Excellence of FSL Educators

Across Canada

8 Phonemes, Phonology, Phonics...

What is your PH- level?

9 Building Empathy through Bilingualism

12 Investing in Canada’s Future

14 Booking it in French

18 Then & Now

REGULAR ARTICLES

2 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

11 EDUCATION RESOURCES

Learning French Made Fun:

Resources of the Language Portal of Canada

16 FSL FINDINGS

2017 State of French Second Language Education

in Canada Report

20 FRENCH CULTURE & LANGUAGE

The French Presence in Nunavut

23 KEY CPF CONTACTS ACROSS CANADA

Our Chapters from Coast to Coast to Coast

24 OUR ADVERTISERS

This issue of CPF Magazine is printed on

70lb Creator Silk (10% PCW, FSC), using

vegetable based inks. The paper is FSC certified

by the Forest Stewardship Council® (FSC®),

meaning it comes from well-managed forests

and known sources, ensuring local communities

benefit and sensitive areas are protected.

Canadian Parents for French is a nationwide, research-informed, volunteer organization

that furthers bilingualism by promoting and creating opportunities to learn and use French

for all those who call Canada home.


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

W

elcome to another New Year and another edition of CPF’s magazine. I am

honoured to serve as your National President for 2017/18. Having worked

in a number of capacities for over thirty years on French Second Language

programs and issues, I am excited about the opportunities we have ahead of us. A new

year allows us to set new goals, to dream large, to complete projects in a fresh way and

to connect across the country with others who are passionate about our mission.

I encourage you to take the time to read and digest the articles in this issue. They

take a look at FSL education from a variety of viewpoints; teacher, parent, student.

Sharing these perspectives allows us to evaluate our efforts, to guide us as we move

forward. CPF is an organization that champions official language bilingualism. The

National Board wants to ensure that the work we do accurately reflects and meets the

needs of our members/audience from coast to coast to coast. This cannot be achieved

without communication between our National Office, the various Branches and you.

We encourage you to explore all of the tools that are available, both at the National and

Branch levels. The Board is anxious to collaborate with and to support our Branches as

we work together on initiatives that will advance FSL opportunities for youth in Canada.

Please enjoy this issue and let us know what you found of interest and what you would

like to have featured in future editions. n

Nancy McKeraghan, CPF National President

For your postsecondary studies in French

www.uab.ca/csj

2 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


Saluting the

Excellence of

FSL Educators

Across Canada

TEACHERS INTERVIEWED BY MARYANNE BRIGHT, COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, CPF NATIONAL

As official language advocates committed to the advancement of linguistic duality, we recognize the importance

of valuing the contributions of those who make French second language learning possible in schools across

Canada every day!

We’re back for part 2 of our three-part series highlighting the excellence of FSL teachers dedicated to French

second language achievement across our great nation. As educators and instructors, their service inspires and

supports students striving to acquire the skills necessary to lead successful and fulfilling bilingual lives. As

champions of a future where linguistic duality is a key feature in the daily life of all Canadians, we thank them

for making this reality more possible.

In sharing their experiences, challenges and accomplishments we hope to bring attention not only to the

significance of official language bilingualism, but that of the individuals working in support of its promotion

daily. Canadian Parents for French thanks all those who participated in sharing their stories and insights as FSL

educators. Your work is a meaningful reminder that while making a difference takes time, every little bit counts!

Continue reading and learn more about the four teachers featured in this season’s issue: Amanda Culver

from Saskatchewan, Tara Delaney-Thompson from New Brunswick, Kelly MacNeill from Prince Edward Island,

and Helen Malandrakis from Manitoba. To find out about the teachers profiled in our last issue please visit:

http://bit.ly/2CHZCyw

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 3


Amanda Culver

Saskatchewan

When interviewed, Ms. Culver was

teaching French immersion at Walter

Murray Collegiate in Saskatoon, SK.

Ms. Culver, a former core French

student herself, grew up in Ontario

and went on to graduate from the

University of Windsor with a double

major in Math and French. Since the

Fall, she has been instructing Grade

4/5 immersion at Marigold Middle

School in Victoria, BC.

?

What is the most satisfying

aspect of your work as

a core/ intensive French

teacher?

Seeing it “click”. Watching my students

take what they’ve learnt in the classroom

and apply it outside – that is what

indicates to me that I’m on the right

track. Further to that, it’s the moments

they come back and tell me how learning

French has enriched their day-to-day

experiences and their enthusiasm when

they realize the benefits being bilingual

truly brings!

?

What new projects or ideas

do you want to implement

next?

I recently got my AP French certification

and would like to incorporate some of

what I’ve learned into the classroom.

I hope to do a lot more work with the

AIM curriculum and delve deeper in my

professional development as an educator

– I recognize that constantly educating

myself makes me a better teacher and

example to my students.

?

What do you want to

achieve?

I would like to see more aspects of French

culture brought into the classroom. I

help organize a French film festival and

feel giving students the opportunity to

participate in cultural experiences first

hand, would be a great way to engage

more directly with Canada’s French

heritage.

?

What do your colleagues or

your students’ parents say

about you?

‘She’s everywhere!’ – I do a lot of

extracurricular activities and am very

much involved in my community as well

as in the lives of my students. Teaching,

for me, doesn’t just stop when my

students leave the classroom. I try to be

engaged and in touch with my community

as much as possible.

?

When do you know

you reached a success

milestone?

I believe it ultimately comes down to

seeing the students use what they’ve

learnt in the classroom in the real world –

watching them make connections outside

the four walls of the classroom is when I

know I’ve been successful!

?

If you could wave a magic

wand and bring one

improvement to the core/

intensive French program,

what would that be?

Seeing more of an effort placed on

bringing French culture into the classroom

– even for students not studying

French. It’s one of Canada’s official first

languages, and an opportunity everyone

should be able to experience. n

Helen Malandrakis

Manitoba

Helen Malandrakis teaches at

Clearspring Middle School in Steinbach,

Manitoba where she is also currently

the Team Leader for the French

Department. Throughout her career,

she has taught core French

(Communication and Culture in

Manitoba) from Grade 5 through 12 as

well as French immersion and Adult

Education. Alongside her teaching,

Helen has also authored and published

a collection of short stories en français

which she uses in her own classroom

to increase student engagement,

promote literacy, and facilitate learning.

This year she will celebrate 24 years

of teaching excellence!

?

How did you choose

teaching?

Teaching chose me – I always loved school,

even from an early age but it wasn’t until

grade 12 that I made up my mind as to

what I wanted to teach. I was lucky to

have had one of the best French teachers

one could ever imagine. It was he who

inspired me to pursue my goals as a French

second language teacher. From a linguistic

and teaching perspective, he was a role

model for me, and I wanted to be that for

someone else.

4 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


?

What are really proud of in

your teaching practice?

One of my stand-out achievements was

helping to establish and fill the role of

Modern Languages Coordinator in our

district. At the time we were breaking

new ground, but the role proved to be

beneficial for the rural school division and

helped boost enrollment and retention in

the high school as well as raise the profile

of French language and culture within

the community! Even though the position

itself has evolved, I’m proud to say it is

part of a legacy that I’ve left behind.

?

What do your colleagues or

your students’ parents say

about you?

I am very driven, and I always strive for

Tara Delaney-Thompson

excellence in myself and in my students.

?

What new projects or ideas

have you implemented in

your classroom?

The use of tablets in our French

department has changed how we teach.

The students are more engaged with the

French-speaking world because they can

access it more easily as well as record

their own progress. I want students

to love French and experience what I

experienced – my being bilingual really

opened up doors for me culturally and

I want that for them, too!

?

If you could wave a magic

wand and bring one

improvement to the core/

intensive French program,

what would that be?

Smaller classes – the amount of oral

communication and engagement students

can experience in smaller classes is

incredible. It would also be hugely

beneficial if every student enrolled in an

English program across Canada had the

opportunity to learn French starting in

kindergarten. n

New Brunswick

Tara Delaney is a teacher at

Nashwalk Valley in Durham Bridge,

New Brunswick. Since beginning her

career in 2000 as a second language

teacher, Tara has taught intensive

French and even enjoyed a brief stint

in Korea where she instructed English

as a second language. Tara’s passion

for languages stems from her own

experience as a French immersion

graduate, which she credits as having

afforded her amazing opportunities

throughout her life and career.

?

What is your favorite part

about teaching?

There’s immense gratification in knowing

your guidance and instruction can make

a difference in a student’s life. Having

some of the students come back once

they’ve graduated and share their

accomplishments is something that

continues to motivate and inspire the

work I do.

?

What is your biggest

challenge?

Getting the students engaged in the

process. Once they get into it, they really

enjoy learning but getting them hooked is

always the toughest part!

?

What are you really proud of

in your teaching practice?

Seeing the amount of students that

continue on into late French immersion,

and when getting there watching them

excel and knowing that they’ve fallen in

love with learning French as a second

language.

?

What new projects or ideas

do you want to implement

next?

I’d like to see our pen pal program expand

globally. The hope is to broaden the scope

of the program by reaching out to other

schools in French-speaking countries

and collaborating on more projects in

the future.

?

If you could wave a magic

wand and bring one

improvement to the core/

intensive French program,

what would that be?

Simply put, equal access for all students

across New Brunswick because not

everybody has it. n

continued...

Core French Program / Basic French Program

A program in which French is taught as a subject among others

in a regular English program. Also known as French Second

Language Program in Alberta and French Communication

and Culture in Manitoba.

Intensive French / Intensive Core French

A program in which French is taught intensively during five

months of the Grade 5 or 6 year. Students receive about 80% of

their instruction in French during the first half of the year and

20% during the second half; all other subjects in the curriculum

(except for math) are “compressed” into the second half of

the year.

Post Intensive French

A program offered after the initial Intensive French year in which

a similar pedagogical approach continues in higher grades in

order to maintain/enhance proficiency gains made in the initial

year. Also known as Français approfondi, Enhanced French and

other terms in various jurisdictions.

4U credit

An Ontario Grade 12 university preparation course to provide

the knowledge and skills needed to meet university entrance

requirements.

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 5


Kelly MacNeill

Prince Edward Island

After teaching FSL for 17 years

Kelly MacNeill has joined PEI’s

Department of Education where

she now works as a core French

Consultant in the redevelopment of

the core French program. Kelly has

always recognized the value of FSL

programming so when presented

with the opportunity to join the

Department of Education — and bring

with her the skills and expertise she’s

learned throughout the years — it was

a chance she knew she had to take!

?

What is the most satisfying

aspect of your work as a

core French Consultant?

Relationships are powerful. In a very

short time, we have built a community of

passionate and committed core French

leaders island wide. It is because of these

teachers, and the principals who support

them, that the new core French program

is becoming more recognized and

valued as an integral component of

PEI’s education system.

?

What is your biggest

challenge?

Dismantling the thinking that core

French classes are all about “repetition

and memorization”. Nothing could be

further from the truth! The core French

classroom is student centered and very

social; it is a positive, and dynamic

learning space that is driven by students’

social and cultural backgrounds, by

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6 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


their interests, learning styles and reallife

experiences. Students are actively

engaged in meaningful activities where

they learn to collaborate, communicate

spontaneously and problem solve.

?

What would your colleagues

say about you?

I am very positive, passionate, driven…

and have way too much energy!

?

When do you know

you reached a success

milestone?

The success that we have to date is

because of the shared vision amongst not

only those who have worked to develop

the new program but the community it

supports as well. We’ve taken the time

to invest in our core French teachers

through re-education and training and

as a result we’ve seen exponential

growth in the program – our students

are more engaged and our teachers

are empowered; they recognize the

important role they play in preparing

students for success in the real-world.

?

If you could wave a magic

wand and bring one

improvement to the core/

intensive French program,

what would that be?

We must continue to engage parents,

principals and the broader community.

Ultimately the success of this program, and

others like it, is dependent on everyone

committing to, believing in and promoting

a shared belief in its value and the amazing

benefits that can be had as a result of

learning French! n

Stayed tuned

for the inspiring

profiles and

stories of more

FSL teachers

from your part

of Canada in the

upcoming issue

of CPF Magazine.

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CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 7


Phonemes, Phonology, Phonics...

What is your PH- level? BY JENNY GRAY

What do all these terms mean? Let’s do a mental

comparison for comprehension. Let’s compare

water and Phonology.

The pH level in water determines if the pool is a good

environment for swimming. The PH- level in literacy determines

the success in learning to read and write.

Just as a low pH in water creates a negative environment

that irritates the eyes and skin of a swimmer, as well as causing

damage to pool liners, a lower PH in literacy can produce

similar reactions in learners. They become defensive. They

are frustrated with the process which leads to poor academic

achievement progressing to self-confidence issues and a

negative attitude in the classroom. Canada’s French immersion

programs found that poor academic achievement and frustration

were frequently cited by parents and teachers as the main

reasons for an immersion student leaving the program. 1

If you repeatedly return to a pool that irritates you, you

will quit swimming. If you don’t have the tools to support your

learning, you will quit trying to learn.

In alphabetic writing systems, the

consistency of grapheme-phoneme and

phoneme-grapheme relations is a key

factor in learning to read and write. 2

Explicit phonological awareness and the

ability to blend and segment oral sounds has been linked

to success in reading. Yet, the success rate is even higher

when students are taught how to segment and blend

phonemes in the written language: explicit letter–sound

correspondence instruction. 3

There needs to be a balance in the pH level to keep a pool

stable for swimming. There needs to be balanced literacy in

which phonological awareness plays a vital role in the success

of language acquisition. Watermelonworks French Sounds is a

patented method that can help you balance your PH- levels. n

1. Strategies for Helping Underperforming Immersion Learners Succeed (2004) The Bridge.

http://carla.umn.edu/immersion/acie/vol7/bridge-7(3).pdf

2. The Contribution of Morphology to the Consistency of Spelling-to-Sound Relations: A Quantitative

Analysis Based on French Elementary School Readers (2005) http://bit.ly/2rEXmqC

3. Report of the National Reading Panel: Teaching Children to Read (2000) http://bit.ly/2ncg6ZK

8 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


Building Empathy

through Bilingualism

BY EMMA PIAYDA, VICE-PRESIDENT, CPF ALBERTA BRANCH

AND KATE PETERS, BOARD DIRECTOR, CPF NATIONAL

Another benefit to

learning French

“ Nothing develops

human tolerance

and sensitivity more

than learning a

foreign language.”

(Suchankova, 2014)

Introduction

As parents, we choose second-language

education for the long-term social,

cultural and economic benefits. As

societies become globalized, there is

another tangible advantage to language

learning: Intercultural Communicative

Competence (ICC). This increasingly

essential skill represents the ability

to communicate appropriately and

effectively in intercultural contexts

(Suchankova, 2014). Learning French as a

Second Language at an early age provides

critical exposure to understanding others’

perspectives (Fan, Liberman, Keysar,

& Kinzler, 2015) and develops empathy

which contributes to ICC. Developing

intercultural skills is incredibly valuable

in a world that requires our children to

interact with those who are culturally

and linguistically different from them.

What is Intercultural

Communicative

Competence (ICC)?

ICC is the ability to draw on “culturally

sensitive knowledge, a motivated

mindset and a skillset” (Bennett, Bennett

& Allen, 2003) to relate effectively and

appropriately in a variety of cultural

contexts. Qualities such as empathy,

motivation, positive attitudes towards

other cultures, and active listening

(Arasaratnam-Smith & Doerfel, 2005)

have been identified as contributors of

ICC. Second language learning helps to

acquire these skills more effectively than

if they are taught in theory, and offers the

possibility to practice them.

continued...

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 9


Why is Intercultural

Communication

Competence (ICC)

Important for my Child?

Globalization has increased the demand

for a multilingual and diverse workforce

capable of effectively interacting with

people of varied cultural and linguistic

backgrounds. International companies are

actively seeking out employees who have

an intercultural mindset. Human mobility

of the 21st century and the increased

use of technology to collaborate globally

have made intercultural professional and

personal connections a part of how we

live (Elena, 2014). Equipping our children

with the ability to navigate intercultural

situations is essential in the workplace,

and also to affront global issues. As

Radomir Chodera puts it – “nothing

develops human tolerance and sensitivity

more than learning a foreign language”

(Suchankova, 2014).

How could my child

develop ICC?

Choosing an immersion or core French

as a Second Language program for your

child is an important first step towards

developing ICC. Teachers are beginning

to move beyond grammar and oral

competency to help learners acquire ICC

skills such as empathy and an openness to

other cultures. The intercultural approach

to language education “shouldn’t be so

much native speaker competence, but

rather an intercultural communicative

competence” (Bryam, 1997). Teachers

accomplish this by talking about

Francophone cultures, identifying

cultural differences and providing

opportunities to practice negotiations in

different contexts and roles (Suchankova,

2014). Language education should target

creating “diplomats,” capable of viewing

different cultures from a perspective

of informed understanding (Popescu &

Lordachescu, 2015).

Conclusion

We all want our children prepared to

participate in an ever-changing world. To

this end, French as a Second Language

education provides children with a

cognitive and social edge. Language

education can teach them how to

view the perspective of others, avoid

communication barriers, and anticipate

how other cultures may act and

communicate (Suchankova, 2014).

These are all hidden benefits of learning

French. Canada’s bilingualism may

come to be associated with intercultural

competence and empathy; qualities the

whole world can look towards. n

For the references listed in this article please visit:

https://cpf.ca/en/research-advocacy/research/

research-bibliographies-fsl-education/

Le français pour l’avenir reçoit le soutien de

French for the Future is supported by

10 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


EDUCATION RESOURCES

Learning French Made Fun:

Resources of the Language

Portal of Canada

BY JULIE MORIN, PUBLIC SERVICE AND PROCUREMENT CANADA

Do you want to help your kids with their homework?

Improve your writing skills at work? The Language

Portal of Canada offers a wide range of writing tools,

quizzes and links to help you and your children improve your

French and English language skills.

The Portal, a website launched in 2009 and managed

by the Translation Bureau, has two flagship products:

Language Navigator and TERMIUM Plus®. Search the Language

Navigator to find articles on subjects like grammar, spelling

and vocabulary. Or navigate the terminology data bank,

TERMIUM Plus®, to translate millions of terms and expressions

in a wide variety of specialized fields.

Get involved in your family’s language learning!

Stay up to date on language news, become a Portal

ambassador or blog with us! n

Vous voulez aider vos enfants à faire leurs devoirs? Vous

souhaitez améliorer vos compétences en rédaction au

travail? Le Portail linguistique du Canada offre une

vaste gamme d’outils d’aide à la rédaction, de jeux et de liens

pour vous aider, vous et vos enfants, à améliorer votre maîtrise

du français et de l’anglais.

Le Portail, un site Web lancé en 2009 et géré par le Bureau

de la traduction, a deux produits vedettes : le Navigateur

linguistique et TERMIUM Plus®. Cherchez dans le Navigateur

linguistique pour trouver des articles sur des sujets comme la

grammaire, l’orthographe et le vocabulaire, ou encore consultez

la banque de données terminologiques TERMIUM Plus® pour

trouver la traduction de millions de termes et d’expressions dans

un grand nombre de domaines spécialisés.

Investissez-vous dans l’apprentissage des langues de votre

famille! Restez au fait de l’actualité linguistique, devenez un

ambassadeur du Portail ou bloguez pour nous! n

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 11


Highlighting the Excellence

Growing up on a family farm, in a

rural Anglophone community on

Prince Edward Island, meant that

French was not a big part of my life. As I

entered the public education system for

the first time, after being homeschooled

for five years, my parents could not have

imagined how their one small decision,

made on my behalf, would come to

benefit me so much. The opportunity

to learn French was made available to

me through the late French immersion

program as I entered grade seven. It being

only my second year in public school, the

prospect of conducting all my studies in

French was overwhelming. However, by

the second day of classes I had switched

my courses and fully launched myself into

an immersive journey that would totally

change my life.

Although the late French immersion

program proved to be challenging at

times, the skills and language abilities

I have learned have afforded me

innumerable benefits and amazing

opportunities. Yet one of the most

important, and somewhat intangible,

benefits of learning French has been the

way it has shaped my identity as a young

Canadian. As result, I have participated

in events where I had the opportunity to

fellowship with other bilingual youth, and

gain insight to the many different aspects

that make our country an amazing place

to call home.

My ability to communicate in

French, has enriched so many of my

experiences to date from participating

at the Forum for Young Canadians and

being able to fully and fluently engage

with other students from different

Thomas Haslam

Late Immersion High School Senior

Prince Edward Island

provincial, cultural and linguistic

backgrounds; competing at the national

level of Concours d’art oratoire, and

becoming more aware of the value young

Canadians, themselves, place on being

bilingual; to presenting my thoughts

on the significance of linguistic duality

before the Standing Senate Committee on

Official Languages. An opportunity I am

grateful to have been a part of and show

my appreciation for French and the many

ways it continues to enhance my life.

But if I had to just pick one, I’d say

the most impactful and inspirational

event I have participated in was a week

long, immersive experience of “Les

Jeux de la Francophonie canadienne”.

My discipline was basketball, and I am

very honoured to have represented my

province, competed alongside skilled

athletes and artists, and above all else

shared my time with those proud to be

French language speakers. Collectively,

these experiences have pushed me to

overcome my lingual limits, fueled my

interests and affirmed my abilities – all

of which would have been unattainable

had I not enrolled in the late French

immersion program. French, both

culturally and linguistically, has become

a valuable part of my life. Whether it be

interacting with friends, participating

in social opportunities or pursuing my

postsecondary studies, French will

definitely be an influencing factor and an

aiding asset in my future. I am eternally

grateful for all that my FSL education has

provided me, and look forward to the

many more opportunities that lay ahead

because of it! n

12 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


of Canada’s Bilingual Youth

As a science student, my peers, and

even some of my friends, often

ask me why I spent 13 years of

my life learning French. Why did you take

on the extra burden of learning a third

language? All they could see was that I was

not studying French anymore as a postsecondary

student and that I had wasted

my time during my years at elementary and

secondary school. What they didn’t notice

or what they refused to acknowledge was

how learning French, and the opportunities

that came with it, contributed significantly

to my personal growth and made me the

man that I am today.

When my parents first told me that

I would start learning French in Grade 1,

I thought “that must be how schools

work in Canada”. I had no idea that my

parents had signed me up for the French

immersion program. I remember at the

end of my first day the teacher saying “à

demain” meaning “until tomorrow”. As a

young child all I heard was “à May” and I

ran home, full of joy, to tell my mom that

I don’t have school until May! Evidently

my French was non-existent at the time,

but over the years my command of the

language greatly improved and I learned to

love it. So much so, that I sought activities

outside the classroom that would allow me

to apply my new language skills.

I started with charity poetry recitals

and presentations, sharing my stories and

hobbies in French. This early exposure

to public speaking not only improved

my French skills, but also gave me

confidence to interact and socialize with

my peers in English as well. Then came

high school, during which I practiced for

French activities as often I as did sports. I

Wadeed Irfan

Youth Representative

Canadian Parents for French (Ontario)

participated in the Concours d’art oratoire

all four years, becoming a winner in

Ontario in 2014 and going on to compete

at the national level. I also had the joy of

writing and recording several of my own

radio segments in French for 105.1 Choq

FM. As if all this wasn’t amazing enough,

due to my multilingual skills, I was part of

the volunteer group during the Toronto

2015 Pan Am and Para Pan Am Games that

met the athletes at the airport and assisted

them. These unique, rare, and life changing

experiences were only available to me

because I studied French. The intellectuals

I met during Concours, the professionals

I learned from at Choq FM, and the

international friends I made during the Pan

Am Games were all due to French.

Yet, even after completing the French

immersion program, I did not stop.

Even as a biochemistry student, French

continues to be an integral part of my

life. After completing my first year of

postsecondary, I planned to give back to

the community and try to help students

have the same opportunities that I had.

I therefore applied to be the Youth

Representative on the Canadian Parents

for French (Ontario) Board of Directors

and, fortunately, I was selected for the

role. My time as a board member has

been nothing short of extraordinary. I am

constantly learning from my extremely

accomplished board members, from

learning how non-profit organizations

operate, to understanding the many paths

of communication. The most rewarding

aspect, however, is knowing that I am

contributing to the improvement of

the experience of students learning

French. I have had the privilege of being

interviewed by CBC-Radio Canada to

share my journey and experiences and

helped deliver a presentation to Ontario’s

French Language Services Commissioner

and his team in French.

French education and all the

associated activities are responsible for

the person I am today. Although most

people think about increased salary when

they think about French Second Language

(FSL) programs, it is so much more than

that. There are so many chances and

opportunities to learn and grow that are

available to FSL students. And that is why

I learned French! n

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 13


BOOKING IT

in French

Canadian Parents for French has partnered up again with the Association des

auteures et auteurs de l’Ontario français to bring you even more recommended

book titles for young and experienced French language learners!

Read more and get lost in worlds of adventure, mystery and action! The AAOF

supports it authors and promotes Franco-Ontarian literature increasing its

visibility and influence in Canada and around the world. To learn more visit

their website: aaof.ca

Brûlants secrets de Marianne

Auteure / Author Lysette Brochu

1894..., 1916..., années de colonisation dans le Nord

ontarien, de la Première Guerre mondiale, du Grand

Feu de Matheson, de la grippe espagnole…

Marianne Morneau, née à Fournier, perd sa mère à

l’âge de trois ans. Elle passe de la maison d’une tante

à Casselman au couvent de Vankleek Hill. Elle n’a

que huit ans lorsque Fred, son père, réapparaît.

Ce jour-là, sa vie bascule ; Marianne ne sera plus

jamais la même.

Si elle veut poursuivre ses études, son père en

décide autrement et l’amène vivre à Cobalt, ville

minière. C’est là qu’elle rencontre Albert, de dix ans

son aîné. L’adolescente de quinze ans accepte de

l’épouser et de le suivre à Matheson.

Marianne Morneau, born in Fournier, loses her

mother at the age of three years old. She goes from

the house of an aunt in Casselman to the convent of

Vankleek Hill. She is only eight years old when Fred,

her father, reappears. That day, life changes;

Marianne will never be the same again.

Marianne wants to continue her studies, but her

father decides otherwise and brings her to live in

Cobalt, a mining town. There she meets Albert who

she agrees to marry and follow to Matheson.

Roman, éditions du Vermillon, Ottawa, 2014,

284 pages

ISBN (Papier): 9781771201476 - ISBN (ePub):

9781771201735

14 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


Ma branche préférée

Texte de / Text by Mireille Messier

Illustrations de / Illustrations by Pierre Pratt

Une petite fille s’éveille un matin, après une tempête

de verglas et découvre avec chagrin qu’une branche

de son arbre est cassée. Cette branche, c’était sa

préférée. Réussira-t-elle à convaincre maman de

l’importance de la garder ? Une magnifique histoire

qui rend hommage aux rêveurs et aux bricoleurs de

tout âge !

Opération MAD - Perdus

à Madagascar

Auteur / Author Éric Girard

Trois adolescents, une fille et deux garçons, décident

d’aller visiter le port de Montréal. Le chiot de Jacinthe

se faufile sous une clôture et disparaît. Les trois amis

décident d’aller le chercher et font une découverte

qui changera leur vie.

Pris en otage par des trafiquants, ils seront enfermés

et vivront les affres de la traversée de l’océan pour

se retrouver à des milliers de kilomètres de chez eux.

Opération Mad est un roman plein de rebondissements.

A little girl wakes up one morning after an ice storm

and discovers with sorrow that her favourite tree

branch has broken. Will she succeed in convincing her

mom of the importance of keeping it? A wonderful

story that pays tribute to dreamers and do-it-yourselfers

of all ages!

Finaliste pour le Prix Peuplier 2018

Finaliste pour le Prix du Gouverneur Général 2017

Album jeunesse, Éditions Scholastic, Montréal, 2017,

32 pages

ISBN 978-1-4431-5442-0

Three teenagers, one girl and two boys, decide to visit

the Port of Montreal. The girl’s puppy sneaks under the

fence and disappears. The three friends decide to go

after him and they make a discovery that will change

their lives.

Hijacked by traffickers, they will be locked up and

experience the throes of crossing the ocean to find

themselves thousands of miles from home. Operation

Mad is a novel full of twists.

Roman jeunesse, éditions Chardon Bleu, Plantagenet,

2016, 284 pages

ISBN : 978-2-923953-31-1

• bienvenue • welcome • • maligayang pagdating • 歡 迎 • boozhoo • 迎 • karibu • welkom • καλώς ήρθατε •

• ਆਉਭਗਤ • hoşgeldiniz • • willkommen • bem-vindo • • velkominn • дабро запрашаем •

• chào mng • välkommen • добре дошли • üdvözlés • ยินดีตอนรับ • •

• • miro peicak • tervetuloa • akeyi • • i mirëpritur •

Multilingualism...

A People as Diverse as the Land

Within an Officially Bilingual Canada

• maayong pag-abot • આવો • pjila'si • • • vitajte • edlánat’e •

• Добродошли • pitukaieu • • bun venit • • tawnshi •

• 환영 • • vítej • ласкаво просимо • ようこそ • tân’si • • witamy • tikilluarit • welcome • bienvenue •

• እንኳን ደህና መጣህ • soo dhowow • velkommen • bienvenido • добро пожаловать • benvenuto • • dobrodošli • ! •

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 15


FSL FINDINGS

2017 State of French

Second Language

Education in Canada Report

BY PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS MIMI MASSON AND STEPHANIE ARNOTT

Summary of the State

of FSL Education in

Canada Report 2017

The 2017 State of

French Second

Language Education

in Canada Report

explores the teaching

of French-language

form, role of English in

the French-language

classroom, and how

peer collaboration

can enhance students’

French-language

proficiency

and literacy.

CPF

has long been a leader

in advocating for

improved French

second language (FSL) programs

grounded in evidence-based practices.

This year, CPF re-launched its

State of FSL Education Report to great

enthusiasm. Researchers from the

community converged on the report for

insights into the experiences of students

in FSL programs. In the first contribution,

Arnott, Masson, Lapkin and Knouzi

provide a review of studies published

between 2000 and 2016.

Their analysis reveals that research

on FSL students has maintained a strong

focus on teaching and learning French

language form and improving literacy

practices.

Among the research that focused

on form, studies converged on three

areas: the explicit teaching of Frenchlanguage

form, the role of English in the

French-language classroom, and how

peer collaboration can enhance students’

French-language proficiency and literacy.

Among studies that focused on

literacy, the following topics emerged:

identifying early predictors of literacy

achievement and risk, creative literacybased

practices and recognizing the

need for FSL students to develop their

identities as French speakers.

In another commentary in the report,

Dicks and Kristmanson discuss the French

immersion program and its high success

rate demonstrated through research on

student proficiency levels.

As their review of the research

literature suggests, learning French is a

complex social process in which students

work with peer groups to enhance

proficiency and draw on languages that

they bring with them to the classroom

(such as English and other languages). In

a subsequent article, Mady provides an

encouraging update on the inclusion of

English language learners in FSL programs.

She suggests that the face of FSL is

16 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


FSL FINDINGS

STUDENTS IN K-12

FSL PROGRAMS:

WHAT ISSUES ARE

TOP OF MIND IN 21 ST

CENTURY RESEARCH?

Authors: Stephanie Arnott, Mimi Masson, Sharon Lapkin, Ibtissem Knouzi

“more research on the

student experience in

FSL contexts other than

immersion is warranted”

collaboration between student pairs helped individual

learners articulate and test incorrect hypotheses, and

subsequently correct them. Tocalli-Beller and Swain

(2005) explained that the peer collaboration helped

learners discover and address cognitive conflicts when

they were faced with discrepancies between their

production and corrected forms.

FORM AND LITERACY

In several studies, the focus on form was part of a larger

approach to enhance or support FI students’ literacy

achievement. Researchers compared findings from L1 and

L2 studies with special attention to the role of linguistic

form in literacy skill development in both languages. For

instance, Hipfner-Boucher, Lam and Chen (2015) found a

link between young FI students’ ability to produce oral

narratives in French that are grammatically accurate

with higher reading comprehension; a fact that is already

established in L1 studies. The authors recommended that

FI students be given ample opportunity to listen, process

and tell narratives in French so as to become accurate,

literate language users.

Noting a lack of attention to structural aspects of words

in FI classes, Lyster, Quiroga and Ballinger (2013) designed

an instructional unit that integrated attention to word

parts (such as prefixes and suffixes) within a biliteracy

approach, where the same novel was introduced in both

the French and English classes of an FI program. They

found that the intervention had a positive impact on

students’ literacy skills.

In Lyster (2015), a literacy-focused way of integrating

FFI across the FI curriculum was proposed. Coordination

between teachers of different subjects (e.g., language

arts, social studies, and science) whereby grammatical

gender instruction was introduced explicitly in some

classes (but not in others) and further consolidated

through tasks assigned in other subjects led to significant

long-term improvement on both oral and written tasks.

LITERACY

Some studies (reviewed above) integrated a focus on

literacy development with a focus on form. In this

section, we introduce others that focused on FSL learners’

emerging literacy skills with a special attention to

identifying early predictors of literacy achievement and

risk, describing best practices for building FSL students’

literacy skills and exploring their effects on the identity

constructing of FI students.

IDENTIFYING EARLY PREDICTORS OF LITERACY

ACHIEVEMENT AND RISK

Several studies explored the possible link between

proficiency in a learner’s repertoire of languages (e.g.,

English or other languages as L1, French as an L2/

increasingly as an L3) in view of predicting, identifying

and assisting students at risk of experiencing literacy

delays. For example, early English cognitive measures

were shown to predict students’ later reading ability in

both English and French (Jared, Cormier, Levy & Wade-

Woolley, 2011). A similar trend emerged in Bérubé and

Marinova-Todd (2014), where early measures of oral

language proficiency and reading comprehension in

English (L2) predicted oral language proficiency and

reading comprehension in French (L3). In terms of

reading delays, Bourgoin (2014) found that students who

showed signs of reading delays in English in Kindergarten

experienced reading issues in French when they entered

FI at Grade 3. Early testing in Grade 3 at the beginning of

FSL exposure was another predictive factor of the level of

French reading achievement at the end of Grade 3.

Another subset of studies was more clearly focused on

tracing FI students’ achievement in reading and writing,

either as a way to assess the performance of the program

in general or in relation to results usually expected in

monolingual programs. For instance, Turnbull, Hart and

Lapkin (2003) found that Grade 6 FI student achievement

in reading, writing and math was comparable to that

of students in regular English language programs, thus

GUEST COMMENTARIES

Canadian Parents for French is known for sharing evidence-based research on a variety of

contemporary issues in French as a second language education. With these three guest

commentaries, we revisit some of the key issues: two share updates from commentaries

originally published in 2008 on French immersion and access for allophone learners, while a

more recent study of core French students adds to findings of a CPF-commissioned survey of

core French graduates, published in 2004.

FRENCH IMMERSION STUDENTS: HOW

GOOD IS THEIR FRENCH NOW?

By Joseph Dicks and Paula Kristmanson

The question of students’ French proficiency has

down to what we mean by bilingual or proficient, and the

preoccupied parents, administrators, educators and standard by which we are measuring that bilingualism

researchers since the earliest French immersion programs or proficiency. As Graham Fraser, the Commissioner

appeared half a century ago. In a special issue of

of Official Languages of Canada, wrote recently in

Language and Society published in 1984, Dr. Birgit Harley a carefully articulated piece in the Globe and Mail,

published an article entitled simply “How good is their immersion is not perfect:

French? “. In 2017, this question is still being asked and

the statement serving as a header to Dr. Harley’s article is “Some of the disenchantment with immersion comes

just as accurate and relevant today as it was then: “The from unrealistic expectations. Immersion doesn’t – and

quality of French spoken by immersion children has been isn’t intended to – produce graduates who speak French

eulogized by some and criticized by others” (Harley, with the fluency of native speakers. What immersion

1984, pp. 55-60).

does provide is an important building block on which

graduates can develop their language skills.” (Globe and

Indeed, the perspective of another contributor to that Mail, June 12, 2016)

special issue, Dr. Gilles Bibeau in an article entitled “No

easy road to bilingualism” reflects one side of that reality: Despite the caveats about lack of native-like

pronunciation or grammatical complexity, French

“Authentic pronunciation and delivery, the major

immersion students continue to demonstrate levels of

linguistic goals of early bilingualism, are only partially proficiency that no other school-based program has even

satisfied through immersion. Although the best students approximated.

do develop a certain facility with delivery, their ease with

the language modeled on the teacher’s own fluency

usually falls far short of that of young Francophones”

(Bibeau, 1984, pp. 44-47).

Dr. Bibeau clearly chose to determine the success

of French immersion in relation to the fluency of

“young Francophones”. He also states that “authentic

pronunciation and delivery” are the major linguistic

goals of early bilingualism. From this native-speaker

perspective, it could be argued that thousands of

fluently bilingual adults in the world are unsuccessful.

Many speak a second, third or more languages very well

but with an accent that is not native-like. Immersion

students are not and never will be “young Francophones”

or older Francophones for that matter! They are non-

Francophones who are learning to speak the French

language at a level that is quite impressive, albeit

imperfect.

Dr. Harley recognized this when she wrote this much

more nuanced description of immersion students’ French

abilities:

“The spontaneity with which young immersion children,

despite their limited grammatical resources, endeavour

to express themselves in French stands in obvious and

In a recent research study, we interviewed Grade 3, 6, and

refreshing contrast to the inhibited efforts of students

9 students in a Francophone school, and in both English

from traditional formal classrooms …. Their remarkable

and French immersion classes to explore their ability to

ability to comprehend spoken and written discourse in

express the concept of probability in mathematics. We

French is a strength which no doubt reflect the emphasis

debated whether we should even bother interviewing

of their schooling” (Harley, 1984, p.60).

the Grade 3 FI students in New Brunswick since, due to

Those two quotations from 33 years ago could just as program changes in that province, they only began FI

easily be written today. The crux of the issue comes at Grade 3 and, at the time of our research study, had

“French

immersion

students have

a level of

proficiency

that is the

envy of many”

RECOMMEND

READING

Our report contributors have gathered a listing of

reading.

We begin with three literature reviews of publicat

sharing a national and international perspective o

followed by recent policy and related documents

or departments identifying principles, goals and s

in their decision making to enhance teaching and

of education in English-language school boards. F

and related organizational reports sharing results

(DELF) proficiency testing in various jurisdictions.

students and student proficiency.

State of FSL Education in Canada 2017 | Canadian Parents for French | 5

State of FSL Education in Canada 2017 | Canadian Parents for French | 9

“... the face of FSL is changing

to welcome a plurilingual and

pluricultural student body that

reflects the richness and diversity

of Canadian society.”

changing to welcome a plurilingual

and pluricultural student body that

reflects the richness and diversity of

Canadian society.

Mady’s review also highlights that

research, largely focused on the French

immersion context, has created a gap in

our knowledge of students’ experiences

in core French. Building on this gap,

Desgroseilliers’ commentary in the report

sheds further light on secondary school

students’ experiences in the core French

program. Graduate students of core

French feel bilingualism is an asset, but

wish for more support to maintain their

motivation and commitment to staying

and succeeding in the program.

In addition to these articles, the

CPF Report provides a useful list of

recommended readings, including

national literature reviews, provincial and

territorial policy documents and reports

on FSL education and proficiency testing.

It also articulates a recommended

agenda for change in FSL. Specifically,

CPF advocates for increased funding

for official language research into

students’ experiences and for innovative

approaches to teaching French that can

maximize student motivation, retention

and success.

CPF also supports increased collaboration

between the federal government,

provincial and territorial Ministries of

Education, school districts and parents

to promote official bilingualism.

Lastly, CPF recommends more

support for FSL teacher professional

development in order to facilitate

French-language educators’ familiarity

with inclusive and literacy-based

pedagogical practices that can enhance

student engagement and participation.

The re-launch of the CPF State of FSL

Education Report in 2017 makes a timely

contribution to the ongoing discussion

about FSL programs across Canada. The

existing research shows that students

can benefit from improved methods of

learning French comprised of collaborative,

creative and inclusive practices in

FSL classrooms which increasingly

take into account the development of

students’ multifaceted identities as

French-language speakers. However,

the field could benefit from more

inquiry into core French programs

in particular. Visit: https://cpf.ca/en/files/

State-of-FSL-Education-Report-Final-Web.

pdf n

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 17


&

BY NANCY MCKERAGHAN, CPF NATIONAL PRESIDENT

THEN

I

am an advocate. It started in 1981

when my husband and I decided to

enroll our five year old daughter in

a fledging French immersion program.

This meant putting her on a bus to

a school outside our area. It was a

scary proposition and we had lots of

opposition from family and friends

who told us we were crazy.

My experience over the years has

proven that those parents who took that

leap of faith tended to be involved in

what was happening in the program. We

wanted our children to be successful in

acquiring a second language, so we paid

attention. And, when issues arose that

threatened that premise, we advocated.

Among the issues we faced were:

• misunderstanding about the

program. (It’s not “special”. It is the

same program, just taught in another

language.)

• accommodation

• access

• program quality

• accusations of elitism

• transportation

• counselling out

• critical mass

• bias/prejudice

• secondary access and programming

• teacher proficiency

• support for students needing access to

special education opportunities.

Thankfully, we had a school board

who was also interested in seeing

the program succeed. Not only has it

succeeded, it’s flourished! Over the years,

the board set up committees which

included trustees, staff and parents.

We struggled with these issues, we

compromised, we found solutions. For

the parents, the focus was always on

the students, their program, and their

success. It wasn’t easy and it wasn’t

perfect. In those days, there wasn’t a lot

of support or research. We didn’t know

there were groups of other parents and

supporters who were also advocating.

We thought we were alone. We didn’t

know that Canadian Parents for French

existed. What a difference it made when

we did!

NOW

I am proud to say that today I have

a daughter who is fully bilingual.

Unfortunately, I have a son who is not

(though he is able to communicate in

French) because he was counselled out

of the program. It is one of my greatest

regrets that I didn’t know it was my right

to insist that he stay in the program and

get the help he required.

So, where are we today with respect

to French as a second language? There

are thousands of students whose lives

have been enriched because their parents

saw the value of learning a second

language. Unfortunately, many of the

issues that existed in 1981 still occur. In

my grandson’s French immersion school,

boys and children who are “restless” are

discouraged from entering the program.

Already there have been several children

counselled out of his Grade one class

and sent back to their English one. That’s

after only four months. In many areas

across the country, there are struggles

around accommodation and access to

programs. Trustees and staff still need

to understand the programs offered, the

importance of providing transportation

and access, and the need to provide

opportunities for students who may

have a learning disability to remain in

the program with some assistance. (The

same assistance that will be required if

they are counselled out of their program.)

There are still concerns around teacher

18 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


proficiencies. Sadly, myths around second

language learning still exist among the

general public.

WHAT HAS

CHANGED?

Thanks to Canadian Parents for French,

we now have access to fact-based

research to use in our advocacy. We

have forty years of knowledge and

experience to call on when needed. We

have committed parents and supporters

who volunteer to sit on committees and

FSL Working Groups. We have position

statements to use in our advocacy. We

have a network of committed people

across the country who are willing to

share their experiences. Hopefully, we

have advocates at the school level who

will make sure that the trustees, school

staff and parents know and understand

the work that Canadian Parents for

French provides. It could be as simple

as purchasing a membership, even if

your child is no longer in the program.

Numbers do matter and demonstrating

support for second language learning

with your membership sends a

positive message.

MY FINAL

WORD?

FSL programs are not mandated. Pay

attention, get involved. Make sure

the focus within your school district is

on positive language acquisition and

programs that are accessible to all. n

“ It is one of my greatest regrets that

I didn’t know it was my right to

insist that he stay in the program

and get the help he required.”

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 19


FRENCH CULTURE & LANGUAGE

The French Presence in

Nunavut

ᓄᓇᕗᑦ

BY MARYANNE BRIGHT

VISUAL CREDIT OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF OFFICIAL LANGUAGES

The Government of Nunavut,

with the support of the

Office of the Commissioner of

Official Languages, is doing its part

to recognize the rich cultural and

linguistic heritage of Francophones

in Canada’s North.

Recent statistics show approximately

1,400 Nunavummiut speak French

either as their mother tongue or as

a second language. Most Nunavut

Francophones reside in the capital

city of Iqaluit where 13 per cent of the

population can converse in French.

As support for linguistic duality

grows nationally, the importance

for quality resources and access to

French second language learning

opportunities becomes vital. As an

organization that aims to make French

and English an integral part of daily

life we are happy to be expanding our

efforts into Nunavut and contributing

to the advancement of bilingualism

in Canada – while also incorporating

the significance of Inuit culture and

language throughout the region.

ench Presence in

Presence in

NAVUT

VUT

4.3%

4.3%

English

Français

English

OF THE POPULATION

Français

OF THE POPULATION (1,525 people)

can SPEAK BOTH (1,525 ENGLISH people) AND FRENCH

French

can

is:

SPEAK BOTH ENGLISH AND FRENCH

French is: • the MOTHER TONGUE of 1.7% OF THE POPULATION (616 people)

• the MOTHER • the TONGUE FIRST OFFICIAL of 1.7% LANGUAGE OF THE POPULATION of 1.8% OF (616 THE people) POPULATION

• the FIRST

(625

OFFICIAL

people)

LANGUAGE of 1.8% OF THE POPULATION

(625 people)

147 STUDENTS

147 STUDENTS are enrolled in

1.7%* are enrolled CORE in FRENCH

1.7%* CORE FRENCH (2015–2016)

(2015–2016)

*of eligible enrolment

Nunavut is home to the world’s

*of eligible enrolment

Nunavut is home to the world’s

THE NAME “TROIS-SOLEILS”

THE NAME SYMBOLIZES “TROIS-SOLEILS” THE HARMONY

SYMBOLIZES between THE Francophones,

HARMONY

between Francophones,

Inuit and Anglophones, the

Inuit and Anglophones, three cultures present the in

three cultures Nunavut’s present capital in city

Nunavut’s of capital Iqaluit. city

of Iqaluit.

NORTHERNMOST

NORTHERNMOST FRENCH-LANGUAGE

FRENCH-LANGUAGE

SCHOOL:

SCHOOL: the École des Trois-Soleils

(Kindergarten to Grade 12).

the École des Trois-Soleils

(Kindergarten to Grade 12).

WH

WHERE FR

FRANC

Most

Most Francoph in the

in the capital,

ECON

ECONOMIC RE

A

B

C

Baffi

Keew

Kitik

WH

WHERE TH

THEY

Els

Elsewhere in

20 CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018


in the capital, Iqaluit.

Most Francophones in Nunavut live

Most in the Francophones capital, Iqaluit. in Nunavut live

in ECONOMIC the capital, REGIONS Iqaluit.

ECONOMIC

A Baffin REGIONS (Iqaluit): 86%

ECONOMIC REGIONS

BA

Keewatin: Baffin (Iqaluit): 10% 86%

A Baffin (Iqaluit): 86%

CB

Kitikmeot: Keewatin: 10% 4%

B Keewatin: 10%

C Kitikmeot: 4%

C Kitikmeot: 4%

WHERE WERE

THEY WHERE BORN? WERE

WHERE WERE

THEY BORN?

THEY BORN?

Fall

Fall

Elsewhere in Canada: 77%

Elsewhere in Canada: 77%

Elsewhere in Canada: 77%

MEDIA

IMMIGRANTS BORN?

There

There

are

are

very

very

few

few

French-speaking

French-speaking

immigrants

immigrants

in

in

Nunavut

Nunavut

(20).

(20).

Half

Half

were

were

born

born

in

in

Africa

Africa

and

and

the

the

other

other

half

half

were

were

born

born

in

in

AEurope.

Europe.

C

A

A

C

C

CELEBRATE! B

B

B

HISTORY

There are very few French-speaking immigrants

in Nunavut (20). Half

Le Nunavoix

were born in Africa and the

other half were born

Le

in

CFRT Nunavoix

Europe.

FM 107.3 (Iqaluit)

CFRT FM 107.3 (Iqaluit)

History

CFRT FM 107.3 (Iqaluit)

CELEBRATE!

the 1800s.

CELEBRATE!

CELEBRATE!

The Association des francophones du Nunavut hosts events t

such In as the French-language 1970s, the federal film screenings, government music concerts an

The opened Association regional des francophones offices with du Nunavut bilingual hosts events t

The such staff Association as French-language The in Frobisher Association des des Bay. francophones film screenings, du du Nunavut music hosts concerts events ant

t

film screenings, music The concerts RALLYE and book FAMILIAL fairs. DE

such as Spring French-language film screenings, music concerts an

In 1981, the organization (family that snowmobile is rally) is held du

the Association des francophones

in The Iqaluit THE RALLYE and RALLYE brings FAMILIAL together Franc DE

du Nunavut Spring Spring

was founded. The (family held RALLYE snowmobile during the FAMILIAL spring rally) festival is held DE in du Iq

Spring

(family in Iqaluit snowmobile and brings rally) together is held Franc du

The PARTIE D’HUÎTRES (oys

THE

THE

RALLYE

RALLYE

FAMILIAL

FAMILIAL

DE

DE

MOTONEIGES

MOTONEIGES

The first Fall French (family

(family

snowmobile

snowmobile

mother in Iqaluit rally)

rally)

tongue and brings together Franc

traditional

THE is

is

PARTIE

activity that

D’HUÎTRES

has been

(oy

held

held

during

during

the

the

spring

spring

festival

festival

in

in

Iqaluit

Iqaluit

and

and Fall

he

education

brings

brings

together

together

program

Francophone

Francophone

started

families.

families.

been held in 1993 for the past 18 years in

in The Iqaluit’s PARTIE French-speaking D’HUÎTRES comm (oys

(Grade 1 to 6).

THE

THE

PARTIE

PARTIE

D’HUÎTRES

D’HUÎTRES

(oyster

(oyster

supper)

supper) Fall

is

is a

traditional

traditional

activity

activity traditional The that

that PARTIE has

has activity D’HUÎTRES that has been (oys he

Abroad: 10%

Fall

been

been

held

held

for

for

the

the

past

past

18

18

years

years

in

in

Iqaluit’s

Iqaluit’s

French-speaking

French-speaking

community.

community. traditional in Iqaluit’s activity French-speaking that has been commhe

Nunavut was created in 1999.

In Nunavut: 13%

In Nunavut: 13%

In Nunavut: 13%

Abroad: 10%

Abroad: 10%

FRENCH CULTURE & LANGUAGE

CELEBRATE!

The first Francophones to come to

the area that would become Nunavut

were members of whaling crews in

The

The

Association

Association

des

des

francophones

francophones

du

du

Nunavut

Nunavut

hosts

hosts

events

events

throughout

throughout

the

the

year,

year,

such

such

as

as

French-language

French-language

film

film

screenings,

screenings,

music

music

concerts

concerts

and

and

book

book

fairs.

fairs.

Spring

Spring

Nunavut’s only French-language

school was opened in 2001.

HISTORY

in Iqaluit’s French-speaking comm

The Commission The first Francophones scolaire to francophone

come to the area that w

du Nunavut of whaling was crews created in the in 1800s. 2004.

Le Nunavoix The

The

first

first

Francophones

Francophones

to

to

come

come

to

to

the

the

area

area

that

that

would

would

become

become In the Nunavut

Nunavut 1970s, were

were the members

members federal government opened regio

Le Nunavoix

of

of

whaling

whaling

crews

crews

in

in

the

the

1800s.

1800s.

Frobisher Bay. In 1981, the organization that is now

du Nunavut was founded.

In

In

the

the

1970s,

1970s,

the

the

federal

federal

government

government

opened

opened

regional

regional

offices

offices

with

with

bilingual

bilingual

staff

staff

in

in

CFRT FM 107.3 (Iqaluit)

CFRT FM 107.3 (Iqaluit) Frobisher

Frobisher

Bay.

Bay.

In

In

1981,

1981,

the

the

organization

organization

that

that

is

is

now

now

the

the

Association

Association The first des

des French francophones

francophones mother tongue education program

du

du

Nunavut

Nunavut

was

was

founded.

founded.

Nunavut was created in 1999. Nunavut’s only Fren

The

The

first

first

French

French

mother

mother

tongue

tongue

education

education

program

program

started

started

in

in in 1993

1993 2001. HISTORY

(Grade

(Grade The Commission 1

to

to

6).

6). scolaire francophone du

The first Francophones to come to the area th

Nunavut

Nunavut

was

was

created

created

in

in

1999.

1999.

Nunavut’s

Nunavut’s

only

only

French-language

French-language

school

school

become The first was

was

Nunavut Francophones opened

opened

were members to come to of the whaling area th

in

in

2001.

2001.

The

The

Commission

Commission

scolaire

scolaire

francophone

francophone

du

du

Nunavut

Nunavut

was

was

created

created

the become 1800s. in

in Nunavut 2004.

2004. were members of whaling c

the 1800s.

In the 1970s, the federal government opened

Sources:

with In the bilingual 1970s, Statistics

staff the federal Canada,

in Frobisher government 2011 Census

Bay. opened o

CELEBRATE!

with bilingual Statistics staff in Canada, Frobisher 2011 Bay. National H

In 1981, the Fédération organization des communautés that is now the Ass fran

Sources: Statistics

Statistics

Canada,

Canada,

2011

2011

Census

Census

of

of

Population

Population

francophones In 1981, the Profiles organization du Nunavut of the Francophone that was is founded. now the and Ass A

The Association des francophones du Nunavut hosts events throughout Statistics

Statistics

Canada,

Canada,

the year, 2011

2011

National

National

Household

Household

Survey

Survey

francophones du Nunavut was founded.

such The Association as French-language des francophones film screenings, du Nunavut music hosts concerts events and throughout book fairs. the year,

L’Association des francophones du

Fédération

Fédération

des

des

communautés

communautés

francophones

francophones

et

et

acadienne

acadienne

The first French mother tongue education pro

such as French-language film screenings, music concerts and book fairs.

1993 The first (Grade French

Canadian

du

du

Canada,

Canada,

to mother

Parents

6). tongue

for

education

French

Profiles

Profiles

of

of

the

the

Francophone

Francophone

and

and

Acadian

Acadian

Communities

Communities

of

of pro

1993 (Grade

École

Canada

Canada

1 to

des

6).

Trois-Soleils

L’Association

L’Association

des

des

francophones

francophones

du

du

Nunavut

Nunavut

The RALLYE FAMILIAL DE MOTONEIGES

Nunavut was created in 1999.

Spring

(family

The RALLYE

snowmobile

FAMILIAL

rally) is held

DE Canadian

Canadian

during

MOTONEIGES Parents

Parents

for

for

French

French

the spring festival

Nunavut was created in 1999.

Spring

in

(family

Iqaluit

snowmobile

and brings

rally)

together

is held

Francophone

during École

École

the des

des

families.

spring Trois-Soleils

Trois-Soleils

festival

Nunavut’s only French-language school was in Iqaluit and brings together Francophone families.

Nunavut’s only French-language school was o

The Commission scolaire francophone du Nun

The PARTIE D’HUÎTRES (oyster supper) is a

created The Commission in 2004. scolaire francophone du Nun

Fall

created in 2004.

traditional

The PARTIE

activity

D’HUÎTRES

that has been

(oyster

held for

supper)

the past

is a

Fall

18 years

in

traditional

Iqaluit’s

activity

French-speaking

that has been

community.

held for the past 18 years

in Iqaluit’s French-speaking community.

CPF MAGAZINE SPRING 2018 21


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