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Advances in E-learning-Experiences and Methodologies

Compilation of

Compilation of References Vermetten, Y.J., Vermunt, J.D., & Lodewijks, H.G. (2002). Powerful learning environments? How university students differ in their response to instructional measures. Learning and Instruction, 12, 263-284. Vermunt, J.D. (1998). The regulation of constructive learning processes. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 67, 149-171. Vinicini, P. (2001). The use of participatory design methods in a learner-centered design process. ITFORUM 54. Retrieved October 18, 2007, from http://it.coe.uga. edu/itforum/paper54/paper54.html Vora, P. (1998). Human factors methodology for designing Web sites. In C. Forsythe, E. Grose & J. Ratner (Eds.), Human factors and Web development. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Vygotsky, L.S., & Cole, M. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Wadia-Fascetti, S., & Leventman, P. G. (2000). E- mentoring: A longitudinal approach to mentoring relationships for women pursuing technical careers. Journal of Engineering Education, 89(3), 295-300. Wang, K. H., Wang, T. H., Wang, W. L., & Huang, S. C. (2006). Learning styles and formative assessment strategies: Enhancing student achievement in Webbased learning. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 22(3), 207. Warburton, B., & Conole, G. (2003). Key findings form recent literature on computer-aided assessment (pp. 1-19). ALTC-C University of Southampton. Ward, M., & Newlands, D. (1998). Use of the Web in undergraduate teaching. Computers and Education, 31, 171-184. Waxman, H. C., Lin, M., & Michko, G. M. (2003). A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of teaching and learning with technology on students outcomes. Naperville, IL: Learning Point Associates. Webster, J., & Hackley, P. (1997). Teaching effectiveness in technology mediated distance learning. Academy of Management Journal, 40(6), 1282-1309. Webster, W.R. (2002, July). Metacognition and the autonomous learner: Student reflections on cognitive profiles and learning environment development. In A. Goody (Ed.), Spheres of influence: Ventures and visions in educational development. Proceedings of ICED 2002, UWA, Perth, Australia: University of Western Australia. Webster, W.R. (2003). Cognitive styles, metacognition and the design of e-learning environments. In F. Albalooshi (Ed.), Virtual education: Cases in teaching and learning (pp. 225-240). Hershey, PA: Idea Group Publishing. Webster, W.R. (2004, November 2-3). A learner-centred methodology for learning environment design and development. In Exploring integrated learning environments. Proceedings, Online Learning and Training 2004, Brisbane. Brisbane, Australia: Queensland University of Technology. Webster, W.R. (2005). A reflective and participatory approach to the design of personalised learning environments. Unpublished PhD Thesis, Lancaster, Lancaster University. Webster’s Online Dictionary. (n.d.). Retrieved October 30, 2007, from http://www.websters-online-dictionary. org/definition/quality Weigand, H. (1997). Multilingual ontology-based lexicon for news filtering. In IJCAI Workshop on Multilingual Ontologies (pp. 138-159). Weil, S. (1999). Re-creating universities for beyond the stable state: From dearingesque systematic control to post-dearing systemic learning and inquiry. Systems Research and Behavioral Science, 16, 170-190. Welling, L., & Thomson, L. (2003). Using session control in PHP. In Sams Publishing (Ed.), Php and mysql Web development. Developer’s Library. Wells, P., Fieger, P., & de Lange, P. (2005, July). Integrating a virtual learning environment into a second year accounting course: Determinants of overall student perception. Paper presented at the 2005 Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand Con-

Compilation of References ference, Melbourne, Australia: Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand. Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice learning, meaning, and identity. Cambridge University Press. Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice. Learning as a social system. Retrieved October 17, 2007, from http://www.co-i-l.com/coil/knowledge-garden/cop/lss. shtml Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice. Learning, meaning and identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Wentling, T. L., Waight, C., Gallaher, J., La Fleur, J., Wang, C., & Kanfer, A. (2000). E-learning - a review of literature. Knowledge and Learning Systems Group, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Retrieved October 19, 2007, from http://learning.ncsa.uiuc.edu/papers/elearnlit.pdf . Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education. (2002). Best practice for electronically offered degree and certificate programs. Retrieved October 19, 2007, from http://www.wiche.edu/telecom/Article1.htm Wiggins, G. (1989). A true test: Toward a more authentic and equitable assessment. Phi Delta Kappan, 70, 703-713. William, D., & Black, P. (1996). Meanings and consequences: A basis for distinguishing formative and summative functions of assessment. British Educational Research Journal, 22, 537-48. Williams, P. E. (2003). Roles and competencies for distance education programs in higher education institutions. The American Journal of Distance Education, 17(1), 45-57. Williams, S.C., Davis, M.L., Metcalf, D., & Covington, V.M. (2003). The evolution of a process portfolio as an assessment system in a teacher education program. Current Issues in Education, 6(1). Retrieved October 28, 2007, from http://cie.ed.asu.edu/volume6/number1/ Wilson, B.G. (1995). Situated instructional design: Blurring the distinctions between theory and practice, design and implementation, curriculum and instruction. In M. Simonson (Ed.), Proceedings of selected research and development presentations. Washington, DC: Association for Educational Communications and Technology. Retrieved October 18, 2007, from http://carbon.cudenver. edu/~bwilson/sitid.html Wilson, B.G. (1996). What is a constructivist learning environment? In B.G. Wilson (Ed.), Constructivist learning environments: Case studies in instructional design (pp. 3-8). Educational Technology Publications. Winch, C. (1996). Quality in education. Oxford: Blackwell. Wirsig, S. (2002). ¿Cuál es el lugar de la tecnología en la educación? Retrieved October 26, 2007, from http:// www.educoas.com/Portal/xbak2/temporario1/latitud/ Wirsig_Tic_en_Educacion.doc Wise, J. C., Lall, D., Shull, P. J., Sathianathan, D., & Lee, S. H. (2006). Using Web-enabled technology in a performance-based accreditation enviroment. In S.L. Howell & M. Hricko (Eds.), Online assessment and measurement. Cases Studies from higher education, K-12 and corporate. (pp. 98-115). London: Information Science Publishing. Woolfolk, A. (2001). Educational psychology. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. World Alliance in Distance Education, (2002). World alliance in distance education. Retrieved October 19, 2007, from http://www.wade-universities.org/index.htm Wright, C. R. (2003). Criteria for evaluating the quality of online courses. Retrieved October 30, 2007, from http:// www.imd.macewan.ca/imd/content.php?contentid=36 Wu, D., & Hiltz, S. R. (2004). Predicting learning from asynchronous online discussions. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 8(2), 139-152. Xenos, M. (2004). Prediction and assessment of student behaviour in open and distance education in computers using Bayesian networks. Computers & Education, 43(4), 345-359. Yin, R. K. (1984). Case study research: Design and methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

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    Advances in E-Learning: Experiences

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    Table of Contents Preface .........

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    Chapter XIV Open Source LMS Customi

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    Chapter III Philosophical and Epist

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    of constructive and cooperative met

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    Chapter XIV Open Source LMS Customi

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    contents, learning contexts, proces

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    xv these organizations do not get a

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    xvii QuALIty In e-LeArnIng Before t

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    allow that the teachers in training

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    xxi ISO. (1986). Quality-Vocabulary

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    Chapter I RAPAD: A Reflective and P

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    RAPAD in fields such as law, engine

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    RAPAD mystery to the new student. B

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    RAPAD example, whereas Laurillard h

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    RAPAD Ontologically, systems philos

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    RAPAD information related processes

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    RAPAD methods and techniques accord

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    RAPAD 2. An introduction to learnin

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    RAPAD then asked to reflect on and

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    RAPAD Figure 4. A rich picture to h

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    RAPAD Again using techniques from t

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    RAPAD university preparation course

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    RAPAD The third interface is at the

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    RAPAD Knight, P.T., & Trowler, P. (

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    RAPAD AddItIonAL reAdIngs Goodyear,

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    A Heideggerian View on E-Learning t

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    A Heideggerian View on E-Learning (

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    A Heideggerian View on E-Learning s

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    A Heideggerian View on E-Learning r

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    A Heideggerian View on E-Learning o

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    A Heideggerian View on E-Learning n

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    A Heideggerian View on E-Learning M

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    A Heideggerian View on E-Learning W

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    Philisophical and Epistemological B

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    Philisophical and Epistemological B

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    Philisophical and Epistemological B

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    Philisophical and Epistemological B

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    Philisophical and Epistemological B

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    Philisophical and Epistemological B

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    Philisophical and Epistemological B

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    Chapter IV E-Mentoring: An Extended

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    E-Mentoring However, what is unders

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    E-Mentoring baugh, & Williams, 2004

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    E-Mentoring Table 2. Contact. Diffe

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    E-Mentoring Table 10. Ethical impli

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    E-Mentoring Table 15. Technology st

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    E-Mentoring Table 21. Coaching. Bes

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    E-Mentoring Table 27. Moment. Best

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    E-Mentoring Moreover, existing rese

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    E-Mentoring Kasprisin, C. A., Singl

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    E-Mentoring Ensher, E. A., Heun, C.

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    Chapter V Training Teachers for E-L

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    Training Teachers for E-Learning FL

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    Training Teachers for E-Learning ne

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    Training Teachers for E-Learning A

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    Training Teachers for E-Learning yo

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    Training Teachers for E-Learning Di

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    Training Teachers for E-Learning ht

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    The Role of Institutional Factors i

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    The Role of Institutional Factors i

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    The Role of Institutional Factors i

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    The Role of Institutional Factors i

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    The Role of Institutional Factors i

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    The Role of Institutional Factors i

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    The Role of Institutional Factors i

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    The Role of Institutional Factors i

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    E-Learning Value and Student Experi

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    E-Learning Value and Student Experi

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    E-Learning Value and Student Experi

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    E-Learning Value and Student Experi

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    E-Learning Value and Student Experi

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    E-Learning Value and Student Experi

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    E-Learning Value and Student Experi

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    E-Learning Value and Student Experi

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    E-Learning Value and Student Experi

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    E-Learning Value and Student Experi

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    Integrating Technology and Research

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    Integrating Technology and Research

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    Integrating Technology and Research

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    Integrating Technology and Research

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    Integrating Technology and Research

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    Integrating Technology and Research

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    Integrating Technology and Research

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    Integrating Technology and Research

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    Chapter IX AI Techniques for Monito

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    AI Techniques for Monitoring Studen

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    Chapter X Knowledge Discovery from

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Knowledge Discovery from E-Learning

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    Chapter XI Swarm-Based Techniques i

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    Swarm-Based Techniques in E-Learnin

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    Swarm-Based Techniques in E-Learnin

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    Swarm-Based Techniques in E-Learnin

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    Swarm-Based Techniques in E-Learnin

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    Swarm-Based Techniques in E-Learnin

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    Swarm-Based Techniques in E-Learnin

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    Chapter XII E-Learning 2.0: The Lea

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    E-Learning 2.0 Table 1. Different s

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    E-Learning 2.0 Figure 1. Difference

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    E-Learning 2.0 where the blog is al

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    E-Learning 2.0 process. Along this

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    E-Learning 2.0 forth, and, of cours

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    E-Learning 2.0 Finally, it is impor

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    E-Learning 2.0 never be a hotchpotc

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    E-Learning 2.0 McPherson, K. (2006)

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    E-Learning 2.0 Rosen, A. (2006). Te

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    Telematic Environments and Competit

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    Telematic Environments and Competit

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    Telematic Environments and Competit

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    Telematic Environments and Competit

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    Telematic Environments and Competit

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    Telematic Environments and Competit

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    Telematic Environments and Competit

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    Telematic Environments and Competit

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    Telematic Environments and Competit

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    Open Source LMS Customization Intro

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    Open Source LMS Customization or ev

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    Open Source LMS Customization compa

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    Open Source LMS Customization Figur

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    Open Source LMS Customization Figur

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    Open Source LMS Customization Figur

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    Open Source LMS Customization Haina

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    Evaluation and Effective Learning p

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    Evaluation and Effective Learning r

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    Evaluation and Effective Learning t

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    Evaluation and Effective Learning p

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    Evaluation and Effective Learning m

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    Evaluation and Effective Learning c

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    Evaluation and Effective Learning H

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    Chapter XVI Formative Online Assess

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    Formative Online Assessment in E-Le

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    Formative Online Assessment in E-Le

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    Formative Online Assessment in E-Le

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    Formative Online Assessment in E-Le

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    Formative Online Assessment in E-Le

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    Formative Online Assessment in E-Le

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    Formative Online Assessment in E-Le

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    Formative Online Assessment in E-Le

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    Formative Online Assessment in E-Le

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    Formative Online Assessment in E-Le

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    0 Chapter XVII Designing an Online

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    Designing an Online Assessment in E

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    Designing an Online Assessment in E

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    Designing an Online Assessment in E

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    Designing an Online Assessment in E

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    Designing an Online Assessment in E

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    Designing an Online Assessment in E

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    Designing an Online Assessment in E

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    Designing an Online Assessment in E

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    Quality Assessment of E-Facilitator

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    Quality Assessment of E-Facilitator

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    Quality Assessment of E-Facilitator

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    Quality Assessment of E-Facilitator

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    Quality Assessment of E-Facilitator

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    Chapter XIX E-QUAL: A Proposal to M

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    E-QUAL is proposed to evaluate the

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  • Page 368 and 369: E-QUAL (EQO) co-located to the 4 th
  • Page 370 and 371: E-QUAL SMEs: An analysis of e-learn
  • Page 372 and 373: E-QUAL Meyer, K. A. (2002). Quality
  • Page 374 and 375: Compilation of References Argyris,
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  • Page 378 and 379: Compilation of References Cabero, J
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  • Page 390 and 391: Compilation of References Harbour.
  • Page 392 and 393: Compilation of References Little, J
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  • Page 410 and 411: About the Contributors Juan Pablo d
  • Page 412 and 413: About the Contributors part: “An
  • Page 414 and 415: About the Contributors María D. R-
  • Page 416 and 417: About the Contributors Applications
  • Page 418 and 419: Index e-learning tools, automated p
  • Page 420: Socrates 55 Sophists 55 student-foc
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