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Fitzgerald's Town

Habgood J. H. 1986.

Habgood J. H. 1986. Lincoln Community Centre, 25 Years, 1961-1986. Lincoln Community Centre Committee. Holmes J. 1977. Saint Stephen’s Church, Lincoln. Historical Notes. St. Stephen’s. O’Malley P. 1999 The Life and Times of Henry Moffat. Pioneer Miller, Lincoln, Flaxton, Wakanui, Otautau. Phil O’Malley, Christchurch. Restall P. 2004. Restall Family Tree 1739-2004; Pat Restall. Robb J. A. 1868. Tod, the Pioneer. A Biography of William and Mary Tod, Pre-settlement Pioneers of Canterbury. Wood F. 2000. Pioneer Days of Ploughing. The First Hundred Years 1869-2000. Lincoln Ploughing Association. Published Papers Adams, T.W. 1917. Early Lincoln. Canterbury Agricultural College Magazine, pp467-474. Adams, T.W. 1918. Early Lincoln. The Chronicles of a Pioneer. Canterbury Agricultural College Magazine, pp524-529. Cant R. G. 1968. The Agricultural Frontier in Miniature. A microstudy of the Canterbury Plains 1850- 1875. New Zealand Geographer 24: 155-167. Cassells K. R. 1962. Little River, Southbridge and Whitecliffs; The N.Z. Railway Observer. Chapman R. A. 1999. Temporary Quarters. Immigrant accommodation in Canterbury 1840-1876. Records of the Canterbury Museum 13: 1-30. Magazines and Journals The New Zealand Tablet Websites Christchurch City Libraries Kete Selwyn Lincoln University Living Heritage Papers Past 180

FitzGerald’s Town tells the story of Lincoln and its first forty years from foundation in 1862 to about 1900. It discusses early business activity, the efforts of the farming community to improve their lot, the development of infrastructure, and its impact upon the village and district. This is the story of those who lived there, of the churches they built, the organisations they supported, the games they played and the tragedies they shared. Neville Moar grew up in Pohangina, a small rural community in the Manawatu overlooked by the southern Ruahine Ranges, where he and his two brothers were raised on the family farm. He was educated at Pohangina Primary School, at Feilding Agricultural High School, at what is now Victoria University of Wellington, and at the University of Cambridge in England. In 1947, he was employed by Botany Division, Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, and transferred to Christchurch when the Division was moved to that city in 1954. In 1960, Botany Division moved into purpose-built laboratories at Lincoln, now occupied by its successor, Landcare Research. In 1964, after returning from study in England, Neville bought a cottage in Maurice Street, married, and with Maria, raised three children there. On arrival he knew nothing about the township of Lincoln, but he embraced his new home and quickly developed an active interest in local history, involved in projects such as the relocation of the Liffey Cottage in 1977. After officially retiring from Landcare Research in 1987, he began researching the founding years of the Lincoln village. What began as a hobby, culminated in a meticulously researched self-published print version of “Fitzgerald’s Town – Lincoln in the 19th Century” in 2011. This account quickly became a definitive work for the early history of Lincoln and districts. Following his death in June 2016 it was decided to publish a second edition in a digital format, making this valuable resource accessible to a wider audience and paving the way for others to take the story forward into the 20th and 21st centuries. 181

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    FITZGERALD’S TOWN LINCOLN IN THE

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    FOREWORD When Fitzgerald’s Town -

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    The Methodists ....................

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    LIST OF IMAGES The Lincoln and Dist

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    42. Presbyterian Church, now Union

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    INTRODUCTION I came to live in Linc

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    In this context I acknowledge the h

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    In June 1862 J. Ollivier & Sons adv

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    period and the process was accelera

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    THE BUYING OF LINCOLN As agricultur

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    were to be found on the western sid

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    anging between 12 pounds 10 shillin

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    Mary Ann Blythen (née Page) was bo

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    BUTCHER, BAKER AND CANDLESTICK MAKE

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    The next blacksmith was Keith Forbe

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    social centre which not only catere

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    in local affairs as his brother alt

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    9. Lincoln Store - Howell Brothers

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    work, not without reason, for the w

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    across the L1 and the mill pond whi

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    worked from his cottage in Market S

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    11. W. Bartram and Co. Calendar pos

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    Bricklayer: William G. Jennings. Bu

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    21. Southern Provinces Almanac, 189

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    of Canterbury land, including much

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    14. McLaren Clayton Mill owned by H

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    was seen as a major disadvantage to

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    James Gammack discussed the influen

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    was decided to disband unless the c

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    The Times also commented that the t

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    “could walk through the grounds a

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    17. H. E. Peryman’s threshing mil

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    at public meetings where large comm

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    The School of Agriculture 19. The S

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    may have worked on the farm or arou

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    6. Lyttelton Times. 25 June 1869. S

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    DEVELOPING THE INFRASTRUCTURE 22. S

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    where he was active in local and st

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    end of the century is uncertain, bu

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    24. A view of Lincoln Township look

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    By the end of 1879 the Lincoln Road

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    CONTINUING DEVELOPMENT The Railway

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    surface. The following year there w

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    However, there was increasing press

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    Inevitably there were problems. Pre

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    The line to Southbridge was officia

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    29. The train from Little River ste

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    opened. The post office worked from

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    32. Report of an assault at Lincoln

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    Some introduced plants, including t

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    Sources and Notes 1. The Press 20 J

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    READING, WRITING AND ARITHMETIC 34.

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    As already mentioned, Mrs Tod taugh

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    his tenure there was a period when

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    when seasonal work on the farm call

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    13. Ibid 1 August 1878, 25 July 187

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    The Church of England The first chu

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    It was clearly unsatisfactory that

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    39. Lincoln Baptist Church assemble

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    40. Presbyterian Church, now Union

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    service, conducted by the Revd T. B

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    42. Roman Catholic Church of the Re

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    following from Fr. Foley dated Apri

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    ladies and by the bachelors of the

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    3. See map of original subdivision.

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    44. Report of a new Lodge opened at

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    travelled to New Zealand to inaugur

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    healthy and prosperous community. 1

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    PLAYING THE GAME Lincoln pioneers w

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  • Page 143 and 144: 47. The Lincoln Races. Lyttelton Ti
  • Page 145 and 146: A year later the Lincoln folk decid
  • Page 147 and 148: For the first few years competition
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  • Page 155 and 156: KICKING UP THEIR HEELS Most pioneer
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  • Page 161 and 162: eceived. Of the soloists, Mrs. West
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  • Page 165 and 166: THE LIBRARY 55. Pioneer Hall - the
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  • Page 173 and 174: ACCIDENTS AND OTHER DISASTERS When
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  • Page 181 and 182: THE END OF THE CENTURY Lincoln was
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  • Page 187 and 188: 1882 - First services held in the n
  • Page 189: Goulter M. C. 1957. Sons of France.
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