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Fitzgerald's Town

1. James Edward

1. James Edward Fitzgerald. Photographer H.C. Barker, courtesy of the Canterbury Museum. First published in a print edition in 2011 by N.T. Moar Copyright © 2011 Neville Moar and photographers as named Edited by Alison Barwick This second edition published digitally in 2018 by the Lincoln and District Historical Society in collaboration with the Lincoln University Museum and Documentary Heritage Committee Copyright © 2018 - CC-BY-NC-ND Edited by Roger Dawson, Joanne Moar, Rupert Tipples ISBN 978-0-86476-430-0 (PDF)

FOREWORD When Fitzgerald’s Town – Lincoln in the 19 th Century was first published in 2011, Neville Moar’s history of Victorian Lincoln, New Zealand, added to the growing body of serious studies of a small colonial community. He published the book himself with support from Selwyn District Council’s Creative Communities Scheme. Over the next two years, Neville distributed the 205 copies of the book via the Manaaki Whenua Press Bookstore and at the Lincoln Farmers & Craft Market. By the time of his death in June 2016, the book was well and truly sold out. Neville had been President and subsequently Patron of Lincoln & Districts Historical Society (L&DHS newsletter, Issue 42, December 2016). He left the rights to his book and his research materials to the Society. When studying the computer files for the book Fitzgerald’s Town – Lincoln in the 19 th Century, it became apparent that the published version had fewer pictures and plans than Neville had originally intended. Subsequently, as a memorial to Neville, the Society decided, with the agreement of the Moar family, to produce a second edition. This was to be supplemented by the previously unused photos and plans and others thought useful in illustrating the subject matter. To keep the costs of a second edition down an e-book format was suggested, hosted on the Lincoln University Living Heritage: Tikaka Toku Iho site. This had the added advantage of making Neville’s book available worldwide to anyone with access to the internet. Thus Neville’s carefully researched history would be available to school children and students as well as older readers, and at no expense. The new edition is provided in A4 rather than A5 format and a larger font on the advice of Roger Dawson who manages the Living Heritage site. Roger had also helped Neville with some of his property research on early Lincoln. He has been instrumental in facilitating this new edition, spending many hours researching and rescanning photographs. He joins Joanne Moar, Neville’s daughter and myself, Rupert Tipples, on the editorial panel overseeing the work. We have made some editorial policy decisions about the images used in this new edition. Where we have been able to source an adequate nineteenth century photo where Neville had used a twentieth century one we have preferred the older picture to give a feel for the times. Thus the cover photo is now Gerald Street looking east to St. Stephens Anglican Church, not a modern photo of the Mill Pond, and we have new pictures for the final chapter “The end of the century”, which reflect the end of the Victorian era and the start of Edwardian times. Even since the book was first published in 2011, change in Lincoln has been exponential. With this second edition we wish to make Neville’s valuable “labour of love” a lasting resource, accessible to all. To finish with Neville’s words: “This account deals with the foundation years from 1862 to 1900, and it is left to others to take the story forward into the 20th and 21st centuries.” The editors, Roger Dawson, Joanne Moar and Rupert Tipples. February 2018. ii

  • Page 1: FITZGERALD’S TOWN LINCOLN IN THE
  • Page 5 and 6: The Methodists ....................
  • Page 7 and 8: LIST OF IMAGES The Lincoln and Dist
  • Page 9 and 10: 42. Presbyterian Church, now Union
  • Page 11 and 12: INTRODUCTION I came to live in Linc
  • Page 13 and 14: In this context I acknowledge the h
  • Page 15 and 16: In June 1862 J. Ollivier & Sons adv
  • Page 17 and 18: period and the process was accelera
  • Page 19 and 20: THE BUYING OF LINCOLN As agricultur
  • Page 21 and 22: were to be found on the western sid
  • Page 23 and 24: anging between 12 pounds 10 shillin
  • Page 25 and 26: Mary Ann Blythen (née Page) was bo
  • Page 27 and 28: BUTCHER, BAKER AND CANDLESTICK MAKE
  • Page 29 and 30: The next blacksmith was Keith Forbe
  • Page 31 and 32: social centre which not only catere
  • Page 33 and 34: in local affairs as his brother alt
  • Page 35 and 36: 9. Lincoln Store - Howell Brothers
  • Page 37 and 38: work, not without reason, for the w
  • Page 39 and 40: across the L1 and the mill pond whi
  • Page 41 and 42: worked from his cottage in Market S
  • Page 43 and 44: 11. W. Bartram and Co. Calendar pos
  • Page 45 and 46: Bricklayer: William G. Jennings. Bu
  • Page 47 and 48: 21. Southern Provinces Almanac, 189
  • Page 49 and 50: of Canterbury land, including much
  • Page 51 and 52: 14. McLaren Clayton Mill owned by H
  • Page 53 and 54:

    was seen as a major disadvantage to

  • Page 55 and 56:

    James Gammack discussed the influen

  • Page 57 and 58:

    was decided to disband unless the c

  • Page 59 and 60:

    The Times also commented that the t

  • Page 61 and 62:

    “could walk through the grounds a

  • Page 63 and 64:

    17. H. E. Peryman’s threshing mil

  • Page 65 and 66:

    at public meetings where large comm

  • Page 67 and 68:

    The School of Agriculture 19. The S

  • Page 69 and 70:

    may have worked on the farm or arou

  • Page 71 and 72:

    6. Lyttelton Times. 25 June 1869. S

  • Page 73 and 74:

    DEVELOPING THE INFRASTRUCTURE 22. S

  • Page 75 and 76:

    where he was active in local and st

  • Page 77 and 78:

    end of the century is uncertain, bu

  • Page 79 and 80:

    24. A view of Lincoln Township look

  • Page 81 and 82:

    By the end of 1879 the Lincoln Road

  • Page 83 and 84:

    CONTINUING DEVELOPMENT The Railway

  • Page 85 and 86:

    surface. The following year there w

  • Page 87 and 88:

    However, there was increasing press

  • Page 89 and 90:

    Inevitably there were problems. Pre

  • Page 91 and 92:

    The line to Southbridge was officia

  • Page 93 and 94:

    29. The train from Little River ste

  • Page 95 and 96:

    opened. The post office worked from

  • Page 97 and 98:

    32. Report of an assault at Lincoln

  • Page 99 and 100:

    Some introduced plants, including t

  • Page 101 and 102:

    Sources and Notes 1. The Press 20 J

  • Page 103 and 104:

    READING, WRITING AND ARITHMETIC 34.

  • Page 105 and 106:

    As already mentioned, Mrs Tod taugh

  • Page 107 and 108:

    his tenure there was a period when

  • Page 109 and 110:

    when seasonal work on the farm call

  • Page 111 and 112:

    13. Ibid 1 August 1878, 25 July 187

  • Page 113 and 114:

    The Church of England The first chu

  • Page 115 and 116:

    It was clearly unsatisfactory that

  • Page 117 and 118:

    39. Lincoln Baptist Church assemble

  • Page 119 and 120:

    40. Presbyterian Church, now Union

  • Page 121 and 122:

    service, conducted by the Revd T. B

  • Page 123 and 124:

    42. Roman Catholic Church of the Re

  • Page 125 and 126:

    following from Fr. Foley dated Apri

  • Page 127 and 128:

    ladies and by the bachelors of the

  • Page 129 and 130:

    3. See map of original subdivision.

  • Page 131 and 132:

    44. Report of a new Lodge opened at

  • Page 133 and 134:

    travelled to New Zealand to inaugur

  • Page 135 and 136:

    healthy and prosperous community. 1

  • Page 137 and 138:

    PLAYING THE GAME Lincoln pioneers w

  • Page 139 and 140:

    At some stage the club must have go

  • Page 141 and 142:

    The club again fell on hard times,

  • Page 143 and 144:

    47. The Lincoln Races. Lyttelton Ti

  • Page 145 and 146:

    A year later the Lincoln folk decid

  • Page 147 and 148:

    For the first few years competition

  • Page 149 and 150:

    Lawn Tennis Club A lawn tennis club

  • Page 151 and 152:

    opened the baths, and during his sp

  • Page 153 and 154:

    emergencies, and local dignitaries,

  • Page 155 and 156:

    KICKING UP THEIR HEELS Most pioneer

  • Page 157 and 158:

    Broadfield schools. In his response

  • Page 159 and 160:

    for some to entertain their fellow

  • Page 161 and 162:

    eceived. Of the soloists, Mrs. West

  • Page 163 and 164:

    The society was still in existence

  • Page 165 and 166:

    THE LIBRARY 55. Pioneer Hall - the

  • Page 167 and 168:

    establish a library was made in 187

  • Page 169 and 170:

    One was to accept the offer from th

  • Page 171 and 172:

    56. The Coronation Library built in

  • Page 173 and 174:

    ACCIDENTS AND OTHER DISASTERS When

  • Page 175 and 176:

    narrow boot resembling those worn b

  • Page 177 and 178:

    The first doctor to live reasonably

  • Page 179 and 180:

    seriously ill with syphilis, agains

  • Page 181 and 182:

    THE END OF THE CENTURY Lincoln was

  • Page 183 and 184:

    agricultural and biological researc

  • Page 185 and 186:

    58. The remains of the mill pond as

  • Page 187 and 188:

    1882 - First services held in the n

  • Page 189 and 190:

    Goulter M. C. 1957. Sons of France.

  • Page 191:

    FitzGerald’s Town tells the story

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