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F*CK U! In The Most Loving Way

Exhibition catalog for "F*CK U! In The Most Loving Way" created by the Northern California Women's Caucus for Art.

As a pre-teen I was

As a pre-teen I was developing a sense of self-worth. This was a time of great change for women. Female status in society was evolving. Thanks to the efforts of the 1960s and 70s women’s liberation movement, I grew up with many more options and career choices for my life than the women of the generations before me who were generally not allowed to pursue any option outside the home. Nancy Roy, 11 years old, 1972. However, during that same timeframe where women were being freed to pursue options outside the traditional domestic role, we continued to adhere to the male-dominated ideal of what the female body type should be. Fashion in the late 60s featured a doe-eyed female British teenage model known as Twiggy. She was more than stick thin—every bone in her body seemed to protrude prominently through the clothing she was modeling. She was on every major magazine cover and was presented to us as the body we needed to achieve. Television brought into our homes the American ideal; what we needed to buy, how we should behave, and what we should look like. A prominent cigarette brand, Virginia Slims known for their 1970s slogan, “you’ve come a long way baby,” encouraged women to smoke as a symbol for feminine power and sex appeal. It’s hard to imagine today, but at that point in time many physicians recommended that women smoke to prevent weight gain. (It would seem that in their eyes the risk of lung cancer was preferable to weight gain.) A memorable 1980 lyric advertising Enjoli perfume for the modern woman, “I can bring home the bacon and fry it up in the pan and never let you forget you’re a man because I am a woman” illustrates the cultural direction corporate America sold women—you can be successful, but you must continue to be the male ideal of what was considered sexually attractive at the time. In other words, women could have it all and do it all, as long as they looked “good” while doing it. It’s no wonder that I learned from an early age that my not-so-skinny body was not acceptable. As a fat female child I experienced daily bullying in school and snide comments made by wellmeaning (?) adults concerning my weight. A familiar chant often heard as I boarded the school bus, “fatty and skinny went to bed fatty rolled over and skinny was dead” (Unknown author) still echoes in my ears today. As I continue to experience discrimination in a fat-phobic American culture all my successes fade to the background and that childhood experience jumps to the foreground. The adult woman that I am continues to be devalued by a continuing culture that negatively stereotypes corpulent people, thus affecting equal access to advancement in employment. 202

In the United States, a heavy person is often discriminated against in the work place. It is much more widespread than most realize. A war has been declared on those whose bodies are not considered “normally weighted.” It has given many people the green light to make it their civic duty to shame these already marginalized people. To what end? To make them comply? With what? And, for what reason? Health? I think not. Rather, I think it is a way to continue to hold women down. Indeed, many women today know there is a double standard for males and females. Women are still the spectacle of the male gaze with self-worth tied to a cultural appearance and behavior that defines femininity— by whom? It is a proven fact, bullying through shaming is psychologically destructive. One only has to look to the recent presidential season for this to be reaffirmed. President elect, Donald Trump reportedly caused emotional stress and made discriminatory comments regarding former Miss Universe, Alicia Machado’s weight and she acknowledges the years of therapy she has endure due to the abuse. When politicians in the U.S. model this behavior it is all the more imperative for fat people to be included in anti-discrimination laws. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a federal law that prohibits employers from discriminating against employees on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin, and religion. By adding “sizeism” or over-weight to the aforementioned list, heavy people will not be excluded from protection under federal anti-discrimination law. It won’t be a cure all against marginalization, but as one step closer towards an inclusive society. 203

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    F*ck U! In the Most Loving Way onli

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    ABOUT NCWCA (SPONSORING ORGANIZATIO

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    EXHIBITIONS CHAIR STATEMENT Like ma

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    Our financial goal was at the minim

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    VOLUNTEER and DONOR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

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    Photographer: Priscilla Otani Galle

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    F*ck U! In the Most Loving Way Pros

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    Installation at Arc Gallery, 1246 F

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    Opening Reception: Arc Gallery, 124

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    Rulers. Performance by Emma Sulkowi

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    Docent Tour of Exhibition—Friday,

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    Performance Afternoon—January 14,

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    Some Untidy Truths: On Curating the

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    originally suggested by art histori

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    As the juror Shannon Rose Riley fin

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    A row of white cubby storage units

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    ejeweled doll appears ready for com

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    is known for coining the term “au

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    7 Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mysti

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    41 FEATURED ARTISTS

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    Mannichiwa, America! I am MANKO (pu

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    JUROR STATEMENT It has been a great

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  • Page 191 and 192: WOMEN’S MARCH PHOTOS from around
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  • Page 201: Exclusion from Inclusion by Nancy R