hopulist issue 4

hopulist

Welcome to issue 4 of Hopulist. This month we feature Signature Brew, Bison Beer, an exclusive interview with Kasper Ledet, an adventure in the Japanese craft beer scene and much more...

日 本 特 産 品


One of the really great things about craft beer

is that it unites people, no matter what their

nationality or gender. It’s an inclusive industry,

and one that is championing that cause further

with each passing day. We experienced the

international love of the industry in full this

issue when we headed to Japan on a craft beer

adventure that we would strongly advocate giving

a go yourself. It was incredibly interesting and

insightful to see how the industry there has

developed with a blend of its own ideas and ideas

from the other side of the world. We hope you

enjoy reading it as much as we enjoyed the trip

itself.

Elsewhere in this issue, we have some awesome,

innovative companies featured that are

showcasing that to be successful in this beery

world, you just need a great idea and a positive

attitude.

Cheers,

The Hopulist team


06

10

12

News and views

from planet craft.

Fresh new beers that

you need to drink.

How a Bison is

boosting Brighton.

20

22

34

Look as fresh as the

beer you drink.

Music and beer go

together at Signature.

Our picks of beers

with sour power.

48

54

64

Our beery A-Z

reaches D.

Kasper Ledet:

exclusive interview

Read all about the

beer you love.

66

70

84

How Thornbridge

touched perfection.

Explore Japan

through craft beer,

What the Hopulist

team’s been drinking.


© Brewdog.com

BREWDOG

DOWN UNDER BREWDOGDOWN

After six months of planning BrewDog has chosen Brisbane

as the home of its Australian brewing operation. The company

is investing $30 in construction of a 50 hectolitre brewing and

canning facility as well as a restaurant, taproom and visitor

centre.

Director of BrewDog Australia, Zarah Prior, said support

from Brisbane Marketing, Austrade and the Queensland

Government had been essential in choosing Brisbane as its

preferred site.

“We’ve been so humbled by the support from local businesses

as well as the local community who have shown a real passion

for BrewDog to call Brissie home,” Prior said. “It’s a city that’s

on the brink of some incredible growth, and we can’t wait to be

a part of that. There are tonnes of amazing local breweries we’re

looking forward to working alongside and collaborating with.”

The plan is to produce BrewDog’s core range beers and a

number of small-batch brews featuring local ingredients.

Construction is due to start later this year with beer production

set for early 2019. The news comes just a year on from the

opening of its first American Brewery in Columbus, Ohio.


AND THE

NOMINEES ARE...

Some of the UK’s top craft beer and brewing businesses

have been named amongst the finalists in The Society of

Independant Brewers (SIBA) Business Awards 2018.

The awards received a 60 per cent increase in entries

this year and include a wide range of categories across

Marketing Implementation, Green Business and Business

Innovation as well as design awards and industry awards

which highlight the best pubs, bars, restaurants and

retailers for independent craft beer in the UK.

The SIBA Business Awards 2018 will be presented at an

evening ceremony on the 14th March 2018 at BeerX UK

2018, the UK’s biggest beer and brewing trade event, being

held in its new home at Exhibition Centre, Liverpool.

THE BUSINESS AWARDS

2018 FINALISTS:

MARKETING IMPLEMENTATION

Fourpure Brewing Co.

Signature Brew

Wood’s Brewery

GREEN BUSINESS

Bun Dubh

Clarkshaws

Farr Brew

Hobsons

BUSINESS INNOVATION

Clarkshaws Brewing Co.

North Brewing Co .

Veterans Brewing

UK’S BEST INDEPENDENT

CRAFT BEER RETAILER –

MULTIPLE

Pivovar

Real Ale

Waitrose

UK’S BEST INDEPENDENT

CRAFT BEER RETAILER –

SINGLE

Beer 52

Hop Burns & Black

House of Trembling Madness

The Epicurean

UK’S BEST INDEPENDENT

CRAFT BEER BAR OR PUB –

CITY

North Bar, West Yorkshire

The Box Social, Newcastle

Wigan Central, Lancashire

Sheffield Tap, South Yorkshire

UK’S BEST INDEPENDENT

CRAFT BEER BAR OR PUB –

RURAL

The Bailey Head, Shropshire

The Cove, Devon

Geese & Fountain, Lincolnshire

Red Lion Inn, Wiltshire

View the full list at:

www.siba.co.uk


DURATION UPDATE

Duration Brewing recently received

the approval on a rural development

grant, which means it can begin work

to transform a derelict priory site into

a destination farmhouse brewery.

The building project will soon

commence at Abbey Farm in West

Acre, Norfolk and is likely to take six

months from start to finish.

Co-founder Miranda Hudson

commented: “We have received

overwhelming encouragement and

valuable guidance from the UK

beer community. A passionate and

enthusiastic bunch of drinkers, sellers

and makers who have helped us to

reach this milestone - thanks for the

part you are playing.

“Being given money to create jobs is

really incentivising and what we love

most is this is the first time (we know

of) that two separate applications were

considered in tandem to support one

project.”

Duration beers will continue to

be available via collaboration with

other breweries over the coming

months – the next two releases are

with Amundsen (Oslo) and Brew By

Numbers (London).

If you missed

it, you can read

more about the

Duration Brewing

story in issue

three of Hopulist.


HOP GLUT AS

CRAFT SALES SLIP

The US craft beer industry trade group

Brewers Association estimates craft beer

sales grew only 6.2% in 2016 after a

decade or so of double-digit growth and

similar figures forecast for 2017. This

sudden slowing of growth has plunged

the speciality hop market into difficulties.

Globally the demand for aromatic hops

had been outstripping supply and in 2015

Washington state’s Yakima Valley was

hit by droughts which lead to a global

shortage. As a result hop production

has almost doubled in the past five years

and with growing fears of hop shortages

farmers increased production and acreage

to meet demand. However, the rising

output and unforeseen fall in demand has

resulted in a hop glut.

This has lead to many of the leading

hop varieties dropping in price and a

number of hop farmers facing financial

uncertainty.

Citra, the most popular hop variety in

craft brewing well known for it’s tropical

fruit and citrus aroma, has almost halved

from $23 a pound in 2015 to $13 in 2017,

whilst Cascade has gone from $7 a pound

to just $1.20.


WANT YOUR LATEST BEER LAUNCH FEATURED

BIRTHDAY TREAT

One of a series of Beavertown collabs

with Cloudwater to celebrate their 6th

and 3rd birthdays respectively. Do Not

Open Until 1985 is a big, hazy, heavily

hopped DIPA. This is a celebration of two

of Britain’s front runners in the craft beer

scene.

Release date: Already on sale

SAY CHEESE

Left Handed Giant (LHG) and Verdant

have combined their talents to bring us

this hazy Mosaic IPA Even Sharks Need

Cheeseburgers. A mash up of LHG’s

Cheeseburger Cavalry and Verdant’s

Even Sharks Need Water. Expect big fruit

aromas and piney, citrus tropical flavours.

Release date: Already on sale


NEW RELEASES WE

CAN’T WAIT TO GET

OUR HANDS ON...

? CONTACT US AT INFO@HOPULIST.COM

AMPLIFIED RANGE

Brewdog head of production Jason

Pond is the brainchild of Native Son a

powerhouse of resin, pine and gloriously

dank american hops. This hop-heavy DIPA

weighs in at a relatively strong 8.5%. and

is everything you would expect from a

West Coast.

Release date: Already on sale

BREAKFAST OF KINGS

It’s that magical time of the year when

you can get your hands on Kentucky

Breakfast Stout (KBS). An imperial stout

with a massive amount of coffee and

chocolate which is cave-aged in oak

bourbon barrels for a year. If you’ve never

tried it before then make 2018 the year.

Release date: March-April


THE BISON

OF BRIGHTON

When a B|son proudly strutted |nto

central Br|ghton you may have expected

w|despread pan|c and perhaps nat|onal

news coverage. |nstead, the good folk

of the town got a bar, bottle shop and

brewer of |nnovat|on and d|st|nct|on.


Oh, we do like to be beside the

seaside. And we like it even more

when there is some quality, locallybrewed

craft beer to enjoy the views with.

These two likes are shared by the co-owners of

an up-and-coming bar, taproom and brewing

brand based in one of England’s favourite

seaside towns, Brighton. Bison Beer is the

brainchild of Nick Vardy and Jack Cregan,

a British duo who three years ago found

themselves wanting something more from

their regular nine-to-five existences.

“Nick and I worked together for a long time

in sports media in London,” begins Jack.

“We worked on projects for various big

organisations such as the BBC and UEFA and

during that time we watched craft beer go

from becoming an underground scene to a

ragingly popular one in the British capital. We

also discovered that we were looking forward

to our beer after work a lot more than we were

looking forward to Monday mornings.”


That might sound like an obvious statement

for many, but what Jack is getting at is that

they both had an itch to try and turn this love

for beer into something bigger. Neither of the

pair were what they would classify as beer

geeks or home brewers – they were end users

who really enjoyed what was happening with

craft beer.

“It was a risk, leaving comfortable jobs on

decent money to try and make a business

in craft beer, but we were both up for the

challenge,” says Nick. After some discussion,

they settled on Brighton as the location to set

up in – they had both lived there at various

points, and perhaps more importantly, they

identified it as somewhere where a craft beer

business could thrive but where there wasn’t a

huge amount of activity at the time.

“If you’ll excuse the pun, we saw that

Brighton had a thirst for craft beer and we

thought we could help solve that problem,”

Jack explains.


“We had seen taprooms and bottle shops,

as well as breweries springing up all over

London when we lived there in places like

Clapham and Tooting. These were places we

loved to go as consumers and something we

thought we could extend into Brighton with

our own business.”

By their own admittance, Bison Beer is a

bit of a hybrid business. It started off as a

bottle shop, but they also have some draught

beer and a growler filling facility. Nick and

“ |t was a

r|sk, leav|ng

comfortable

jobs on decent

money to try and

make a bus|ness

|n craft beer,

but we were

both up for the

challenge...”


Jack have also dabbled in brewing, creating

some of their own core range beer as well

as doing special limited edition collabs with

local brewers. Most recently, they also opened

a Bison Beer bar in nearby Hove, creating a

sort of craft beer holy trinity that seems to be

paying dividends for them.

Jack continues: “One thing that was amazing

about Sussex is that when we first opened

Bison Beer three years ago there were about

60 micro breweries, but you never would

have guessed it when you went into the bars

and pubs of Brighton. Our idea was to open

a place where these brewers could sell their

beer to an audience that was engaged in their

collective ethos.

“We champion local beers – pale ales and

lagers in particular are made incredibly

well in this area, so providing a platform for

people to enjoy those is paramount. That’s not

to say we don’t give people the chance to buy

international beers – of course we do – but if


“ We champ|on

local beers – pale

ales and lagers

|n part|cular are

made |ncred|bly

well |n th|s area,

so prov|d|ng a

platform for people

to enjoy those |s

paramount.“

you are into fresh beer, then it doesn’t get

any fresher than ones made in Sussex.”

As Nick and Jack both worked in

marketing before, it’s perhaps no surprise

that the branding of their company is

pretty strong. The name, Bison Beer, and

the accompanying logo and graphics are

something else that make it stand out and

appeal to the target audience.

Jack explains: “As Nick and I

both worked in marketing and the

complexities of it, we decided to go back

to basics with the name of our business.

Our former jobs had been very serious

so we decided to have some fun with

it. We came up with a cartoon bison as

our mascot, as we feel he symbolises the

fun and adventure that our brand does.

He has a massive beard, Nick and I have

massive beards – it’s a bit of fun and that’s

what our brand is about.”

That fun and playful narrative is

something that has crept into all aspects

of Bison Beer, which could be one of

the reasons why it has also dabbled in

some brewing. When the bottle shop first

opened, the pair decided to launch a beer

to celebrate that and created Seeside IPA.

“We loved American pale ales with

fruity hops, so we had a go at making

something similar, which became our

signature beer,” says Nick.

The pair have also teamed up with

quite a few other breweries to create

collab beers over the years and have had


a chance to be quite experimental with

those. One great example is Ride With

Us, a rye IPA that was made in Bristol

after a team from Bison Beer cycled there

from Brighton – that sense of adventure is

evident once again.

Jack adds: “We love the creativity that

collabs can produce – both in terms of

producing a great beer and in terms of

artwork. So far, our beers have received

really positive reviews from rating sites

such as Untappd and Rate Beer and our

friend Jordan Mower, who owns local

brewery Unbarred, reckons that beers

we’ve made with him have been some of

his fastest sellers. So, it’s all positive.”

But what of the future for a company

that has spread itself nicely across the

three points of the craft beer triangle?

First things first, staying by the seaside,

according to Jack.

“We want to stay in Brighton and the

surrounding area, we like it here and it

works. We opened the bar in Hove to try

and expand the reach and convenience of

what we offer to people a little further out

from Brighton, but that actually decreases

the risk for us as a business. We also will

continue to get involved in loads of food

and beer events in the local area – one

really great example of it was a beer we

made last year called Swarm of Bees. We

even got together with a local bee keeper

who supplied the honey for this beer and

a local pizza company supplied honey and

goat’s cheese pizzas for the launch event. It

was a great way of local business combining

to create a real buzz, no pun intended.”

So, if you love craft beer and being

beside the seaside – you should almost

certainly consider a trip to the south coast

to check out what the Bison boys are up to.

The charge of this beast shows no signs of

stopping.

| N F O

BISON BEER

Bottleshop, 7 East Street,

Brighton BN1 1HP

È cheers@bisonbeer.co.uk

Bar & bottle shop, 57 Church

Road, Hove, BN3 2BD

È hove@bisonbeer.co.uk

BR|GHTON & HOVE

É www.bisonbeer.co.uk

$ ! " *


BOVINE BEAUTY

It wouldn’t feel right having Bison

Beer featured in the magazine without

showcasing their amazing t-shirts. So

here we are – a quality heavy-duty screen

printed tee avec über cool bison logo.

MORE MAD SKULLS

The quality merch from Beavertown

keeps rolling in, this time in the form of

a double layer knit beanie. It comes in

either burnt orange or gamma blue. What

better way to warm your bonce?

W A N T Y O U R P R O D U C T F E A T U R E D ? C O


SHOW YOUR TRUE

CRAFTY COLOURS

WITH PRIDE...

BACK TO BLACK

Newport’s award-winning brewers Tiny

Rebel have a selection of epic clothing

merch on offer via their website. This

rather simple (but eye-catching) t-shirt

design was one of our faves.

IL FANTASMA

These limited edition commemorative

Bundobust x Fantasma t-shirts are selling

out fast. Featuring a three colour screen

print and both company logos on the

back of the shirt.

N T A C T U S A T I N F O @ H O P U L I S T . C O M


LIQUID

TUNES

EVER BEEN TO A GIG THAT YOU’RE

SUPER STOKED FOR, ARRIVED AT

THE VENUE A LITTLE EARLY SO HIT

THE BAR FOR A DRINK TO GET THE

BUZZ GOING ONLY TO BE SERVED

A WARM, FLAT PINT OF CARLING?

THAT EXACT FEELING IS WHAT GAVE

BIRTH TO ONE OF CRAFT BEER’S

MOST INTERESTING UP-AND-COMING

BREWERIES, SIGNATURE BREW.


TOM BOTT

&

SAM McGREGOR


Beer and music just go together. Whether

that’s background indie tunes in your

favourite taproom, that well-worn LP that

you love to play while kicking back enjoying

a Sunday evening beverage, or a few cheeky

beers at a gig or concert. But the latter of those

scenarios hasn’t always been a bastion of quality

in terms of beer – and that fact was what set

two cousins on the path to creating their own

beer. Tom Bott and Sam McGregor loved going

to watch bands and other music acts but began

to grow increasingly frustrated by the fact

that beer at music venues was often seen as an

afterthought.

“There was simply nothing more annoying

than an overpriced, boring lager ruining the

experience of watching one of your favourite

bands,” explains Tom.


“Sam and I had been chatting about starting a

brewery for a while and I guess we just had one gig

too many with that poor drinking experience and

decided to do something. So, we chose to form a

brewery with a musical niche – Signature Brew.”

The combination seemed to be the perfect fit for

the pair – Tom’s parents own and run Stoke-based

Titanic Brewing (his brother still holds the role of

head brewer there), while Sam worked in the music

industry. Although brewing was never part of Tom’s

life plan, he took to it pretty quickly.

“I went to university not really knowing what I

wanted to do like many people, but I had always

been exposed to brewing at a young age and always

found it interesting. A combination of that, plus really

enjoying trying my hand at it and learning the process

with a growing and changing beer industry got me

interested.”

“SAM AND I HAD

BEEN CHATTING

ABOUT STARTING

A BREWERY FOR

A WHILE AND I

GUESS WE JUST

HAD ONE GIG TOO

MANY WITH THAT

POOR DRINKING

EXPERIENCE AND

DECIDED TO DO

SOMETHING.”


The initial plan with Signature Brew is still

the company’s tagline today – brewing with

music. Tom and Sam wanted to get musicians

and bands involved in the brewing process –

in effect making collaborations with them.

Tom explains: “We figured that by doing

that we’d create beer that was different and

also ones that artists would be enthusiastic

about and pass that enthusiasm onto their

fans – our target audience.”

The pair began working with various local

bands in London and selling the beers they

had made at their gigs – if they couldn’t do

that then they’d run after parties for the gigs of

those bands. It was a hugely successful way of

getting Signature Brew to market and getting

the word of mouth started to spread its name.

This was in 2011 and in those early days,

things could be quite cyclical for the business.

They’d work on a project, tour with the band

selling and promoting it for a period of weeks

and then it would all be over. In 2013, with

things going well and Tom and Sam wanting

to create a more stable base, they launched a

core range of beers, which still stands strong

and grows today. It includes E.P. – an extra

pale ale, Roadie – an all-night IPA, Studio

Pilsner, Studio Vienna, Backstage IPA,

Nightliner – a coffee porter and Stagediver – a

double IPA.

But the brand still maintains it’s ‘brewing

with music’ ethos and works on several band

collaborations a year, as Tom explains.

“We’ve worked with quite a wide variety of

artists, we were conscious we didn’t want it

to be too male or rock music dominated. But


what makes it different is that the band really

do get involved in the creative experience from

start to finish. I’m sure there are some instances

where bands have just whacked their name on

a product knowing very little about it, but how

we brew with them is very different. We want

the bands to be part of the beer because they

are the ones who are going to take it on tour

and we want them to be able to say why it is

what it is.”

Throughout its history, Signature has worked

with has worked with Enter Shikari, Professor

Green, Frank Turner, Mastadon, Slaves and

many others in a bid to bring beer and music

even closer together. But whoever the artist,

the process starts with them heading down to

Signature HQ in Stratford, northeast London

and sitting down with the team.


“We usually start with a tasting session with our

brew team so they can get a feel for what kinds of

beer they like, what attributes they dislike and so

on,” says Tom.

“We really encourage them to say what they

think and usually they are not shy about getting

their point across. Once we have a feeling and a

flavour outlined we can get to work on making it

and they can be as involved as they want to be, but

one thing we always try to do is get them down on

canning day so they can taste the first beer off the

production line – something I’ve never actually got

to do as a co-owner!”

Tom and the brew team encourage the artists

to ‘think unusual’ because they also want to cover

new ground themselves – one of more interesting

beers they’ve made was a Belgian pale ale with

sarsaparilla root, which is usually used in root beer.


“OUR MANIFESTO IS PRETTY SIMPLE AND STAYS THE

SAME – WE WANT TO BE THE GO-TO BRAND FOR MUSIC

FANS WHO ARE SICK OF DRINKING SHIT BEER.”

Now with a stable core range and three or four eyecatching

musical collabs per year, what does the future

hold for Signature Brew?

“Our manifesto is pretty simple and stays the same

– we want to be the go-to brand for music fans who

are sick of drinking shit beer,” says Tom. “Happily for

us, that is a problem that has not really been fixed, so

that’s our long term goal. In the short term, we are

about to undergo a range review and also looking at

freeing up some space at the brewery to undertake

some exciting new projects. We have some special

guest beers coming up which are very much our brew

teams’ babies.”

Tom is also a trustee of the Society of Independent

Brewers (SIBA), so whatever he does with Signature

Brew will be in the best interests of British brewers

and the industry.

He concludes: “It’s going to be an interesting year for

beer. In our East London microcosm, it can feel like

the feel-good factor will never stop – we’re all growing

and it feels like things are going in the right direction,

but there are some issues that need addressing. One

is the decline of cask beer. Of course keg and can are

very much the future, but the constant devaluianing of

cask beer and its quality is an industry-wide concern.

We’ve seen quite a few breweries end cask production

and you can’t help but reflect on it. It only makes up

about 10 per cent of Signature’s output, but we will

continue with it. It’s not our bread and butter so we

can afford to be bolder on styles and prices.”

S|GNATURE BREW •

|NFO

Signature Brew

Leyton Business Centre,

London, UK

É www.signaturebrew.co.uk

$ @signaturebrew

! /SignatureBrew/

" /signaturebrew


TOP

OF THE

HOPS

TOM GIVES

US HIS

TOP FIVE

ALBUMS AND

RECOMMENDS

THE BEST

SIGNATURE

BREW BEERS

TO PERFECTLY

COMPLEMENT

THEM.

Road|e

(WHAT’S THE STORY)

MORNING GLORY?

By OASIS

“Now, we’re

definitely not

the only people

to suggest that

having a beer

and listening to

Oasis is going to be a good

time, but did you know that

Noel Gallagher was a roadie

for Inspiral Carpets before he

joined Oasis? Our Roadie also

had humble beginnings and

has gone on to great things,

so in the absence of sipping

on a Champagne Supernova

(whatever that is), Roadie might

just be the perfect companion

for our favourite Oasis record.”

Backstage |PA

WATCH THE THRONE

By JAY-Z & KANYE WEST

“The backstage

area is the haven

of the rockstar

on the road.

Particularly if

you’re Jay-Z, who

expects his green room to be

exactly 72 degrees with ‘good

quality peanut butter, jelly, one

martini shaker, 12 shot glasses,

and a pack of Marlboro Lights’.

Then factor in that Kanye

requires Versace towels and

a slushie machine that makes

‘Greygoose and lemonade’ and

‘Hennessy & Coca-Cola’ iced

beverages. Fortunately with big

hop hits and a solid malt bass,

Backstage IPA demands none

of these grandeurs. Just a fridge

and a sofa will do perfectly,

thank you very much.”


Stud|o P|lsner

RUMOURS

By FLEETWOOD MAC

“Is there a more

infamous studio

story than the

inter-band drama

of Fleetwood

Mac recording

Rumours? From relationship

meltdowns to frenzied all-night

sessions. And what came out

of all of that friction? One of

the most iconic records of

all time. It takes all sorts to

make the perfect album and

it takes all sorts to make our

Studio Pilsner, which is bitter

with floral notes – a bit like

Fleetwood Mac’s experience in

the studio come to think of it...”

N|ghtl|ner

HOW DID WE GET

SO DARK?

By ROYAL BLOOD

“How did we get

so dark? Believe

us, that’s the

question we asked

ourselves when

we first tried our

jet black, 5.7% coffee porter,

Nightliner. Turning out the lights

and drinking Nightliner while

listening to the thundering bass

of Royal Blood’s second record

is an experience to be hold,

trust us.”

N|ce T|me

PART & PARCEL

By THE SKINTS

“At Signature

Brew, we pride

ourselves on our

collaboration

beers with bands

so we’d be crazy

if we didn’t suggest pairing

the pale ale we made with

London ska outfit The Skints

with our favourite album by

them. It has hits of passionfruit

with bursts of Pink Guava and

Blood Orange. We’d say it’s

‘totally tropical’ but apparently

someone already used that

tagline...”


THE BREAD SURPLUS STORY

24 MILLION

SLICES OF BREAD ARE THROWN AWAY EVERY DAY BY HOUSEHOLDS IN THE UK

44 PER CENT

OF ALL BREAD PRODUCED IN THE UK IS THROWN AWAY

1.3 BILLION

TONNES OF FOOD IS WASTED EACH YEAR GLOBALLY

VISIT WWW.TOASTALE.COM TO FIND OUT MORE

“THERE IS

NOTHING MORE

DEPRESSING THAN

TOAST THAT NO

ONE EATS.”

PETER HEDGES, WHAT’S EATING GILBERT GRAPE


Sour beer is such an expansive

category that it can be intimidating

for the uninitiated. It incorporates

numerous styles and brewing

techniques from Berliner weisse to

wild ales. Our man Tom Sell breaks

through the haze to bring you 12 of

the best in the market place.


MISSION GOSE

BREW|NG

MT PLEASANT, SC

Style:

SOUR - GOSE

ABV: 4%

Volume: 330ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.83

WHAT THEY SAY:

This is mission

gose: our take on

an old-fashioned

and slightly odd

German beer

style that is with

good reason

trending as the

tastiest right now.

It’s tart, salty, low

in alcohol and

probably the

most refreshing

beer you’ll ever

have.

WHAT WE THINK:

Pale yellow in

colour, rather

murky with a

thin white head

that disappears

into nothing

pretty quickly.

Lime cordial,

lemon peel,

lemongrass, and

slightly earthy

notes in aroma.

Taste is sea salt,

lemon, lime zest,

slightly sour,

touch of malt

vinegar in the

finish. Lively and

well carbonated,

this is a good

example of a

modern day gose.


SUR CITRA

COPENHAGEN

Style:

SOUR PALE ALE

ABV: 5.5%

Volume: 330ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.90

WHAT THEY SAY:

Ever had a pale ale

and thought “this is

great, but I wonder

if it could be a bit

tart?” Well now you

can. Continuing

our experimental

Sur series of beers,

we present to you

a single-hopped

American pale ale,

using Citra, with

a soured mash

to bring a tart,

refreshing drink to

your lips.

WHAT WE THINK:

A dark yellow

to orange beer,

slightly hazy. Nice

thick brilliant white

long lasting head.

Strong grapefruit,

passionfruit,

barnyard funk,

pine needles

and lemon peel

aromas. Taste

is a big burst

of orange peel,

grapefruit, a

bracing crispness

then comes

through and gives

way to a slight

leathery flavour

which is more

noticeable at the

back end, the

sourness is present

throughout but not

too overbearing.

A nice dry finish

which lasts quite

long.


BIÈRE DE MARS

DEXTER, M|

Style:

FLANDERS SOUR

ABV: 7%

Volume: 375ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.94

WHAT THEY SAY:

Brewed with two

yeasts, mellowed

in large oak casks

and re-fermented

in the bottle, our

Bière de Mars is

a sustaining beer

brewed to comfort

in the gusty ides

of March and

welcome in a

warmth of warmer

weather.

WHAT WE THINK:

Dark auburn

brown, hazy in

appearance. Small

white head which

disappears quickly.

Strong aromas of

red grapes, red

apple, cherry,

balsamic vinegar,

some sour funk.

There’s also an

oak-aged barrel

aroma. The taste

is tart apples,

balsamic vinegar,

some grassy

notes, a touch

of redcurrant

and cherry also

present. There’s a

gentle reminder of

a malty caramel

backbone. The

finish is dry and

tart, but too sour.


HOP DROP SOUR

STAVANGER

Style:

SOUR |PA

ABV: 6.2%

Volume: 330ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.79

WHAT THEY SAY:

We love our sour

beers and we love

our IPAs. In this

case we made

our favourites

come together. A

massive amount

of hops were

dumped into this

sour to give the

zing a little zang.

Light bitterness

and medium

tartness with

serious hop aroma

and flavors.

WHAT WE THINK:

A hazy golden

light orange in

colour, a very

small white

head that

disappears fairly

quickly. Lemons,

peach, apricot,

tropical fruits

in the aroma.

Taste is lemon

peel, grapefruit,

gooseberry,

slight acidic

twang, which

gives way to a

slightly peachy

finish. Bitterness is

restrained. Body

is pretty light

considering the

strength. A nice

balance between

hoppiness and

sourness.


SALTY KISS

HUDDERSF|ELD

Style:

SOUR - GOSE

ABV: 4.1%

Volume: 330ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.48

WHAT THEY SAY:

This is our take

on a traditional

German style

gose, flavoured

with fruit, sea

buckthorn and

sea salt. Tart,

lightly sour, fruity

and refreshing

with a defined

saltiness makes

this beer an

excellent

accompaniment

to food.

WHAT WE THINK:

Pours a hazy,

straw coloured

yellow hue. Nice

thick and tight

white head.

Aromas of sour

gooseberry, sea

air. Flavour is

slightly wheaty,

with a touch of

sea salt, lemon

sherbert, light

gooseberry.

Nicely lightly

carbonated

which

complements the

flavours very well.

Finish is tart, dry

and sharp. Very

accessible, and

easy to drink.

Perfect summer

sipper.


SOURDOUGH

CO

Shepton Mallet

Style:

BERL|NER WE|SSE

ABV: 3.6%

Volume: 330ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.55

WHAT THEY SAY:

Loosely based on

a Berliner weisse

style – a historical

Sour beer style

from Germany, but

with a Wild Beer

slant to it. We have

used the 58 year

old sourdough

culture and a little

brettanomyces

and put the

beer straight

into oak barrels

for its primary

fermentation.

WHAT WE THINK:

Appearance is a

hazy pale golden

yellow, a fairly

thin white head.

Tart lemon peel,

malt vinegar,

cider apple and

hay notes on the

aroma. The flavour

is strongly acidic,

with lemon juice,

sour yogurt and

a classic Lambic

style barnyard

funk that then

takes over. The

carbonation is

absolutely perfect,

and pushes the

beer around the

mouth nicely.

Finish is sharp and

dry. A refreshing

beer.


TART

BAkEWELL

Style:

S O U R

ABV: 6%

Volume: 330ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.49

WHAT THEY SAY:

Our Bakewell

Sour brewed in

collaboration

with Wild Beer Co.

pours a golden

yellow colour with

a white head, the

beer is refreshingly

tart and dry with

a combination

of citrusy hops

and flavours of

grapefruit and

bitter lemon.

WHAT WE THINK:

Pours a beautiful

golden yellow

colour, a nice

thick white fluffy

head which

hangs around

for a bit. Plenty

of carbonation.

Aromas of lemon

peel, pear drops

and floral hops.

The taste is a

nice balance

between the cider

vinegar tartness

and passionfruit

from the galaxy

hops. The alcohol

is pretty much

unnoticeable.

The finish is dry,

the carbonation

pushes the body

of the beer around

the mouthfeel.


St. BRETTA CLEMENTINE

DENVER, CO

Style:

W|LD ALE - SOUR

ABV: 5.8%

Volume: 375ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.95

WHAT THEY SAY:

Crooked Stave

brewery is known

for their brewing

specialty in

Brettanomyces

fermentations and

barrel-aged sour

and wild ales.

Crooked Stave

Brewing Company

is home to some

of the finest sour

beers.

WHAT WE THINK:

A yellow golden

colour, slight haze.

Absolutely no

head whatsoever.

A real cidery

aroma to this

one, apples

and farmyard

funk dominate

the senses,

there’s a slight

pineapple touch

there too. Taste

is strongly tart,

elements of lemon

peel, barnyard

funkiness, slightly

clove flavour

with a bit of a

medicinal taste.

Carbonation is

spot on, it helps

with the refreshing

quality to the brew.

Nice dry finish.


MEADOWSWEET 16

PROJECT

SUDBURY

Style:

S O U R

ABV: 6.7%

Volume: 330ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.96

WHAT THEY SAY:

We had smelled

the pungent

meadowsweet

flowers growing

locally, with their

notes of sweet honey

tempered with an

aroma of antiseptic

cream and a

background of

freshly-cut grass. In

the past we hadn’t

been brave enough

to use them in beer

then we thought we

would give it a go.

WHAT WE THINK:

Cloudy yellow to

golden in colour,

a very thin white

head. A funky,

herbal slightly

grassy aroma,

slightly fruity. Taste

is a hit of brett

sour, then fruity,

flavours like apple

and honey come

to the fore. There’s

an acidic touch to

the fruity flavour.

The finish is not as

dry as many other

sours, there’s a

cider like sparkling

apple flavour also

in the finish.


CUVEE SOFIE

Moen

Style:

BLOND SOUR

ABV: 8%

Volume: 330ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.98

WHAT THEY SAY:

Complex blond

full-bodied sour

beer aged on

red wine barrels

(St-Emelion,

Margeaux,

Pomerol). A big

barrel aged

blond sour!

WHAT WE THINK:

Hazy orange to

brown in colour,

little to no head

whatsoever. Very

distinctive aromas

of barnyard funk,

boozy cognac,

toffee and oak

with a slight

floral note. A

flavour explosion

on the first sip,

sour cherries,

redcurrant,

gooseberry,

tart raspberry,

sourness

is present

throughout.

Very boozy

and medicinal

aftertaste, the

finish is dry.


50 STATES OF FREEDOM

HELS|NGBORG

Style:

BERL|NER WE|SSE

ABV: 4%

Volume: 330ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.67

WHAT THEY SAY:

Brewski is not a

normal brewery.

We want to

explore and set

new limits for what

can be and not

be done. This is

a collaboration

with Cycle Brewing

Company, a

farmhouse Berliner

with lime.

WHAT WE THINK:

A very pale light

yellow beer,

slightly hazy with

a decent white

rocky and thick

head. A very

inviting aroma of

lime zest, lemon

peel, slightly

lactic and a

touch of mint.

The flavour is

straight up lime

cordial, with some

saltiness and

herbal qualities

coming through.

The tangy flavour

carries through

into the finish,

which is dry, fruity

and tart.


ZUUR RHUBARB

LYM|NGTON

Style:

BELG|AN SOUR

ABV: 3.5%

Volume: 330ml

UNTPPED.com

RAT|NG: ●●●●● 3.56

WHAT THEY SAY:

Our very popular

sour beer. We

alternate the

recipe on every

batch with

seasonal fruits

and American

hops. Our mighty

Zuur recipe has

had bushels of

fresh Rhubarb

blended to create

a very creamy

incarnation of an

already powerful

beer.

WHAT WE THINK:

A cloudy, straw

yellow coloured

beer. Head is a

thin white head

which dissipates

quickly. Cider

apple aromas,

tart rhubarb and

tangy. Taste is

zingy rhubarb,

slight sour yogurt

and some saltiness

comes through.

The sourness is

quite restrained

and subtle, but is

still noticeable.

Good creamy

mouthfeel for the

ABV. The finish is

dry, gently sour

and easy to drink.


IS FOR,

WELL, LOTS

OF THINGS.

THAT’S WHY

WE HAVE

DEVISED OUR

OWN BEER

GLOSSARY

FOR YOU TO

DRINK IN.

IMPROVE

YOUR

KNOWLEDGE

OF WHAT

MAKES BEER

SO GREAT

AND IMPRESS

YOUR

FRIENDS IN

THE BAR.

WHAT HAVE

YOU GOT TO

LOSE?

DRAUGHT BEER

This the general term

for beer served from

a keg or a cask and

is commonly found

in pubs and bars.

There’s something

about draught beer

that is really hard to

beat and even we are

not sure what it is.

Watching someone

pull a pint of the

nectar you’re about to

sample seems to make

it taste better than

if they just grabbed

a can or bottle from

a fridge. There are of

course some benefits

to controlling the

carbonation and

mouthfeel of a beer

when storing and

serving beer for

draught. All we know

is, it’s hear to stay and

we enjoy it. A lot.

A


DRY HOPPING

A technique in

brewing that adds

a tonne of flavour

and aroma to a beer.

Essentially what it

means is adding hop

after the wort has

been cooled during

the brewing process.

The benefits of this

are that no oils are

boiled off, meaning

that the hops added at

this stage give a huge

flavour and aroma

boost to the beer.

However, possible

downsides include an

oily taste that some

people don’t like –

also hops added at

this stage are not

sanitised by boiling.

We however, having

dabbled in some

brewing ourselves,

are huge fans of this

technique.

DIACETYL

Dia.. Deeaa.. Daiss..

This chemical, which

is often tricky to

pronounce can be

added to beers to

create a buttery

flavour. It can be

created through yeast

metabolism depending

on temperatures and

amount of time left

to ferment. It can

be a tricky one to

control and also a

tricky one to detect if

you don’t have a very

experienced pallet.

Often the butteriness

that it delivers actually

only increases over

time.

This is straying into

the more complicated

aspects of brewing,

but at least you know

how to say it… maybe.

DARK MALT

Barley is the preferred

grain used in beer

and malted barley or

malt is the form of

barley that is ready

to be fermented into

alcohol. There are

many different types

of malt including dark

ones, which have been

roasted for longer.

There is a common

misconception that

darker beers made

with darker malts are

stronger – not so. The

darkness of the malt

is down to how long

it has been roasted,

which can in fact

lockup some of the

startches in the beer

actually resulting in a

lower ABV.

Darker malts often

produce a thicker

mouthfeel and richer,

deeper flavours.


DELTA HOPS

This hop variety is

a relatively new kid

on the block, having

only been released in

2009 from the United

States. It is fairly mild

in aroma with a slight

spicy, citrusy edge.

It is from the Fuggle

family of hops but

has decidedly more

kick, giving it that

true American style.

It is often found in

American pale ales,

IPAs and ESBs –

Midtown Brewing has

a Delta IPA, as does

Brussels Beer Project.

It also makes you

sound like a badass

saying the word Delta

openly in bars.

DUVEL

One of Belgium’s great

brewers, Duvel has

been churning out

the good stuff since

1871 and is exported

to over 40 countries

worldwide.

The brewery has

bought up a few

of its competitors

over the years as it

has grown, such as

Brasserie d’Achouffe,

De Koninck and

Boulevard Brewing

Co to help increase

its beer types and

distribution.

As well as the classic

Duvel there are also

Tripel Hop and Victory

versions available

of this strong, but

fantastically rounded

beer.

A


DOPPELBOCK

A Bock is a super

strong German lager,

and as the astute of

you may have guessed,

a Doppelbock is even

stronger and more

malty in flavour. With

a full-bodied flavour

and a darker colour

than their single

siblings, Dobbelbocks

often have slight

chocolate or roasted

characteristics in

their darker forms.

The low end of the

ABV is around 6 per

cent and they top

out at around 9 per

cent. Not for the faint

hearted, but definitely

a hearty ‘meal in a

glass’ for those into

that sort of thing.

DURATION

Hopefully you read

all about one of the

most talked about

breweries in the

making in our last

issue, but if you

didn’t here is the

quick 101. Duration

will be a Norfolk,

farmhouse-based

brewery with the mad

skills of American

brewer Derek Bates,

promising to deliver

proper seasonal

beers with terrior.

The brewery will also

have a pretty amazing

looking taproom on

site and is aiming to

re-connect beer with

its roots of natural

ingredients.

DIPA

Sometimes also called

imperial IPAs, DIPAs,

or Double IPAs these

are beers for those

hop hungry drinkers

among us. They are

usually hop-centric in

aroma and flavour and,

as the name suggests,

have a higher alcohol

content than standard

IPAs which is achieved

by adding more malt.

We are big fans of

DIPAs (perhaps a bit

too much on certain

nights we can/can’t

remember) and there

are several breweries

who know how to do

them very well such as

Cloudwater and To Øl.


PHOTO CREDIT: ROBERT GIGLIOTTI.


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kASPER

LEDET

THE MAN BEHIND THE BEAUTIFUL DESIGNS ADORNING

DANISH MICRO BREWERY TO ØL’S BOTTLES AND CANS

EXPLAINS HOW NEW ORDER, THE FIAT MULTIPLA AND

SECRET ADVENTURES ON THE GROUNDS OF THE CARLSBERG

BREWERY INFLUENCED HIS UNIQUE STYLE. THIS IS KASPER

LEDET’S WORLD AND WE ARE JUST DRINKING FROM IT.

You describe yourself as a self-taught graphic designer,

can you tell us how you got into design and how you

think this has influenced your work?

In my early teens, me and my friends started to record music

and publish it on our own home-cooked CDs. I quickly

found out that I was much better at making the artwork for

the covers than actually making the music. So that is pretty

much how my interest in graphic design started out.

Back then, there was quite a strong design community on

Proto blogs such as K10K, Design is Kinky and Newstoday.

Through those sites, I discovered a lot of different design

inspiration from all around the world. This was the early

2000’s back when 3D explosions and vector graphics with

abstract geometric shapes were peaking. Helvetica was just

making its comeback and web design was the hot shit. I

was particularly inspired by people like Mike Young and

his online art project Designgraphik and Bradley Grosh

(Gmunk) and his motion graphics. I guess my early sources

of inspiration were really international. There was no Danish

sites or blogs covering the local design scene, so it was only

natural to look abroad.


How did you start working

with To Øl and BRUS?

I attended the same high school

in Copenhagen as the founders

of To Øl. Back then they were

starting to experiment with home

brewing in the school’s kitchen.

They needed some labels and

since I was playing around with

graphic design they asked me to

do them. The labels were made on

a Xerox machine and pasted onto

the bottles by hand. When To Øl

made its first commercial release

in 2010 the guys called me again

to do the label and I’ve been on

board ever since.

T|ME CAN BE

BOTH FORG|V|NG

AND DOWNR|GHT

BRUTAL. |T |S

THR|LL|NG TO

PUBL|SH A DES|GN

WHERE YOU ARE

TRULY |N DOUBT

WHETHER |T |S

BR|LL|ANT OR SH|T.


Can you tell us more about the concept behind your

work at To Øl? In a recent interview, you were brutally

honest about some of your own work, both the good

and the bad. Is that an important part of how you

develop as a designer?

I guess that self-critique is a really important part of every

creative process. With To Øl in particular, the output is so

huge that inevitably some of the designs will be bad. We

have created over 300 different beers in total. There is not

much you can do about a bad design once it’s published. The

only thing you can do is discuss it and learn from it. The

goal is by no means to stop making bad designs. They are

a consequence of taking risks and trying new things. The

important thing is to understand that the line between a

good and a bad design is blurry. Time can be both forgiving

and downright brutal. It is thrilling to publish a design where

you are truly in doubt whether it is brilliant or shit.


THE F|AT

MULT|PLA

HAS ALMOST

BECOME A

k|ND OF

MASCOT FOR

ME. |T PROVES

A VERY

|MPORTANT

PO|NT |N

DES|GN: |T

DOES NOT

HAVE TO BE

BEAUT|FUL

TO BE

|NTEREST|NG.

Looking through your Instagram account you seem

to be inspired by an eclectic mix, from Peter Saville

to modernist architecture to even the Fiat Multipla,

who and what would you say are your biggest creative

influences when it comes to your label designs?

Peter Saville is definitely an important source of inspiration

for me. When I started out I thought that graphic design on

a professional level was all about simple logos and functional

design systems, that graphic design should convey a clear

and precise message. When I discovered the work that Peter

Saville did for New Order in the 80’s all my ideas about

graphic design changed. I realized that it could be about

diffusing contrasting feelings and that it could be very

personal. It could be conceptual and self-referential and there

was no need to provide any clear answers. I guess some of

those ideas are apparent in my work for To Øl.

Architecture is also an important source of inspiration.

Not only the kind of architecture that is designed by

‘stararchitects’, but the building environment as a whole.

Many of the designs for To Øl features photos I have shot of

the forgotten or insignificant parts of the urban landscape

like a decaying plant, the content of a glass disposal container

or social housing.

The Fiat Multipla has almost become a kind of mascot for

me. It proves a very important point in design: it does not

have to be beautiful to be interesting. The Pompidou Center

in Paris and the furniture coming out of the Italian Memphis

group of the 80’s also exhibit some of the same qualities. I

would love to have followed the design process of the Fiat

Multipla. Just think about the board meetings where sketches

and models of this absurd looking car were shown and

decisions to make huge investments in further development

were decided upon.

I guess the Multipla could only originate from an Italian

company, with Italian designers and an Italian leadership.

The essence of this very fascinating, but also highly

paradoxical country, is deeply embedded in the Multipla.

Plenty of boring, ugly and insignificant cars have been

designed in the past, but the special thing about the Multipla

is that it’s ugly and at the same time, stands out as a true

icon. A really glorious attempt to develop the aesthetics

of transportation. It must have taken great courage from

everybody involved.


| HAVE

LEARNED

THAT THERE

ARE A

LOT MORE

|NTERESTING

BEERS OUT

THERE THAN

A FUCk|NG

CARLSBERG.

How much has the job influenced your

relationship with craft beer and vice-versa?

I have learned a lot about craft beer from working

at To Øl. To put that in perspective, in one of the

first interviews I gave as To Øl Art Director I said

that my favorite beer was Carlsberg. By now I

have learned that there are a lot more interesting

beers out there than a fucking Carlsberg. There is,

however, no way of getting around the fact that

Carlsberg is really close to my heart since I grew up

right next to its Copenhagen brewery and global

headquarters where the business was started back in

1847. There is literally five meters from the door of

my parents’ house to the factory perimeter. As kids,

we used to jump the fence and go on an adventure

on the brewery site and the first word I could read

or recognize was “Carlsberg”.


Are you excited about the quality of design and

illustration in the craft beer market at the moment? Do

you feel that the Nordic countries are leading the way?

I’m thinking that a lot of breweries are really starting to

recognize the power of good design. When To Øl started

out there was not a lot of interesting stuff around – now the

situation is completely different.

I don’t know if the Nordic countries are necessarily leading

the way, but there is definitely some strong design coming

out of the Scandinavian craft beer scene. Just think about

Karl Grandin’s work for Omnipollo or Keith Shore’s work for

Mikkeller. I don’t see them as being particular ‘Scandinavian’

in their aesthetics. Craft beer is a really globalized

phenomenon so maybe there is no need for a deep regional

aesthetic foundation. Maybe it is more about connecting

people across the world through visuals that tells a story and

stand out from the mainstream breweries. You can properly

find traces of Scandinavian modernism in my work, since

that is what I have grown up with. Movements and artists

completely unrelated to Denmark or the Nordic Countries

also act as significant sources of inspiration to me, like

American land art, Brazilian architecture or Italian Futurism,

just to name a few. I definitely consider my own work rather

globalized, but standing on a Scandinavian foundation.

What are you working on at the moment?

Unfortunately, most of the To Øl stuff that I’m working on at

any given moment won’t be released for six months, so I can’t

say a lot. I’m doing an ongoing collaboration with a Danish

post punk/darkwave band called Boundaries. This mostly

involves getting hammered at their gigs but once in a while

some visuals also see light of day.

I’m also trying to visit some of the great and more

unknown examples of Danish modernist architectural

heritage. I’m posting the pictures from the visits on my

Instagram account. And finally, I’m also working on a new

personal website with the programmer David Udsen who

also developed the sites for To Øl and BRUS.


TOP

5

THE FIVE

LABEL

DESIGNS

KASPER

LEDET

IS MOST

PROUD OF.

CLOUDY 9 W|T

The artwork consists of

a gradient and a grid of

crosshairs. The colour

scheme is referencing the

two special ingredients in

the beer: mango and orange

peel. The grid of crosshairs is

inspired by the photos from

the Apollo missions to the

Moon, where they were used

to carry out measurements

and correct distortions.

Here they are placed over

an abstract gradient and are

transformed into formal

aesthetic symbols instead of

scientific tools.

THE HAZE CRAZE

This design consists of a

photo shot through some

frosted glass depicting

some kind of building or

structure. The image has

been turned 90 degrees

and the blurriness of the

artwork caused by the

frosted glass is a reference

to the hazy nature of the

beer. Furthermore, the image

is balancing just on the

verge of abstraction. It could

be mistaken for a painting

or a piece of Photoshop

generated artwork. It is

not about photography’s

ability to make believable

representations of reality. It

is about the texture of the

image and the almost tactile

quality of the final print.


SAY WHAT

The name of the beer is

illustrated with simple

pieces of abstract

concrete poetry. Text is

often associated with

clarity and meaning – it

should say something or

mean something. Here an

exclamation mark and a

question mark are organized

in a way that is meant to

imply a kind sequence,

rhythm or beat more than

an actual message or title.

SUR TANGER|NE

Sur Tangerine is part of the

Sur Series and the label

also features an extremely

grainy photo like most of

the other instalments in

the series. The photo was

shot in the middle of the

night and is depicting a tree

in a park in Copenhagen.

The ground is covered in

snow which reflects the

lights of the city, boosting

the ambient light and

making the sky yellow. The

extremely low light confuses

the sensor in the camera,

which makes the branches

of the tree turn purple.

TOTEM PASS|ON

The design features a closeup

photo of a window

display where several

beautiful pieces of wood are

exhibited. It is not clear what

the purpose of the display

is since there are no text or

signs explaining anything. It

could be a kind of shop or

an alternative therapist –

maybe even a cult or sect or

something entirely different.

It is rather refreshing with

a bit of mystery in our

structured and repetitive

everyday lives.


LONDON CALLING

This is Jonny and Brad’s (of Craft Beer

Channel fame) second book. Part where

to drink and part exploration of London’s

beer culture. Ideal if you are thinking of

sipping your way around the capital.

CRAFTY WORLD TOUR

Award-winning beer and food writer

Melissa Cole guides you through 100

of the world’s tastiest brews. Fun and

beautifully illustrated, a perfect read for

newcomers and seasoned drinkers alike.

W A N T Y O U R P R O D U C T F E A T U R E D ? C O


IF YOU CAN’T BE

DRINKING IT AT LEAST

BE READING ABOUT IT...

PEOPLE POWER

Brew Dog’s Craft Beer for the People

covers everything from how beer is made

to the many styles you can enjoy it in

and pairing it with food. Great if you are

thinking of brewing your own beer.

BOOT CAMP FOR BEER GEEKS

A demystifying breakdown of the beer

market and beer styles. Structured into

easily digestable classes you’ll learn how

to dissect a beer and even how to pair

beer with food.

N T A C T U S A T I N F O @ H O P U L I S T . C O M


X ST. ERIKS BRYGGERI

THORNBRIDGE HALL

BAkEWELL x STOCkHOLM

Style:

|MPER|AL STOUT

ABV: 10%

Volume: 500ml

When a giant of England

crashed head on with

a giant of Sweden

the results were, quite

frankly, delicious.

Thornbridge and St. Eriks

have colluded to put the

imperial into stout with a

collaboration that packs

punches of the rich, dark

and fruity variety.


What do the

grounds of

Thornbridge

Hall in the picturesque Peak

District and the beautiful

islands of the Swedish

capital Stockholm have in

common? The answer is not

an awful lot, that is until

recently. Two fine brewing

minds, with their companies

based in these two stunning

locations, came together

in 2013 to create a beerbased

bond that we think

is just about on the edge of

perfection. Thornbrige Hall

Imperial Raspberry Stout is

the creation and Rob Lovatt

of Thronbridge Brewery and

Jessica Heinrich of St Eriks

Brewery are the collaborators

– and boy did they hit the

jackpot.

THE

GOLD

CLUB

IN THIS SERIES

WE EXAMINE THE

BEERS THAT WE

THINK HAVE TOUCHED

PERFECTION. JUST

HOW DO THEY DO IT?


IT’S A

BEER

MADE FOR

SHARING

WITH

FRIENDS

AND MUCH

OF THIS

OWES

TO ITS

CREATION.

The Imperial Stout pours rich

and dark and blossoms with fruity

aromas, hints of liquorice and

chocolate, all generously infused

with Scottish raspberries. The aroma

alone is one of the most distinct we

have been fortunate enough to try,

but it doesn’t get overpowered with

sweetness on the first taste. Malty,

chocolate and raspberry flavours

combine with a roasted finish to

make it very drinkable indeed. The

balance that has been achieved with

this beer does a great job of masking

the relatively strong 10% ABV. We

feel this would be just at home on

a hot summer’s evening as it would

in front of a cosy roaring fire – it is

is everything you would like a good

stout to be!

It’s a beer made for sharing with

friends and much of this owes to

its creation – showcasing just what

friendship and sharing inspiration

among your peers can inspire.

For those who don’t know,

Thornbridge is one of England’s

oldest craft breweries and began

brewing way back in 2005. Its initial

focus was on traditional recipes with

a modern twist – something that

shines through in this collaboration.

Head brewer Rob Lovatt studied

microbiology at Sunderland

University and has always had

a vision of brewing that infuses

modernity and tradition. Having

been around the beer game for quite

some time, he has come to know

many of his peers well, including

Jessica Heinrich of St Eriks Brewery.

St Eriks can be dated back as far

as 1859, and Jessica was the head

of a revamping of the company

and brand that began in 2009. Her

aims have always been to champion

Stockholm’s proud beer making

history, whilst also keeping things

new and exciting. Sharing a similar

ethos to Rob, Jessica has always

aimed to equally excite demanding

beer enthusiasts and casual drinkers

thanks to the brewery’s age-old

knowledge and modern techniques.

This collaboration is one of those

where you can tell just how easy

it felt for these two brewers to

work together, while at the same

time they got a measure of each

other’s differences in approach and

technique.

It’s lucky for us that such

friendship and sharing exists in

craft beer, because it bestows us

with wonderful tipples such as this.

Reach for the raspberries today.


LAND

OF THE

RISING

CRAFT

JAPAN IS A COUNTRY OF GREAT HISTORIC TRADITION

AND CUTTING-EDGE MODERNITY, SO IT SHOULD BE NO

SURPRISE THAT THESE TWO ATTRIBUTES HAVE COMBINED

SEAMLESSLY TO CREATE A THRIVING AND INNOVATIVE

CRAFT BEER INDUSTRY. HOPULIST TRAVELLED TO THE FAR

EAST TO SAMPLE IT FOR OURSELVES.


JAPAN

日 本 国

• KYOTO

OSAKA •

TOKYO

By David Guest

There’s something about Tokyo at night that

intoxicates you in a way that no other city

can quite manage. The gentle hum of the

traffic, the hypnotic glow of neon, the inexhaustible

cacophony of jingles emanating from shops, street

crossings and vehicles. The city has a heartbeat that

never stops, but it also never feels overbearing or

threatening – it’s just somewhere that feels like no

matter who you are, you’ll find a place. And if like

us, a cosy craft beer bar with locally-brewed and

international beers is ‘your place’, then Tokyo and

the rest of Japan welcomes you with open arms.

And that is exactly what happened on our recent

visit to the country.

The original motivation for this expedition was

pretty far removed from craft beer – I was on a

mission to tick the Tokyo Marathon off my running

bucket list – but it soon emerged that Japan was a

serious craft beer destination.

The country has a long association with brewing,

with Japanese Sake dating back to as long ago as

the third century, and its beer brewing pedigree

also has ancient roots. Craft beer has naturally

developed in the country, borrowing traditions

and styles of the ancients and combining them

with its love of staying current, experimenting with

innovation and doing it all in its own über cool

style. Despite the power of huge beer players like

Asahi, Kirin and Sapporro, Japan’s craft beer scene

is absolutely thriving. Brewers of all shapes and

sizes have been springing up around the country

for years, as Japanese drinkers crave the inspiring

stories behind the beer they consume.

One thing unites them all is a genuine passion for

making great beer, telling great stories and sharing

good times together. The spirit of craft is alive and

kicking in Japan. So, as we staggered around (and

believe me, I was staggering after that marathon)

the metropolis that is Tokyo and into the first craft

beer pub of the trip, we opened a Pandora’s box

of fantastic brewers and wonderfully warm and

welcoming people.


京 都 市

TOKYO

That first craft beer establishment of the trip was

Hitachino Brewing Lab, located on the outer

perimeter of Tokyo’s central railway station

(crucially also just a short wobble from the finish

line of the Tokyo Martahon). Hitachino is probably

one of the best-known Japanese craft brewers on

a global scale as it’s been around for a number of

years and managed to work hard on its export to a

point where it is relatively commonplace in Europe

and even the USA. This bar is a prime spot for

starting your Japanese craft beer adventure, not

only because its location is practically impossible to

miss, but also because Hitachino is a nice middleof-the-road

brewer that’s well established. The

bar is modern, clean and offers the core range of

Hitachino beers on tap. There’s also the occasional

special or limited edition beer that makes it onto

the roster, as well as a good selection of pub snacktype

food. One of the other great things about the

bar is the view – floor to ceiling windows look out

onto a sky scraper-lined avenue that typifies Tokyo.

From a personal point of view, I’m not sure I’ve

sampled a more satisfying beer – a Dai Dai Pale

Ale, with 42 kilometers in my legs, watching the

world go by in this fantastic city.

After a few days for emotions to settle down

and legs to recover, we decided to visit a bar that

showcases why Tokyo should really be considered

a serious city when it comes to craft beer.

Influential Danish brewer Mikkeller has its own

Tokyo bar that has been established for several

years, becoming an important part of its global

business. But despite this being an arm of a fairly

large and well-known European brewer, the bar

has a local atmosphere that could fool you into

thinking it was born and bred in Japan. The art

deco exterior is perfectly paired with a stripped

back and minimal interior where you’ll find a

fantastic array of Mikkeller beers and a few from

other local producers too. The bar is located a very

short walk from one of Tokyo’s most iconic sights

– Shibuya crossing. If you don’t know what that is,

imagine literally hundreds of people crossing at a

road intersection at a time, set against a backdrop

of flashing neon and lit up advertisements.

The Mikkeller bar has huge windows at the front

that in summer open up onto the street to create

an exclusive block party environment that we

imagine is unrivalled elsewhere in the city. Also,

in keeping with the theme of running, there’s a


thriving Mikkeller running club based out of the

bar too.

Craft beer is becoming such an intrinsic part

of life in Tokyo that we even ran into some while

taking in some of the sights of the city. After

ascending the Eifel Tower-esuque Tokyo Tower to

take in 360-degree views of this sprawling urban

playground, we noticed a mobile craft beer bar

had been set up by the entrance. The open-sided

truck spewed comfortable looking chairs and

tables out onto the pavement while craft beers

from the nearby Shinagawa-based TY Harbour

Brewery were served. This brewer predominantly

serves its beers in its 11 restaurants around the

city but clearly wants to capitalise on the growing

thirst for craft beer by showcasing its produce

to a wider audience in this format. The foot of

Tokyo Tower could be one of the best locations

in the city for attracting passers by, and not just

Japanese ones of course, it’s a tourism hotspot. As

we arrived, the van was only just setting up for

the afternoon’s trade, but we were told by locals

that TY Harbour’s beer is some of the best on this

southeastern side of the city. Looks like we’ll just

have to come back to sample it.

On the final night in Tokyo, we made a date

with the devil – DevilCraft bar in Hanamatsucho.

This brewpub-style venue has a focus on pairing

food with the craft beer it produces and thanks

to the influence of one of its American owners, it

offers some of the best Chicago-style pizzas you

will find in the city. The bar itself is bustling, and

not with tourists. Locals packed in from all walks

of life when we visited and the vibe was one of

fun and laughter. There was a good selection of


CRAFT BEER

IS BECOMING

SUCH AN

INTRINSIC

PART OF LIFE

IN TOKYO

THAT WE

EVEN RAN

INTO SOME

WHILE

TAKING IN

SOME OF

THE SIGHTS

OF THE CITY.

DevilCraft’s own beers as well as many American favourites from

brewers like Stone and Left Hand Brewing. There are three of these

bars in the city, the other two being in Gotanda and Kanda, making

this an accessible place to enjoy craft beer wherever you are in

Tokyo. Not that getting around in Tokyo is ever an issue – the city

has the best public transport on the planet and it doesn’t come at a

ridiculous cost. This was a great place to round off our visit to the

Japanese capital and prepare for a journey to its anagram lover’s

cousin Kyoto, 450km to the west.

Chiyoda

千 代 田 区

Kokyogaien

National

Park

皇 居 外 苑

403

01

Tokyo Station 東 京 駅

Yoyogi Park

代 々 木 公 園

Shibuya

渋 谷 区

04

413

Shibuya 渋 谷 駅

Tokyo

東 京 都

02

Minato

港 区

Shiba Park

芝 公 園

Hibiya Park

日 比 谷 公 園

301

Onarimon 御 成 門 駅

03

C h ıu ıo

中 央 区

Hamamatsucho 浜 松 町 駅

Shinsen 神 泉 駅

01 Hitachino Brewing Lab Tokyo Station | www.hitachino.cc

02 Craft Beer Van | www.kyoto-craftman.com

03 DevilCraft Hamamatsucho | www.devilcraft.jp

04 Mikkeller Tokyo | www.mikkeller.jp


京 都 市

KYOTO

The next leg of our craft beer adventure saw us

arrive in Japan’s ancient capital Kyoto after hurtling

across the countryside in a train fired from the

barrel of a gun. Kyoto has a very different vibe as

a city compared to Tokyo, but the craft beer scene

is no less dominant. If anything, craft beer seems

to be a bigger deal in Kyoto, which one Japanese

person described to us as a more hipster, Los

Angeles-style city, likening Tokyo to New York.

Interesting comparison and we could kind of see

what they were getting at as we entered the openair

bar Bungalow in Shijo Dori, right near the

city centre. This stylish bar features stools around

overturned barrels which serve as tables for the

clientele to enjoy the fine craft beers on offer – most

of which came from the Kyoto Brewing Co on our

visit. Sampling Kyoto-brewed beer in the heart

of the city itself helped us feel like we were truly

experiencing the ‘real’ craft beer scene of Japan.

Bungalow actually has two locations in Kyoto, the

other being in Teramachi, but the low key setting

really fits in with the city itself. Kyoto is packed

with temples and shrines and there are many strict

building laws, which mean buildings cannot be

over a certain height, so there’s no skyscrapers

at all. The public transport is also limited for the

same reason – planning permission to build more

underground metro lines is simply too much of

a pain – so getting taxis is a good option, as is the

humble bicycle. We’ve already likened this city

to LA, but to us it felt more like Copenhagen or

Amsterdam with the constant whizzing of bicycles

on every corner.

Using said bicycles, we jettisoned off to another

watering hole – CraftMan in Dojisacho. This bar

is much more of a local’s affair and has the typical

standing bar that many Japanese establishments

employ. The bar was surrounded by workers who

we presume were drinking away the stresses of the

day in the humble bar’s setting. There was laughter,

there was heated debate, there was a great selection

of bar snacks and food – this place has the feel of

something more traditionally Japanese, less like the

usual format of craft beer bars. That doesn’t detract

from our enjoyment as we sample some beers from

the wide range of Japanese brewed beers on offer

and drink in the surroundings. Even though we

can’t understand a word anyone is saying, we can

fill the gaps with our imagination. “I’m a strict IPA

man, I don’t like to try other beers.” “You can’t say


you like craft if you only stick to one kind of beer,

try this stout, it’s so well balanced.” “Stout!? No way,

that’s what my grandfather drinks.” “Just try it.”

“Okay… it’s… wow. That’s pretty good. Barman! I’ll

have a stout!” Okay, so maybe that isn’t what they

were saying, but what’s sitting in a bar if you can’t

people watch occasionally?

The main shopping street in Kyoto is like going

back in time. The promenades are covered by

elaborate shelters which bathe the pavements

below in a golden light as people make their way

up and down it. Classic Toyotas are commonly

used as taxis and consistently make you feel like

you are walking down a street in the 1980s. There

is definitely a love of all things retro in this city,

and that’s evident in our next stop Beer Komachi.

Hidden down a quiet side street, Komachi has a

really old school feel thanks to its simple interior,

worn furniture and the fact that the kitchen is

basically in the bar with you. We order a couple of

beers from Aomori Brewing and relax in the dingy

and dark corner of the bar, this time surrounded

by a few other European tourists from Italy and

Austria. It’s such a quiet and peaceful street that

you’d forget that Kyoto’s bustling Nishiki Market is

just a couple of blocks away. That’s what’s nice about

the craft beer bars here, they are sanctuaries that

offer a perfect place to enjoy each other’s company

and meet other keen craft connesuirs. One keen

Japanese gentleman recommends another Kyoto

Brewing Beer that we try before we leave and is

keen to learn more about craft beer in the UK.

Thankfully, I’m wearing my Beavertown cap, so I’m

able to get one brewer’s name across to him even

with the language barrier.


Nakagyo Ward

中 京 区

367

Karasuma Oike 烏 丸 御 池 駅

Underground & train stations

Sanjo 三 条 駅

143

04

Higashiyama 東 山 駅

38

Kamo River 鴨 川

01

02

Karasuma 烏 丸 駅

Shijo 四 条 駅

03

Kawaramachi 河 原 町 駅

Gion-Shijo 祇 園 四 条 駅

Maruyama Park

円 山 公 園

Higashiyama Ward

東 山 区

01 Bungalow バンガロー | www.bungalow.jp

02 Craft Man クラフトマン | www.kyoto-craftman.com

03 Beer Pub ICHI-YA | facebook.com/ICHIYA.Beerpub/

04 Beer Komachi | www.beerkomachi.com

Kyoto

京 都 市

THE BEER

COMMUNITY

HERE SEEMS

A LITTLE

MORE TIGHT-

KNIT AND

THE BARS A

LITTLE MORE

HOMELY,

WITH FAR

MORE

LOCALS IN

THEM.

The final stop in Kyoto is Beer Pub Ichi-Ya – a bright and modern

bar that is owned by the Ichijoji Brewery, also based in Kyoto. The

beers on offer are largely from Ichijoji and the current tap selection is

displayed on the wall in a flavor chart, describing what the different

beers are like in graphical format if you don’t fancy trying to decipher

the Japanese menu. We go for the most Japanese bar snack we can

think of – endamame beans – to go with our two Ichijoji beers and

summarise what we think of Kyoto as a drinking destination. It’s a

totally different proposition to Tokyo, but no less intriguing. The beer

community here seems a little more tight-knit and the bars a little

more homely, with far more locals in them, compared to the slightly

more tourist-infested Tokyo venues. Ichi-Ya has slightly overzealous

staff who seem eager to impress to foreign visitors, but overall it’s a

pleasant bar that you could probably make your first stop in Kyoto, as

it’s relatively central and a welcoming environment. We are told that

the food here is particularly good, though we have a date with some

late-night ramen, so we noodle off into the night.


大 阪 市

OSAKA

Speaking candidly, Osaka is my favourite city in

Japan. I have visited on a couple of occasions before

and it’s home to some of the best food you will

find in the country (okonomiyaki pancakes and

octopus balls) as well as a more relaxed vibe than

other cities in the country. It is just half an hour

from Kyoto on the train but feels like a world away.

Sky scrapers return and with them comes a little

more wealth – there’s a big banking industry here

as well as some designer shopping streets to rival

London or Paris. But none of that is why I love the

city – it’s the people. To showcase that, we headed

to a bar I’d actually attended before, Yellow Ape

Craft Bar in the Kitahama area of the city. Having

recently celebrated its fifth anniversary, this bar is

well-established among locals and we get a warm

and friendly welcome as we take up a couple of

stools around the bar. The menu has offerings from

Japan, the USA and in particular Scandinavia –

they are big fans of To Øl here, it turns out. We take

recommendations on a couple of beers and then

get chatting to the staff about their bar and how it

has grown in popularity over the years. Eventually

a regular customer enters and is eager to show

off a few cans he has bought from a nearby craft

bottle shop. A couple are American and a few are

British, so we immediately get involved chatting

to him (albeit in broken English). Eventually, the

chap decides he wants to share one of his cans

with all of us and orders six glasses so we can

all sample it, including the bar staff. It’s Rogue’s

Straight Outta Newport IPA, which is a belter,

and we enjoy several toasts of ‘Kampei’ together.

We only intended to stay for one drink here, but

the atmosphere carries us away and we end up

staying for a few more. The conversation eventually

reaches a point where one of the charismatic bar

staff wants a photo of our hair so he can tell his

barber he wants it dying this colour next time he

gets a cut. Many laughs are had, and we are seen

off by the staff all coming to the door to wave at us

as we stagger down the street. Yellow Ape is a fine

example of Japanese people’s genuine keenness for

craft beer. They wanted to know what we normally

drank, what we would recommend as British craft

drinkers and to share thoughts and ideas on their

favourite beers. I can’t recommend enough going to

this bar if you ever make it to Osaka.

But undoubtedly, one of Osaka’s biggest names

is Minoh. It has grown at a strong rate since its


Reading material

There’s a few beer magazines and

journals in Japan, but the daddy is

Japan Beer Times. Billing itself as ‘the’

craft beer magazine of Japan, Craft

Beer Times features regular focuses

on brewers, bars, taprooms and

other issues surrounding the industry.

Better still, the articles are printed

in both Japanese and English, making

it accessible to most. You can usually

grab a free copy in any decent craft

beer drinking establishment.

www.japanbeertimes.com


foundation in 1996 and remains a family-run affair,

with the eldest daughter of the family, Kaori Oshita,

the well-regarded head brewer. The brewer has its

own bars in the city, known as Beer Belly, and we

checked one out on our last evening with Japan.

The bar is filled with tanks in the front section

where much of the beer on offer is brewed and

stored and again we get an all-too-familiar warm

Japanese welcome. Minoh’s beers are some of the

highest rated in Japan and the brewer has a focus

on history and tradition. I sampled the classic

stout, which was actually one of the best beers I

had during the entire trip. It’s clear that Japanese

brewers know how to do the classics very well, as

well as doing their own thing with unusual and

varied ingredients.

The Beer Belly bar is right on the river bank in

the city, views of which can be seen just behind

the bar staff. It’s a perfect place to reflect upon our

trip, where we’ve learned so much about Japanese

craft beer that it’s hard to take it all in. Japan should

rightly be considered a big player in the industry,

and even though we might not

know the brewers or beers as

everyday names in western Europe,

it is probably only a matter of time

before we do. This country is not

just jumping on a bandwagon, it

feels like craft beer would have

developed here no matter what was

happening elsewhere in the world.

It’s a natural evolution of its cultural

development and its strong heritage

in fine food and drink. Arigato

Japan, you’ve been wonderful.

MINOH’S BEERS ARE

SOME OF THE HIGHEST

RATED IN JAPAN AND

THE BREWER HAS A

FOCUS ON HISTORY

AND TRADITION.

02

Tenjinbashisuji 6-chome

天 神 橋 筋 六 丁 目 駅

Ogimachi

Park

扇 町 公 園

Naniwabashi なにわ 橋 駅

Kitahama 北 浜 駅

14

01

Temma 天 満 駅

Osaka

大 阪 市

Kita

北 区

O River 大 川

Chuo

中 央 区

Underground & train stations

01 Beer Belly Tenma ビアベリー 天 満 | www.beerbelly.jp

Osaka Castle

大 阪 城

02 Yellow Ape Craft 大 阪 クラフトビール | www.yellowapecraft.com


THE TOP

5

BREWERS

FROM

J




A

P

A

N

Kyoto Brewing

Company

京 都 醸 造 株 式 会 社

The combined brainchild

of a Welshman, a Canadian

and an American who met

in Japan, Kyoto Brewing

Company is the product

of ten years of friendship

and love of beer in Japan.

The company is proud

to be based in Kyoto, the

Japanese city that the trio

of owners claim there is

nowhere with a stronger

artisanal history or

particularity about quality

and flavour.

The sole mantra for Kyoto

Brew Co is ‘brew the beers

you want to drink’, which

is exactly what they have

done, with a focus on being

ethical, and combining the

unique characteristics of

brewing powerhouses the

USA and Belgium.

Baird Beer

A Japanese brewer with

heavy roots in the Pacific

Northwest of the United

States, Baird Beer started

when husband and wife

Bryan and Sayuri Baird quit

their jobs in Japan to take

up brewing in the USA.

Eventually they found their

way back to Japan and set

up their company with the

sole intention of celebrating

great beer. Baird is based

in Shuzenji in the Shizuoka

Prefecture close to Mount

Fuji and boasts making beer

with minimally processed

ingredients. They exclusively

use whole flower hops and

floor-malted barley. The

brewer has six taprooms

dotted around the

southeast of Japan.

HOPULIST BEER

RECOMMENDATION:

Purple People Eater, a collab

sour saison with Heretic

Brewing, made using ume

juice and red shiso leaves.

Red Rose Amber Ale, a rich,

fruity and malty ale that has

refreshing crispness and dry

mouthfeel.


Hitachino Nest

Beer - Kiuchi

木 内 酒 造

As one of the Japanese

brewers that has managed

to gain some serious

traction on the global stage,

the little red owl logo of

Hitachino will probably be

familiar to many of you. The

many beers of this brand

are brewed by the Kiuchi

Brewery, which is an eightgeneration

family business

that has been brewing

Japanese sake since 1823.

The brand uses western

hops and malts but brews

them in traditional Japanese

styles to create beers

of depth and character.

The brewery also began

growing its own hops in

Japan in 2014, with the

beers to be brewed with

those hops yet to arrive on

the market.

Minoh

大 阪 ・ 箕 面

The leading light in craft

beer in Osaka, Minoh

Brewing has an emphasis

on making beer with

feel. Its brewers are

hugely experienced and

encouraged to make great

beer with sight and taste

and trial and error that only

comes with going through

the process many times.

It has grown at a strong

rate since its foundation in

1996 and remains a familyrun

affair, with the eldest

daughter of the family,

Kaori Oshita, the wellregarded

head brewer. The

brewery has several pubs

in the Kansai region by the

name of Beer Belly and has

some stylish branding with

its iconic purple monkey

adorning the taps of craft

bars around Japan.

DevilCraft

DevilCraft is a beer

pub and pizza joint with

several locations in Tokyo

– however, it’s also a

well-established brewer

in its own right and uses

ideas and inspiration from

Japan and the USA, as it

is a combined business

venture by folk from these

two nations. The brewpub

mentality of DevilCraft

is enhanced by its focus

on creating great food to

match its great beers (it’s

Chicago-style deep pan

pizzas are pretty famous in

Tokyo). Great beer paired

with great food has helped

DevilCraft become one of

Tokyo craft beer lovers’

best-kept secrets.

Dai Dai Ale, a fruity IPA made

with fukuremikan orange,

combined with Bourgogne,

Chinhook and Hallertau hops.

Imperial Stout, a stout with a

fine blend of roasted malts and

sweetness, followed by hints of

chocolate and coffee.

Patriot Crush New England

IPA, an absolute cracker of

an IPA, hazy, fruity and hardhitting

on a hop front.


Our favourite

craft beers of

the moment.

So good we are

drinking them

at home.


TIME AND TIDE

THE KRAKEN

COFFEE STOUT

This dark stout ouses

roasted malt and

coffee but with a subtle

creaminess that really

makes it so distinct.

Time And Tide use

bespoke green-roasted

coffee beans that are

microroasted and cold

brewed. Ideal for coffee

lovers. Release the

Kraken!

ABV: 7.4%

Colour: Black

Aroma: Coffee/Malt

Taste: Coffee


WYLAM

REMEMBER 430

DDH PALE ALE

Housed in the Palace

of Art in Exhibition

Park, Newcastle, Wylam

Brewery really is worth a

visit if you get the chance.

This is just one of our

favourites from their

core range, an American

pale ale strong in pink

grapefruit/tropical fruit

aromas and taste. Very

drinkable indeed.

ABV: 5.5%

Colour: Hazy gold

Aroma: Pink grapefruit

Taste: Tropical fruit


FALLEN BREWING

CHEW CHEW

SALTED CARAMEL

MILK STOUT

Forming a part of the

core beers from these

Scottish brewers this is

a smooth salted caramel

milk stout with notes of

toffee, belgian chocolate

and butterscotch. Smooth,

sweet and creamy this

felt stronger on the milk

than it did on the salted

element.

ABV: 6%

Colour: Jet black

Aroma: Caramel fudge

Taste: Chocolate, salted

caramel, ice cream


BRIXTON X

DURATION BREWING

NUCLEAR DAWN

BOTANICAL SOUR

The first in Brixton’s

small-batch range of

experimental beers.

Brewed in collaboration

with Duration, Nuclear

Dawn is a kettle soured

beer with layers of

botanical and fruity

flavours. Each batch is only

available for a limited time

so be quick.

ABV: 4.7%

Colour: Clear gold

Aroma: Mango, fennel

Taste: Sour citrus fruit


MIKKELLER

HALLO ICH BIN

BERLINER WEISSE

One of the more

interesting beers in

Mikkeller’s Hallo Ich Bin

Berliner Weisse range, this

one is for fans of citrus

and, obviously, pineapple.

The pineapple flavour is

nicely balanced with a

malty aroma and a slightly

sour finish. This is an easydrinking,

palate-cleansing

crowd pleaser.

ABV: 3.7%

Colour: Hazy yellow

Aroma: Pineapple, malty

Taste: Tart pineapple


NEXT ISSUE READY FOR CONSUMPTION

JUNE 2018


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