hopulist issue 4

hopulist

Welcome to issue 4 of Hopulist. This month we feature Signature Brew, Bison Beer, an exclusive interview with Kasper Ledet, an adventure in the Japanese craft beer scene and much more...

THE F|AT

MULT|PLA

HAS ALMOST

BECOME A

k|ND OF

MASCOT FOR

ME. |T PROVES

A VERY

|MPORTANT

PO|NT |N

DES|GN: |T

DOES NOT

HAVE TO BE

BEAUT|FUL

TO BE

|NTEREST|NG.

Looking through your Instagram account you seem

to be inspired by an eclectic mix, from Peter Saville

to modernist architecture to even the Fiat Multipla,

who and what would you say are your biggest creative

influences when it comes to your label designs?

Peter Saville is definitely an important source of inspiration

for me. When I started out I thought that graphic design on

a professional level was all about simple logos and functional

design systems, that graphic design should convey a clear

and precise message. When I discovered the work that Peter

Saville did for New Order in the 80’s all my ideas about

graphic design changed. I realized that it could be about

diffusing contrasting feelings and that it could be very

personal. It could be conceptual and self-referential and there

was no need to provide any clear answers. I guess some of

those ideas are apparent in my work for To Øl.

Architecture is also an important source of inspiration.

Not only the kind of architecture that is designed by

‘stararchitects’, but the building environment as a whole.

Many of the designs for To Øl features photos I have shot of

the forgotten or insignificant parts of the urban landscape

like a decaying plant, the content of a glass disposal container

or social housing.

The Fiat Multipla has almost become a kind of mascot for

me. It proves a very important point in design: it does not

have to be beautiful to be interesting. The Pompidou Center

in Paris and the furniture coming out of the Italian Memphis

group of the 80’s also exhibit some of the same qualities. I

would love to have followed the design process of the Fiat

Multipla. Just think about the board meetings where sketches

and models of this absurd looking car were shown and

decisions to make huge investments in further development

were decided upon.

I guess the Multipla could only originate from an Italian

company, with Italian designers and an Italian leadership.

The essence of this very fascinating, but also highly

paradoxical country, is deeply embedded in the Multipla.

Plenty of boring, ugly and insignificant cars have been

designed in the past, but the special thing about the Multipla

is that it’s ugly and at the same time, stands out as a true

icon. A really glorious attempt to develop the aesthetics

of transportation. It must have taken great courage from

everybody involved.

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