Dirt and Trail April 2018

RobRidefast

Dirt and trail Magazine April 2018 issue

Ride More Stress Less

www.dirtandtrailmag.com

APRIL 2018

APRIL 2018 RSA R29.50

18004

9 771815 337001

HONDA

CRF450RX

WIN

A PAIR OF NEW

SIDI

CROSSFIRE 3 SRS

CAIROLI

LIMITED EDITION

BOOTS

WIN A 3 NIGHT 2 DAY ENDURO RIDING HOLIDAY

WORTH R10 000 WITH TRAIL BOSS ENDURO

PLUS: KING OF THE WHIP 2018 / CAIRO TO CAPE WORLD RECORD

TRIUMPH SA NEWS / OLD SCHOOL AFRICA TWINS / ELECTRIC BIKES


Oxford Mondial Breathable Waterproof

3-in-1 Textile Jacket

Oxford Toledo 1.0 Air Textile Jacket

Tech Black

R4,750.00

• A hugely versatile, mid-length, waterproof jacket, as much at home on a sports bike as it is on a

touring or adventure machine.

• 3 jackets in 1: mesh ventilated main jacket; waterproof layer which can be worn inside or out;

removable, thermal ‘puffa’ jacket which can also be worn on its own when off the bike.

• Waterproof pockets on the front, plus a handy change pocket on the sleeve (ideal for tolls/passes).

• Multiple adjustment points on arms and waist.

• A unique rain hood is hidden in the collar and can be worn underneath the helmet to avoid water

ingress around the neck area.

• Lots of printed reflective detailing for improved visibility at night.

• Comfort is prioritised with a beautifully finished synthetic suede collar and easily adjustable,

soft-edged cuffs.

R2,495.00

• Waterproof membrane throughout the jacket

• Storm-flap and rain gutter system

• Water resistant zips on all air vents

• Lock open air vents on the front and rear

• Adjustment points on arms and waist

• Reflective detailing for improved visibility at night

• Easily adjustable synthetic suede collar

• Soft edged cuffs

• The connecting zip is compatible with all Oxford pants

• Pocket for Velcro in back protector ensures perfect positioning for comfort and protection

• Oxford CE back protector available separately

Vision Pants

R2,390.00

Outer shell 600d ballistic

nylon, stretch panels,

molded rubber snaps and

pullers; large steel mesh air

intake and exhaust panels;

extra ventilation zip panels

on arms; various storage

pockets. CE protectors;

storage pockets.

Vision Jacket

R3,250.00

Outer shell 600d ballistic nylon, stretch panels,

molded rubber snaps and pullers; large steel

mesh air intake and exhaust panels; extra

ventilation zip panels on arms; various storage

pockets. CE armours on arms, shoulders and

padded back protector.

Clarino Gloves

R545.00

This is a glove for adventure riding and summer commuting.

The Clarino glove has hard knuckle and PU finger protection.

The glove also has a leather wrist cuff protector as well as a

convenient pull tag. It also has superior impact and abrasive

protection for the palm and has conductive touch fabric for

the use of smart devices. Sizes available are XS - 3XL.

Venus Jacket

R1,995.00

Outer shell 600d polyester & 1650 ballistic

nylon, stretch panels, molded rubber snaps

and pullers; large steel mesh are intake

and exhaust panels; extra ventilation zip

panels on arms; various storage pockets.

CE armours on arms, shoulders and padded

back protector.

To find your nearest Oxford or Octane dealer - Tel: 011 792 7691 Web: www.dmd.co.za

Prices mentioned are at recommended retail including VAT. E&OE


CS-MX ll

• Polycarbonate Composite Shell: Lightweight, superior fit and comfort using advanced CAD

technology.

• Large Eye Port: For maximum visibility and superior goggle fit.

• “ACS” Advanced Channeling Ventilation System: Full front to back airflow flushes heat and

humidity up and out.

• Plush, Nylex® Interior: Comfortable, removable and washable.

PBA DEALER LISTING

PBA DEALER LISTING

GAUTENG

ZEEMANS MOTORCYCLES 011 435 7177

BIKING ACCESSORIES 012 342 7474

FACTORY RACING 011 867 0092

GAME MOTOR SERVICES 011 849 7000

MOTO-MATE RIVONIA 011 234 5275

MOTO-MATE STONERIDGE 011 609 0944

JUST BIKING 016 421 1153

KCR MOTORCYCLE FANATIX 011 975 5405

OFF-ROAD CYCLES 012 333 6443

PRIMROSE MOTORCYCLES 011 828 9091

RANDBURG MOTORCYCLES 011 792 6829

WAYNE HEASMAN RACING 011 955 5960

MPUMALANGA

BIKE CITY 013 244 2143

NELSPRUIT ATV 013 752 2023

NORTHWEST

BIKERS PARADISE 018 297 4700

INSANE BIKERS 014 594 2111

MOTORS @ KLERKSDORP 018 468 1800

WATER RITE MOTORCYCLES 018 771 5050

LIMPOPO

K.R.MOTORCYCLES 015 297 3291

FREESTATE

SALLEYS YAMAHA 051 430 3326

KZN

ROCKET RACING PINETOWN 031 702 2606

ROCKET RACING MARITZBURG 033 264 3240

RBS YAMAHA 031 701 1311

RIDE HIGH WITH YAMAHA 035 789 1851

PERRY’S M/CYCLES UMHLANGA 031 566 7411

PERRY’S M/CYCLES HILLCREST 031 765 2560

CAPE PROVINCE

CRAIGS M/CYCLE FITMENT 021 939 8944

TRAC-MAC BELVILLE 021 945 3724

TRAC-MAC PAARDEN-EILAND 021 510 2258

TRAC-MAC WYNBURG 021 761 4220

MIKE HOPKINS MOTORCYCLES 021 461 5167

NEVES MOTORCYCLE WORLD CC 021 930 5917

EASTERN CAPE

IMOLA MOTORSPORT 043 748 1017


EDITOR: ROLEY FOLEY

Ray and Bob, two Government mechanical engineers are standing and looking

up at a fl agpole.

A woman walked by and asked what they were doing?

We are supposed to fi nd the height of the fl agpole said Bob but we don’t have

a ladder.

The woman says hand me that wrench out of that toolbox.

She loosens a few bolts and lays the pole down.

She then takes a tape measure from their toolbox, takes a measurement and

announces eighteen feet six inches and walks away.

Ray shakes his head and laughs.

Ain’t that just like a Miss-know-it-all he

said.

We need the height and she gives us

the length.

Bob and Ray still work for the

Government.

CONTENTS: APRIL 2018

THE TEAM:

EDITOR:

Glenn Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

DESIGN:

Rob Portman

rob@ridefast.co.za

ADVERTISING:

Sinead Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

Kyle Lawrenson

lawrensonk@mweb.co.za

ACCOUNTS &

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Anette

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Office no (011) 979-5035

(011) 979-0053

CONTRIBUTORS:

Kurt Beine

Richard Sutherland

Zygmund Brodalka

Byron Rudman

Sean Hendley

Tristan Foley

Mike Wessels

Dries vd Walt

14: COVER STORY: 2018 HONDA CRF450RX 30: FIRST RIDE: 2 NEW POLARIS 1000’S

38: FEATURE: KING OF THE WHIP 2018 46: FEATURE: TWO OLD SCHOOL TWINS

TO SUBSCRIBE

CALL 011 979 5035 OR EMAIL

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Digital or hard copy.

58: WORLD RECORD: CAIRO TO CAPE 64: TESTED: THREE ELECTRIC BIKES

2 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Piston and Gasket Sets

Cranks, Conrods and Camshafts

Cylinder Kits, Rebores, Main Bearings and Clutch Plates

VALVES,STEM SEALS AND SPRINGS

Email:G124@mweb.co.za

no 4 Fifth avenue

Northmead

Benoni

011 425 1081/4


Cairoli signs up for 2019 and 2020

#222 adds another 2! Red Bull KTM Factory Racing

has announced that reigning MXGP number one and

nine times FIM Motocross World Champion Antonio

Cairoli will remain part of the team for another two

years and through the 2019 and 2020 Grand Prix

seasons.

The 32 year old Sicilian renewed his contract in

Rome in the presence of Team Manager Claudio

De Carli and KTM Motorsports Director Pit Beirer.

The agreement means that Cairoli – who gave the

factory their first title in the premier class of the FIM

series with the KTM 350 SX-F in 2010 and delivered

the KTM 450 SX-F’s first MXGP crown in 2017 – will

register eleven years with the brand.

In a remarkable career that boasts nine titles (seven

in the premier class since 2009, six with SX-F

technology), 213 GP appearances, 83 career wins

and 145 podiums (with 163 moto victories) Cairoli is

still the reference for the sport as he bids for a recordequaling

tenth championship and his first viable

‘defense’ of the No.1 status with the KTM 450 SX-F.

“I’m really happy to announce this because we

already made history in 2010 with the KTM 350 SX-F

against the 450s and succeeded with that challenge. I

feel a part of KTM because of that success and since

then the company has grown a lot,” commented

Cairoli. “I put in a lot of effort to bring titles and I feel

very proud to be part of the company. They invest a

lot and do a lot of work in development and you see

the result because it is the top off-road manufacturer

in the world. I’m happy to continue and to do another

two years and to try for more titles. I’m fully motivated

for the upcoming seasons.”

“Around two years ago people were already saying

that Tony was getting too old to stay at the top and I

took that moment to declare that we had full trust in

his skills and capabilities. He had two tough seasons

but it was amazing how he bounced back in 2017 and

showed that we were absolutely right,” said Pit Beirer.

“It made me happy and very proud that he wanted

to continue and he wants to keep pushing. I believe

Tony has found the right balance in his life - personally

and professionally - to keep racing and wanting to

achieve. He is very passionate about it and this is

why he continues to be so strong. I’m only too happy

to make this strong commitment to Tony and very

pleased that our MXGP story will go on. I also want to

thank and pay credit to Claudio De Carli and his role.

He has had a big say in the Cairoli-KTM success over

the years and long may it last.”

WIN A PAIR OF

LIMITED EDITION

SIDI CROSSFIRE 3 SRS

CAIROLI BOOTS

All you have to do is send us

an image of your skankiest old

boots wearing them, not wearing

them - whatever - we’ll judge

the best pic - and decide on the

most deserving winner. Use your

imagination, make it entertaining,

this should be a lot of fun! All

entries will be published and

we’ll announce the winner in our

June Issue!

Only 2 months - get clicking guys

and gals!

entries to foleyg@mweb.co.za

4 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


John Lennon’s monkey

bike sells for £57,500!

A 1969 Honda Z50A monkey bike that was once

owned by Beatles legend John Lennon sold for a

staggering £57,500 last weekend, making it the most

expensive monkey bike in the world.

The bike, which Lennon owned in the 1960s and was

used by him for riding around his Tittenhurst Park estate

in Surrey, has changed hands a few times but its last

owner, John Harington, owned it for 47-years. Carrying

the registration plate XUC 91H, Lennon was famously

pictured riding it with his son, Julian, on the back.

Mark Bryan, Head of Sales for H&H Classics

Motorcycle Department, said: “Naturally we were

thrilled to be entrusted with the marketing and sale

of this bike, given its extraordinary provenance. So to

achieve this price is hugely satisfying.”

Now that’s a great return on investment… Just shy of

a million ZA Rands!

Regina’s new Professional

Enduro Chain

The guys from Regina Chjains have just introduced a

chain specifically manufactured for enduro.

They tell us that the chain is designed and developed

to withstand the severe stresses caused by Off- Road

riding. It’s produced with Z-Rings to extend lubrication

intervals, while maintaining a low pin length and light

running characteristics. Assembled with high carbon

alloy steel, solid bushings and rollers, shot-peened

plates, pins and rollers to reach high fatigue limit.

They tell us This Chain last s longer while reducing

rolling resistance and weight.

Available at dealers all over. RRP is R925 inclusive

Knox’s new defender Elite shirt:

Enduro or Adventure

New from KNOX is the Defender Elite shirt - the

result of valuable feedback from riders who wanted

all the benefits of a standard Knox armoured shirt

but with extra protection on the shoulders, elbows,

chest and lower back. This is a highly breathable

armoured shirt is perfectly suited for either ON or

OFF Road riding, ideal to wear underyour MX jersey

for the warmer days. It has the added benefit of a

full length Aegis Level 2 back protector and chest

protection. The Defender Elite is fitted with soft,

comfortable MICRO-LOCK Level 2 armour in the

shoulder and elbows which are held comfortably

in the right place so, if you ever need them, they’re

exactly where they need to be. Offering all-day

comfort, this versatile garment has tough, abrasion

resistant 2-way stretch panels on the shoulders

and elbows. British Arrownet mesh on the front and

back is used for strength and durability. Moisture

wicking Italian Carvico bi-

elastic micro mesh is used

on the sleeves and side

panels for breathability and

to keep the skin fresh and

dry, preventing irritation

and itching during active

sports. Unlike any other

garment of this type, the

shirt can be zipped from

the back protector and

machine-washed, keeping it

fresh and clean throughout

the riding season.

At dealers or www.dmd.

co.za for your nearest

stockist.

6 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Photo: F. Montero

R 10,000.00

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

WORTH OF POWERPARTS

KTM 250 XC-W OR 300 XC-W

Purchase your 2018 KTM 250 XC-W or KTM 300 XC-W and receive Powerparts

to the value of R 10,000.00, offer valid while stocks last. T’s and C’s apply.

Contact your nearest KTM dealer or phone 011 462 7796 for more info.


A scooter you can ride

on water in 5 seconds

Ok add some knobblies please, how’s this cool

scoot! This scooter, which you can ride on land and

water, will make you forget any cool thing people

like Graham Jarvis or Robbie Maddison have ever

conquered on two wheels

in extreme conditions.

Called the Biski, it’s

powered by a 55hp

2-cylinder engine and at

a touch of a button can

be ridden on water in five

seconds.

Reaching an impressive

80mph on land and

37mph on water, those

with superhuman riding

abilities need not apply.

Built by British Company

Gibbs Amphibians,

who specialise in

amphibious vehicles, the

Biski is joined by other

The Bike Tyre Warehouse Mobile

Division – Events – Tour Back Up –

Bike Recovery – Bike Transport.

The Bike Tyre Warehouse Group have opened a new

mobile division to cater for race & leisure events; tour

back up; bike transport and recoveries; according

to Bruce de Kock a necessary expansion to enable

them to provide professional technical support on the

adventurous builds, like the Quadski, Humdinga, Triski

and our personal favourite, the Terraquad.

However, those glorious twisting Alpine roads across

the water might lose their appeal on the Biski, as we

don’t imagine you’d want to lean it over too much on

land. Just imagine touching the extremely wide fairing

on the tarmac and putting a gaping hole in the side?

You’ll be the definition of a sinking duck…

move, with a fully equipped mobile fitment centre they

basically have the same capability as at their shops.

The mobile unit and the skilled technicians to operate

it will be available for projects throughout the SADEC

region; with bookings already secured for on and off

road events in the 2018/2019 calendar.

For more information please contact Byron Collard

082 927 0463 email mobile@biketyrewarehouse.com

or 011 205 0216.

Akrapovič “Slip-on Line”

This Akrapovič slip-on silencer offers more

power and torque, an uncompromising race

bike look, and substantial weight savings.

Benefits include:

• More power and torque

• Identical look to our factory team

• Manufactured from high-grade titanium

• Tuned to comply with current FIM noise regulations

Suggested Retail: R 7869.00.

Available from KTM Dealers.

8 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


New Shift riding gear

The WHIT3 (White) Label Ninety Seven Jersey has

a whole new design for 2018. Through simplistic

innovations, they tell us that the WHIT3 Label Jersey

gives you more of what you need and less of what

you don’t.

The WHIT3 Label Jersey comes with a bevy of

performance features and scool graphics. The main

body fabric is lightweight, yet durable and features

wicking properties to keep you drier and cooler

during your ride. An easy-fitting silhouette keeps

you relaxed on the bike. And ventilated side panels

deliver comfort all season long.

TECHNICAL DETAILS

• Durable, moisture wicking main body fabric

• Mesh side panels for massive airflow

• Athletic, low profile collar for increased comfort

• Fade resistant sublimated graphics for long lasting

color fastness

• Premium screen printed graphic application for a

unique look and feel

• Dyed main body fabric

• Drop tail keeps jersey tucked in

• Relaxed fit for added comfort

on the lower leg improves comfort inside the boot.

A padded knee construction increases comfort

and durability, while leather on the right knee brings

abrasion and heat resistance.

TECHNICAL DETAILS

• Lightweight minimalistic design

• 600D main body polyester provides excellent

durability

• Multiple stretch-zones ensure mobility and a

contoured fit

• Articulated knee and hip design conform to the rider

• Padded knee construction for increased comfort

and durability

• Fade resistant sublimated graphics for long lasting

color fastness and durability

• Minimal seams and mesh paneling on lower leg for

extra comfort while tucked into the boot

• Leather on right knee panel provides extra durability

and heat resistance

• Premium screen printed logos for a unique look and

feel

• Silicone waistband lining

• Dyed main body fabric

SHIFT WHITE LABEL TARMAC PANT

The new WHIT3 (White) Label Tarmac

Pant focus on simplistic innovations,

they tell us that they have reduced

weight, while improving flexibility,

ventilation, and durability.

The pant design centers around a

600D main body construction for

a balance of strength and weight.

This is amplified by smart details to

improve fit and functionality, such

as, stretch zones in the waist, back

panel, and lower leg that allow the

pants to move with you without

feeling inhibiting. The articulated

knees and hip make everything

work. Low-profile mesh paneling

MCR Motorcycle Recovery

Had a breakdown or a mishap on your bike?

MCR Motorcycle recovery has a fully rigged trailer to

assist anyone who has a breakdown or a bike accident

and needs assistance getting the bike to the relevant

dealer.

They are affiliated with most insurance companies and

will get your pride and joy to where it needs to go. If

you need a hand one day, keep their details handy.

Motorcycle specific recoveries in Gauteng.

David 071-246-5782

Keith076-612-4100

10 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Trail Boss Enduro News:

South Coast

Trail Boss Enduro is an Enduro & Adventure

Company based on the South Coast of KZN and

was started in 2010 by Jason Livingstone and a

few of his friends. Jason has spent most of his

life in the tourism and adventure sport industry

and is passionate about what he does. In the

beginning they started by offering riders a chance

to experience their amazing riding terrain on guided

outrides, but over the years their services have

expanded to include beginner to advanced enduro

skills training, endurance fitness, sports nutrition

and all-inclusive enduro and adventure vacations

for the whole family or groups of friends.

They will organize your sea side accommodation

and set up activities for the non riders in the group

to keep busy while you focus on your fun or

training rides. If it’s more than riding you want to

do you can upscale your adventure holiday with

activities like downhill mountain biking, surfing

lessons, trail running or golf. Chill out on some of

South Africa’s most pristine beaches, hike through

natural indigenous forests, go shark diving on

Protea Banks if you are open water qualified, or

terrify yourself on a crazy gorge swing.

With endless and diversified riding terrain, a subtropical

climate, relaxed atmosphere and a host of

exciting adventure activities to try out there should

be very few reasons not to book your next riding

adventure with Trail boss enduro.

www.trailbossenduro.co.za

Trail boss enduro is an Enduro & Adventure Company based on the South Coast of KZN and was started

in 2010 by Jason Livingstone and a few of his friends. Jason has spent most of his life in the tourism and

adventure sport industry and is passionate about what he does. In the beginning they started by offering

WIN A 3 NIGHT 2 DAY ENDURO RIDING

riders a chance to experience their amazing riding terrain on guided outrides, but over the years their

HOLIDAY WORTH 10 000 RAND

services have expanded to include beginner to advanced enduro skills training, endurance fitness, sports

nutrition and all-inclusive enduro and adventure vacations for the whole family or groups of friends.

They In will three organize easy your sea side steps accommodation you can and set up enter activities and for the non stand riders in the a group to

keep busy while you focus on your fun or training rides. If it’s more than riding you want to do you can

upscale chance your adventure to win holiday an with amazing activities like downhill riding mountain trip biking, for surfing you lessons, and trail

running or golf. Chill out on some of South Africa’s most pristine beaches, hike through natural

indigenous 3 of your forests, go family shark diving or on Protea friends. Banks if you You are open will water be qualified, staying or terrify in yourself on

a crazy gorge swing.

Southbroom, one of South Africa’s premier riding

With endless and diversified riding terrain, a sub-tropical climate, relaxed atmosphere and a host of

exciting adventure activities to try out there should be very few reasons not to book your next riding or

family

and

adventure

holiday

with Trail

destinations

boss enduro.

at the beach, and enjoy

two days of epic guided riding from your doorstep.

T&Cs apply.

1) Email your full name to info@trailbossenduro.

co.za with “dirt & trail” in the subject box.

2) Go and like our Facebook page “Trail boss

enduro – Train Ride Play”.

3) Go “Like” and “Share” this holiday giveaway

post on our Facebook page.

The winner of this amazing holiday giveaway will be

notified on May 6 2018 via email and will also be

announced in the mag and on the Trail boss enduro

Facebook page.

L-Bou Workshop re-opens

After a brief soujourn at one of the KTM dealerships,

the very experienced master mechanic Lood Bouwer

has re-opened his race workshop out near Parys.

Sounds far but they collect and deliver twice a week

throughout the JHB, PTA region with the superefficient,

Friendly Nel handling the phones and all

the queries. Lood has run the race teams for guys

like Husky and KTM and comes with a wealth of

experience in the bike game.

For details 0847384537 jokerlb@gmail.com

12 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


GRAB THE

OPPORTUNITY

JOIN THE WINNING TEAM

WP is expanding its footprint in South Africa and is looking for professional business partners that can bring

the exciting PRO COMPONENTS range of WP to the market. Are you a suspension expert and interested in

becoming one of our WP Authorized Centers? Please send an enquiry to franziska.brandl@wp-suspension.com

so we can take the first step in getting you in front.

WWW.WP-GROUP.COM


14 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MARCH 2018


HONDA ATTACKS THE 450 MARKET.

Do you remember when 450’s were built for real men? Well Honda has built one just like that… and, although

we’ve really had to wait for it, we finally got to play with it – a lot.

We never got to ride the ’17, Honda

imported these bikes in really limited

quantities so – none were available for us

mere mortals. Along came 2018 and the

RX and the MX bikes were dropped at our

offices. How cool is that?

This is one bike that makes you smile

from the moment that you climb aboard.

We are not going to bore you with all sorts

of technical info about the rake and trail

and spring setups and other mergafters,

but here’s the bottom line.

Have to be honest - we had an absolute

hoot riding this bike.

As expected, everything is typical Honda

quality. The only thing we wonder about

with most of the Jap bikes is why they

don’t go to hydraulic clutch – and why not

chuck in a set of handguards and a little

digital display? It’s a simple addition that

will pull more buyers. But we do love those

twin pipes, the styling and bodywork is just

so European sexy. A large wrap around

style skid plate protects the water pump

and ignition cover from rocks and debris.

The 8.5 litre plastic fuel tank looks bulky

compared to the CRF450R’s aluminium

tank, but we didn’t feel any difference while

riding.

The Fuel injected Honda CRF450RX

has all the same engine parts the MX bike

“R” has, but what makes the CRF450RX

stand out is the revised ignition mapping

(for a smoother power delivery than the

“R” model), an 18 inch rear wheel, revised

fork and shock settings (increased preload,

SPECS: HONDA CRF450RX

Engine: 449cc liquid-cooled singlecylinder

four-stroke

Suspension (front): Showa 49mm

coil spring fork (305mm stroke)

Suspension (rear): Showa

monoshock using Honda Pro-Link

system

Kerb weight: 118Kg

Tyres Front: 90/90-21 Dunlop

GeoMax AT81. REAR 120/90-18

Ground Clearance: 328 mm

Seat height: 959mm

Fuel capacity: 8.5L

Price: R109,900

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MARCH 2018 15


lower oil level, decreased rebound damping, lighter

rear spring) a larger fuel capacity, plastic skid plate,

and Dunlop Geomax AT 81 tyres.

Our ride:

Our first ride was at the Mamarok track that we

reviewed in the March issue – not ideal terrain for a

big 450, we literally couldn’t get out of first gear really,

so much speed and power that – so it was a nonevent

really, but we did take not of just how capable

the bike is in more technical terrain. We enjoyed the

suspension, lightness – and of course the power that

made mincemeat of the steep climbs and stuff, but

this bike is simply too much for a track like this.

A couple of days later, we just popped out into the

veld at the back of our offices where there are lots of

fast, sweeping trails, lekker river crossings – and oh

yes there’s an old MX track too. Now that’s where this

bike truly shines.

We came home ready for the week with huge grins

on our faces.

Electronic Wizardry:

A 450 is – well let’s face it, a bit too much for most

mere mortals, so Honda, being the smart guys that

they are addressed this by giving the bike three

different power settings – just like on their MX version.

F for fast, ff for a bit faster and fffffff for well hold on

tight and kiss yr ass koebaai.

16 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MARCH 2018


TRUE ADVENTURE.

From R155 000 - DCT R172 500

READY TO WIN!

NC750 from

R94 400

XR125

R25 000

CRF250R R96 000

CRF450R R107 900

Trade-Ins welcome! Finance and insurance arranged in-house.

XR150

R27 900


Seriously, the difference in the power settings is

instantly noticeable – and it’s all adjustable via a very

simple to operate button on your left handlebar.

Without realizing, we had the bike in strong – tore

off down the road and came back shaking our heads

wondering when you’d actually get to use all of

the power. Then we popped it into smooth – and it

became a whole new bike. Still powerful – make no

mistake, but it brings all the ponies under control and

induces that face splitting effect. While some brands

employ the use of tuning tools to adjust power

curves, Honda lets it all happen via a very simple

button. Now that is cool.

Where the Europeans use words like “smooth

and subtle” for their big cc Fourstrokes, the Honda

is about as subtle as a sledgehammer – just so

powerful and fun to ride. But it’s also small and light,

with excellent trail manners – and importantly, good

brakes, so you can really throw it around.

Honda’s CRF450RX is a very fun, fast, wellmannered

hybrid machine that is capable of taking

you to the moto track and the trails all in one day.

Fast as a cat out of the bog , turnd like few other

bikes can, no headshakes and ridiculous fun.

Honda. Please. Do like you did in the old days.

Get a good rider into the saddle and take this bike

racing…

We reckon it is as competitive as anything out

there.

This one from BB Honda Zambezi. R109900.00

(012)523-9500

18 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MARCH 2018


TRIUMPH SA

NEW DISTRIBUTOR APPOINTED FOR TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLES IN SOUTH AFRICA

Triumph South Africa (Pty) Ltd – a joint venture between the Fury Motor Group and automotive industry veteran Bruce

Allen – has been appointed as the new distributor of Triumph Motorcycles in South Africa.

We were all invited for a little meet and greet at the famous Rim And Rubber venue in Fourways, to meet the team and

pose any questions…

20 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Triumph as a brand is just too good to not be properly represented

in SA, and while to start with there will only be one branch in JHB

where you can buy a new Triumph, most of the dealers country wide

that were either Triumph dealers or service dealers, will stay on as

service dealers. In time we are sure there will be more official retail

dealers in the major centres in SA. In the meantime, if you live in Cape

Town for instance and want to buy a brand new Triumph, Triumph SA

will deliver your bike and do an official handover to you where you live.

In time the brand will grow again, it is just too good a brand not to.

The new guys tell us that they are not in it for a quick buck, they’re in it

for the long haul.

Triumph UK wants to standardize the shop frontage, as well as have

ideal positioning in SA, an expensive outlay for anyone upfront given

our economical situation in SA, but in time this will happen, so, all

those Triumph lovers and potential Triumph lovers, Triumph is back.

Triumph South Africa will sell adventure and touring motorcycles

(Tiger 800, Tiger 1200 and Tiger Sport), roadsters (Street Triple and

Speed Triple) as well as modern classics (Bonneville T100, Bonneville

T120, Thruxton, Street Scrambler, Bonneville Bobber and Bonneville

Speedmaster). Timelines required for regulatory processes should

allow the first sales of motorcycles in May this year.

The Triumph brand has been represented in South Africa for 23

years.

Paul Stroud, chief commercial officer of Triumph Motorcycles UK,

says that the company has high aspirations for the South African

market. “We are delighted to partnering with Triumph South Africa

as our new distributor, and look forward to a long and prosperous

relationship.

Triumph has enjoyed its role as one of the fastest growing global

motorcycle brands over the past few years, thanks to a combination

of our award-winning new models and improved dealer network.

Appointing a strong and professional distributor in South Africa shows

that we really mean business in the increasingly important South

African market.”

Established in 1902, Triumph Motorcycles is the largest British

motorcycle manufacturer and has more than 750 dealers across the

world. The company produces around 60 000 motorcycles per year.

At the heart of Triumph’s philosophy is a commitment to developing

unique motorcycles that offer a blend of distinctive design, intuitive

handling and performance. “The innovation and engineering passion

that gave birth to the iconic Bonneville of the 60s has today created

a broad range of bikes suited to all motorcycle riders, including the

striking 2.3 litre Rocket III, the unmistakable Speed Triple and the

SuperSports Daytona 675,” explains Allen.

Triumph currently employs around 2 000 people worldwide and has

subsidiary operations in the UK, America, France, Germany, Italy,

Japan, Sweden, Benelux, Brazil and most recently India, as well as

a network of independent distributors. Triumph has manufacturing

facilities in Hinckley, Leicestershire, and Thailand plus CKD facilities in

Brazil and India.

Motorcycle lovers the world over have embraced the Triumph brand.

In fact, in its 2017 financial year, Triumph grew global revenues by

£90.9m (R1.5 billion) to £498.5m (R8 billion).

South Africans have also long had a love affair with the Triumph

brand. “In recent years Triumph has sold an average of 450

motorcycles per annum, enjoying a market share of 6% of the over

500 cc segment,” says Allen.

Triumph is a premium brand, which is synonymous with quality.

Accordingly, on an international front, Triumph is committed to

ensuring that its motorcycles are presented in a premium manner.

Precisely the same modus operandi will ensue in South Africa. “We

have committed to building a flagship ‘Triumph World Black’ facility in

Woodmead, Johannesburg. This will initially accommodate the needs

of our Gauteng customers,” explains Allen.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018 21


Construction on the new facility will

commence in May 2018. It will open to the

public by December 2018.

Facilities meeting global Triumph

standards will open in Cape Town in 2019

and in Pretoria in 2020.

Triumph South Africa has committed

itself to great customer service. As such,

Triumph Johannesburg will operate in the

interim from South Road in Sandton , where

servicing will be available from late March

2018. This is a Fury Motor Group owned

property which has been made available for

use by Triumph South Africa.

The historical Triumph dealers in Gauteng

(Centurion, Edenvale and Boksburg) will

continue to act as Authorised Triumph

Service Centres during construction of the

‘Triumph World Black’ facility in Woodmead.

Cape Town, Durban and Port Elizabeth will

also continue to support Triumph owners as

Authorised Triumph Service Centres in their

respective cities. “The Authorised Triumph

Service Centres are dealerships that formed

part of the previous Triumph network. They

will be service centres only.

Due to the only current new flagship retail

dealership being Triumph Johannesburg,

should a future Triumph owner wish to

purchase a new motorcycle, we would

gladly facilitate the sale and delivery through

Triumph Johannesburg,” explains Allen.

Customers will, no doubt be pleased to

hear that their warranties will be honoured.

“All warranties on products sold by the

previous Triumph retail network will remain

intact on the original Triumph warranty

terms for the balance of that motorcycle’s

warranty. Triumph South Africa, through

the appointed service network will ensure

that customers’ service, parts and warranty

needs are well taken care of,” says Allen.

Fury Motor Group and Allen have

optimistic plans for Triumph South Africa.

The Fury Motor Group is a diverse

private motor group, representing multiple

automotive brands in Gauteng and KwaZulu-

Natal. Fury has seen quality organic growth

since its establishment in 1995.

“The addition of Triumph motorcycles

to the portfolio is an exciting venture

for Fury, and in following our mission of

‘Doing the Right Thing’, we hope to ensure

that Triumph enjoys the rightful position

amongst premium motorcycle brands it

deserves,” says Marq Roberts, CEO of

Fury Motor Group. Allen brings extensive

automotive and premium brand experience

to the new Triumph business. With 24

years of automotive retail experience, a

real passion for creating great customer

focussed businesses, and an appreciation

for the subtleties of the motorcycle lifestyle,

he is committed to ensuring this great

brand becomes a true contender in the

South African market.

“Triumph South Africa’s goal is to drive

progressive growth in volumes, delivering

market share of closer to 10% by 2021.

This will be done by ensuring that the

Triumph brand is presented and promoted

in South Africa in a premium and focused

manner, with a priority being the customer’s

experience on both a product and

engagement level. I am convinced that this

is the start of an overwhelmingly positive

era for the brand in South Africa,” Allen

concludes.

Frequently asked questions:

There have been questions from customers

and the general public regarding Triumph’s

way forward in South Africa. Triumph

answers some questions:

Q: The single point Triumph Flagship

facility does not provide a sufficient

footprint for representing the Triumph

Brand in Gauteng, how does this help me

as a Triumph owner?

Globally, Triumph is going through a

process whereby the brand is being

positioned in the premium manner it

deserves. In assessing the requirements

for reestablishing the Triumph business

in South Africa, while at the same time

following the global direction of premium

representation, we had to balance the

investment required against the ability to

still have multi point representation in a

city. For this reason, we have positioned

the site for the new facility in Woodmead

as geographically central as possible in

order for current customers to be able

to access us from the various freeways.

Current Triumph volumes unfortunately do

not allow for the multiple dealers to invest at

the required level, so there is a compromise

between an ongoing presence for Triumph

in SA and a single point facility.

Q: I live in Gauteng, but Triumph SA does

not yet have the service capacity to look

after my needs, what do I do?

The transition time between the previous

distributor in SA and Triumph SA being

appointed, has been extremely brief and

has not allowed for adequate capacity to be

22 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


established to take care of customers’ needs.

Triumph SA has entered into an

agreement with previous Triumph dealers

in Centurion, Edenvale and Boksburg to

service and maintain Triumph motorcycles

until December 2018.

Triumph Johannesburg’s service facility

will be ready to take care of customers’

needs from April 2018 at its (temporary)

South Road Sandton facility. The service

capacity of this facility will be gradually

increased over the next 9 months to

ensure that we are in a position to fully

accommodate customers by the end of

the year.

Q: What do I do if I live in Cape Town and

own a Triumph, who will look after my

motorcycle?

As is the case in Port Elizabeth and Durban,

Cape Town customers will continue to

be supported by the same agents who

currently look after their motorcycles in

these cities.

Q: When will Triumph open other

dealerships in other cities in South Africa?

We have made an initial commitment to

have a retail presence in Cape Town next

year (2019) and Pretoria the following year

(2020). Durban will be considered over the

next couple of years, but we are unable to

make a commitment at this stage.

Q: When will I be able to buy a new

Triumph motorcycle again?

We are planning to commence retailing

motorcycles in May 2018. This will depend

on time required for homologations.

Q: What bikes are you bringing in?

The full model lineup will include the

following:

• Adventure & Touring Modern Classics

Roadsters.

• Tiger 800 Bonneville Bobber (+Black)

• Street Triple 765 RS

• Tiger 1200 Bonneville, Speedmaster,

Speed Triple

• Tiger Sport Bonneville T100

• Bonneville T120

• Thruxton

• Street Scrambler

• Street Twin

Q: When will you be announcing retail

pricing for the range of motorcycles that

you plan to import?

We are still busy finalizing our pricing

strategy on a couple of the new models and

will be in a position to announce our pricing

in mid-March 2018.

The new Triumph South Africa team from left to right: Damien Maclachlan, Ashleigh James, Riaan Fourie,

Bruce Allen (CEO), Marq Roberts (Fury), Marthinus Smit and Liandre Gibson

Q: I live in Durban and would like to buy a

Triumph, how do I go about this?

In line with our strategy of only retailing

from a facility that is in line with Triumph’s

global standards, motorcycles will only be

available for sale from our Johannesburg

store initially. However, should there be

a requirement from an out of Gauteng

customer, we would be happy to facilitate

the sale and arrange delivery and handover

where you live.

Q: I am the owner of a 2016 Triumph

Explorer XC, and am concerned about

the effect of the September 2017 “fire

sale” on the resale value of by bike. I am

led to believe that the used values have

dropped badly.

We believe that whatever has happened is

very short term, and only has an impact on

someone who wishes to sell their recent

model Triumph between the “sale” and

when we commence retail of our new bikes.

A used motorcycle price is a function of a

willing seller and willing buyer, if the used

bike hasn’t been sold at a reduced value,

the value has not dropped.

When we come back into the market with

the same bike that was discounted last year

at the relevant retail price, the used values

will be pegged off relative value to the new

bike. i.e. how much less than a new bike

should a one-year old bike be? The market

will correct itself in the

short to medium term.

Our take on the entire

effect of the “sale” is

that those that bought

the cheap bikes really

benefited, but not at

the expense of current

Triumph owners.

Q: Are Triumph parts

readily available in

South Africa?

Our first parts orders

were placed on

1 March 2018 on

commencement date as the new distributor

for Triumph Motorcycles.

Prior to this we requested the dealers

that would continue as Authorised Triumph

Service Centres stock up with fast moving

parts in order to minimize the effect of a

gap between distributors. We have ordered

sufficient stock of the most frequently

needed parts to ensure our customers are

well supported.

Q: What effect does the change in

distributor have on my warranty on my

2017 Triumph?

Your bike is still well covered in terms of

the original warranty conditions set out by

Triumph, and can be taken to any one of the

Triumph service centres convenient to you.

Q: I am looking for a new Rocket III, but I

don’t see it as an available model on your

media release?

Globally Triumph has ceased production of

the Cruiser models being Thunderbird and

Rocket in order to focus on the segments

where the opportunity lies for Triumph to be

economically competitive.

Customers needing support or

information relating to this transition are free

to contact Triumph South Africa on info@

triumphbikes.co.za

24 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


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In the 1950s Sweden wanted to hold its own six-day motorcycle race. A tough enduro-style event was born

and for a decade, brave riders would contest the gruelling race held in various locations close to Stockholm.

Husqvarna machinery proved to be some of the most competitive, especially in the 125cc class. Read on to

learn more about the race and the various characters who rode there. By Kenneth Olausson.

The International Six Days is well known to most bike

enthusiasts. Back in 1950 the Swedes wanted their

own enduro, so the first “Motoring Six-Days” event was

introduced. This gruelling race lasted throughout 50s and

was cherished by riders who wanted success despite the

sacrifices. It was also the official racing comeback for the

Huskvarna Factory after the war.

Carl Heimdahl was one of the leading technicians at

Husqvarna’s R&D department, having been contracted

by the factory from the beginning of the 30s. Among his

other achievements Carl was also responsible as the

chief engineer for the coming ‘Silver Arrow’ - Husqvarna’s

biggest street success throughout history. He was also a

keen competitor and had collected a lot of trophies on his

bookshelf. In the beginning of 1950, the newly developed

125cc engine was ready for testing at the factory. Since the

‘Motoring Six-Days’ was coming up in mid-May, everyone

was looking to finish the new machine in time for this

decisive race.

90 participants throughout five classes - including

sidecars - took off from the start at 5.30 in the morning of

May 13th 1950. The day’s stage went from Linköping to

Västerås, and was 463km long. As the final part consisted

of a swamp section, quite a few of the delegates had to

unfortunately abandon the race there. Only five riders were

without penalties after day one. The second stage was

easier to accomplish, while the third consisted of a tough

night-stage, 324 km long. It was a cold night and very

testing for the competitors - just 30 men made it through

the darkness. After only four hours of the sleep, the next

stage was held over 244km. The final stretch then went to

Stockholm with the riders completing a total distance of

1,900km. In the 125cc class, Husqvarna dominated the

results sheet by taking the four first places, including Carl

Heimdahl who placed fourth at the finish.

The popular event was repeated in 1951, but the race

ran from Falun to the Stadium in Stockholm over seven

stages - the night section included. This time, the start was

held on June eighth, which made the enduro conditions a

little less extreme than the previous year. In the landscape

of Dalarna, many difficulties were encountered by

optimistic riders. Stages in touristic towns like Leksand,

Rättvik, Orsa and Mora had to be covered. The knockout

sections were saved until the last days, in order to separate

the men from the boys. After his 1950 success, Carl

Heimdahl was awarded to start as the number two rider a

few minutes after six o’clock in the morning. However, he

was out of luck and did not finish the competition. Instead,

two other Husqvarna-mounted riders were successful and

finished second and third in the 125-175cc class.

26 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


www.husqvarna-motorcycles.com

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The FE 250 is the smallest capacity 4-stroke in the enduro

line-up. The small capacity means it is very lightweight and

shines in tough technical terrain while delivering a torquey

and manageable 4-stroke performance. Combined with class

leading WP suspension, selectable engine maps and Magura

hydraulic clutch, the FE 250 features an array of premium

components for unsurpassed quality and reliability.

THE 2016 2-STROKE ENDURO MODEL RANGE.

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destinations that few others would dare to aim for. The 2016 Husqvarna Mo

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weight – letting you easily explore wherever you choose to go.

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

Photo: H. Mitterbauer

FREESTATE - Husqvarna Central, Bloemfontein – (051) 430 1237

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1955 was the last true Six-Days event of

the ‘Motorsexdagars’ as it was shortened

after this year. A record number of 105 riders

turned up to participate, but only 65 percent

of them managed to take the chequered flag

on May 22nd when the competition came to

an end. Before that, the race was not only

a nightmare to conquer, but the authorities

had turned against motorcycling in general

- bike racing such as enduros in particular.

The police were watching everywhere and

gave out penalties to surprised riders who

in some instances had broken the law with

the lowest margins. Despite all the rattling,

Husqvarna managed to dominate the

175cc class with their reliable machines.

Out of 11 gold medals in this class, the

Husqvarna riders captured no less than

eight golden plaques - a phenomenal record

in the books. The rider Bengt Fasth came

home without penalties, having ridden the

ultra-new Silver Arrow with modified front

forks and a rebuilt rear-frame. One year

later, the event had transformed into a

four-day competition due to the high costs

of the venue. 97 men started this enduro in

Strängnäs and 66 made it to the finish line.

The Husqvarna riders Sune Olsson and Lars

Hansson were first and second in the 175cc

senior class, where the competition was

very strong. In 1957 the race was reduced

further to three days, which would remain

for the lifetime of the event. Rolf Stagman

was a good enduro rider for Husqvarna

Team work in hard terrain

and won a gold medal there. He was then

approached by the factory and assigned as

a test rider for the ‘Silver Arrow’ project.

In 1958 the Motoring Six-days had the

status of a national enduro championship

race. Again, the 175cc class was won

by Husqvarna with Göte Berglund in

the saddle. Finally, 1959. It was again

a super-tough race with only a couple

of riders without penalties at the finish.

Consequently, the organisers prolonged

the riding time by 10 minutes in order to be

able to distribute all the 41 medals that had

been prepared for 55 riders in this event.

There were of course massive protests

from the most successful participants, but

the organisers insisted, so the result sheet

wasn’t a complete waste of paper.

In the circle of life, the “Motorsexdagars”

came to an end after costs sky-rocketed

and interest diminished. It was a stellar

50s venue where only the strongest were

victorious. Husqvarna made a strong

contribution to this success!

Hard conditions at

motoring six-days event

in the 50’s

28 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


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TWO NEW POLARISES

WARP SPEED SUL

THE GENERAL AND THE RZR 100

30 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MARCH 2018


We set the day up at the famous Rhino Park facility out near

Rayton – during the week so that we would not scare any of

the regular riders out that side. The crew from Katay took the

opportunity to invite a few race snakes – in the form of Juan

Ballister and Thomas Eich. Also along was the famous road racer

Veron Pappas – we all put the cars through their paces – and

everyone came away grinning from ear to ear.

“Did you check that bud!” “How does this thing turn!” “Flippen

hell (Ok that’s the family version), how do these things go…!”

But we are getting ahead of ourselves…

U

0 TURBO DYNAMIX.

The General: a cross between a workhorse and a fun machine…

We have had the privilege of watching sxs’s evolve over the years

– from the very first Rangers and Rhino’s right up to todays high

spec, high performance models. We’ve always appreciated the

Rangers, great suspension – and Polaris has always taken the

liberty of fitting more performance oriented engines to their range of

work horses.

What Polaris was missing in their lineup was a vehicle suited for

75% recreation and 25% utility. That is where the General comes

in, and after we spent the day in it, we think that Polaris has hit a

home-run.

The Generals motor is pinched straight from the mighty RZR,

minus the turbo. Yup a 1000cc parallel twin workhorse – so you can

literally mooch along to get feed to the cows and sheep, lug a fair

load to the building site and have enough performance to quickly

zip into town for a toot and back without the Mrs knowing that you

were missing.

And you can do all of this in absolute comfort. If you are a regular

reader of this here quality publication, you’ll see that we often

wonder how they are going to make these things better. Just when

you think it’s perfect, the boffins astonish you with an even better

machine.

This one is superior. Using this 999cc ProStar powerplant has

become standard for Polaris and it should be very proud of its

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MARCH 2018 31


capabilities, because it builds great usable horsepower

and torque. But forget the power, everything else just

makes sense. The occupants are safely ensconsed in

a very roomy cabin, complete with bucket seats and

seatbelts. High back seats surround you and give you the

support your body needs for virtually any amount of time

on the trails, not to mention they make you confident in

the safety of the rig. It’s difficult to describe, but you sit in

the car, lower than in the Rangers. It has proper shoulder

height doors giving you that extra sense of safety.

Polaris has included two new handles for the passenger

to grab onto, one on the door and another on the centre

storage console. Keeps things feeling safe and tidy.

Polaris has a simple button for 4wd actuation and

gear selection is the traditional way – just with a lot less

clunky noises than on previous gens. The selector picks

up the chosen gear with no musical accompaniment. It’s

32 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MARCH 2018


BUILT TO WIN

K16161

RANGE


smooth anything. It’s simple to drive and just so much fun.

Polaris’s On-Demand four-wheel drive system is magic.

You really do put the thing in gear then forget about it.

In four-wheel drive mode the transmission will actually

select three-wheel drive and engage the fourth wheel

when conditions deteriorate. All this is done without the

operator noticing anything. The General also gets larger

27x9-14 and 27x11-14 Maxxis Coronado rubber on cast

aluminium rims. These tyres gave us plenty of traction and

the big wheels mean that you can go just about anywhere.

AND it even comes with Polaris’ turf mode for single

wheel drive so that you don’t duff up the lawn.

Compare the General’s specs with those of a

comparable Polaris UTV – the Ranger 900 EPS, say – and

you’ll notice subtle differences. The General is slightly

longer and wider, but lower. Its payload capacity is lighter

(500 versus 680kg), its occupant capacity two rather than

three, and it has a lot more suspension travel at both ends.

The Ranger – more workhorse. The General, more fun.

But and here’s the skinny: On our trail, the suspension

was felt so good at soaking up bumps and humps there’s

very little we had to slow down for. The seamless CVT

transmission is geared low too, so engine response is

instantaneous – which, in combination with the brilliant

handling makes you feel like a rally driver.

Ask anyone who drove it, the General is truly amazing –

the fastest, best-handling farmstyle (well not really), UTV

that we have driven to date… See - we even printed that.

SPECS: POLARIS GENERAL

Engine: 999cc 4-Stroke Twin Cylinder

Drive System Type: On-Demand True AWD/2WD/

VersaTrac Turf Mode

Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection

Payload Capacity: 500 kg

Front Suspension: Dual A-Arm 12.25” (31.1 cm) Travel

Rear Suspension: Dual A-Arm, IRS 13.2” (33.5 cm) Travel

Front/Rear Brakes: 4-Wheel Hydraulic Disc with Dual-

Bore Front Calipers

Wheels: Cast Aluminum

Ground Clearance: 30.5 cm

Overall Vehicle Size (L x W x H): 300 x 158.7 x 187 cm

Wheelbase: 206 cm

Estimated Dry Weight: 676 kg

Steering: Electronic Power Steering

Instrumentation: Digital Gauge, Speedometer, Odometer,

Tachometer, Tripmeter, Clock, Hour Meter, Gear Indicator,

Fuel Gauge, Hi-Temp, Coolant Temperature, Voltmeter,

Service Indicator, Seat Belt Reminder, User selectable

Blue/Red backlighting, Gear Indicator, DC Outlet

Fuel capacity: 35.9L

www.polarissa.co.za

34 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MARCH 2018


THE RZR 1000 TURBO DYNAMIX

“YOU CAN’T DESCRIBE THE FEELING”

You’d have read all about this new RZR

in last months issue - and in some of our

previous issues too. We are not going

to go into too much detail about all of

the features that Polaris has packed into

this one – you can read all about that in

the spec sheet. We are going to focus,

however on what its like to drive this thing.

Polaris backed off from the horsepower

race (Errr ok that’s not quite true, this

one puts out a whopping 168BHP), and

included something they call Dynamix,

which is, in effect interactive electronically

actuated suspension. What they have

effectively done is made a very fast

machine, just that much safer.

Basically what that does – in doff laymans

terms… Fancy electronics read the terrain

for you and send a signal that makes each

corner react to that specific moment in

time. Serius! Clever voodoo this!

Dynamix was designed so that you no

longer have to choose between setting

your suspension for a comfortable ride or

for performance; now you get the optimum

setting because it adjusts itself as you drive.

Attack a corner and the outside shocks

instantly firm up to reduce body roll, as

speed increases your suspension stiffens for

better stability, take to the air & all 4 shocks

to maximum resistance so you don’t bottom

out, and tap the brakes to strengthen front

shocks and minimize diving.

We’ll say this - until you drive one you

cannot fathom how good it actually is. It is

flippen amazing! We worked a little route

through the quarry section – steep ups,

downs, donga’s rocks, you name it – with

a nice fast section chucked in just for

giggles. The faster boys really hammered

it around as we mere mortals just gaped.

Polaris has always made vehicles with

great suspension – but to quote and old

cliché, this is truly next level…

We deliberately took the General out

first – and you’ll see in our story how we

felt about that. To be quite frank, for us the

RZR is probably overkill – and that’s what

every adrenaline junkie is after, but the

way the car handled the fast turns, rough

terrain and giant inclines was, quite literally

amazing.

With all of the power on tap, we barely

even looked at using 4wd – but Polaris

36 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MARCH 2018


Chris Beasly from

TV Fame made a

movie about the day

has transferred more drive to the front when the system is

engaged - and you can feel the pulling power as you tear up

the hills. Or – if you wish you can go really slowly – but that’s

kinda pointless in this one…

It is magic, no question, faster that you can imagine,

enormously capable and just so much fun to drive.

Where would you use it? Head for the desert or fast open

back roads.

It’s big? Sure it is, all of the side by sides are growing…

but this one not as big as some of the other performance

SXS’s on the market… we’ve seen that first hand as the

Katay clan comes squeezing through some of the tight stuff

on the trails. They tell us that it’s half the fun.

Conclusions:

Amazing. We’ll say it again (Sigh!), we are constantly amazed

at how innovative Polaris is. Better and better, both of these

machines are truly incredible. So much fun should be illegal.

And thanks to the stronger Rand, and Polaris doing some

serious negotiating, the prices have dropped quite a bit…

SPECS: POLARIS RZR 1000 TURBO DYNAMIX

Engine: 925cc ProStar Turbo H.O.; 4-Stroke DOHC Twin Cylinder Turbocharged

Drive System Type: High Performance True On-Demand AWD/2WD

Horsepower: 168 HP

Electronic Suspension Control System: Standard

Front Shocks: FOX® 2.5 PODIUM Live Valve with Bottom-Out Control

Front Suspension: Dual A-Arm with Stabilizer Bar and 16 in (40.6 cm) Travel

Rear Shocks: FOX® 2.5 PODIUM Live Valve with Bottom-Out Control

Rear Suspension: Trailing Arm with Stabilizer Bar and 18 in (45.7 cm) Travel

Front/Rear Brakes: 4-Wheel Hydraulic Disc with Triple-Bore Front and Dual-Bore Rear Calipers

Wheels: Cast Aluminum

Ground Clearance: 34.3 cm

Overall Vehicle Size (L x W x H): 302.2 x 162.6 x 187.3 cm.

Wheelbase: 228.6 cm

Estimated Dry Weight: 680 kg

Payload Capacity: 336 kg

Steering: Electronic Power Steering

Instrumentation: It reads like a luxury car.

RIDE COMMAND 7” Glove-Touch Display, DYNAMIX Visualizer, Digital Instrumentation,

Built-In GPS, Mapping, Bluetooth & USB Smartphone Connectivity, GoPro® Control (GoPro®

not included), AM/FM & Weather Radio, In-Vehicle Communications Capable, Ride Command

App Integration (Group Ride, Follow the Leader, Ride Stat Tracking), Speedometer, Odometer,

Tripmeter, Tachometer, Coolant Temperature, Volt Meter, Hour Meter, Service Indicator, Clock,

Gear Indicator, Fuel Gauge, Hi-Temp Light, Seatbelt Reminder Light, Fault Code Display, DC

Outlet… See! We told you so.

Other Standard Features: DYNAMIX Control System with Selectable Modes, Rear Wired

Camera.

Fuel capacity: 35.9L

This RZR came from Katay Racing (011) 475-4892

Or www.polarissa.co.za for your nearest authorized Polaris stockist.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE MARCH 2018 37


King

The Second Annual

of the Whip

Pics by Rich Sutherland, Emerson Haupt, Eric Palmer Glenn and Tristan Foley.

This was the second King Of The Whip Competition hosted by

LW mag, and we have to say that it is one of our favourite fixtures

on the insanely busy motorcycle calendar every year.

This year, the Quarry in Malibongwe drive ROCKED to the

sounds of motorcycles flying through the air, piloted by some of

South Africa’s top Freestyle and Motocross stars.

The crowds are huge. That quarry

was full of peeps.

Whip (Noun):

A maneuver performed on a motorcycle, usually during a

motocross or freestyle motocross contest, in which the rider brings

the rear of the motorcycle abruptly around to either side. Performed

while the machine is airborne off a jump. In very extreme whips,

the rear of the motorcycle will end up perpendicular to the direction

of travel, in addition to the motorcycle being laid flat. The purpose

of the whip is to show off, to alter the trajectory of the bike in flight,

and to scrub speed over jumps.

We have no idea how the heck these guys land some of the

insane whips that they pull – It’s like they almost reverse the bikes

upside down through the air – and still land upright. The laws of

Physics and gravity simply do not apply to these guys.

What a very cool Highveld afternoon spent out in the fresh air…

This year was Dallan Goldmans turn – he took many breaths

away with his incredible high flying performance. He was followed

on the podium by Grant Frerichs – who we have not seen in action

for a good long time – an amazing talent. Filling the third step is

one of Botswana’s favourite sons and crowd favourite Alley Sayer.

So – if you did not get there, go to the mirror. Look at yourself

and say – “I AM A CHOP!” and get your butt down there next year.

All of the participants:

Dallan Goldman (1st)

Grant Frerichs (2nd)

Alastair Sayer (3rd)

Caleb Tennant (4th)

Camz Odendaal (5th)

Neels van Niekerk (6th)

Dylan Mostert

Garric Pretorious

Mike Oyston

Nico van der Linden

David Goosen

Maddy Malan

Jason Hannan

Reece Chinery

Chad Howard

Damon Strydom

Jacques Human

Scotty Billett

Jarryd Maguire

Jarred van Vuuren

Trustan Tredoux

Craig Emmerick

Michael Kok

The top 6 names made it to the final.

www.lwmag.co.za

38 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


The Dunlop crew

Mr, Mrs and Junior Smith

The Motul crowd - keeping everyone

well oiled.

Glad we didn’t have to judge... Richie

VDW with Messers Le Riche and

Potter had that privelige.

Ryan from LW Mag trying

to smous us a tee shirt...

Crowd favourite Alley Sayer was

dissapointed with his third spot.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018 3 9


2018 AMA

SUPERCROSS


DT Garage

TECH TIPS

What to look for when you buy your next lid

A heads up on DOT, ECE 22.05 and Snell motorcycle helmet standards.

Here’s a handy look at the three most common helmet performance standards.

You’ve bought the latest and

greatest superbike. You’ve

read up and researched all the

info. Have you done the same

for the most critical part of your

motorcycling gear?

In South Africa: Due to the fact that SA does

not have testing facilities, South Africa’s

experts have agreed that ECE homologation

standards apply to all helmets imported to SA.

Buying a helmet may make you wonder about

the various helmet safety certifications and

changes that go into effect in May 2013 for

the DOT helmet standard may make you

wonder even more.

There are more than the three standards

that we’ll cover here, but these are the ones

you are most likely to see: DOT, ECE 22.05

and Snell.

We don’t assume that one standard is

superior to any of the others; rather the

purpose is to show how the standards

compare and where they apply. These

motorcycle-helmet standards are not mutually

exclusive; some helmets are certified to

multiple standards.

Following is an explanation of each helmet

standard.

DOT Helmet Standard:

This stands for “Department of

Transportation, and it is applicable to helmets

sold in the U.S. for on-road use.

The National Highway Safety Administration

(NHTSA) enforcement authority of the DOT

certification requirement applies to helmets

intended for on-road use, though using a

certified helmet for off-road purposes or in

competition is certainly a good idea.

NHTSA does not test helmets against the

DOT standards before they can claim DOT

certification; rather, each helmet manufacturer

marketing their helmets for road use in the

U.S. must test and self-certify the models

they want to sell and then permanently affix

the “DOT” emblem signifying compliance with

FMVSS 218.

FMVSS 218 sets standards in three areas

of helmet performance: impact attenuation,

basically energy absorption; penetration

resistance; and finally the retention system

effectiveness, and there are new product

labeling requirements.

The standard also requires peripheral vision

to be not less than 105° from the helmet

midline. Projections from the surface of the

helmet (snaps, rivets, etc.) may not exceed

5 mm.

The impact test measures acceleration of

a headform inside the helmet when it is

dropped from a fixed height onto a spherical

and flat surfaced anvil. The standard allows a

peak acceleration energy of 400 G (G being

“gravity constant” or an acceleration value of

ft. per second x seconds).

The penetration test involves dropping a

piercing test striker onto the helmet from a

fixed height. The striker must not penetrate

deep enough to contact the headform.

The retention system test involves placing

the helmet’s retention straps under load in

tension. For this test the load is progressive;

first a load of 22.7 kg (49.9 lb.) is applied

for 30 seconds, then it is increased to

136 kg (299.2 lb.) for 120 seconds, with

measurement of the stretch or displacement

of a fixed point on the retention strap from the

apex of the helmet.

ECE 22.05 Helmet Standard:

ECE stands for “Economic Commission for

Europe,” which was created under a United

Nations agreement in 1958. The 22.05

part refers to the specific regulation that the

standards for testing are described in.

The ECE standard, which is accepted

in 47 countries, is similar to the DOT

standard in several ways, for

example: like the DOT standard,

peripheral vision through an arc

of 105° from the helmet midline

is required. Also, environmental

conditioning of helmets to be

tested is required similar to

the DOT standard and certain

labeling requirements apply, as

well.

Impact absorption testing is

performed in a manner very similar

to the DOT standard, involving a drop

test from a fixed height on a steel anvil with a

headform fitted inside to measure the energy

transmitted. Peak acceleration energy at the

headform allowed to pass the test is 275 G.

Impact absorption and rotational forces are

also tested at points where any surfaces or

parts project from the shell of the helmet.

The retention system is tested with a free-fall

drop test of a 10 kg (22.0 lb) weight from

a height of .75m (29.5 in.) attached to the

fastened chin strap. No more than 35mm

(1.37 in.) displacement of the attachment

point is allowed.

The chin strap buckle system is also tested

for slippage under load, and the strap

material itself is tested for abrasion resistance

and tension failure load (which cannot be less

than 3kN or 674.4 lb.). There are also tests

for ease of release and durability of quickrelease

buckle systems.

There are some areas where the DOT and

ECE standards differ, for example: The

surface of the helmet is tested for abrasion

resistance—but in this test the performance

42 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Brought to you by

standard requires that the helmet surface

either shear away or allow the test surface

to slip past the helmet. This is to minimize

the amount of twisting force the helmet

would transmit to the wearer’s head

and neck. Projections from the

helmet (snaps, rivets, etc.) may

not exceed 2 mm.

Another test assesses the

rigidity of the shell of the

helmet by measuring the

deformation of the helmet

shell when progressively

more load is applied up to

630 Newtons (141.6 lb.).

In addition to these areas,

ECE 22.05 includes

performance for the

visor on a helmet, if it is

an integral part of the

helmet. DOT provides

standards for visors and

other eye-protection gear

in a separate standard referred to as

VESC 8 (Vehicle Equipment Safety

Commission). The ECE standards

do not include a test for penetration

resistance.

Unlike the DOT system, where the

product is not subject to third-party testing

prior to sale, the ECE system required

batch sampling when production begins,

submission of up to 50 sample helmets/

visors to a designated laboratory working for

the government that uses the ECE standards

under the United Nations agreement and

verification of quality control during on-going

production.

The ECE standard specifies which type or

configuration of helmet the approval applies

to, using the following codes: “J” if the helmet

does not have a lower face cover, “P” if the

helmet has a protective lower face cover,

or “NP” if the helmet has a non-protective

lower face cover, (stated as ECE 22.05J, ECE

22.05P or ECE 22.05NP).

Snell (Snell Memorial Foundation M2010)

Helmet Standard: Generally EXCEEDS

ECE and DOT testing.

The Snell Memorial Foundation is a private,

non-profit organization formed in 1957

dedicated to improving helmet safety.

Snell goes beyond the governmental

standard-setting approach and is available

to assist manufacturers with helmet

development by offering prototype testing.

Once development is completed,

manufacturers seeking certification submit

sample helmets to Snell for testing using

the Foundation’s standardized tests. If the

helmet passes all the tests, it will receive

certification under the standard (currently

designated M2010) and the manufacturer

can label the helmet as Snell certified.

Once a given model design is certified,

it cannot be altered in production. Postmarketing

random testing is also conducted

by the Foundation to verify continued

compliance. Failure during random testing

can lead to de-certification of the helmet.

Snell certification is voluntary and is not

required by federal or international authorities,

but may be required by some competition

sanctioning bodies.

Snell Foundation testing evaluates each

helmet model in four areas and specifications

for pre-test environmental conditioning of

helmets are used. As with the other two

systems, 105° of peripheral vision from

the midline is required.

Impact Test

This test involves a series of

controlled impacts where a helmet

is positioned on a metal head form

and then dropped in a guided fall

onto various steel test anvils (Flat,

Hemisphere, Kurbstone, Roll bar,

Edge or a Horseshoe type) which

simulate different impact surfaces.

The head forms are instrumented

with an accelerometer to measure

peak G force or acceleration which is

measured in “G”ravitational units. The

impact energy (drop height and mass),

or how hard the helmets are impacted

is unique to each standard. However,

in any valid test, if the peak acceleration

imparted to the head form exceeds certain

threshold value (around 300 G’s, depending

on standard and test type), the helmet is

rejected.

Positional Stability (Roll-Off) Test

Head form is mounted on a stand so that

it points face downward at an angle of 135

degrees. The helmet is placed on the head

form and the straps and buckles adjusted

to obtain a “best fit”. A wire rope is hooked

to the rear edge of the helmet and brought

forward so that its free end runs across the

helmet and downward towards the floor. The

free end of the rope has a mechanical stop

with a 4 kg weight resting on the stop. The

weight is raised to a prescribed height and

dropped onto the stop. The resulting shock

places a rotational load on the helmet. The

helmet may be shifted, but must not roll off

the head form. Next, the head form is rotated

180 degrees, the helmet adjusted, and tested

with the wire rope hooked to the front edge of

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018 43


DT Garage

TECH TIPS

the helmet and the test is repeated. As in the

first case, the helmet may be shifted but must

not roll off the head form.

Brought to you by

Dynamic Retention Test

The helmet is placed on a head form and

the chin strap fastened under a device

approximating the contour of the jaw. The

jaw piece is loaded with a 23 kg weight for

approximately one minute. The retention

system is tested by simultaneously removing

the 23 kg weight and applying a 38 kg mass

in an abrupt guided fall. The retention system

fails if it cannot support the mechanical loads

or if the maximum instantaneous deflection

(stretch) of the retention system exceeds 30

mm. Drop heights for the fonts 38 kg mass

are different for each standard, however the

mechanism and failure criteria are similar for

other types of headgear.

Chin Bar Test

The chin bar test applies to full face

motorcycle, special application racing and

kart racing helmets. The helmet is affixed to

a rigid base with the chin bar facing upward.

A 5 kg weight is dropped through a guided

fall to strike the central portion of the chin bar.

Maximum downward deflection of the chin

bar must not exceed the stated distance.

Shell Penetration Test

The shell penetration test applies to

motorcycle, special application racing, kart

racing, skiing and equestrian helmets. The

helmet is affixed to a rigid base. A 3 kg

sharply pointed free 3d models striker is

dropped in a guided fall onto the helmet from

a prescribed height. The test striker must

not penetrate the helmet or even achieve

momentary contact with the head form.

Faceshield Penetration Test

The face shield penetration test applies to full

face motorcycle, special application racing

and kart racing helmets. The face shield

is affixed to the helmet and shot along the

center line in three separate places with an

air rifle using a sharp icons soft lead pellet.

Pellet speed will be approximately 500 kph.

For both types of shield the pellet must not

penetrate, and for the racing helmet any

resulting “bump” on the inside of the shield

must not exceed 2.5 mm.

Flame Resistance Test

The flame resistance test applies to special

application racing helmets only. The test

is conducted using a propane flame of

approximately 790 degrees centigrade. The

flame is applied to the shell, trim, chin strap

and face shield for a specified number of

seconds, and any resulting fire must

self-extinguish within a specified time

after flame removal. During the whole

process the temperature of the interior lining

of the helmet must not exceed 70 degrees

centigrade.

The Snell label identifies the type of

application the helmet is certified for, using

letter codes:

• M=motorcycle

• SA=special application

• SAH=special application, frontal head

restraint system

• K=karting

• CMR=children’s motorsports restricted

• CMS=children’s motorsports standard

Dual approval is your best option on a helmet

– look for a helmet that is both ECE and Snell

approved.

The weight of a helmet: Is lighter better?

Our humble opinion, within reason -

sometimes, less weight means less safety

material.

This goes further: Some name brand lids,

same model, make etc weigh more in the

USA than they do Europe. Go and check for

yourself you’ll see what we mean.

Why? Because it might pass the ECE test,

but they have to thicken the shell in order for

the same helmet to pass DOT and SNELL

testing.

Helmet manufacturers claim that Snell

certification can add 50 to 100 grams or

more weight to a helmet, this is due to the

differences in the thickness of the entire shell

in order to meet DOT and Snell requirements.

Makes you think. Doesn’t it?

Dual approval is your best option on a helmet

– look for a helmet that is both ECE and Snell

approved.

44 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Suzuki Weekend Away in Mpumalanga 30 June - 01 July 2018!


BLAST FROM THE PAST: TWO ORIGINAL

AFRICA TWINS

When we visited the Scott Riding Gear importers the other day, we noticed a pair of bikes lurking under some covers in

the factory where they operate from. We glanced under those there covers and found a pair of perfect 750 Africa Twins.

46 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


To the lighties out there – yes, that’s

you… these were some of the first real

adventure bikes on the market. After these,

Honda lost the plot a bit with their more

road oriented Trans Alp, and there was a

real drought in anything from Big Red until

they delivered a Kamikaze blow with their

current Africa Twin.

A brief history of the Honda Africa Twin:

Pay attention it is a good read.

It’s easy to forget how big a deal the

Paris-Dakar Rally was in the 1980s.

With the modern event now consigned

to South America and 450 singles, the

Dakar’s heyday 30 years ago was a global

sensation contested by ever-more radical,

road bike-derived machinery.

This led to increasing manufacturer

and commercial involvement. From the

outset, France’s Yamaha importer Sonauto

entered a Dakar team aboard modified

XT500s – the biggest and best production

trail bike of the time – and Yamaha was

rewarded with a 1-2 in 1979, and first

through fourth the following year, both won

by Cyril Neveu.

That success (Yamaha sold over 60,000

XTs in Europe between 1975 and 1985,

20,000 in France alone) attracted other

manufacturers. Honda made its first

official entry in 1981 (a modified XR500R

single ridden by Alain Padou coming sixth)

while an even more significant entry from

Germany changed the template for Dakar

bikes forever.

BMW had just launched its first

R80G/S and, seeing the Dakar as an ideal

promotional tool for its new machine,

entered a team backed by its French

importer. The 800cc BMW’s power was

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018 47


Orioli taking the

NXR to its 1988

Paris-Dakar win.

Realising that its existing singles had no

hope against the BMW twins (or, later, the

first Cagiva V-twin which Auriol debuted in

1985), Honda, at the request of its French

importer, set up an official HRC (Honda

Racing Corporation) project team in the

autumn of 1984 with the aim of ‘winning

the 8th rally in 1986’. Thus began the

development of Honda’s first purpose-built

Paris-Dakar machine. The Africa Twin’s seed

had been sown.

The project team, comprising Honda’s

best and brightest talents in road,

motocross, endurance and dirt track,

attended the next Paris-Dakar in early 1985

on a fact-finding mission. It’s fair to say it

was a baptism of fire.

With temperatures ranging from

below zero at night to over 50°C, terrain

comprising desert sand, barren rocks, gravel

and even Tarmac – and the longest stages

over 500 miles – none of them had ever

witnessed anything quite like it before. Even

so, it was enough for them to be able to

come up with a list of requirements for their

new machine.

It was decided the new bike should be:

• Light and compact

• Capable of 180kph/112mph with a cruising

speed of 150kph/95mph

• As undemanding to ride as possible

• Reliable

• Easy to work on

• Stable at speed

• Fuel efficient (a target of 450km/280miles

per tank was set)

• Have as low a C of G as possible

With all the above in mind, the first

decision was to use a V-twin engine with

a 45° cylinder angle and 90° crankshaft

to minimize vibration – important to ease

rider fatigue. In addition, this type of layout

was as slim as a single cylinder, important

for off-road ability. With a bore and stroke

of 83 x 72mm, displacement of the liquidcooled

unit was 779.1cc producing 70bhp

at 7000rpm.

To enable the range required and yet keep

the CofG low a giant, saddle-type fuel tank

extended down each side of the engine with

a further fuel tank doubling as the ‘bash

plate’ below the motor.

However, much of the rest of the bike

was fairly conventional, the aim being

to maximize reliability. The frame was a

familiar tubular steel cradle with long-stroke

telescopic forks at the front and a Pro-Link

monoshock at the rear.

Finally, the resulting bike was given the

name NXR and entered into the 1986 Dakar.

It was to be a significant year. Suddenly

the leading desert racers were all large

capacity twins – or more. The factory BMW

The 1986 Rothmans version.

Gilles Lalay takes first

in the 1989 Paris-Dakar

on HRC’s NXR750 – the

father of the Africa Twin.

superior to the Japanese 500s and, despite

the G/S’s extra weight, its flat-twin layout

had a lower centre of gravity – also an

advantage. BMW team leader Hubert Auriol

won first time out a new era had clearly

begun. Auriol, this time aboard a 980cc

version of the BMW GS, won again in 1983.

While his new teammate, Belgian Gaston

Rahier, and despite ever-larger Japanese

single-cylinder competition, won in 1984

and 1985.

48 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Official Dealer

The All new Yamaha YZ65 Arriving soon!

SPECIFICATIONS

Type Liquid-cooled, 2-stroke, reed valve with YPVS

Displacement 65cc

Bore x stroke 43.5mm x 43.6mm

Clutch type Wet, Multiple-disc coil spring

Ignition system Digital CDI

Front suspension Telescopic forks, Ø 36mm

Rear suspension Adjustable pre-load and rebound damping, Monocross

Seat height 755mm

Wet weight (including full oil and fuel tank) 61kg

Fuel tank capacity 3.5L

Stock is limited so book yours now.

Follow us on our Facebook page to keep up to date with all of the events for kids.

E&OE

(t) 011 251 4000

(e) info@linexyamaha.co.za

Cnr. Malibongwe Drive & Tungsten Road

Strydom Commercial Park, Randburg


GSs were now 1040cc, the Cagiva Elefant

V-twins were entering their second Dakar

while fierce Honda rivals Yamaha entered –

alongside its conventional XT600 singles – a

radical FZ750-based four-cylinder machine.

In 1987, came the debut of the XL600V

Transalp, another V-twin, but this time with

the liquid-cooled, chain-drive engine derived

from that of Honda’s 600 Shadow custom

and a machine who’s concept was for fairly

leisurely “long holiday rides from town over

the Alps to the Mediterranean.”

In the wake of the NXR’s success, and

despite the Transalp’s popularity, Honda

wanted more. Spurred on further by

requests from Europe, Honda decided to

produce a bike with an even more

aggressive approach. Tomonon Mogi

was put in charge of the project.

“At the time Honda was aiming to

expand its market share in the growing

Adventure Touring segment which

had become extremely popular in

Europe,” Mogi said years later. “Our

single cylinder models stacked up well

against rivals yet couldn’t quite take

the lead. Then the XLV750R debuted

in the Europe. This was designed by

a Honda R&D group that was mostly

involved with on-road models. With

its V-twin engine, shaft drive and

excessive unprung weight it had a lot

50 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


of weak points, and was quite heavy,

so nobody could really consider it to be

viable in the dirt.”

In its place, he said, the idea for the

new bike was to be a more aggressive

and adventurous version of the

Transalp; “The Transalp’s image was

of a bike crossing the Alps on the way

to the Mediterranean,” said Mogi.

“But European dealers told us they

wanted a machine that conveyed a

more powerful image – of crossing the

Mediterranean and charging across the

Sahara desert. That was at exactly the

time that the factory-built NXR had just

won the Paris-Dakar. What was clear

was that we would be making a replica of

the NXR – it was the whole point.”

Mogi’s team started with the Transalp’s

583cc, three-valve, SOHC V-twin engine

and over-bored it by 4mm to boost capacity

to 647cc and raise peak power by 2bhp.

After that, the plan was to make the new

bike more aggressive and replicate as many

NXR elements as possible.

“I wanted to make it aggressive, you

see. This was going to be ridden off-road,

right? So the suspension stroke had to be

long. So we set the seat height at 890mm

(the Transalp’s was 860mm) to give us the

suspension stroke needed for off-road

riding.”

Joining all that together was a new

perimeter-style frame fashioned from

rectangular section steel tubes and

designed to be 20% more rigid – essential

for high speed stability – than that of the

Transalp. New, long travel, 43mm forks

were derived from those used in Honda’s

motocrossers, as was the box-section

aluminum swing arm. The rear monoshock

was adjustable not just for preload but for

compression damping as well.

Cooling-wise, the newcomer had not one,

but two small aluminium radiators squeezed

under the tank each side of the frame,

while the determination to build a true ‘NXR

replica’ prompted Mogi to borrow the actual

Dakar-winning bike from HRC for inspiration.

He says it transformed the design process.

“On parking it at our work site we found

that it exuded the true aura of the racer that

had survived Africa and outrun everyone

else in the desert,” he said. “It gave a really

muscular impression and powerful sense of

surviving in the wilderness.”

In fact, everywhere you looked, the

emphasis was on making the new bike

appear every inch the factory-built racer.

That’s why the newcomer got a fully

stainless steel exhaust. That’s why it had

an ‘auxiliary type’ instrument panel (where

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018 51


the panel is made up of different, separate

elements). And that’s why, when it finally

went into production, it was built at HRC as

well. The HRC ‘tricolore’ colourscheme went

without question.

That first Africa Twin was launched on

May 20th 1988 and proved an immediate

sensation.

Gilles Lalay, widely accepted as the father

of hard enduro, took first in the 1989 Paris-

Dakar on HRC’s NXR750 – the father of the

Africa Twin.

Three years after that, even more

significant changes were made. With 1993’s

new XRV750 RD07, it wasn’t the engine, but

the chassis and bodywork that received a

makeover with a new frame, repositioned

and lower fuel tank, a lower seat (both to

improve handling) and all-new bodywork.

In this final incarnation (there was a final

slight update in 1996 which saw a revised

cowling and higher screen) the Twin lived on

until 2003, co-existing for its final four years

alongside Honda’s new, more powerful,

but larger and less aggressive XL1000V

Varadero. Finally outgunned by newer,

bigger rivals, the Africa Twin was at last

deleted.

Today, however, all retain a strong,

devoted following, thanks to their durability,

style and versatility, while the original RD03

650 is at last becoming an appreciating

modern classic. Modern adventure bikes

simply wouldn’t be what they are today

without it.

And the name?

“Africa Twin was decided upon based on

the comments of one of the European sales

staff who said ‘It must be a real Africa Twin

if it has the V-twin engine that raced through

Africa.’” A legend was born.

These two bikes:

The red and white one is a 1998 model

with 17000 genuine Km’s on the clock. It

was traded in at one of the dealerships in

Gauteng. The Campbell brothers heard

about it and scragged it they have owned

it for four years and have only clocked up

1000 extra kilometres. It has panniers and

is still in perfect nick… Remus pipe, SW

Mototech crash bars, Oxford Heated Grips.

Jonty and Mike Campbell

The white one is a 2000 model with 23000

genuine kilo’s on the clock.

The brothers heard about a bike in Kokstad

belonging to a 2nd owner and without even

seeing the bike they paid a deposit and

confirmed the sale. It turned into a ding

dong when the owners son tried to return

the deposit and stop the sale, but there was

a paper trail…after about a week of arguing,

the bike found its new home. Laser Pipe.

Wingrack panniers.

Both bikes are ridden occasionally, but

they are kept primarily as collectors’ items,

but they don’t hang on the wall of a pub

somewhere, they are kept under covers for

when the itch arises. They start first time

and still run like on the day they rolled off the

production line…

The guys do own a third bike that is on its

way for a full factory rebuild at Pro Dirt Bike

in Vereeniging. We’ll tell you all about that

when it’s done.

Great to see these old bikes so well cared

for.

52 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


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Andre 082 771 3040 / Sales: Avril 083 284 4201

Technical: Fernando 071 895 9567

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//STRIKE250

//SECTOR750

R67 500 R147 500

R119 900 R225 000

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RACE PARTS

www.motosport.co.za

KENNY GILBERT

TAKES THE WIN

1st National Offroad for 2018… Eshowe.

Pics by ZC marketing and “Dan The Man” Photography

Kenny G did not put a wheel wrong.

We’ve chatted to lots of riders around this race – consensus

is that this one was tougher than most off-road races, closer

to enduro than to cross country. What a beautiful part of the

world to race in…

Pepson Plastics Husqvarna Racing started its SA Cross

Country racing season with a bang in more ways than one

over the weekend, when Kenny Gilbert rode to open class

OR1 victory.

“The track was very demanding, it had a bit of everything,” a

delighted Gilbert explained after bringing his Pepson Plastics

Husqvarna home to the OR1 win. “I overcame a tough dice

all day to beat KTM’s Ross Branch and I’m happy to have

started the season off on top of the podium. “My Husqvarna

FX450 ran like a train and our Pepson Plastics team is

absolutely amazing — thanks so much for a brilliant machine

today.

The weekend worked out well for Pepson Plastics Husqvarna

Racings new recruit Taki Bogiages, who was drafted into the

team on the eve of the race before delivering a fine second in

OR2. “Eshowe was my first race under the Pepson Plastics

Husqvarna Racing flag, and what a race it was!” Pretoria rider

Taki smiled. “The track was very demanding and tested us all

in every possible way.

Young gun Travis Ghelig made it two Husqvarnas on the OR2

podium with a hard-fought third at Eshowe. “Third in class

and some good points for the championship — I’m pretty

chuffed with that!” Boksburg lad Travis explained.

Masters rider Iain Pepper made it four podiums for Pepson

Plastics Husqvarna when he overcame a tough run to come

home third among the madalas. “This was one tough Cross

Country race,” Midrand rider Iain confirmed. “I had a hard

second lap but I was happy to bring it home to complete a

strong opening race for the team — thanks to everyone for a

great effort — that’s the way to start the season!”

The Brother Leader Tread KTM squad took their place at

the start line expecting to push the pace and blitz their way

across Natal’s lush vegetation – but what they encountered

instead was a tough and technical loop that put their enduro

skills to the test.

With steep climbs, river beds and rocky terrain, both the

riders and their bike setups were taken by complete surprise.

Lourens Mahoney, a true pro.

Louw Schmidt back from injury.

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Defending OR1 champion Branch

remained calm, and set off into the

unfamiliar territory with a sprained wrist.

With the 2019 Dakar Rally on cards and

a full season ahead, the rider did some

damage control and conserved his energy

instead of risking injury.

While he admits that it took him a few

laps to get going, Branch pulled off a

second place for the day.

Amused by the technical challenge he

encountered, he commented: “So this

was a learning curve… my first tough

‘enduro’ event! It’s been a hard day out

and I’m relieved to be on the podium.

Definitely going back home to practice on

some rocks – I’m excited! I’ll hopefully get

my KTM 450 XC-F back on the top spot

at the next one.”

The journey back to the number one plate

was off to a promising start for Louwrens

Mahoney. This experienced racer stepped

up to the technical challenge with a

wealth of experience behind his name,

and quickly pulled away from the rest

of the OR2 field. With Husqvarna’s new

addition Taki Bogiages just a few minutes

behind him, Mahoney was the first man to

reach the finish line and ultimately the top

step of the podium.

“It was super challenging! The route was

just in your face the whole day, and took

a lot of concentration. Hats off to the

youngsters, who handled it all super well,”

said Mahoney.

Reigning champion Juan “Bollie” van

Rooyen never leaves fans disappointed

as he attempts to stake his claim in the

Senior Class for the fifth consecutive time

this year. His Zululand victory came as

no surprise. Not only did he take the win

for the day, but managed to do it with an

www.motosport.co.za

impressive 10-minute lead.

Returning to the cross country scene were

Louw Schmidt and Jarryd Coetzee.

Schmidt has had to take the past few

months easy after surgery, and spent

less time in the saddle before the season

opener than usual. His performance

surprised him, however, and with a fifth

place in the OR1 class he said: “It was a

true test of skills and ability to race out

there. After almost three months off, I felt a

lot fitter than I thought I would. I brought it

home safe today – didn’t want to make any

mistakes, there’s a long season ahead!”

Coetzee’s come back is also well

underway. The OR3 rider has struggled

with a knee injury and was side-lined

for the majority of 2017 season. With a

renewed determination to ride, Coetzee

narrowly fell short of the podium and

finished the event in fourth place.

The Brother

Leader tread

team.

This was Taki’s first race

with the Husky team.

PUT... OIL IN YOUR BIKE

www.motosport.co.za


Nowadays bike shop’s customers expect more than just their motorcycle from dealerships, so it’s those that

provide riding and social opportunities, as well as quality products and service that are most likely to succeed.

Trax KTM of Silverlakes in Pretoria is a bike shop that has applied this approach successfully enough to become

South Africa’s most successful KTM dealership, so when I was invited to join their first adventure bike fun day at

Rhino Park near Cullinan, I was really interested to find out what it was all about. By Paddy Moore

Having fun and riding and meeting other

adventure bikers are important reasons for

adventure biking, so I was pleased to realise

that they were very much part of what Trax

is offering.

After an impressive 77 entrants had

registered, they were turned loose on what

had been a 4WD training ground, where

a twisty course led them over multiple

humps and through sandy, banked corners

connected by short straights. It was all just

challenging enough to keep an intermediate

rider well occupied, whilst the experts were

really blasting around enjoying themselves.

Next up was the barrel racing, where teams

of fast ladies and gents slewed their KTM’s

and BMW’s around a tight oval track until

racing guru Johan Gray picked the winners

out of the dust cloud that they had created.

As an ex dirt tracker I was impressed by the

extent to which some riders got their big

bikes seriously sideways, without dumping

them groundwards.

After all this excitement, a change of pace

was called for, so organiser Riaan Koen

called all riders to a large tree, to which a

stout rope had been attached. The task

then before them was to ride around the

tree in progressively smaller circles, so as

to wind the rope around it as many times

as possible but using their throttle hand to

hold the rope. This was a tricky challenge

but some serious skilful riders managed nine

turns before the rope ran out, as their bar

ends scraped against the tree itself.

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After lunch, the action moved across to

a really sandy area known as The Beach,

where another course has been laid out for

anyone brave enough to tackle it. Fortunately

Trax KTM’s friends and customers are all

courageous fellows, so it wasn’t long before

the atmosphere was shattered by howling

engines as they attempted to power through

the deep, soft sand, whilst staying upright. A

few really skilful riders succeeded, but most

pulled out after a strenuous lap or two, having

learnt that heavy adventure bikes and soft

sand are basically incompatible…

Back at the Rhino Park restaurant, sponsor

Liqui Moly’s products were freely awarded

to most entrants, in recognition of their good

natured efforts. Not one injury was sustained,

everyone enjoyed themselves tremendously,

made new friends and went home eager for

Trax’s next event. Riaan and his efficient,

helpful staff were rewarded with lots of

positive feedback, some serious interest in

their demo bikes and the satisfaction of a job

well done.

Having made such a good start they’ll

be hosting another fun day next year, so if

you’re interest in participating, check out

their website and/or Facebook page for

information, then tell your riding buddies

about it too. Great to see such pro-active

dealers out there!

Willow Rock Shopping Centre, Solomon Mahlangu Drive, Equestria,

Pretoria East LANDLINE: 012 111 0190 / 012 809 1670


CAIRO TO CAPE

IN 8 DAYS BY BIKE… A WORLD RECORD.

Andrew Russell left Cairo before dawn on 2 January - less than eight days later he was in Cape Town. Picture: supplied

Cape Town - It took three tries, but Andrew Thabo Russell has finally broken the record for the fastest time between

Cairo and Cape Town on a motorcycle. And not just broken it - he slashed five days off the previous mark of 13 days

23 hours, set by Swiss endurance rider Urs ‘Grizzly’ Pedraita in 2016, completing the 11 000km ride on his KTM 1190

Adventure R in seven days 18 hours 52 minutes.

By: Dave Abrahams, IOL Motoring. Glenn Foley Dirt And Trail and Andrew Russell.

Russell, 34, put his much faster time down

to, among other things, improved road

conditions, which have seen the record fall

sharply in recent years, from 20 days to just

over a week.

“Infrastructure in Africa is improving

dramatically,” he said. There are now only

about 250 kilometres of untarred surface

remaining on the iconic Great North

Road, allowing riders to use bigger, faster

machines, and there’s a new land border

between Egypt and Sudan that sidesteps a

slow ferry ride up Lake Nasser.

Not an easy ride

But that doesn’t mean it’s an easy ride - it

took Russell three attempts just to finish his

epic journey.

His first effort, in 2015, ended just past

halfway, when his passport was stolen at

the border between Ethiopia and Kenya.

Russell’s second run, in December 2017,

was cut short after only 2000km by a

broken chain in the middle of the Nubian

desert which caused catastrophic gearbox

damage.

“I had to hitch-hike on trucks for five days,

with a 240kg bike that wasn’t running, to

get it back to Cairo,” he said. “It was very

draining but full of rich human experiences;

the truck drivers fed me every night, refusing

any form of compensation - this happened

in countless ways throughout the trip.”

A Sudanese biker gang arrived at one of

Russell’s breakdown points, helping him all

night to fix the bike.

“They were brilliant,” he said. “They used

engineering techniques that you won’t find

in any manual - but some things just can’t

be fixed without new parts.”

58 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Russell’s final effort - which he

described afterwards as a fairly clean

run - started from Cairo on 2 January.

“There were even times when I could

forget about the record and just

enjoy riding,” he said. “The border

regions of Ethiopia are amazing, with

incredible land formations covered in

vegetation I’d never seen.

“The Rift Valley in central Tanzania

is one of my favourite landscapes.

There are very few people in this wild

and beautiful land.”

The journey was not without its

challenges, including a front tyre

blowout and subsequent rim

damage, hitting a Kudu in northern

Kenya, and having a terribly close

call with a truck in Zambia, while

sleep and concentration fatigue were

battles at the end of every day.

Nevertheless, Russell arrived safely

in Cape Town in record-breaking time

on 9 January this year.

Will his record be broken?

“Yes, but there’ll be lots of luck

involved,” he said. “There are so

many factors to consider and things

that can go wrong when covering 11

000 kilometres through Africa that

fast, especially at night.”

What a ride! What a cool story!

We sent Andrew a few questions

about his quest... What an amazing

adventure!

What made you do it?

Hard to answer, the motivations changed.


Attempt 1 - December 2015

• In the first instance, I suppose I

wanted to feel alive. The feeling that

comes on ones limit.

• ​And the accomplishment. (Which by

the way is a fairly empty feeling!)​


Attempt 2 - December 2017

• I loved the first attempt. I loved

racing, pushing myself, the long days

on the bike - it was joy. The content

feeling that comes after the long days​

with the beer and curry afterwards

(every rider will know what I am

talking about​).

• To finish what I started.

• ​For all the kind supporters of the first

attempt, I wanted to finish for them.

Attempt 3 - January 2018

• There was little joy left, frankly I was

spent after the minor five odyssey on

the trucks from Khartoum to Cairo.

• To finish what I started.

• Again for all the kind supporters, to

finish for them.

• ​I was slightly curious about facing

myself without the innate almost

manic energy I am able to build

inside myself though mental &

physical preparation. That tank was

almost empty.

2nd attempt departure, 17

December 2018, from Qasr

Al-Nil Statues, Cairo.

2nd Attempt, 18 December 2018,

Nubian Desert Sudan, and first chain

break 250kms North of Khartoum.

3rd attempt, 2 January 2018, Nubian

Desert, Sudan.

3rd Attempt, 5 January 2018, South

West Ethiopia – front tyre blowout and

damaged rim.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018 5 9


3rd Attempt, 6 January 2018, Northern

Kenya – Camels in the road

3rd Attempt, 5 January 2018, South

West Ethiopia – posed catnap position

3rd Attempt, 8 January 2018, Central Zambia

– 3am, waking at the side of the road.

3rd Attempt, 7 January 2018, Northern

Zambia – potholes

Why the KTM rather than the traditional

Bavarian Brand?

The GS 800 felt pap. And the 1200 bulky. The

1190 felt agile fast and fun. It was a joy to

ride. The 1190 is not without its issues, but I

still think it is the best bike for the race.

Pic 1

Pic 2

Who supported you on this any sponsors?

Nope - no commercial motivation.

How many countries Did you traverse?

8 countries - Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya,

Tanzania, Zambia, Botswana, South Africa.

Pic 3

Pic 4

Worst borders?

Egypt-Sudan - 4 hours

Sudan Ethiopia - closed early - 3 hours, I

had to get it opened just for me, a very tiring

process after an exhausting day.

Easiest border?

The rest were all quick less than an hour

Was it easy to find Fuel everywhere?

No, some states in Sudan had no fuel, and

it’s a big country. Luckily I had 48 litres

capacity. And I needed it. The main issue was

riding 500kms at night and early AM while the

fuel stations were closed. That’s why in the

north I needed so much. I even had to have

someone waiting for me at the Sudan border

Pic 5

Pic 1: They impounded the bike.

Pic 2: The impound, Cairo Customs,

where hope goes to die.

Pic 3: Negotiations went on into the

night, luckily I was going on to the

largest television show in Egypt that

night and politics won the day.

Pic 4: The disgruntled bureaucracy

and my team, at last we had control

of the machine.

Pic 5: After a few days battling in the

infamous Cargo City, eventually I see

my bike, it would be a few more days

before it was released.

60 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


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with fuel. From Southern Egypt to Central

Sudan, we’re talking 900kms without access

to fuel stations (also due to night and early

morning riding.)

Any getting lost?

​Not really - I had three GPS devices. So I

think I took the fastest route. ​

How long did it take you to prepare for

this sprint? Was it a team effort or purely

solo. Did you set up a team in each

country to assist or how did you go?

• I focused on the race for about 3 months

prior to the attempts.

• Solo.

• I had a fixer in Sudan. He was a guardian

angel. I needed lots of help there on the 2nd

failed attempt. ​

Approximate cost of the 8 day final in full

food etc?

• Hard to say - just while on the road?

Including bike, depreciation, transport to

Cairo, prep in Cairo, extras? I don’t really

know the answer.

Did you sleep on the road every night?

What time did you call it quits each day?

• ​On the final run, only 1 night on the side of

the ​road.

• Average 3.5 hours of sleep. 14 hours

moving time. On average road from 03h30-

22h00.

What was total distance?

​11000kms​

How much did you do each day?

​Average 1400kms a day - between

1000kms - 2000kms​. Strangely enough the

short days were harder than the long KMS

days. It meant tougher roads.

Did you have 8 days in your head or did

you just aim for the best possible result?

​I was going for 6.5 days. I ended up 7.75.

I had to nurse the bike from Cairo due to

attempt 2 injuries and didn’t maintain such

high speeds. We couldn’t fix everything.

Ethiopia was much slower than I expected.

I lost a whole day. Also due to blowout (3.5

hours) and rebel army (4 hours) in the North

not allowing for me to ride at night. But

things will go wrong - one will hit an animal,

one will have a blowout, one will have close

calls with vehicles that will slow one down,

so it’s simply part of the race. I don’t think

I could go much faster. Some roads will

get faster. I consider my third run a virtually

clean run.


What’s next?

Riding with friends!

I think I am going to start sailing.... with

motorbikes and surf boards on board.

Explore coasts + land. I just don’t know how

to sail or surf:)

EgyptSudan

border, I slept the

night on the flag’s

platform. Cold.

Truck ride to Khartoum

An option was to buy another

bike, and this would have

been the one.

62 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Being a tourist while we

waited for the gasket set

from Austria.

Fixing the bike outside the

Acropole Hotel - Khartoum

final touches at KTM Cairo

for 3rd and final run. We

added a 20l fuel tank giving

me 48l total.

Another cup

of generosity

Eventually

back in Cairo

Beautiful desert

Nubian desert chain break

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018 6 3


64 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


By Glenn Foley

My kids first learned to ride on electric

bikes. When my lightie Tristan was about 3

or 4, we found him a used Oset to learn the

basics on - a year or two later he inherited

a TTR50 and so it went on. The Oset was

handed down to his little Brother

Kyle who also cut his teeth

on it so to speak. We often

wonder where that bike is now… or whether

those guys even import into SA. It was a

great, safe bike for the little guys to learn on

and they are the good riders that they are

now, thanks in part to that bike.

When the guys from Mechspec invited us

to the launch of their electric bikes late last

month, we unfortunately could not attend,

so, we booked the bikes, brought them

along to the office and proceeded to ride

the wheels off them. It was quite funny – our

gardener Paul was astonished at these silent

“Stututu’s”, and even our elderly neighbours

(In their eighties), wandered over to have a

look at these “Rather Quick BMX’s.”

3 models were dropped, the kids sized

Kuberg X-Force Pro 50, the medium, spider

like Kuberg Freerider, and the blue full sized

Electric Motion Escape. After riding all three

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018 65


of them you can see exactly who they are

aimed at. The X-Force was grabbed by the

junior member Kyle, who promptly took off

around the garden. After warning Tristan, a

very experienced rider about the Freeriders

crazy torque, he pulled off with an enormous

wheelie and promptly landed flat on his

arse. Dad climbed aboard the blue Escape

and tried to supervise the whole affair… and

he was soon sucking dust while the lighties

blitzed around.

Trials bike power in a lightweight

package…

Tristan convinced Dad to surrender the

blue and that was that – dad was relegated

to the insanely manic Freerider for the rest

of the test – and we simply could not pry

Tristan from the Motion.

The beauty of bikes like these is that

they are virtually silent, so you can fly

around the garden without upsetting the

neighbours. They don’t get hot – so no

exhaust burns. They don’t carry fuel – so

if you are pressed for space, you can lie

them down in the back of your bakkie or

pop them in the boot without hassling about

spilling or asphyxiating yourselves. It is not

recommended that you don’t submerge

the bikes – they are electric after all, you’ll

break it – and probably get a new hairstyle.

While the electrical components are virtually

waterproof, high pressure washer cleaning

best be avoided - rather use a regular

garden hose or a damp cloth.

The Kuberg X-Force Pro 50

Obviously - this is a kids bike. Kyle is 8

and rides a Honda CRF 100 full time. The

X-Force fitted him perfectly, but he did

take a while to come to grips with the very

snappy power delivery. A tad stronger than

his old electric and more two-strokey than

the four stroke to which he is accustomed.

Fortunately all three bikes come with

three power settings – let’s call them mild,

medium and Peri Peri. He started out mild

but by the time the day was over, it was Peri

Peri all the way as he scared the daylights

out of our resident Kiewiets. Let’s not kid

about – in slow mode, this bike is easy to

ride and to learn on – pretty safe. In fast

mode, we reckon that for track application,

this bike is right up there with some of the

petrol powered two-strokes and we can

almost guarantee you a holeshot every

time… we understand that the importers

have approached MSA about allowing these

bikes to race in the 50cc MX class. MSA

has thus far declined but are interested in an

electric class. This bike has however been

approved to race in the UK and Germany

and was the first electric bike to ever win a

MX race against other petrol bikes.

Enormous fun… No Mistake.

Even the

X-Force can

jump logs

66 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


The Kuberg Freerider

Downhill BMX on steroids…

All of the adults gravitated towards this

bike – the ed in his blasé manner pulled a

huge wheelie and almost fell flat on his arse

too. Then we set it on mild and proceeded

to have a lot of fun. This is the tricker of

the pack, popping wheelies, climbing over

logs and general buggering about is where

this nimble electric is right at home. This

thing is INSANE – eye watering acceleration

and we’d hazard a guess at a top speed

of about 60kph or so. Our concern is that

it feels rather bicycley with a whole pile of

power – it weighs almost nothing… so it can

be a proper handful to ride… proceed with

caution, you have been warned.

Amazing performance, light and fun.

Relive your youth – go and get one and learn

to stunt again… it’s cheaper than a high end

bicycle… and you don’t even have to pedal.

The Escape:

What a cool bike this is… The closest to

a traditional motorcycle of the whole lot.

It feels substantial, nice and solid, good

suspension and ground clearance and it

delivers real world performance. Michelin

trials tyres are fitted for lots of traction.

Interesting is the fact that this one has what

they call and ELS “Clutch”, and you ride it

like a normal bike minus the gears… it’s just

like having a Rekluse clutch It just weighs a

whole lot less than a traditional motorcycle.

They rate the riding time once fully charged

to be 2-3 hours – we know guys who went

and rode Heidelberg – roughly 2 and a half

hours later they got back in.

We mentioned earlier that T would not

give it up, he is still out there. Somewhere….

Conclusions:

Guys – what a cool experience. Would I

trade my dirtbike for electric? MMM not just

yet, but if we had limitless shekels, we’d

have them in the garage. They are insanely

good fun and a perfect way to get your

riding skills up to spec. Let’s say that you

live near a horsey place – you can’t ride

your dirtbike after work – but you can take

your Electric bike for a good spin without

anyone even knowing – then swing your leg

over your “Traditional” enduro bike on the

weekend.

Electric tech is certainly getting more and

more impressive – we have no complaints

about the performance. They are virtually

maintenance free, no moving components

– just charge them up, adjust the chain and

you are set. The only limiting factor really is

saddle time. You won’t be doing any offroad

races or long outrides. Here is something

interesting – when you tap off, the spinning

wheels have a magneto that recharges the

battery a bit – amazing innovation We say

around 2 hours of riding on each bike before

they needed a recharge – so ride them for

the intended purpose.

My kids love the fact that bike bikes talk

to you – when you use the little magnet

to adjust the power – a very robotty voice

says “1” Or 2 – or 3… very cool, we reckon

when it gets to 3 it should say –“Prepare for

liftoff…”

Anyway, what a great ride. Lots of fun.

These ones were collected from

Mechspec racing in Kyalami:

www.mechspecracing.co.za

For further info or queries: www.

electronpowersports.co.za

Tristan wouldn’t

give the Electric

Motion back

Big guy small

freerider

68 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


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BBS D&T April'18.indd 1

2018/03/15 12:56 PM


BAVIAANS TOUR

Hi Dirt And Trail magazine. We are Bert and Jovanks Mertens. We reside in Mossel Bay.

We’ve started a motorcycle adventure touring business in Mossel Bay. Our approach is somewhat different compared

to other motorcycle touring businesses; we will be using the Honda XR-190 agricultural motorcycle, a small to medium

sized, 140 kg motorcycle. 184cc - 4 stroke, single cylinder, fuel injected motor. It is easy to handle, light weight,

rugged, and a reliable machine. The bigger picture is that we are targeting potential new riders, and especially new

potential women riders into adventure motorcycle riding…

Would you guys like to come along and do a feature?

We couldn’t make it, but Brian Cheyne went along and sent us his impressions…

About the writer:

Brian Cheyne is a freelance

journalist based in Pretoria. He got

his first bike at age 16 and currently

rides a BMW C650GT. He got his

start in journalism as a stand-in for

the injured editor of Ultimate Drive,

and has since become a regular

contributor to that publication. He

also contributes to two regional

papers and is the motorcycle

journalist for the Afrikaans online

platform Maroela Media.

70 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Some of my most memorable moments

have been on a bike. When I remove my

dusty helmet, I almost always wear a grin

and slightly messed up hair. I have ridden

parts of the Garden route before, but I

realised that I had barely scratched the

surface when we rode the first section of

the Seven-passes road in George recently.

I wanted to explore further, but looking

at my road-bike, I knew I had to make

another plan if I wanted to venture onto

these roads.

I came across this new company in

Mossel Bay that specializes in tours in and

around the Garden route. To my surprise I

realized that I had met the co-owner Bert

before, and when I contacted him, he

promptly invited me to come and do a tour

with their touring company, called African

Karoo Adventures. I said I wanted to do

the Seven-passes road, and I wanted to

sleep somewhere in the Karoo. I left the

rest to him and his partner Jovanka.

These two gave up a comfortable life

in Gauteng and settled in Mossel Bay to

start AKA. What tickled me, though, was

their choice of bike. When we arrived at

the workshop that acts as their base,

there were 6 brand new Honda XR 190

CT motorcycles. If you think about it, it

makes perfect sense. The bike is light,

very economical, and quite punchy in

second gear. Also, for a novice rider, this

is probably the least intimidating bike I

can think of, apart from maybe a Jonway

scooter. AKA wants to attract more female

riders to adventure motorcycling, so they

invited a female rider along with some

very rusty riding skills. I have been down

to Gamkaskloof on a big adventure bike,

and I must admit that my first thought was

that this would be so much easier on a

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018 7 1


smaller bike. Hard-core adventure riders will

probably scoff at the little Honda, but this is

not the core target market for AKA.

The bike itself has skinny tyres and a

21-inch front wheel. There is a rack over the

pillion seat, and a side-stand on both sides

of the bike, which points to its intended

role as a farm implement. AKA added

handguards, a gel seat, and a tankbag for

all your goodies. There is no need to carry

luggage, as all their overnight tours have a

support vehicle to carry all that. You can just

enjoy the scenery. Should you worry about

your own ability in some of the sections,

Jovanka will gladly swap with you.

The night before we left, we discussed

the brief outline of our tour. AKA is

completely flexible with the itinerary.

You can choose to book your own

accommodation, or you can let Bert and

Jovanka do it all. Their daily rate includes

the rental, fuel, the guide and the support

vehicle. From there you can build your tour

to suit your needs. They have extensive

local knowledge, and having ridden here a

lot, I was amazed at the little gems that they

showed us along the way.

Over the next three days, we rode

through spectacular scenery and

experienced all the elements thrown at

the little Honda. We had wind, dry sand,

rocky gravel, mist and rain, all in one day.

The brave little XR did not blink once. I felt

completely at ease on the bike, and with the

bike governed to 100km/h, we had a lot of

time to soak it all in.

72 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


Our overnight stop was in an old farmhouse on

the Baviaans road. Here we could see the stars in all

their glory, and I sat in amazement at what we put the

Hondas through and where these brave little troopers

got us today. Would my experience have been better

on a colossal Adventure bike? I think not. With Bert’s

local knowledge and infinite patience, I experienced

the Garden route far better than if I was there on my

own. And with a lighter, nimbler bike my confidence

grew over the course of the tour.

I have always wondered whether renting a bike is

a viable option, and the answer is a resounding yes!

You don’t have to make the investment, or worry

about maintenance and insurance. So if you ever

want to have a wonderful tour on a bike through the

most beautiful part of South Africa, be sure to look up

Bert and Jovanka from AKA tours.

Go check out their website on www.akatours.co.za.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018 73


YAMAHA’S 700 TENERE CLOSER TO

PRODUCTION

It seems to have taken a long time but… it looks like Yamaha’s 700 Tenere is closer to production than

ever before… Are they just teasing us again? We hope not, this bike looks amazing!

Inspired by the huge levels of interest

generated during the last year, Yamaha

will be taking the Tenere 700 World Raid

prototype on a worldwide tour throughout

2018. During this special ‘World Raid

tour,’ a team of Yamaha riders will take

on a number of tough adventure stages

across the globe, enabling fans in America,

Australia, Africa and Europe to see, feel

and hear the much-awaited machine.

For its tour debut the Tenere 700 World

Raid made an appearance in Australia,

ahead of the “Tenere Tragics Bay to Bush

Run” in Queensland. Factory Yamaha

Dakar Racer, Rod Faggoter, was honored

with the task of riding the new twincylinder

adventure machine during its kick

off leg. According to Yamaha, Africa will be

the next stop on the tour.

The Tenere 700 World Raid prototype

is being used to develop the final

specification of the production model.

Featuring the rugged rally-inspired

character of the original T7 concept bike,

and developed using the information

gained from intensive testing of the T7

during 2017.

74 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


At the very heart of the Tenere 700

prototype is the same highly acclaimed

689cc CP2 engine that has been used in

the popular MT-07. Its compact design

and linear torque delivery give it plenty of

power for strong performance on the tar or

dirt, while its mass-centralized layout and

low weight contributes to the bike’s agile

handling. The prototype also features a

custom-made rally-style Akrapovič exhaust

that reinforces the bike’s rugged looks and

delivers a lekker growl.

The prototype’s steel chassis has been

reworked and improved in key areas in order

to achieve optimized on-road and off-road

handling. It also inherits the same rally bike

silhouette and ‘Racing Blue’ color scheme

as the T7 but with a number of small

touches, such as a lower seat height that

makes it more accessible to a wider range

of adventure riders.

In addition, the fuel tank has been

developed to give a more useful range

between refills, while at the same time

offering better ergonomics. Carbon fibre

is used for the side panels, front fender

and the one-piece rear tail. It also gets a

distinctively-styled cowl equipped with a

Dakar Rally inspired 4-projector headlight

assembly. The cockpit area is designed

to enable the rider to attach additional

equipment such as navigation devices.

Throughout the 2018 World Raid Tour, the

Tenere 700 prototype will be tested on all

types of terrain. From these tests, Yamaha

plans to develop the final specifications for

the production model. Maybe when it gets

here we’ll get the opportunity to ride it?

That’s a formal request please Yamaha – we

aren’t even trying to email you or call – this

time we are printing the request….

Hopefully, it will be sooner rather than

later when we finally see the Tenere 700

arriving on dealer floors!

Photos Courtesy of iKapture

76 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


CASH

FOR

Some gyms use machines…Base Fit builds them

Train to Win

Custom Sport Fitness

Base Fit Training is specifically designed for dirt bike

riders to dramatically improve riding fitness, explosive

power, strength endurance, stamina and core stability.

www.basefit.co.za

Fourways l Centurion l North Riding l Lanseria l Westrand l Eagle Canyon l Hillcrest l Hilton l Online

SUBSCRIBE

TO SA’S

DIRTIEST

MAGAZINE

CALL 011 979 5035 OR EMAIL anette.

acc@mweb.co.za. Digital or hard copy.

BIKES

Train to wi

training vouc

WE BUY AND SELL

GOOD CONDITION

SECOND HAND

BIKES

www.bobbyscott.co.za

Cnr. Breed & Taaifontein Road,

Montana, Pretoria.

Tel. 012 548 0040/45

Grant Scott 082 706 0070

grant@bobbyscott.co.za

GPS - S25’ 40.724’

E 028’ 16.326’


COME COME JOIN JOIN

THE THE FUN FUN

Some pics from the fun and games on rides hosted by the Adventure Company. They host day

rides and weekends away for dirtbikes all over the show. Everyone welcome!

Swazi Mangala: long weekend of the 27th April. 2 days of spectacular riding through Swaziland.

We only have (Very comfy) backpackers accommodation and camping space left, so if you

want to join us, please give us a call.

On the weekend of May the 26th - Wakkerstroom: We’ve had loads of requests for this trip,

some really cool riding in a world heritage site. If you are keen, drop us a mail and we’ll put it all

together. Wakkerstroom is beautiful, we’ll give you a great weekend out with good food and an

awesome ride! Waterfalls, rocks, rivers, mountains... Amazing.

June 29th it’s time for Tri Nations! Bookings are open, SA, Swaziland, ending on the beach in

Ponta, always fantastic and filling up fast! come and join the fun.

July the 28th we’ll host a day ride - Somewhere on the East Rand, watch this space! Always a

great day out.

August 24th: Lesotho. In winter. Amazing come and see the snow and we’ll treat you to an

awesome ride in the mountains.

September 28th: Q4Q - JHB to The Bay. New routes, new dates starts at Carnival Sat the 29th

, ends in Richards Bay Tuesday the 2nd October this year. Four days of Lekker lekker - raising

funds for the Quadpara association. Always fun - Put your leave in and come and be a part of a

life changing event.

That’s it for now! watch this space for more updates as we go along.

(011) 979-5035

(011) 979-0053

www.facebook.com/theadvco

www.adventurecompany.co.za

www.adventurecompany.co.za


VELOCITY

Racing

ADVENTURE COMPANY

2018


Organised by Roberts Racing, the South

Africa Kalahari Rally is a new event that will

be raced from 13 to 19 October in Mafikeng,

South Africa. This rally has its roots back in year

2014, when for the first time a race like this was

planned. The time has come for South Africa

to host a Cross-Country Rally with international

standards. South Africa produces some of the

most successful and competitive rally cars, bikes

and quads with small budgets in comparison to

the world rally community.

Therefore it makes sense that South Africa

moves to the next level of rallying by hosting an

international format rally. Southern Africa boasts

some of the best rally terrain in the world.

With that in mind, Robert Racing announced

for spring 2018 the inaugural multi-stage crosscountry

rally edition of the South Africa Kalahari

Rally. It will be hosted by the North Western part

of South Africa, only 25 km from the Botswana

border, and in the Southern part of the Kalahari

Desert. The rally has a medium term strategy to

eventually become a multi-country rally.

The race will have 6 stages, with a total racing

distance between 2600 and 2800 kilometres in

the vastness of the Kalahari desert. The stages

vary from sand, riverbeds, mountains, hard pack

to very technical navigation.

The Kalahari Desert is not really a desert, but

rather a large arid to semi-arid sandy area in

southern Africa, covering much of Botswana

and parts of Namibia and South Africa. Though

it is semi-desert, it has huge tracts of excellent

grazing after good rains and is rich in wildlife.

The homeland of the Bushmen for perhaps thirty

thousand years, the desert was the setting for the

movie The Gods Must Be Crazy, which featured a

Bushman family.

The entries for this rally will open at 31 March

and will close in definitive at the 1 August.

If you could enjoy a change in scenery

and enter this exciting race, please contact

the organization, by emailing them at info@

kalaharirally.com

www.kalaharirally.com

80 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE APRIL 2018


MOTORCYCLE

LIFT TABLE

DELIVERY

COUNTRYWIDE

This ZIPPEL

motorcycle work table is designed for

motorcycle maintenance and is a must have,for repair

shops or home maintenance workshop. Quick, easy,

one man operation which reduces fatigue, no more

sore back and neck from bending for hours on end.

Adjust the height from 200 - 800mm to get the most

comfortable position and work height. This “Radial

Arm” table design is different from the cheaper

imported “Scissor Operation” types with individual

moving legs, which need a smooth flat surface to

operate, and have tendency to be unstable! However

the ZIPPEL work table has a rigid base which can even

be bolted to the floor and works perfectly, even on any

irregular surface.

Pushing the motorcycle on and off the ramp is made

easy by the gentle slope and integral loading ramp

when in the down - loading position, and having the

front wheel catcher is a great feature especially when

loading Race Bikes or MX bikes which have their bike

stand removed – this feature allows you then to secure

the bike on the table with the tie down straps.

Truly a one man operation!

PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS

• Designed for one man operation or motorcycles

without a stand

• Infinite Height adjustment from 200 - 800 mm

• Automatic front wheel catcher (fully adjustable

for all wheel sizes)

• Supplied with eye bolts

• Extended operating jack handle to reduce

lifting effort

• Signal red - durable powder coated finish

• Powered by sturdy 1.5 tonne hydraulic jack

• Suitable for motorcycles up to 250 kg in weight

• Countrywide Delivery

• 12 month guarantee

NOW AVAILABLE FROM

FOR MORE INFO

Cobus Marais

0825709201

011 902 9213

info@zipplafrika.co.za


Jaycee Nienaber

Holeshot Husqvarna

PHOTO BY : Kerry Hughes

Just 1

helmet For the job

J12

Henderson Racing Products - 011 708 5905

www.facebook.com/Hendersonracingproducts

J32

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