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09042018 - AS APC'S NEC MEETS TODAY: Oyegun, Tinubu's ‘soldiers’ head for showdown

44— VANGUARD, MONDAY,

44— VANGUARD, MONDAY, APRIL 9, 2018 08070524223 When artists vend flesh while the country burns By OSA AMADI, Arts Editor Before the Afrobeat king, Fela Anikulapo Kuti, met the American lady, Sandra Smith (now Sandra Izsadore) in 1969 in Los Angeles, the lyrics of Fela’s songs were irrelevant: how sweet his mama’s soup was and all that. This young lady, Sandra, changed Fela’s philosophical outlook. She found it ridiculous that Fela with his kind of powerful instrumentation was lyrically preoccupied with irrelevancies when his country and Africa, with its rich history, was in the grip of social, political and economic enslavement. Sandra’s recollection of her meeting with Fela is quite inspiring: “When I heard Fela’s music, after we had been spending time together, I heard them rehearse, and I liked it, but I had no idea what he was saying. So I asked him, “Fela, what are you saying?” He said he was singing about his soup. He was singing about nothing. I laughed and I said, “That doesn’t make sense, you should use your music to educate. You should write songs that have meaning.” I was looking for African pride, and I looked to my own African King, and he told me that there was no pride in Africa, at that time. I was shocked. When H.B. Barnum, the music director for [original Rat Pack member] Joey Bishop’s TV show, and Duke Lumumba brought him in for the 1969 sessions, Fela started writing •1995 cartoon by Akin Onipede •Artwork projecting a child’s face onto toxic factory smoke music that had some meaning for his people. When he went back to Nigeria, he was a changed person. It wasn’t until 1976 that I learned that it was because of the books that I had given him…” Go and sing songs that will address the political problems of your country and continent, things your people can relate with, educate your people with your music and arouse their political consciousness, Sandra told Fela, and Fela got the message. A new consciousness took hold of him, and he ceased to be the proverbial man whose house was on fire and he was busy chasing rats. He began to use his music to attack the ills of his society and the human agents of oppression. And what a dignified battle he fought; what a warrior he was and still is. Later, Fela had this to say about his encounter with Sandra: “Sandra gave me the education I needed. She was the one who opened my eyes. She was the one who spoke to me about Africa! For the first time, I heard things I’d never heard before about Africa! She talked to me about politics, history. She taught me what she knew and what she knew was enough for me to start on.” Likewise, many Nigerian artists, musicians, journalists, intellectuals, writers, etc., are chasing rats today while the country is on fire. Many of us are vending flesh of women in the vulgar bandwagon belief that “sex sells.” Art – whether visual, literary, or music – is a force that has always been employed for positive social change. Throughout history, the arts have played significant roles in the fight against undesirable social, political or economic conditions. Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, Fela, Sonny Okosun, Dele Jegede, and many others could not afford to vend flesh of women and preoccupy themselves with trivialities when their society and peoples’ lives were threatened by dangerous social, political and economic problems. “Art can be used not only as indices of aesthetic cognition, but equally as important tools in stemming the marginalisation of the blacks’ contributions to world civilisation,” said Dele Jegede, the artist who used satirical cartoons to criticise social and political systems in Nigeria. Jegede used his art to denounce electoral malpractices, malfunctioning educational system, and the horrors of Rwanda and Burundi. Fearlessly, he criticized major social problems and inspired a new generation of artists like Akin Onipede who produced the daring Abacha cartoon in 1995. Similarly, on the international scene, a stunt by the company Xiao Zhu triggered a global conversation on Chinese pollution. Their idea of projecting children’s faces onto toxic factory smoke plumes went viral on the social media intensifying pressure on companies and the government to come up with a policy on air quality. These and many other examples show how shameful it can be for contemporary Nigerian musicians, artists, journalists, and intellectuals, who by virtues of the nature of their callings, choose to adopt escapist ideologies, themes and lifestyles in the midst of life-threatening political, economic and social conditions. What could be more debasing, for instance, than for someone who calls himself or herself a musician in contemporary Nigeria to be singing about women’s breasts and bum-bum and flaunt same on TV screens when Fulani herdsmen and Boko Haram are massacring people in the country almost on weekly basis and an unperforming Federal Government, army, and police living on taxpayers’ money are doing nothing about it? No doubt, Chinua Achebe, Fela, Sonny Okosun, Gani Fawehinmi, Ken Saro Wiwa and other activists and nationalists who used their arts, pens, influences and positions to battle the ills of Nigerian society, will be turning and moaning in their graves, seeing what cowards and lily-livered humans this generation of Nigerians has become. Aboderin Talabi: Publishing culturally intelligent books for kids By Prisca Sam-Duru Olubunmi Aboderin Talabi is an author and the founding publisher of Clever Clogs Books. In this exclusive interview, she speaks about her love for writing for children Kindly give a background of your enterprise, Clever Clogs Clever Clogs is a niche, Start-up Company focused on the production of Nigerian-themed children’s picture books for young readers under the age of nine. So far, I have published Tobi Visits the Conservatory; Kob the Antelope and Diary of a Toddler. What inspired you into writing and publishing children’s books? I have always been a writer for as long as I can remember. However, I made the decision to start writing children’s books when I realised that we simply don’t have enough readily-available picture books specifically for Nigerian children. Many of the picture books in our environment are from or based on a different culture. Reading is good for the cognitive development of children but continually reading books featuring other cultures may unintentionally cause them to feel as if those cultures are of more value than ours. You’ve just launched your book series, how has it been for you? I would say it has been great. It is amazing that a lot of schools, parents and even the kids appreciate what we are trying to achieve with our books which is enabling children identify with the environment they live in. What challenges do you face writing and publishing children’s books in Nigeria? One of the challenges was finding the perfect illustrator to help portray exactly what we wanted. Also, finding a sheetfed printer who pays attention to detail so that the final outcome is flawless was also a challenge. However, we are happy with the quality of the final versions of the books. What makes your books unique? They feature day-to-day life in modern day Lagos from the perspective of children under 9.The passion, the detail, the purpose behind them, make them unique. The books are woven with several learning undertones to help readers gain all-round knowledge that may not be taught in the classroom. For example, in the Diary of a Toddler, the book introduces valuable life concepts to the child, such as the importance of getting enough rest, the need for good personal hygiene, the role of prayer, when to brush your teeth and have your bath, as well as the deliciousness of home-cooked Nigerian food. It shows that there is a time for everything and it helps them to tell time. Reading such a book will encourage a nonsedentary lifestyle, as it depicts an active protagonist. What are the reasons for resonating Nigerian culture, values and milieus within the themes of your books? There are simply not enough picture books readily available to Nigerian children. In a country of over 170 million people, when you visit a bookstore, you will find out that there are not many early childhood books which depict people who look like us, or live in our environment or appreciate the things we appreciate. If the alphabet charts were true to form we use A is for amala instead of ‘A’ is for apple. Both are true but one is more culturally intelligent. I am very interested in our children understanding our values and ideals as Nigerians from the moment they can start to read. •Olubunmi Aboderin-Talabi It would easily become a part of them that way. Aside publishing, what other steps have you taken to help improve children’s reading culture in Nigeria? I do book readings at schools, book clubs, and other organisations. I also have a You Tube channel called Picture Book Story time. The goal of Picture Book Story time is to encourage those who want to learn how to read to follow the words as I read them out loud. What are your long-term plans for Clever Clogs? To see Clever Clogs Books in every household in Nigeria.

VANGUARD, MONDAY, APRIL 9, 2018 — 45 ODIFIRI I, formerly known and addressed as Miss Patience Idowu Odifiri, now wish to be known and addressed as Mrs. Patience Idowu Ossuetta. All former documents remain valid. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the general public please take note. INYANG I, formerly known and addressed as Miss Inyang Glory Inyang, now wish to be known and addressed as Mrs. Glory Dominic Odey- Ogah. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. ABU This is to confirm that the names Miss Abu Amina and Miss Abu Somu Cindy refer to one and the same person; but now wish to be known and addressed as Mrs. Bokolo Somu Cindy. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. EDESIRI I, formerly known and addressed as Miss Ladu Merit Edesiri, now wish to be known and addressed as Mrs. Fovie Ladu Merit Edesiri. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. FLORENCE I, formerly known and addressed as Igbogho Oghenetano Florence, now wish to be known and addressed as Igbogho Oghenetano Mildred. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. DERE I, formerly known and addressed as Akonu Dere, now wish to be known and addressed as Akonu Ajoritsedere Abejoye. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. PEACE My name was wrongly written as Ojiewulu Peace U., instead of Ojiewulu Ogechi Peace which is my correct name. I now wish to be known and addressed as Ojiewulu Ogechi Peace. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. EFEAKPOKRIRE I, formerly known and addressed as Efeakpokrire Joppa Ovoke, now wish to be known and addressed as Efe Joppa Ovoke. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. EDE I, formerly known and addressed as Anthonia Ogoma Ede, now wish to be known and addressed as Anthonia Ogoma Egboja. All former documents remain valid. Fidelity Bank Plc. and the general public please take note. OWOYELE I, formerly known and addressed as Owoyele Elizabeth, now wish to be known and addressed as Tuoyo Elizabeth. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. IDEHO I, formerly known and addressed as Miss Marilyn Omua Ideho, now wish to be known and addressed as Mrs. Marilyn Omua Ideho- Seitz. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. UGBOKERE I, formerly known and addressed as Ugbokere Ufuoma Vera, now wish to be known and addressed as Imonije Ufuoma Vera. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. ESIONYE I, formerly known and addressed as Miss Esionye Esther Chidinma, now wish to be known and addressed as Mrs. Njoku Esther Chidinma. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. OMENA My name was wrongly written as Edore Okemena Omena, instead of Edore Okemena Godswill, which is the correct name. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. ADEKUNLE I, formerly known and addressed as Adekunle Oluwaseun Toyin, now wish to be known and addressed as Oyedele O l u w a s e u n Oluwatoyin. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. TOOGUN I, formerly known and addressed as Toogun Mary Oluwabukolami, now wish to be known as Mrs. Mary Oluwabukunolami Adeolu Okunade. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. EGWUIBE We, formerly known and addressed as Mr. Egwuibe Onyekachi, Mrs. Egwuibe Florence Nwakaego, Master Egwuibe Somtochukwu Testimony, Master Egwuibe Onyedikachim Praise and Miss Egwuibe Oluchi Rejoice, now wish to be known as Mr. Ogbonnaya Onyekachi, Mrs. Ogbonnaya Florence Nwakaego, Master Ogbonnaya Somtochukwu Testimony, Master Ogbonnaya Onyedikachim Praise and Miss Ogbonnaya Oluchi Rejoice. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. ABUBAKAR I, formerly known and addressed as Abubakar Laraba Oghenebukome, now wish to be known and addressed as Apemiye L a r a b a Oghenebukome. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. DAVID This is to confirm that the names, David Ovie and Eyekaghe Ovie refer to one and the same person, but henceforth wish to be known and addressed as Eyekaghe Ovie. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. OKOR ORO I, formerly known and addressed as Miss Mariagoretti Ugochinyere Okoro, now wish to be known and addressed as Mrs. Mariagoretti Ugochinyere Mgbeme. All former documents remain valid. GTBank, Access Bank and general public please take note. EKASA I, formerly known and addressed as Miss Anthonia S. Nwokocha Ekasa, now wish to be known and addressed as Mrs. Anthonia Scholastica Lori. All former documents remain valid. General public please take note. 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