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Durham Chronicle Volume XLIV, Issue 11

Durham Chronicle Volume XLIV, Issue 11

30 The

30 The Chronicle April 10 - 16, 2018 chronicle.durhamcollege.ca Entertainment Demo Derby = smash hit? Kayano Waite The Chronicle Lauryn Macfarlane found herself in room G213 of Durham College, filled with several dozen strangers. She went to the front of the room with a group of professionals from her field in front of her. She then played a song she wrote. She remembers being nervous as her demo played through the room. “I got into my own head. I didn’t look around to see other people’s reactions,” Macfarlane said. This was in April 2017, at last year’s Demo Derby. The Demo Derby is part of the Oshawa Music Week, formerly known as the Reel Music Festival. The second year students of the Music Business Management (MBM) program organize the event every year. The Demo Derby is a showcase of local music talent in the Oshawa community. People present their one minute recordings to a panel of judges, ranging from songwriters and producers, to music managers. Tony Sutherland is a professor for the MBM program. He says after the recording is played, the panel gives the singer feedback on their demo. He says it is not simply about Photograph by Kayano Waite In the spring, Lauryn Macfarlane is planning a handful of events to celebrate her album release. the song being “good”. “We’re talking about is it recorded well? How can you promote it? How can you market it into the marketplace?” says Sutherland. Sutherland also believes the point of the Demo Derby is less about winning overall. “The prize is the feedback you get. If you can sell stuff and get an audience (after) that’s your prize,” Sutherland says. Macfarlane agrees the feedback given was helpful for her after the session. “You can take this part that would have been the hook and switch it around to get a bit more dynamic” was advice Macfarlane received from one of the judges. Macfarlane was also an MBM student when she played her work for the Demo Derby. Because she was in the program she knew the judges would be more honest about the quality of her work. “They knew I was strong enough, they weren’t going to baby me,” Macfarlane said. “They’re going to really rip your song apart in front of everybody.” Though several singers in the Demo Derby are MBM students like Macfarlane, some end up becoming judges like Dan Hand, who was a MBM student in 2008. After graduating, Hand has worked for both major and independent labels, such as Universal Music Canada and his own Black Lamb Music. Recently, he has focused more on artist management. He manages such acts as the Silence Factory and Diamonds. Hand was asked to be a judge for the Demo Derby in 2013. He tried to be as honest as possible as a judge. “I try to give them actual critique that I feel would truly help,” said Hand. “I legitimately listen to the song and try to figure out, ‘What can I compare it to?’” Lauryn Macfarlane, musician and composer. Photograph by Kayano Waite Hand says he tried to give enough of a critique that the musician felt their time spent was valuable. Hand says he would return as a judge for future Demo Derby if asked. He also believes future musicians participating in the Demo Derby should be sure to select the song they are most passionate about. “Don’t just pick a song because it’s the first one on the album,” Hand said. “Pick the one song that defines your music the best it can. Find the best 30 seconds of the song and focus on that,” said Hand. Macfarlane won last year’s Demo Derby. She is currently recording her first major album. The album is being produced by Damon de Szegheo. De Szegheo has worked with breakthrough Canadian acts such as Serena Ryder, Said the Whale, and the Barenaked Ladies. De Szegheo reached out to Macfarlane in November. “He says he’s been following my work for a while and would like the opportunity to be the producer on my first record,” Macfarlane said. Macfarlane’s album is tentatively scheduled to be released in May. She plans to do a release show in her hometown of Peterborough, Ontario before having it officially released on streaming sites, then follow the release with her first Ontario tour. Importance of laying back, being punky and a bit rebellious Aly Beach Punk: a word that makes you think of anarchy, ass-kicking and rebellion. Some may argue punk is dead. Others would have you believe there is no need for punk because there are so many sub-cultures that fight the system. However, there is still a need for the classic punk attitude. There needs to be someone who will smash the white-picket fences and give the finger to the American dream. Maybe punk isn’t as in-yourface as it once was but its ideologies around humanitarianism, anti-establishment, civil rights and gender equality still hold true today. Many movements have embraced these concepts. What is more punk than fighting the system and being political by fighting for what you believe in? Punk music and culture is believed to have started sometime in the mid-‘70s in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia. The movement created a new subculture and a new generation of rock bands such as Sex Pistols, Ramones, The Clash and Black Flag. In the late ‘70s and ‘80s, the punk movement experienced a second wave as genres such as newwave, hardcore and anarcho-punk emerged with bands like Minor Threat and Subhumans. In the ‘90s punk influenced new genres such as post-punk, indie and alternative rock. It evolved into new sub-genres like hardcore-punk like Anti Flag and pop-punk with bands like Green Day, the Offspring, Blink-182. Green Day is known for their iconic 2004 song “American Idiot,” which is still relevant today. Now, punk music is thriving in its own way with the many popular sub-genres and its influence can be heard throughout many rock genres. Punk portrays its ideologies through its music, fashion and general culture. Many bands have continued this trend with having complex, politically charged lyrics. Examples include The Wonder Years, Neck Deep and Senses Fail. On their seventh album, in the song “Gold Jacket, Green Jacket…” Senses Fail speaks on gun violence, twisted Christianity and the impact of 9/11. Punk isn’t dead, it has just evolved. And in this current political climate, we need punk more than ever. We need people to fight the system, smash the white picket fences and give the finger to the American dream.

chronicle.durhamcollege.ca April 10 - 16, 2018 The Chronicle 31 Sports Is 2018 the year of the Bruins? The Penguins may be reigning champions, but their time is over Conner McTague The Chronicle Who’s in the best position to win the holy grail of hockey? It’s often called the hardest trophy in sports to win, because the Stanley Cup takes eight weeks and a minimum of 16 games after an already gruelling 82 game regular season, to clinch it. The NHL playoff format has the top three teams from each division (Atlantic, Metropolitan, Central and Pacific) make the playoffs, as well as two wild card teams from each conference. The division winner with the highest point total will play the second wild card team, the other division winner will play the first wild card team. The second and third place teams in their respective divisions will face each other in the first round. As of April 3rd, the teams who have clinched playoff berths are the Tampa Bay Lightning and Boston Bruins and Toronto Maple Leafs (in the Atlantic), the Washington Capitals and Pittsburgh Penguins (Metro) in the Eastern Conference,. The Nashville Predators, Winnipeg Jets, Minnesota Wild (central), Vegas Golden Knights and San Jose Sharks (Pacific) have clinched in the Western Conference. The teams likely to claim the remaining divisional spots are the Philadelphia Flyers or Columbus Blue Jackets in the Metro, and the Anaheim Ducks or Los Angeles Kings in the Pacific. Both wild card spots in the east and west will go down to the wire, as the Ducks, Kings, St. Louis Blues and Colorado Avalanche all sit within two points of each other. The east will see either the Flyers, Blue Jackets or New Jersey Devils as the wild cards. To avoid a first round matchup with Nashville or Vegas, Anaheim, one of the slower teams in the league, will need to get “the hell out of the wildcard spot they sit in. By any means necessary,” as tweeted by Dimitri Filipovic of Sportsnet. Although their chances of doing this took a hit on Saturday night when their star netminder, John Gibson was injured. To avoid facing the winner of the Atlantic Division, the Flyers, Devils and Jackets will have to finish as the top wild card. This would get them a matchup against a lesser opponent in the Capitals. Home ice in the first round in the Metro and Pacific are still up for grabs, this would give the higher seed a potential of four games on home ice in a seven game series. While every playoff team is competitive, there can only be one champion. The Penguins, of course, can never be counted out as they’re the defending repeat Stanley Cup champions but their time on top has come to an end. This is why the Boston Bruins will be hosting the holy grail of hockey come June. Through the first month of the 2017-18 season, the Bruins didn’t look like a playoff team, much less a Stanley Cup contender. Since beginning the season at 6-7-5, with a goal differential of -10, the team has been on a tear. In this tweet from Filipovic, he shows just how dominant the Bruins have been in their last 60 games. For the season, the Bruins are 49-18-12 (110 points), have plus 56 goal differential and have surrendered the second fewest goals in the league with 201. The Kings have given up fewer at 195. As for the 54.2 per cent of shot attempts at five on five, a single player with this number is impressive, but an entire team? Dominance. This has the Bruins as the best five-on-five possession team in the NHL among playoff teams at 53.6 per cent. The Bruins have three players with 30 or more goals on one line. They also have 161 goals at five on five. These numbers become all the more important because in the playoffs, power-play opportunities are scarce, leaving much of the game to be played at even strength. Even if it comes down to special teams, the Bruins have the fifth ranked power-play at 23.4 per cent. The team also possesses the fifth ranked penalty kill at 82.9 per cent as well as nine shorthanded goals. Of course, to get these kinds of numbers, a team has to have quality players. The Bruins have arguably the best top line in the league with Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand and David Pastrnak a part of the unit. 29 players have 30 or more goals this season, and the Bruins have three of them on one line. Marchand has 34, Pastrnak 33 and Bergeron rounds it out with 30. All also average at least a pointper-game or better. As Pastrnak is at 1.00, Bergeron 1.02 and Marchand is at 1.31 (1st in the NHL). Bergeron, according to analytics, is the best two-way forward in the league. He has won the Selke trophy (best defensive forward) four times in his career. What if the top line struggles? then teams have to deal with a second line of Jake DeBrusk (46 points), David Krecji (42 points) and Ryan Donato (seven points in seven games). And their bottom six forward group is rounded out by players such as two-time 40 goal scorer Rick Nash, David Backes, Riley Nash, and Danton Heinen. The Bruins have a top defensive pairing of 40-year-old Zdeno Photograph by Conner McTague Penguins defenceman Kris Letang (58) will be vital to the team's chances of beating the Bruins. Chara, who is playing some of the best hockey of his career and 20-year-old Charlie McAvoy. The Bruins possess 55 per cent of five-on-five shot attempts while McAvoy is on the ice. Their second pair is headlined by Torey Krug, who has 57 points this season. He’s flanked by Nick Holden, acquired from the New York Rangers in February. Their bottom pairing of Kevan Miller and Matt Grzelyck is solid, if unspectacular. Lastly, in net the Bruins have former Vezina trophy winner Tuukka Rask. The 31-year-old has won 34 games while posting a .919 save percentage and a 2.28 goals against average. Rask also has the fifth best save percentage all time in the playoffs, with a .928 mark in 53 games. As for worries about the rest of the team being able to handle the pressure, the Bruins have the seventh most playoff wins in the salary cap era (2005-present) with 59, and they’ve missed the playoffs just four times in this span. As mentioned earlier, counting out the repeat Stanley Cup champions in Pittsburgh isn’t a good move, as the playoffs are a different animal and the unexpected is to be expected. All it takes is a hot goalie or bad puck luck to change a teams fortunes. But the Bruins have shown it will to be hard for anybody to knock them off.

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