Views
6 months ago

ESC Annual Report 2018

EDUCATION SOLUTIONS Head

EDUCATION SOLUTIONS Head Start & Early Head Start Children from lower income families can have many barriers to school readiness. In the Head Start (HS) and Early Head Start (EHS) programs, children and families receive child development education, family support, health, dental, mental health & nutrition services and transportation. Early Head Start serves prenatal women and children ages 0-3 years old. Each family is assigned a home visitor who provides weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly home visits, based on the program option the family has chosen. Children are assessed in all areas of development and growth. All services are provided in conjunction with the child’s parents. Early Head Start also offers free or reduced fee full-day childcare opportunities for parents who are working and/or going to school full-time. Head Start serves children ages 3-5 years old. Services are provided to children through part-day child development centers. Children are transported to and from home via Head Start bus transportation services. Children receive breakfast/ lunch or lunch/snack depending on the time of day they attend class. Children are taught by Teachers with at least an Associate’s Degree in Early Childhood Education and/or an equivalent degree and Teacher Aides with at least a Child Development Associate certificate. SOURCES OF FUNDING – BUDGET AND BENEFITS TO COMMUNITY Head Start has an operating budget of over $6 million. An additional $2 million in non-federal donations is received. Federal regulations cap administrative costs at 15% of the total budget. ESC’s administrative costs are less than 9% leaving additional money available to be used toward child and family services. The Head Start transportation budget supports 35 buses that travel approximately 200,000 miles per month. Staff salaries and fringe make up 80% of the expenses in the services category; supporting over 200 Head Start employees. ESC receives just over $1,496,617 in federal funds for its Early Head Start program. Donations, primarily volunteer time, accounted for an additional $620,284. Operating with low administrative costs, the program is able to spend most of early head start budget head start budget 32

EDUCATION SOLUTIONS its dollars on services to prenatal women, infants, toddlers and their families. The largest cost category in EHS is staff salaries and fringe, ($912,889) supporting approximately 30 employees. The next largest category under services is infant/ toddler child care. Early Head Start serves 22 children with $161,276 through federal child care funds. The money is paid directly to child care facilities in the community to provide EHS child development services. The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) pays for all food served to Head Start children and approximately ½ of the cook’s salaries. The CACFP program is a reimbursementbased program. The program prepares enough food for a full classroom, although we are only reimbursed for the children who actually eat the meals. We were reimbursed $390,107 this year. RESEARCH Poor children suffer higher incidences of adverse health, developmental and other outcomes than non-poor children. Specifically children from low-income backgrounds have lower birth weights, stunted physical growth, and higher incidences of lead poisoning. They have lower scores on intelligence, verbal ability, and achievement test scores. They complete less years of school and drop out of high school more often. In addition, poor children exhibit more emotional and behavioral issues and are more likely to have a child as a teenager out-of-wedlock (Brooks- Gunn and Duncan, 1997). From the National Head Start Association Research Bites: • Reliable studies have found resoundingly favorable long-term effects on grade repetition, special education, and high school graduation rates for Head Start children. • By the spring of their kindergarten year, HS graduates’ reading assessment scores reached national norms, and their general knowledge assessment scores were close to national norms. • A higher proportion of Head Start parents reported that their 3-year-old children were either in excellent or very good health as compared with those parents who did not have children enrolled in Head Start. • Young women who have experienced a quality early childhood program are onethird less likely to have outof-wedlock births. • Compared to children in a control group, Head Start children are more likely to avoid serious problems in school as they are less likely to be held back a grade, have better attendance rates, and are less likely to miss standardized tests. 33

Full ESC Report - Ministry of Finance
ESC Annual Report 2008-09 - Essential Services Commission
2018 Annual Report
2017-2018 Annual Report
Restoration Academy's 2018 Annual Report
2017-2018 Annual Report (English)
Annual Report
Annual Report
Annual Report
Annual Report -
ANNUAL REPORT
ANNUAL REPORT
ANNUAL REPORT
Annual Report
Annual Report