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Georgia Experience Teacher Toolbox SAMPLE - Grade 5

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NAME: ______________________________ GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 5 | CHAPTER 11 Document-Based Questions PRIMARY SOURCE ANALYSIS STUDENT OBSERVATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS What do you observe about the location? (Describe what you see.) What can you deduce about the location? (Support your deductions with evidence, inferences, and/or reasoning.) Use a world map to identify where the photograph was taken. (Hint: it’s in Asia) Describe the action. What do you see? What do you think might be occurring? SAMPLE Use what you see and what you learned to make inferences based on the photograph. After your teacher shares additional information, expand on your observations and conclusions. ©Gallopade • All Rights Reserved • www.gallopade.com Permission is granted to use Toolbox only with students for whom a current-year Experience Class Set is purchased. 15

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 5 | CHAPTER 11 Document-Based Questions PRIMARY SOURCE ANALYSIS TEACHER NOTES Before World War II, Japan ruled the Korean peninsula as its colony. When Japan lost the war, the Allies made Japan give up its colony. But the Allies had to decide what to do with the Korean Peninsula. The U.S. and the Soviet Union agreed to divide the peninsula along the 38th parallel of latitude. The Soviets occupied the northern half, and the U.S. occupied the southern half. In the Korean War, the north and south regions fought over control of the whole peninsula. After three years, they agreed to stop fighting. The ceasefire left the dividing line very close to where it had started, and even though it does not run exactly along the 38th parallel, it crosses it. To avoid constant fighting along the border, two kilometers on each side of the line that separates North Korea and South Korea were designated as a demilitarization zone (DMZ). This area is considered neutral, and it is off-limits to most people. The areas north and south of the DMZ are heavily fortified. But inside this four kilometer strip that stretches across the peninsula, nature has taken over! The DMZ is one of the most natural, undeveloped areas in Asia. Thousands of birds, fish, and mammals, many endangered, live here. The boundary line is marked off by 1,292 identical signs, placed at intervals across the peninsula. US COB 728MP stands for the U.S. 728 th Military Police Battalion Company B, which has provided security and order along the border since the end of the Korean War. The north-facing side of the signs are written in Korean and Chinese, and the south-facing sides are written in Korean and English. Today, the signs are aging and rusting. SAMPLE POSSIBLE STUDENT OBSERVATIONS: (You can prompt for some of these with questions if needed.) • rural; evidence = no buildings • hilly/mountainous • dry; evidence = dust, no trees • sign looks older than signs today • trucks could be military or moving dirt and rocks • sign is in English With additional information from teacher notes, students can deduce: • the trucks are traveling from North Korea to South Korea • if these are military trucks, it’s pretty risky behavior! ©Gallopade • All Rights Reserved • www.gallopade.com Permission is granted to use Toolbox only with students for whom a current-year Experience Class Set is purchased. 16