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3 months ago

The_Hollywood_Reporter__February_07_2018

About Town People,

About Town People, Places, Preoccupations but — and this is my shit that I need to work on — I still have a bit of shame around raising my hand and being the boss. Our society has this way of going, “Don’t shine too bright, know your place.” So the idea of being in a position of domination made me [uncomfortable]. By 28, you had already created two TV shows. You didn’t get comfortable then? I definitely learned, but there was also a bit of, “She’s doing too much and we don’t like it.” Who’s the “we”? My @ replies on Twitter? (Laughs.) There was a bit of, “Who does she think she is?” And people get mad at you. I thought my dreams were coming true, then someone was like, “Don’t listen to them.” I’m all, “Who’s them?” I had no idea. I do think things have changed, even in the last six months, but there’s this idea of, you don’t get to achieve too much [as a woman] without losing friends and people not liking it. And I’ve definitely had male counterparts [for whom] people were like, “Fucking awesome, dude, that’s so cool. You’re killing it.” There’s not a lot of, “Who does he think he is?” You got your start writing for Comedy Central roasts. In 2011, you roasted Donald Trump. With every roast, it’s all fun and games until you’re up there, and then people’s feelings always end up getting hurt. But his feelings did not get hurt. I remember being like, “Wow, he’s loving this.” And net-worth jokes were off-limits? Oh yeah. At every roast, something’s off-limits. I love that it wasn’t his daughter or his wife, it was his money. Griffin with Cecily Strong in The Female Brain. I Was Wrongly Accused of Harassment. This Is What I Did I ‘To have my workplace conduct questioned was gut-wrenching,’ writes the E! News star of allegations recently found to be unsubstantiated, as he pledges ‘to help voices be heard’ By Ryan Seacrest do not take things for granted. Every day I am living my childhood dream because of the efforts of so many other people. I do my best to show and express my gratitude to my co-hosts, producers, guests, audiences, executives, partners and fans for the privilege of their collaboration and participation, and for the unwavering support of my loved ones and team. In November, I received a letter from a lawyer representing a former show stylist. She claimed that I mistreated her more than a decade ago when we worked together. This arrived during an unprecedented public reckoning by women in our industry and beyond, courageously coming forward to share their stories, many of them heartbreaking. These women sought to bring attention to the systemic gender inequality that has occurred for decades. I was — and am — amazed at their bravery. To have my workplace conduct questioned was gut-wrenching. I’ve always aimed to treat all of my colleagues with honesty, respect, kindness and compassion. Yet I knew, regardless of the confidence I had that there was no merit to the allegations, my name would likely soon appear on the lists of those suspected of despicable words and deeds. The pressures of our overflowing newsfeeds would insist on it. I absolutely want to be part of the change, the progress, that is coming. I did not want to be a postscript of evidence of its cause. After sharing the letter with the network, I publicly denied the claims against me and agreed to participate in any inquiry the network deemed appropriate. On Feb. 1, I received notice that an Guest Column ↑ Seacrest appeared on E!’s Live From the Red Carpet before the Grammy Awards on Jan. 28. independent third party found the claims to be unsubstantiated and that there was no evidence of wrongdoing on my part. Most of us agree that the presumption of innocence is an important standard. We are taught early on that it’s essential to see all sides, to give everyone a chance to explain and to check for exculpatory evidence that may have been missed. At a time when improper interactions between men and women, particularly in the workplace, are part of a national conversation, we must find a way to ensure that everyone — the public, private and public institutions, accusers and accused — is given the opportunity for a swift and fair review. My job is to listen. Beyond listening, which I will continue in earnest, I also will ask questions and try to help voices be heard. It isn’t lost on me that my platforms — radio, TV, social media — can be powerful conduits for change. We all have the right to be treated equally, regardless of our gender, race, faith, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity or other status. We find ourselves in extraordinary times in American culture. We live with near-constant change, disruption and public discourse. I realize the morals and values, the decency, we’ve perhaps taken for granted, individually and as citizens of the world, are in question. Worse, at risk. I do not take these things for granted. Seacrest is an award-winning TV/radio host and producer and creative entrepreneur. FEMALE: COURTESY OF IFC FILMS. SEACREST: TIMOTHY KURATEK/CBS (2). THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 24 FEBRUARY 7, 2018

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