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Scenarios and Patterns for Regiobranding – Rural-urban Territories in the Metropolitan Region Hamburg

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Jörg Schröder

Maddalena Ferretti

SCENARIOS

AND

PATTERNS

FOR

REGIO

BRANDING

1


Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

4

Preface

Urbanism and Architecture in Regiobranding

Scenarios and Patterns

Background: Project Regiobranding

Background: Hamburg Metropolitan Region

4

6

16

26

28

FOCUS REGION

STEINBURGER ELBMARSCHEN

30

Portrait Focus Region

Territorial Portrait Zooms

Patterns

Spatial Perception and Landmarks

Explorative Design Projects

Scenarios

Findings towards Branding

32

48

68

82

86

94

102

2


FOCUS REGION

GRIESE GEGENDELBEWENDLAND

104

Portrait Focus Region

Territorial Portrait Zooms

Patterns

Spatial Perception and Landmarks

Explorative Design Projects

Scenarios

Findings towards Branding

106

122

160

174

178

198

206

FOCUS REGION

LÜBECKNORDWESTMECKLENBURG

208

Portrait Focus Region

Territorial Portrait Zooms

Patterns

Spatial Perception and Landmarks

Explorative Design Projects

Scenarios

Findings towards Branding

210

226

246

260

264

276

284

3


Preface

Jörg Schröder, Maddalena Ferretti

Scenario drawing and pattern analysis are seen as evolving, innovative tools for spatial characterisation

and spatial visioning. The design research shown in this book contributes to these currently

highlighted fields from a perspective of urbanism and architecture that aims to enhance articulation

of spatial qualities at larger scales.

Targeting three areas in the Hamburg Metropolitan Region, the project seeks regional visions for

new rural-urban alliances in a deeply transforming spatial context. Scenarios and patterns are displayed

as accelerators in knowledge and decision processes linked to the concept of Regiobranding,

which combines imagery, economic positioning, identification processes, and visions of future

habitat. In an architectural-spatial approach, explorative scenarios and relational patterns open up

design-driven knowledge production for larger spatial strategies and territorial planning.

The research presented in this book is based on and contributes to the larger and interdisciplinary

research and development (R&D) project Regiobranding. This focus on building and settlement

development in Regiobranding has been elaborated by the authors and the collaborators of the

Chair for Regional Building and Urban Planning of Leibniz Universität Hannover. In the framework

of the project, research questions and results have been evolved in dialogue and collaboration with

other scientific partners, territorial bodies, local experts, and active civil society. Regiobranding as

an R&D project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research BMBF in

201419. Furthermore, the work has been extended by several university research and teaching

projects at the Chair.

Following the overall structure of the Regiobranding project, Scenarios and Patterns for Regiobranding

addresses three areas:

- Steinburger Elbmarschen

- Griese GegendElbeWendland

- LübeckNordwestmecklenburg

4

INTRO


Logo of Regiobranding project, Design: Lisa Leitgeb, Jörg Schröder

© Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

Working from the perspective of urbanism and architecture, the book employs a series of analytical

and synthetic working steps in addressing building and settlement development in Regiobranding:

- territorial portrait drawing

- spatial pattern analysis

- spatial perception analysis

- explorative design projects

- explorative scenario-building

Using these practices in a common methodology for all target areas provides transversal readings

across the metropolitan region, as well as transversal readings across different spatial scales, planning

levels, and actors’ constellations. Finally, the initial results of these analytical practices contribute

for drawing up branding and innovation plans, and for supporting transdisciplinary research

and the implementation in and beyond the project Regiobranding.

This book has been made possible thanks to the fruitful collaboration in the Regiobranding project.

For this we like to thank all scientific and local partners, and especially the lead partner and project

management from the Institute of Environmental Planning of Leibniz Universität Hannover. We

would like to say thank you also to the many experts, institutions, and engaged citizens who helped

with the project less directly by materials, discussions, information, and opinions. Nevertheless,

the presented materials—especially all the mistakes—in the book are our responsibility. This book

would not have been possible without the work of our collaborators at the Chair for Regional Building

and Urban Planning, and without the students involved in the research and teaching activities

that contributed significantly to the book. We hope that arguments, findings, and ideas presented

may contribute to the results of the Regiobranding project in the three target areas and for further

scientific and practical work on spatial characterisation and visioning.

INTRO

5


Urbanism and Architecture

in Regiobranding

Jörg Schröder

Scenario drawing and pattern analysis are evolving and innovative tools for spatial characterisation

and spatial visioning. This book—based on the collaboration in the transdisciplinary R&D project

Regiobranding (see p. 26)—aims to contribute from a perspective of urbanism and architecture to

an international debate on the improvement of strategic as well as inclusive and communicative approaches

to design future living spaces. This debate has been fostered since the nineteen-nineties

by the growing awareness of the need for sustainability and resilience to be principles in urban

and spatial development, as well as by new challenges of globalisation and European integration.

Concretely the book addresses the phenomenon of regional metropolisation and its ongoing

steering and organisation, which in Germany occurs through associations, cooperation, and alliances,

rather than new institutional bodies. The specific focus on subspaces of new metropolitan

alliances—and specifically peripheral ones—has to be understood from this evolutive and flexible

organisational backdrop. It aims at supporting regional cooperation for urban and spatial development

embedded in growing demands of strengthening civil society, economic competiveness, and

of mitigation of and adaption to climate change.

Contexts of Research

From the very beginning of a profound spatial change since the nineteen-nineties, urban planning,

urban design, and architecture, as disciplines directly linked to spatial qualities, have synthesised

and articulated this transformation through concepts such as Diffuse City (Indovina 1990), Zwischenstadt

(Sieverts 1995), Postmetropolis (Soja 2000), and Horizontal Metropolis (Viganò, Cavalieri

2018); thereby seeding important contributions to the enhancement of the disciplines’ research

and practice, as well as providing a foundation for advice to the public and to policies. Therefore,

this book connects to a growing scientific backdrop that seeks innovation in two specific

areas: firstly, an actualised spatial portrait of peripheral areas in the new metropolitan bodies that

clearly includes both the opportunities and the challenges of these new contexts; and secondly

a perspective of the performativity of space that goes well beyond traditional concepts of spatial

planning and spatial transformation as mere imprints of global trends. Hence, characterisation and

6

INTRO


visioning are considered tools for evolving contexts and instruments that address adaptive and

inclusive concepts of spatial transformation. Compactness and diffusion, comprehension and fragmentation,

generalisation and polarisation in the organisation of space that has been increasingly

hybridised and desynchronised since the nineteen-nineties clearly show deep changes in social

aggregation and activities.

The perspective that new territorial phenomena and the induced transformation in multilayered

territories may offer chances of sustainable new setups of living space is seen as an approach

towards a multiplicity of spatial contexts beyond metropolis (Schröder, Carta, Ferretti, Lino 2017).

It can also be linked to actual multiple visions and concepts of metropolis itself. For new constellations

of urban-rural configurations and of governance processes, and especially for tools of integrative

visioning, the R&D project RURBANCE (Alpine Space 201215; see Schröder 2015) constitutes

a crucial foundation in an operative sense, pointing at the logic of spatial and local dynamics

beyond limited views on aesthetics and protection in settlement, landscape, and infrastructure; the

international platform of TERRITORIES (Schröder 2017) further explored spatial strategies in urbanrural

cooperation for polycentric habitat. Furthermore, with the R&D project AlpBC (Alpine Space

201215) interactions between technologies, traditional knowledge, and regional competitiveness

have been formulated as fields of territorial development.

This background on the research into transformation potentials and formulations of spatial visions

strongly indicates the interfaces between spatial production in settlement and landscape as a field

of future innovation as it refers not only to the capitalisation of renewable resources, energy, and

knowledge, but also to the superimposed—and fragmented—multiple contexts of spatial transformation.

One of the factors of change is seen in new regional food economies, which in the metropolitan

region of Hamburg has explored in 2017 in the exhibition Food Revolution 5.0, based on a

transdisciplinary design, art, architecture, and territorial development research process (Schröder,

Hartmann 2017). This project also highlighted the new demands of integration between nature

protection, the systematic spatial referencing of natural resources, and innovative referencing to

living and economic activities, extending scales and ranges of planning models, as shown already

in LOTO (MiBAC 2004). In parallel to spatial and functional aspects, the research background of

semantic and imaginative approaches to spatial structures—pointing to the potential role of large

territorial figures such as the Elbe river or Baltic Sea coast, as well as to new transport or energy

infrastructures—extends established perspectives of urban or landscape perception, imagery, and

orientation (Corner 1999, Lynch 1960), through the exploration of centralising, radiating, limiting,

allineating, or extending logics of spatial configuration.

Contexts of Space

The metropolitan region of Hamburg (see p. 28) as the stage for Regiobranding can be described

as one of the quite most centralised metropolitan regions in Germany with regards to commuter

movement and economic clustering; additionally it obviously faces major challenges of urban-rural

cooperation because Hamburg is a city-state. The Focus Regions selected for Regiobranding

INTRO

7


Scenarios and Patterns

Maddalena Ferretti

For the investigation of the three rural-urban areas in the metropolitan region of Hamburg—Focus

Regions of the project Regiobranding, qualitative methods—in addition to traditional quantitative

instruments (GIS, mapping)—have been employed to work with a direct experiential knowledge of

the context, while proving the observations with scientific data. The qualitative methods include

field research, expert and group interviews, photographic surveys, perceptive analysis of spatial

and building features, categorisation of spatial and architectural elements, and outlining development

paths. A specific methodology based on pattern analysis and scenario-building has been

conceived and tested. This aims to analyse and survey the relational structure of buildings and settlements

(patterns) in the territory as well as their potential development paths (scenarios), fostering

the inclusion of new operative tools for urban disciplines.

Patterns establish a specific relation of single objects or elements in themselves and

to one another, as well as with the surrounding context. They repeat in a specific context with a

certain incidence and in a certain quantity, so that they become a characteristic recognisable trait.

For this reason, they can be categorised according to some rules. Starting from the definition of

“patterns” by Christopher Alexander (1977), the pattern analysis aims to point out not just the frequency

of these characteristic elements in the territory, but especially the complexity originating by

their belonging to a larger spatial system. The relevance and intrinsic possibilities of patterns derive

indeed from their relational features, which includes physical, functional, and ideal connections

with the context. Thus, pattern analysis calls for a trans-scalar and complex approach that keeps

together material and immaterial aspects, spatial surveys beside perceptive analyses, and semantic

evaluations. Differing from traditional analytical methods, the pattern analysis is illustrated in the

relative chapters almost only with photographic materials to stress the experiential discovery of the

territory, like a trip in the region. Following the Regiobranding logo—where red stands for settlements,

green for natural spaces, and blue for water—the pattern analysis is structured according to

the three relevant spatial issues in the Focus Regions, which correspond to likewise interpretative

categories of the spatial system: “Water and Wind”, “Agriculture”, and “Settlement structure”.

16

INTRO


Auswahl

Selection

MUSTER

PATTERNS

Musterelementekatalog

Catalogue of pattern elements

Projektion

Projection

Analyse

Analysis

KULTURLANDSCAHFT

CULTURAL LANDSCAPE

Szenarienbildung

Scenario creation

Szenarienvergleich

Scenario comparison

SZENARIEN

SCENARIOS

Szenarien

Scenarios

Transfermatrix

Transfer matrix

Transfermatrix

Transfer matrix

Patterns and scenarios methodology, Design: Maddalena Ferretti

© Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

Scenarios are “images of possible futures” (Salewski 2010). They set different (sometimes

extreme) spatial and territorial visions for a given context. Like pattern analysis, the scenariobuilding

method conceptualises territory as a relational system. The two tools have been used in

parallel, such as in design, where a constant step back and forth through scales, objects, and

visions enables new knowledge and concepts. Design is understood as “a tool of reading, of

conceptual innovation” (Bozzuto et al. 2008; Viganò 2014), a reference to its selective and reassembling

capacity and to its anticipatory and visionary quality, elements that are brought into the

scenario-building process. Proposing a re-elaboration of “La Prospective” (Berger 1960), scenariobuilding

consists of six steps. First, strategic questions are set, defining alternative premises, and

in parallel, trends and driving forces of the analysed area are identified. Through this gained understanding,

some logic, or rules, to which the scenarios must be subjected, can be fixed. The

explorative scenarios can then be implemented, each linked to a particular aspect detected in the

initial phase. The subsequent evaluation step serves to test and enhance scenarios to reach “explorative

prospectives”, the final output of the process (Ferretti 2017). With scenarios, it is possible

to extract specific features of an area and project them to the regional scale. Scenarios here are not

INTRO

17


Background:

Project Regiobranding

Regiobranding, an R&D project financed by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research

BMBF from 201419, is part of the FONA initiative aimed at enhancing research for sustainable

development. Regiobranding works on concepts for the branding of urban-rural regions

through cultural landscape characteristics. Addressing regional competitiveness through valorisation

of cultural and natural capital, Regiobranding is working on three subspaces of the Hamburg

Metropolitan Region in order to strengthen identification processes beyond municipal limits. Regiobranding

deals with several currently debated issues of settlement and landscape development:

the formation processes of metropolitan regions throughout Europe as a combination of urban and

rural parts; the search for new concepts and articulation of Leitbilder and spatial visions; and the

development of regional formation processes of social, economic, and cultural positioning.

Organisation

Regiobranding is organised as transdisciplinary “innovation-group” project, initiated and coordinated

by the Chair of Landscape Planning and Nature Protection (Institute of Environmental Planning)

of Leibniz Universität Hannover. Further scientific partners are the Chair for Regional Building

and Urban Planning (Institute of Urban Design and Planning), the Chair for Spatial and Regional

Development (Institute of Environmental Planning), and the Chair for Land and Real Estate Management

(Institute of Geodesy) of Leibniz Universität Hannover, as well as the Institute of Archaeology

of the University of Hamburg, the Institute of Economic Research Niedersachsen NIW, and the

planning office Mensch und Region MuR. Practice partners are the State Office for Archaeology

Schleswig-Holstein, the District Ludwigslust-Parchim (department for regional management), the

City of Lübeck (department for environmental, nature, and consumer protection), and the association

Landschaftspflegeverein Dummersdorfer Ufer e.V.. The Hamburg Metropolitan Region is

supporting the project. Furthermore, additional regional and local institutions, experts, and organisations

are involved in the work of the transdisciplinary R&D project; they are expected to capitalise

on the innovation process of Regiobranding.

Focus Regions

The target areas (Focus Regions) of the project are characterised by forming new cooperative areas

in the larger framework of the metropolitan region, in inter-district or inter-state constellations,

especially in Lübeck-Nordwestmecklenburg (states of Schleswig-Holstein and of Mecklenburg-

Vorpommern) and Griese GegendElbeWendland (states of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and of

Niedersachsen), which integrate in the target areas parts of two states, with all the implied legal,

26

INTRO


Work package 2.1 Work package 2.2

Registration and evaluation Analysis Development and

articulation

Governance structure, actors' constellations,

civil society potentials

Landscape, ecosystem services, cultural

heritage

Building and settlement development

Socio-economic influences

Land monitoring

Targets

SWOT

analysis

Adaption for

Branding

Criteria

Ideas lab

Storyline

INNOVATION GROUP (TRANSDISCIPLINARY)

Project Timeline

Scheme of innovation group process in Regiobranding

political, and planning differences. Additionally both these areas manifest spatial phenomena in settlement

and landscape that are influenced by sitting on both sides of the German-German frontier

during the German Democratic Republic (194590), then are influenced further by the transformation

since 1990. All three target areas are connected to main river valleys and bodies of water in

the metropolitan region: Elbe river (Griese GegendElbeWendland; Steinburger Elbmarschen),

Trave river (LübeckNordwestmecklenburg), and the Baltic Sea (Lübeck-Nordwestmecklenburg).

Working Process

The overall working process is based on the collaboration between scientific and regional/local

partners. This transdisciplinary approach aims at strengthening innovation capacities and at developing

strategies and measures to be implemented in the target areas. Using “innovation groups”,

the set-up of a common knowledge base and the further definition of project objectives are embedded

in a joint development and learning process. Specifically, a communication and learning

strategy is elaborated in a participative process in the target areas (Focus Regions).

The working process of Regiobranding is organised in three phases:

1. Analysis and set-up of the knowledge base

2. Development of regional branding concepts

3. Implementation of pilot projects (measures) and evaluation. [JS]

INTRO

27


30


FOCUSREGION

STEINBURGER

ELBMARS CHEN

31


Expert Interviews and Workshops

District Steinburg

Viktoriastrasse 1618

25524 Itzehoe

City of Glückstadt

Am Markt 4

25348 Glückstadt

Regiobranding Launch Event

20.02.2015 Hamburg

Regiobranding Conference

20.07.2016 Hamburg

Locations, list of expert interviews, and workshops

© Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

Location Person Role / Department / Workshop / Event Date of the meeting

Itzehoe Beate von Malottky District Steinburg,

Department for monument protection

Peter Huusmann

District Steinburg,

Regional planning and development

Glückstadt Lüder Busch City of Glückstadt,

Head of department of technology and urban

development

Glückstadt

Workshop and discussion with regional partners and

local actors

18.02.2015

18.02.2015

19.02.2015

15.03.2016

Workshop with local stakeholders 16.03.2016

Itzehoe

Regional Forum

Steinburger Elbmarschen

16.11.2016

46

REGION


Area and Population

District

Steinburg

Wilster

Stör river

Wilstermarsch

Krempermarsch

Area of the Focus Region

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH,

data based on

© Geobasis-DE/L VermGeo

MV NI SH 2015 ALKIS,

ATKIS, DTK5

Gllückstadt

Horst-

Herzhorn

Elbe river

Area (km 2 ) Population Population / km 2

LAU1 Association of municipalities level

Horst-Herzhorn 147.49 15,722 90

Krempermarsch 81.21 9,356 115

Wilstermarsch 178.48 6,769 38

LAU2 Municipality level

Glückstadt 22.76 11,150 490

Wilster 2.71 4,393 1624

Administrative units, area,

and population

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH;

data based on www.

destatis.de (data 2014)

Total Focus Region 459.65 47,390 103

NUTS3 District level

Steinburg 1,056.13 130,218 123

REGION

47


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

70

PATTERNS


WATER AND

WIND

9

10

11

1 Photovoltaics and power lines

2 Ditch and wind turbines

3 Old windmills in the Wilstermarsch

4 Marshland

5 Geest (moorland)

6 Agricultural channel system

7 Fields with drainage system

8 Touristic harbour

9 Pump station

10 Dyke

11 Water engine

12 Flood barrier

12

© Viviane Schefers, Marina Birich,

Rachel Hosefelder

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH

PATTERNS

71


1

2

3

4

5

76

PATTERNS


AGRICULTURE

6

7

8

1 Livestock breeding

2 Thatched roof

3 Fields and nuclear power plant

4 Industrial livestock farming

5 Agricultural trade centre and feed mill

6 Photovoltaic roofs

7 Vacancy in rural areas

8 Photovoltaic panels

9 Farmhouse

9

© Viviane Schefers, Marina Birich,

Rachel Hosefelder

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH

PATTERNS

77


1

2

3

4

80

PATTERNS


SETTLEMENT

STRUCTURE

5

6

7

1 Central square (Glückstadt)

2 Library (Wilster)

3 Street (Wewelsfleth)

4 Church (Krempe)

5 Town hall (Krempe)

6 Museum (Itzehoe)

7 Church (Wilster)

8 Museum, former town hall (Wilster)

8

© Marina Birich

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH

PATTERNS

81


Rural Towns

This explorative scenario addresses the issue of reconnecting small urban centres with the landscape.

Indeed mid-sized and small towns could play a major role for territorial development, which

is currently not adequately exploited. Steinburg’s centralities could be empowered with a process

of settlement concentration, with the goals of strengthening the urban network, densifying the

promising areas, and providing them with new services and facilities. At the same time the idea

to valorise their identificative and cultural potential could contribute to the branding. The different

poles, so conceived, could specialise in specific issues: a new research and development hub, a

centre for elderly people, a place to implement new start-ups and enterprises related, for example,

to regional heritage. Also a major integration of small towns with their surrounding territories could

be imagined, in particular with the agricultural areas that here are predominant. An integrated vision

of countryside and urban centres could be a possible development path, proposing multi-relational

and multifunctional farmlands, including new touristic and leisure activities.

[MF]

98

SCENARIOS


5 km

Explorative scenario “Rural Towns”, developed for the Steinburger Elbmarschen Focus Region

© Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

SCENARIOS

99


Expert Interviews and Workshops

District Ludwigslust-Parchim

Garnisonsstrasse 1

19288 Ludwigslust

Association of municipalities

Elbtalaue

Rosmarienstrasse 3 10

29451 Dannenberg (Elbe)

District Lüchow-Dannenberg

Königsbergerstrasse 10

29439 Lüchow (Wendland)

Association of Municipalities

Lüchow

Theodor-Körner-Strasse 14

29439 Lüchow (Wendland)

Regiobranding Launch Event

20.02.2015 Hamburg

Regiobranding Conference

20.07.2016 Hamburg

Locations and list of expert interviews and workshops

© Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

Place Person Role / Department /Workshop / Event Date of the meeting

Ludwigslust Torsten Obst District planner, District Ludwigslust-Parchim 17.02.2015

Ingrid Hermann Regional management 17.02.2015

Lüchow (Wendland) Maria Schaaf District planner, District Lüchow-Dannenberg 17.02.2015

Dannenberg (Elbe) Ursula Fallapp Marketing, Association of Municipalities Elbtalaue 16.02.2015

Lüchow (Wendland) Hubert Schwedland President, Association of Municipalities Lüchow 17.02.2015

Udo Schulz Building and public organization 17.02.2015

Claudia Lange Children, youth, cultural marketing 17.02.2015

Ludwigslust

Dannenberg (Elbe)

Workshop and discussion with regional partners

and local actors

Regional Forum

Griese GegendElbeWendland

25.01.2016

21.02.2017

120

REGION


Area and Population

Elbe river

Town

Lübtheen

Town

Hagenow

Hagenow

(part)

Ludwigslust

(part)

Dömitz-Maliss

District

Ludwigslust-Parchim

Town

Ludwigslust

Grabow

(part)

Elbtalaue

Area of the Focus Region

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH,

data based on

© Geobasis-DE/L

VermGeo MV NI SH 2015

ALKIS, ATKIS, DTK5

District

Lüchow-Dannenberg

Lüchow (Wendland)

Gartow

Area (km 2 ) Population Population / km 2

LAU1 Association of municipalities level

Elbtalaue 422.50 20,718 49

Gartow 134.30 3,639 27

Lüchow (Wendland) 561.20 24,371 43

Dömitz-Maliss 257.60 8,685 34

Hagenow (part) 221.40 5,108 23

Ludwigslust (part) 96.50 2,043 21

Grabow (part) 53,70 1816 34

LAU2 Municipality level

Town of Hagenow 67.50 11,443 170

Town of Lübtheen 119.70 4,735 40

Town of Ludwigslust 78.40 12,243 156

Administrative units, area,

and population

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH;

data based on www.

destatis.de (data 2014)

Total Focus Region 2,012.60 94,801 47

NUTS3 District level

Ludwigslust-Parchim 4,752.40 212,631 45

Lüchow-Dannenberg 1,220.70 48,728 40

REGION

121


Hitzacker

[CA]

© Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH, data based on

© Geobasis-DE/L VermGeo MV NI SH 2015 ALKIS, ATKIS, DTK5

1000 m

Terrain and buildings

The overlapping of the contour lines with the buildings map shows the first patterns of settlement development. Clearly visible

is the location of the old town on the Jeetzel island. Striking is also the restriction of any settlement development in the Jeetzel

lowlands on few shallow elevations. These mounds were artificially raised to protect the farms from the frequent floods, sometimes

lasting for months. The settlement development is mainly limited to the higher areas, but avoids the very steep flanks of

the Drawehn hills in more recent times. An unbuilt strip runs through the newer parts of the city, whose spatial logic is revealed

through a look at the water structure. Contour lines are shown every two metres.

142

Z OOM


© Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH, data based on

© Geobasis-DE/L VermGeo MV NI SH 2015 ALKIS, ATKIS, DTK5

1000 m

Fields and buildings

Based on the fields map, the different functional allocations in the area can be read. The different fields reveal the cropland,

grassland, and forestry land use. Striking are also the extensive long-drawn plots along the Elbe. They are related to the waterway

administration and the dyke association. Both in Hitzacker and in some surrounding villages, the small structure of the

plots designated for single-family homes are clearly distinguishable.

Z OOM

143


Messtischblätter der Preussischen Landesaufnahme (18771915) 1:25000,

referenced to © Geobasis-DE/L VermGeo MV NI SH 2015 ALKIS, ATKIS, DTK5

1000 m

Historical map

On the historical map of the Prussian Cartographic Survey of 1881 many elements of the current map can already be found.

The road network did not face major changes. Satemin (highlighted in orange) has developed quite significantly, extending with

the addition of new buildings.

158

Z OOM


© Lorena Hyso and Charlotte Regier for Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH,

data based on © Geobasis-DE/L VermGeo MV NI SH 2015 ALKIS, ATKIS, DTK5

1000 m

Portrait map

Starting with the round hamlets (Rundlinge): the access and cross-street of each village is represented by a dotted red line.

It is noticeable that the exit-streets always lead to one of the higher points in the area. This supports the thesis that this was

deliberately chosen for agricultural purposes. The areas that are lower are mostly grazing land. The name Rundling is explained

through the position of the old farmhouses, which develop star-shaped around the central space. In the Rundling itself, the

buildings are marked by age. The dark-green-coloured buildings are older houses that existed before the Prussian Cartographic

Survey of 1912. The light-green-coloured buildings stand for buildings which were created only afterwards. Also here

the fixed structure of the Rundling is evident; new buildings were possible only outside of this structure.

Z OOM

159


1

2

3

4

164

PATTERNS


WATER AND

WIND

5

6

7

1 Watergate and harbour (Dömitz)

2 Channel

3 Border landscapewater

4 Bridge (Dömitz)

5 Dömitz harbour (restaurant and hotel)

6 River shore landscape

7 Agricultural irrigation

8 Bausch Park with view on the old

paper factory (Neu Kaliss)

8

© Amelie Bimberg

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH

PATTERNS

165


1

2

3

4

168

PATTERNS


AGRICULTURE

5

6

7

1 Stables

2 Grazing land

3 Photovoltaic roof panels

4 Countryside path

5 Transition settlement to agriculture

6 Agricultural fields

7 Landscape edge

8 Old barn

8

© Amelie Bimberg

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH

PATTERNS

169


1

2

3

4

172

PATTERNS


SETTLEMENT

STRUCTURE

5

6

7

1 Thatched cottage

2 Holiday camping / village (Gartow)

3 Buildings from 1950-80

4 Round hamlet (Rundlingsdorf)

(Satemin)

5 Villa Viktor in Bausch Park

6 Farmhouse reused for weddings

(Glaisin)

7 Workers' houses (Neu Kalliss)

8 Workers' house facade

8

© Viviane Schefers, Julia Müller,

Joanna Tegtmeier

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH

PATTERNS

173


Element scale

Settlement scale

Regional scale

Thatched roofs

Building structures

Historic buildings

Manors

Industrial-agrarian

complexes

Brickwork

Fragmentation

Fragmentation

Raseneisenstein

Concentration

Diffusion

Rundling hamlets

Linear extensions

Drainage ditches

Pathway network

Serial disposition

Linear disposition

Homogeneous building patterns

Crop production

Heterogeneous settlement

structures

Linear natural

elements

Industrial /

postagricultural

areas

Linear direction

of elements

Linear landscape patterns

Expanded landscapes

Upgrading of forest

areas

Landscape structures

Landscape within

settlements,

green areas

Heterogeneous

settlement

Homogeneous

building

patterns

Linear

landscape

patterns

Expanded

landscapes

Matrix for a spatial characterisation of the Griese Gegend

© Amelie Bimberg for Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

188

D ESIGN


Scenarios “Densification” and “Flood”

© Amelie Bimberg for Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

Diagram of cultural attractions

© Amelie Bimberg for Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

D ESIGN

189


Expert Interviews and Workshops

Association of Municipalities

Klützer Winkel

Schlossstrasse 1

23948 Klütz

Association for Landscape Care

Dummersdorfer Ufer

Resebergweg 11

23569 Lübeck

District Nordwestmecklenburg

Börzower Weg 3

23936 Grevesmühlen

Association of Municipalities

Schönberger Land

Am Markt 15

23923 Schönberg

City of Lübeck

Department of Archeology and

Preservation

Meesenring 8

23566 Lübeck

City of Lübeck

Department of Preservation

Königstraße 21

23552 Lübeck

Regiobranding Launch Event

20.02.2015 Hamburg

Regiobranding Conference

20.07.2016 Hamburg

Locations and list of expert interviews and workshops

© Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

Location Person Role / Department / Workshop / Event Date of the meeting

Klütz Maria Schultz Planning department, Association of

11.02.2016

Municipalities Klützer Winkel

Renate Menzel

Office head, Association of

11.02.2016

Municipalities Klützer Winkel

Schönberg Frank Lehmann Head officer, Association of

11.02.2016

Municipalities Schönberger Land

Lübeck Dr. Irmgard Hunecke Department of Archeology and preservation, 10.02.2016

City of Lübeck

Anne - Kathrin Lorenzen Planning department 11.02.2016

Grevesmühlen Heiko Boje Regional development planning,

District Norwestmecklenburg

Lübeck Norma Kujath Association for Landscape Care

Dummersdorfer Ufer

Lübeck

Workshop and discussion

with regional partners and local actors

12.02.2016

12.02.2016

09.05.2016

224

REGION


Area and Population

Baltic Sea

Kalkhorst

Dassow

Klützer

Winkel

Lübeck

Selmsdorf

Area of the Focus Region

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH;

data based on

© Geobasis-DE/L

VermGeo MV NI SH 2015

ALKIS, ATKIS, DTK5

Lüdersdorf

Schönberger Land

District

Nordwestmecklenburg

Area (km 2 ) Population Population / km 2

LAU2 Municipality level

Kalkhorst 51.91 1,732 33

Dassow 66.56 4,010 60

Lüdersdorf 54.26 5,278 97

Selmsdorf 36.13 2,786 77

City of Lübeck 214.21 214,420 1,001

Total Focus Region 423.07 228,226 539

Administrative units, area,

and population

© Regionales Bauen und

Siedlungsplanung LUH;

data based on www.

destatis.de (data 2014)

LAU1 Association of municipalities level

Klützer Winkel 203.73 10,602 62

Schönberger Land 260.97 18,066 69

NUTS3 District level

Nordwestmecklenburg 2,118.51 155,424 73

REGION

225


Messtischblätter der Preussischen Landesaufnahme (18771915) 1:25000,

referenced to © Geobasis-DE/L VermGeo MV NI SH 2015 ALKIS, ATKIS, DTK5

1000 m

Historical map

The Prussian Cartographic Survey shows the zoom Kalkhorst at the end of the nineteenth century: it is clear that the composition

and textures of settlement, landscape, and infrastucture have not been altered deeply since then, apart from the new extensions in

settlement areas of the village Karlhorst and near the manor of Gross Schwansee.

232

Z OOM


Kalkhorst

[JM, RP]

Dimensions of the space

Coast forests

Infrastructure grid

Agricultural landscape

Water occurence

Network of settlement

Qualities of space at the Baltic Sea coast

© Julia Maretzki and Rosa Pankarter,

for Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

Z OOM

233


Ortsteile Gemeinde Kalkhorst

Brook

Warnkenhagen

Groß Schwansee

Elmenhorst

Hohen Schönberg

Barendorf

Kalkhorst

Schloss Kalkhorst

Harkensee

Neuenhagen

Dönkendorf

Borkenhagen

Rankendorf

Kalkhorst, Datenbasis: Google Earth

3 km

Historic settlement structure of manors, hamlets, and villages in the Kalkhorst area:

landmarks, spatial orientation, and development opportunity

© Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

262

LAN DMARKS

Messtischblätter

Preussische Landesaufnahme

1877-89, z.T. mit Nachträgen 1904-43


Linearity and parallelism as a coastal pattern. Spatial perception of the German Baltic coast close to Kalkhorst.

Parallelism can be found in the landscape structure, the sequence of sea, shore, dunes, woods, fields, and villages;

new building structures can follow this parallelism to the row of trees and the coast.

© Julia Maretzk, Rosa Pankarter for Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

LAN DMARKS

263


Rural Lübeck

Rediscovering the South of Lübeck

[MV, VZ]

Master plan of the place on

the Trave-Elbe-Channel

© Michél Viertel and Valentin

Zellmer for Regionales Bauen

und Siedlungsplanung LUH

The proposal examines criteria and framworks for a rivival of the South of Lübeck and its potential

new role as sustainability pole in the urban network of Lübeck, discovering a polycentric network

of places and the connecting axis of the ElbeLübeck Canal. In a zoom, a station along this axis

connecting Lübeck with the south, is at the same time a new common meeting point of three

settlement bodies, and also a possible new living and working place. The comprehensive programmatic

framework leads to exploring architectural visions of a new Rural Lübeck—envigorating

existing pioneering places and activities of “zero-kilometre” food production and of a rediscovery

of the countryside.

272

D ESIGN


Concept of polycentric rural Lübeck

© Michél Viertel and Valentin Zellmer for Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

ElbeLübeck Canal as new regional access axis; new housing quarter on the channel

© Michél Viertel and Valentin Zellmer for Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

D ESIGN

273


Scenarios

The scenario-building for the LübeckNordwestmecklenburg Focus Region looks at different perspectives

of development of the area utilising three main factors that have not yet been fully valued.

The perspectives also relate to different scales of reference and intervention. The first factor—

“NorthSouth”—is the possible connection of the area along the northsouth European infrastructure

axis, with consequent advantages in terms of economic and spatial development along the

line, but also with positive influences on the suburban and rural areas to the south of Lübeck. The

second element—“Polarities”—is the attraction factor of centres such as Lübeck, Wismar, and

Schwerin. They represent special polarities at the regional scale and constitute a strong territorial

background against which an enlarged development perspective connected to the Hamburg

Metropolitan Region can be envisaged, relying also on innovative impulses in the suburban towns

around the poles. The third factor—“Along the Coast”—is the spatial, landscape, and cultural

richness and quality of inner rural areas and small towns in Mecklenburg as natural and economic

resources along the Baltic coastline. They can be understood as a premise for major cooperation

with Lübeck, fostering tourism but also turning this peripheral territory into an attractive habitat for

(new) residents.

[MF]

276

SCENARIOS


Overlap of the explorative scenarios

for the LübeckNordwestmecklenburg Focus Region

© Regionales Bauen und Siedlungsplanung LUH

SCENA RIOS

277


Credits

Authors and editors

[JS]

[MF]

Jörg Schröder

architect and urban planner, full professor and Chair for Regional Building and Urban Planning of Leibniz Universität

Hannover LUH; director of the Institute of Urban Design and Planning IES. Research focus on the incentive and

strategic role of a territory- and design-based approach for sustainable habitat development and regional architecture.

Graduated from Technische Universität München TUM; from 200112 he has been teaching and researching with

TUM. Member of the TRUST research centre at LUH, member of the scientific board of the Bavarian Academy for

Rural Areas. Recent research projects: RURBANCE—Rural-Urban inclusive governance strategies and tools for

sustainable development, funded by ERDF; AlpBC—Capitalising knowledge on Alpine Building Culture, funded by

ERDF; Regiobranding, funded by BMBF German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Recent publication:

Dynamics of Periphery (with M. Carta, M. Ferretti, B. Lino eds., Jovis, 2018).

Maddalena Ferretti

architect, PhD, associate professor in Architectural and Urban Design, DICEA Department of Civil and Building

Engineering, and Architecture, UnivPM Università Politecnica delle Marche; from 2012 to 2017 researcher and

lecturer at the Chair for Regional Building and Urban Planning of Leibniz Universität Hannover LUH, member of the

TRUST research centre. Within the project Regiobranding director of the research group for building and settlement

development, formed by IES, and member of the transdisciplinary “Regiobranding Innovation Group”. Professional

architect in the field of architecture, landscape and urban design; architecture and urban planning studies at Roma

3 University; PhD in the International Research Doctorate Programme in Architecture “Villard d’Honnecourt” at IUAV

Venice. Books: Land Stocks. New Operational Landscapes of City and Territory (LISt Lab, 2016), La Fabbrica del Gas

all’Ostiense. Luogo e forma di un’area industriale (with M. Furnari, S. Bernardi, C. Pagani, Gangemi, 2006).

Scientific and technical collaboration

[LB]

[JH]

[LL]

[IL]

[VS]

[ES]

Laura Bornickel B.Sc.

Julia Hermanns B.Sc.

Dipl.-Ing. Univ. Lisa Leitgeb

Dipl.-Ing. Ines Lüder

Viviane Schefers M.Sc.

Eduard Schwarz

286

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