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Sanjay Srikanth - Song Book Final

1. Describe the plot of

1. Describe the plot of your song (what is your song about). Rocky Mountain High: Plot and Theme “Rocky Mountain High” by John Denver describes the life of man who leaves behind his current life and moves to Colorado’s Rocky Mountain High. He seems to have come to Rocky Mountains in search of peace and tranquility. He is hoping to find it in the natural, scenic beauty of the Rocky Mountains. 2. What is the theme of your song? Why is this a possible theme? Provide one properly cited quote to support your theme. YOU MUST EXPLAIN HOW YOUR QUOTE SUPPORTS/PROVES THAT YOUR THEME IS ACCURATE. The theme of the song, “Rocky Mountain High” is that experiencing, appreciating and preserving nature is vital for one’s happiness. The song’s third stanza reads as “He climbed cathedral mountains, he saw silver clouds below” and “Now he walks in quiet solitude, the forest and the streams, seeking grace in every step he takes. His sight is turned inside himself, to try and understand the serenity of a clear blue mountain lake” (Denver). This quote describes the experience of a person exploring the wilderness of Rocky Mountains. His mind is trying to grasp the serenity of the beautiful lake as he is walking all alone in the forest. He is enjoying the beauty of the scenery around him as his mind becomes calm like the lake he is passing by. The song’s last stanza reads “I know he’d be a poor man if he never saw an eagle fly” (Denver). This quote clearly proves the theme of the song. Denver thinks that a man who has never “seen an eagle fly” is “poor.” He means poor in spirit, not in terms of money. Also, the “seen an eagle fly” has a broader meaning here. It means someone has never appreciated the wonders of nature is poor in experiencing life. The theme about persevering nature comes through in the song’s fifth stanza, which states “Why they try to tear the mountains down to bring in a couple more, More people, more scars upon the land“ (Denver). In this quote, Denver is talking about a construction project in the Rocky Mountains that will destroy part of the mountain, perhaps for building homes or housing tourists. He is against this destruction of nature as it will scar the pristine beauty of the mountains. It is very clear that Denver wants to convey the importance of preserving nature in this quote. 7

[1. Simile: The phrase “like a wonderland” is a simile as it compares the world of math to a wonderland using the word, “like.”] [2. Metaphor: The phrase “nature is a book written in the language” is a metaphor as the comparison between nature and book is direct without usage of “like “.] [11. Chorus/Repetition: The sentences “It’s marvelous, magical, mathematics! Mathe-magic!” repeats after every stanza in the song.] [3. Personification: Calling zero a hero is giving it human qualities; hence this is an example of personification.] [13. Oxymoron: A hero, by definition is person recognized for their heroic deeds. Therefore, unsung hero is an oxymoron. The phrase “predictably unpredictable” is also an oxymoron as they are contradictory words.] [9. Symbolism: The word “Darkness” in here is symbolic of bad things like hatred and cruelty.] [12. Figurative language: The phrase “melting pot” is an example of figurative language here as it does not refer to a pot that is melting. It means a place where different peoples, styles, etc. live together.] For the Love of Math By Sanjay Srikanth Between the humble zero and the mighty infinity Lies the fascinating world of mathematics From algebra to geometry It’s like a wonderland for number fanatics It’s marvelous, magical, mathematics! Mathe-magic! Nature is a book written in the language of geometry t Sunflowers arrange their seeds in a pattern known as Fibonacci Snowflakes that is unique yet in perfect symmetry Bees keep honey in hexagons for storage efficiency It’s marvelous, magical, mathematics! Mathe-magic! No one ever thinks much of zero In this world of numbers, it is an unsung hero So much so, it deserves its own ode As there would be no computers without the binary code It’s marvelous, magical, mathematics! Mathe-magic! Let’s stand up to applaud the prime numbers They protect our private data from evil hackers Not the ones to toot their horn Predictably unpredictable, they can lash out in anger! It’s marvelous, magical, mathematics! Mathe-magic! If only people thought more mathematically Our world would be minus hatred and plus harmony Darkness would be driven out and happiness would multiply In our ever-changing melting pot society! It’s marvelous, magical, mathematics! Mathe-magic! s t a n z a s s t a n z a s s a n z a s s t a n z a s s t a n z a s [10. Rhyme Scheme: This is ABAB rhyme scheme as infinity rhymes with geometry. And mathematics rhymes with fanatics] [5. Alliteration: “Marvelous, magical, mathematics” is an alliteration because all three of these words have the same beginning sound.] [7. Allusion: “Fibonacci numbers”, named after famous Italian mathematicians are a series of numbers in which each number is the sum of the two preceding numbers. The reference to “hackers” here is another example of allusion.] [14. Couplet: The words, “zero” & “code” rhyme, in a pair of successive lines. The words, “ode” and “code” rhyme in a pair of successive lines. Hence these are two examples of couplets.] [8. Onomatopoeia: The word, “toot” is onomatopoeia as it mimics the sound of a horn.] [6. Hyperbole: The sentence “lash out in anger” is a hyperbole as numbers are not really going to lash out in anger. It is also an example of personification as it assigns human like attributes to prime numbers.] [4. Imagery: A world without hatred and filled with harmony evokes an image of people living happily without war & hatred.] 8

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