Views
4 months ago

Sanjay Srikanth - Song Book Final

[Figurative language: By

[Figurative language: By “strings already broken,” Denver means that he has cut off his past ties and came to Rocky Mountains for a new life.] [Figurative language: It does not actually rain fire in the sky, Denver is using this as figurative language to mean that he saw a meteor shower.] Rocky Mountain High By John Denver He was born in the summer of his 27th year, coming home to a place he'd never been before He left yesterday behind him, you might say he was born again You might say he found a key for every door When he first came to the mountains, his life was far away on the road and hanging by a song But the strings already broken and he doesn't really care It keeps changing fast, and it don't last for long And the Colorado Rocky Mountain high, I've seen it raining fire in the sky The shadows from the starlight are softer than a lullaby repetition/chorus Rocky Mountain high, Colorado. Rocky Mountain high He climbed cathedral mountains, he saw silver clouds below He saw everything as far as you can see And they say that he got crazy once and he tried to touch the sun And he lost a friend, but kept the memory Now he walks in quiet solitude, the forest and the streams, seeking grace in every step he takes His sight is turned inside himself, to try and understand The serenity of a clear blue mountain lake s t a n z a s s t a n z a s [Rhyme Scheme: Denver uses a rhyme scheme (song, long) to make the lyrics livelier and sound more pleasant.] [ Allusions: Denver is alluding to a friend he lost, whose memory he has in his mind.] [Imagery: In this passage, Denver paints a picture of a man walking in a pristine forest with rivers, and no humans in sight. He sees a lake surrounded by the mountains.] And the Colorado Rocky Mountain high, I've seen it raining fire in the sky repetition/chorus You can talk to God and listen to the casual reply Rocky Mountain high, Colorado. Rocky Mountain high Now his life is full of wonder, but his heart still knows some fear Of a simple thing he cannot comprehend Why they try to tear the mountains down to bring in a couple more More people, more scars upon the land And the Colorado Rocky Mountain high, I've seen it raining fire in the sky I know he'd be a poor man if he never saw an eagle fly Rocky Mountain high, the Colorado Rocky Mountain high, I've seen it raining fire in the sky Friends around the campfire and everybody's high Rocky Mountain high, Colorado. Rocky Mountain high Writer(s): Mike Taylor, John Denver s t a n z a s s t a n z a s [Allusions: Here Denver is alluding to the proposed construction in the Rockies to bring more tourism. Denver is concerned that the pristine land will get ruined when more people come.] 5

Literary Device Used Metaphor Figurative Language and couplet Rhyme Scheme and Figurative Language Quote “The shadows from the starlight are softer than a lullaby” (Denver). “And the Colorado Rocky Mountain high, I’ve seen it raining fire in the sky” (Denver). “...his life was far away on the road and hanging by a song But the strings already broken, and he doesn't really care It keeps changing fast, and it don't last for long" (Denver). Rocky Mountain High: Literary Devices Explain Device (Why is the quote a simile?) This sentence directly compares the shadows to a lullaby without using “like” or “as”. Therefore, it is a metaphor. Fire does not really rain down from the sky. Hence it is considered figurative language. The words “high” and “sky” rhyme, forming a couplet. Denver is using a rhyme scheme here to make the song livelier. The word, “song” rhymes with “long”. “The strings already broken” doesn’t mean a real broken string. It’s a figurative language. Interpret the meaning (What does the artist mean by this line?) Denver is trying to convey that the shadows cast by starlight are very soft and faint, unlike the clearly visible shadows of the daytime. This is likely due to lack of any other lights such as city lights or moonlight. Since lullabies are very soft in sound to help babies sleep, his comparison makes us easily understand how soft the shadows are. Denver is using the term to likely explain the meteor showers he witnessed from the Rocky Mountains. Denver is explaining here about a person who has come to Rocky Mountains for a new life. “The strings already broken” means he has severed any links he has to his past and he doesn’t really care about the past anymore. Imagery Allusion Allusion “Now he walks in quiet solitude, the forest and the streams, seeking grace in every step he takes” (Denver). “And he lost a friend but kept the memory” (Denver). “Why they try to tear the mountains down to bring in a couple more More people, more scars upon the land” (Denver). These words form an image inside reader’s mind of person talking a walk along a river inside a forest. This is an allusion because Denver is referring to a friend he lost. This is an allusion as it refers to destroying parts of the Rocky Mountain to bring more people. In this passage, Denver tells us of a man walking in a pristine forest with rivers, and no humans in sight. The man is feeling blissful as he takes in the beauty of the nature surrounding him. Denver is singing about a friend he lost around the time he wrote this song. Denver continues to remember the friend. Denver is questioning the decision (perhaps by the government) to destroy part of the mountains so more people can come to the Rockies (perhaps for tourism). Denver is saying more people coming in will destroy the area. 6

abstract book final
Abstract Book & Final Program - eurogin
Final Book - Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation
Ruth Rubin: A Life in Song - Yiddish Book Center
The Song of Sixpence Picture Book - Tim And Angi
The Cambridge Songs; a Goliard's song book of the 11th Century ...
Travelling for Love exhibition - Song Book