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Booklet

Understanding the Herrmann Whole Brain® model A Understanding the Herrmann Whole Brain® model A Discover the impact of your HBDI® thinking style preferences. Overlay your profile transparency on the cover of this booklet. Review how your preferences relate to the Brain® model. “Is this profile ‘me’, or how I would like to see myself?” Generally, how people see themselves is accurate and informative: it captures a point of view which can be invisible Upper Lef A QUADRANT Logical Quantitative Analytical Technical Factual Realistic Sensible Sequential Controlled Detailed Cerebral – 1 – VERY STRONG – 1 – STRONG – 2 – INTERMEDIATE –3– LOW My HBDI® Profile Understanding the Herrmann Whole Brain® model to others. Our research has shown that having a third party filling out an HBDI® gives imprecise results. While you might tilt your answers towards an idealised view of yourself, the HBDI® questions are framed to minimise this. Also, it is likely you would think it self–defeating to provide inaccurate information about yourself. Upper Right D QUADRANT Metaphoric Integrative Visual Synthesising Conceptual Metaphoric Feeling–based Emotional Musical Humanistic The background of the Herrmann Whole I — Introduction The human brain is one of the wonders of the world. It weighs only 1.4 kg (3 lbs) yet contains over 100 billion neurons. Each neuron has the possibility of connecting with 10,000 adjoining neurons. This means that the total number of possible combinations in the brain, if written out, would be 1 followed by over 10.5 million zeros. The potential of the human brain is unlimited. In the last 40 years, knowledge of the brain has progressed fur- ther than it had in the previous twenty centuries, thanks to new technologies which allow us to see the brain in action: electroencephalography (EEG), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and fMRI) and more. The Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument® (HBDI®) was developed from this knowledge. The HBDI® allows you to become aware of your thinking preferences in order to use them better in your personal and professional life. II — Right brain/Left brain In 1975, the brain research of Roger Sperry, began to reveal the dual specialisation of the brain. By observing patients who had their brain hemispheres separated by a procedure to sev- er the Corpus Callosum in an attempt to cure epilepsy, Sperry made a multitude of discoveries. For example, the left side of the brain, which controlled the right hand, appeared to have the function of logical, analytical, sequential and rational thinking. Conversely, the right hemisphere was shown to perceive the world and other people in a global mode, instantaneous, intu- itive, visual, synthesising, emotional and expressive. It finds solutions through sudden and spontaneous intuition, leaving to the left hemisphere the job of proving them in a logical, analytical and scientific manner. The research shows that the left hemisphere breaks everything down into different elements; the right hemisphere, on the other hand, considers the global whole and searches systematically for connections, analogies and similarities. This has been demonstrated and observed again and again in laboratory tests, as well as in healthy subjects and patients with lesions in one or the other hemisphere. For example, a victim of damage to the right hemisphere won’t recognise people or streets in his hometown. Someone with damage to the left hemisphere will not be able to express himself easily and may have to begin relying on such elements as word and sentence intonation to regain language ability. Ned Herrmann studied this research and also included other findings about the limbic system, also a dual structure, buried deep inside the brain. The principal location for emotion and memory, this system directs our affective and interpersonal processes. Ned Herrmann synthesised this body of research into the four quadrant Whole Brain® model, a metaphor for how we think. Organised Conservative Expressive Sensory B QUADRANT Lower Left Instinctive C QUADRANT Lower RIght When I filled out the HBDI®, I wasn’t feeling 100%. Will that affect my profile? Mood does have a bearing on the overall size of the profile, but it seems to have very little effect on the shape or orientation. If you were feeling especially positive or expansive when completing the assessment, then you may have answered some questions with higher values, thus expanding your higher preference scores. Your least preferred quadrant will typically not shift with your mood. Page - 2 Page - 3

booklet
booklet