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4 months ago

REALM FELLOWSHIP PROSPECTUS

12 Realm Prospectus

12 Realm Prospectus Challenges Rising & Declining Narratives While Oakland is a hub for major businesses, recently losing their city contracts for major league sports teams such as the Golden State Warriors (to San Francisco, CA), and the Oakland Raiders (to Las Vegas, NV) has increased a greater need for city pride and identity. Oakland is also undergoing major gentrification, which has brought about new prosperity (rising narratives) and major relocation (declining narratives). Uptown Arts struggles with gentrification, health inequality, violence, food deserts, pollution, and families stuck in the cycle of poverty. Local churches can and will make a difference.

Realm Prospectus 13 To reach Oakland, our strategy must deploy unconventional ministries that are both biblically faithful and methodologically appropriate for these Bay area ministry challenges. Civic Engagement Oakland has been the birthplace of many of the nations largest social movements. If a church is going to last in Oakland, they must see social matters, as something the Gospel is powerful enough to address. Being a church that demonstrates the texture of Christ's love for the nations, while remaining socially and spiritually distinct will be a necessary spiritual discipline for the church's rootedness in Oakland. Cost of Living The Median Income For the County is $93,600- Often making if difficult to do full-time vocational ministry. To compare to another major city's COL, Oakland is 16% more expensive than Atlanta- Rent for 900 Sqft is $2,146 (normal area) and $3,181 (expensive area). The former offers living options in sub-standard neighborhoods at high-cost while the latter offers living options in idealized areas at even higher costs. Such prices make it difficult for planters to provide for their families while growing a church. 5,629 homeless

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