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PS400 Cognitive Psychology Exam 4&5 Answers (Ashworth College)

People with lower

People with lower working memory capacity were less susceptible to the cocktail party phenomenon. People with higher working memory capacity were less susceptible to the cocktail party phenomenon. Questio 17 2.5 / 2.5 points n Deaf individuals: Question options: show effects of similarity, but not word length. have no articulatory loop at all. show effects of word length, but not similarity. show effects of word length and similarity, just like hearing individuals. Questio 18 2.5 / 2.5 points n Historically, the serial position effect has been used as evidence for the Atkinson-Shiffrin model. What is the hypothetical relationship between STM/LTM stores and the effects of serial position on recall? Question options: STM is proposed as the basis for the primacy effect, and LTM as the basis for the recency effect. STM is proposed as the basis for the recency effect, and LTM as the basis for the primacy effect. Both STM and LTM are proposed as the bases for primacy effects. Both STM and LTM areproposed as the bases for primacy effects. Questio 19 2.5 / 2.5 points n The classic measure used to assess immediate memory capacity limits is termed: Question options: the Stroop task. memory span. the Brown-Peterson task. the juggling task. Questio 20 2.5 / 2.5 n points Amnesic H.M. demonstrated __________, while amnesic K. F. demonstrated __________. These patterns, in combination, provide strong evidence __________ a distinction between STM and LTM. Question options: intact LTM and poor STM; intact STM and poor LTM; for intact LTM and poor STM; intact STM and poor LTM; against intact STM and poor LTM; intact LTM and poor STM; for intact STM and poor LTM; intact LTM and poor STM; against Section 2 Question 21 2.5 / 2.5 points

Davenport and Potter (2004) examined the effects of context on recognition of objects. They found that: Question options: objects were recognized most easily when they were not presented in a background scene. foreground objects were more easily identified than background objects. background objects were more easily identified than foreground objects. there was a weak effect of consistency between the object and the background scene. Questio 22 2.5 / 2.5 points n When faced with a picture of someone, which of these is MOST difficult? Question options: Recognizing that the face is someone familiar Retrieving the person's name Retrieving a piece of biographical information about the person All information about faces is retrieved with about an equal level of difficulty. Questio 23 2.5 / 2.5 points n The __________ approaches to object recognition might also be termed feature analysis, and propose that recognition __________ depend on the particular perspective we have on the object to be recognized. Question options: image-based; does image-based; does not parts-based; does parts-based; does not Questio 24 2.5 / 2.5 n points Diamond and Carey (1986) propose that we need second-order relational information to recognize faces. This type of information: Question options: is about the parts of the face (such as nose, ears) and how those parts relate to each other. involves noticing that two eyes are above a nose, which is above a mouth. involves comparing first-order relational information to the facial features of a "typical" face. helps us recognize faces in whatever orientation they are presented to us. Questio 25 2.5 / 2.5 points n One problem with the early approach to pattern recognition termed template matching is that: Question options: it seems unreasonable to assume that a matching process underlies recognition. template matching can only explain the recognition of objects. the mechanism of template matching seems too rigid to account for fast and accurate recognition. template matching doesn't explain why recognition might suffer if our view of something is obscured. Questio 26 2.5 / 2.5 points n The face inversion effect: Question options: is the difficulty people have in recognizing upside-down faces. uses first-order relational information to allow people to recognize upside-down faces. allows people to recognize which faces are distorted, even when they are upside-down. builds up over time, through practice trials.