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The Trinidad & Tobago Business Guide (TTBG, 2009-10)

Table 23 Arrivals in the

Table 23 Arrivals in the Caribbean 2002-2007 by source market (million) Market 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 % change 06/’07 USA 10.1 10.7 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 0.95% Canada 1.3 1.5 1.7 1.8 1.8 2.0 12.5% Europe 4.5 5.1 5.3 5.5 5.5 5.5 2.5% Other 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.7 3.5 3.4 - 4.0% TOTAL 19.0 20.4 21.8 22.2 22.2 22.5 1.49% Cruise passengers 15.9 18.0 19.9 19.0 19.2 19.5 +2.0% Source: Caribbean Tourism Organisation; 2007 estimates; figures rounded to nearest ‘000,000 Table 24 Trinidad and Tobago arrivals 2002-7 Stopover 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Tobago 51,828 68,155 78,729 86,467 83,460 63,000 Trinidad 332,384 340,914 363,826 376,723 377,591 386,452 Total 384,212 409,069 442,555 463,191 461,051 449,453 % change 0.3 6.5 8.2 4.7 -0.5 -2.5 Cruise Tobago 8,242 15,916 24,953 34,428 40,709 11,644 Trinidad 51,805 39,616 29,301 32,768 43,404 63,467 Total 60,047 55,532 54,254 67,196 84,113 75,111 Cruise ship 96 88 86 82 94 86 calls Sources: Central Statistical Office, Port Authority, Tourism Development Company Figure 25 Stopover tourist arrivals to Trinidad & Tobago by main markets (2006) Source: Central Statistical Office/Tourism Development Company or Advisory Committee, to be made up of interested parties from the public and private sectors, to coordinate development of the sector. This has yet to occur. The accommodation sector Success in tourism is usually measured by the number of visitors arriving in a given destination. A better measurement would be the revenue they can be induced to generate during their stay. There are two practical constraints to tourism development, and they are inextricably linked, the first necessarily driving the second: • Available visitor accommodation • Airlift from potential source markets. Not only does the availability of beds limit the number of visitors a destination can house: it also determines the nature and style of its tourism sector, the number of people it employs, the revenue it can generate, and ultimately its market reputation. A destination predominantly composed of 4- and 5-star branded properties (such as Ritz- Carlton, Four Seasons, St Regis or Mandarin Oriental) will attract one kind of tourism, while another made up largely of 2- and 3-star properties such as Holiday Inn, Hampton Inn, Quality Inn or Ramada will attract quite another. A case in point is the way in which the addition of the Hyatt Regency has lifted the visitor profile of Port of Spain, and indeed the whole country. Of course, no destination can, or should, expect to be composed exclusively of luxury properties, since a balanced room stock, catering to all tastes, gives much greater market flexibility. It is crucial, however, that the development thrust should give priority to the luxury component, as this is the most difficult to attract and will ultimately define the destination’s international reputation. It will also act as a potent catalyst for future development. The issue of government-owned hotels has long been debated in the Caribbean. Indeed, in places like The Bahamas, Jamaica, Puerto Rico and Curaçao that is how tourism development began. There is a lot to be said for governments shaping tourism by building hotels of the desired quality in strategic places, since in that way it can, and should, play the lead role as architect of the sector’s development. Having built them, however, governments should then sell them as soon as they become financially viable, with the proceeds going into a rotating fund for further development and improvement. Governments do not make good landlords, no matter who they contract to 52 TTBG 09/10

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