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Vol- 8 issue-08

20 TMWS 16 th - 30 th

20 TMWS 16 th - 30 th April 2018 Jetty Jokes www.tmwsmagazine.com A Russian While Visiting India Went For An Eye Check Up. The Dr. Shows The Letters On The Board “CZWXN- QSTAZKY” & Asked. Doctor: “Can You Read This?” Russian: “Read? I Even Know This Guy. He’s My Cousin.” A Guy Sits In A Taxi And Sees His Wife Entering A Hotel With Another Man He Ask The Driver: “Do You Want To Earn Rs 1000 Right Away?.” The Driver Excitedly Says: “What Do I Have To Do?” Man: “Bring My Wife By The Hair Out Of That Hotel, Here’s A Picture Of Her.” After A While The Driver Is Seen Dragging A Woman By The Hair, While Kicking And Beating Her And Puts Her In The Taxi. The Husband Surprised And Says Says: “This Is Not My Wife” The Driver Replied: “Nooooo, This Is Mine, Hold Her For Me. I’m Going For Yours“ A Guy Sits In A Taxi And Sees His Wife Entering A Hotel With Another Man He Ask The Driver: “Do You Want To Earn Rs 1000 Right Away?.” What did the sailor say to the other when they had a problem? -We are in the same boat. The Driver Excitedly Says: “What Do I Have To Do?” Man: “Bring My Wife By The Hair Out Of That Hotel, Here’s A Picture Of Her.” After A While The Driver Is Seen Dragging A Woman By The Hair, While Kicking And Beating Her And Puts Her In The Taxi. The Husband Surprised And Says Says: “This Is Not My Wife” The Driver Replied: “Nooooo, This Is Mine, Hold Her For Me. I’m Going For Yours“ Have any onboard Jokes? Send them to info@TMWSmagazine.com to get featured. www.seafarersjobs.com

16 th - 30 th April 2018 TMWS 21 Health Harbor www.tmwsmagazine.com Mental Health Problems At Sea: A Storm Is Brewing According to the latest statistics, over 25 percent of people will experience a mental health problem at some point in their lives and for those working offshore, this figure is significantly and potentially dangerously higher. What’s more, the problem’s growing. So, what’s causing the rise of mental health problems within our industry and why are seafarers more likely to suffer from these issues than those working on land? Most importantly, what can be done to solve the problem and establish a happier, healthier and safer workforce on the 51,000+ merchant ships that sail our seas? Why are mental health issues more common for off-shore workers? Lack of communication with the outside world away from home between six months to a year, unable to see family and often with limited access to the internet to use communication platforms such as Skype or WhatsApp to keep in contact with loved ones: times can be very tough on a vessel and feelings of loneliness and isolation can soon start to creep in. In this day and age, it’s hard to believe that internet access is not readily available across the globe, but Seafarers’ Trust recently reported that as many as 77 percent of seafarers have their internet access strictly limited, or have no access to internet whilst offshore at all. Physical demands: tiredness kills! It’s often said that seafaring is a physically demanding occupation. Nowhere has this been better expressed than by the International Maritime Health Association when it says, “It has been established that seafaring is one of the most physically demanding professions in one of the most dangerous work environments: the sea.” The fact that there is global evidence of misreported working hours on vessels, shows how cultural and commercial pressures are universally shared. Many seafarers blame the demands of split shift patterns for the high levels of fatigue they experience offshore, but whatever the cause one thing’s for sure, fatigue is strongly linked to mental health problems and is considered one of the greatest contributing factors to mental illness. Social isolation compounded by quick turnaround times in port: It’s been said that an increase in social isolation, compounded by quick turnaround times in port, can make a seafarer’s life very similar to that of a jailed inmate: the ship becoming a floating prison. As a result, and very sadly, depression, psychotic breakdown, and even suicide are relatively common, documented real-life consequences that result from social isolation of vulnerable crew. The rise of multinational crews: making it difficult to form a strong bond The majority of shipping companies employ multinational crew, which introduces its own set of problems such as the language barrier and group formation leading to cultural isolation. Reduced common language and shared culture means that it’s becoming more difficult for crews to communicate with each other in a meaningful way. Reduced crew numbers lead to increased physical and psychological stress Work related stress offshore can soon escalate, with common contributing factors, including; the demands of the job; the level of control seafarers have over their work; the support received from management and colleagues; relationships at work; the seafarers’ role in the organisation; and change and how it is managed, all playing their part. Bullying and harassment: experienced by almost 50% of seafarers! Bullying and harassment at sea can have serious consequences for the physical and emotional health of a ship’s crew, such as decreased motivation, increased absenteeism and a fall in productivity. What’s more, bullying and harassment can also have negative effects for the companies themselves, resulting in a deterioration of working conditions with huge organisational, economic and potential legal consequences too. Given the serious consequences of bullying and harassment, it’s shocking that according to research carried out by Nautilus International, almost 50% of seafarers have personally experienced bullying, harassment or discrimination at sea: this is a common problem. Harassment and bullying can take a wide variety of forms, ranging from verbal aggression, ill-treatment, cyber-bullying or sexual discrimination through to various forms of physical aggression resulting in serious injuries. Aggression may take the form of body language, intimidation, contempt or disdain. While the physical effect of harassment and bullying is fairly easy to identify on account of the obvious external signs, the same cannot be said of the emotional effects of harassment and bullying which are often denied or distorted. Enhancing the problem, there’s evidence to show that a large number of seafarers who’ve experienced bullying or harassment, don’t feel able to make a complaint, for fear that it wouldn’t be taken seriously. www.seafarersjobs.com

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