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[Aristotle,_Roger_Crisp]_Nicomachean_Ethics_(Cambr(BookFi)

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CAMBRIDGE TEXTS IN THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY ARISTOTLE Nicomachean Ethics

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  • Page 8 and 9: Acknowledgements Several friends an
  • Page 10 and 11: Introduction publication, consistin
  • Page 12 and 13: Introduction Aristotle does not him
  • Page 14 and 15: Introduction own makes life worthy
  • Page 16 and 17: Introduction that `happiness' is no
  • Page 18 and 19: Introduction merely to hurl a book
  • Page 20 and 21: Introduction basis of their shared
  • Page 22 and 23: Introduction category: the non-volu
  • Page 24 and 25: Introduction instantiation of all t
  • Page 26 and 27: Introduction Practical wisdom Havin
  • Page 28 and 29: Introduction virtuous person's acti
  • Page 30 and 31: edge about corned beef merely by po
  • Page 32 and 33: Introduction the amicable relations
  • Page 34 and 35: Introduction can have genuine frien
  • Page 36 and 37: Introduction Why should we think th
  • Page 38 and 39: Chronology All dates are BCE 384 Ar
  • Page 40 and 41: Further reading Aristotle's Greek i
  • Page 42 and 43: Further reading Clarendon Press, 19
  • Page 44 and 45: Note on the text 1134a17±23: inser
  • Page 47 and 48: Book I Chapter 1 Every skill and ev
  • Page 49 and 50: Book I demonstrate the truth sketch
  • Page 51 and 52: Book I rationally choosing a life
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    Book I about every good, and that t

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    Book I tion, since we always choose

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    Book I ways: the carpenter in so fa

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    Book I Noblest is that which is the

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    Book I life into his old age and di

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    Book I contrary to what people thin

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    Book I indeed, in that political sc

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    Book II Chapter 1 Virtue, then, is

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    Book II start, the accounts we dema

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    Book II choice, because what is nob

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    Book II feelings (the person who is

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    Book II For good people are just go

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    Book II honour, sometimes the one w

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    Book II osity. The greatest dissimi

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    Book III Chapter 1 Since virtue is

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    Book III pleasant or noble do so wi

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    Book III closely tied to virtue, an

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    Book III do; this is what remains.

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    Book III the individual it is the a

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    Book III the start it was open to t

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    Book III money in good heart. Nor i

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    Book III of a coward; for it is sof

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    Book III and to be courage if it is

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    Book III A distinction should be dr

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    Book III enjoy things more than mos

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    Book III harmony with reason; for t

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    Book IV giving, while taking and ke

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    Book IV he can be cheated, since he

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    Book IV Both, then, because they wi

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    Book IV weddings and suchlike; and

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    Book IV goes to excess in relation

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    Book IV towards people at the middl

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    Book IV nameless, it seems as if th

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    Book IV serious, and very much so i

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    Book IV while the dissemblers are b

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    Book IV make himself. He will not,

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    Book V Chapter 1 We must consider j

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    Book V Justice in this sense, then,

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    Book V and similarly what is just a

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    Book V part. But this proportion is

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    Book V party with more, and add to

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    Book V from the fact that whenever

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    Book V namely, honour and privilege

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    Book V one of the people present, a

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    Book V involuntary, as acting unjus

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    Book V that justice is an easy matt

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    Book V the equitable person is. He

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    Book VI Chapter 1 Since we have alr

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    Book VI practical. Such thought gov

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    Book VI and its contrary, lack of s

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    Book VI some people we think are wi

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    Book VI science, the latter being s

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    Book VI must ®rst inquire into the

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    Book VI the last. The intellect rel

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    Book VI Practical wisdom is not the

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    Book VII Chapter 1 Next we must mak

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    Book VII on the supposition that he

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    Book VII the same or different? Sim

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    Book VII The explanation of how the

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    Book VII children or parents; for t

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    Book VII with the same things as in

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    Book VII to those that most people

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    Book VII thus like a disease such a

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    Book VII who does something for the

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    Book VII happiness involves pleasur

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    Book VII The fact that no pleasure

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    Book VII states and processes, ther

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    Book VIII Chapter 1 After this, the

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    Book VIII Chapter 2 Perhaps the mat

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    Book VIII another's company, since

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    Book VIII true friendship that they

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    Book VIII since one ®nds more of a

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    Book VIII goods, though presumably

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    Book VIII differs as well, and the

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    Book VIII superior. Sometimes, howe

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    Book VIII or to a lesser degree. Pa

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    Book VIII Nor are complaints genera

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    Book VIII thinking it is characteri

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    Book IX wished, then that would hav

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    Book IX when he lent to you as some

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    Book IX Chapter 4 The origin of rel

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    Book IX Chapter 5 Goodwill seems to

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    Book IX Chapter 7 Benefactors seem

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    Book IX all to a person's relation

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    Book IX being self-suf®cient, need

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    Book IX or think); and if perceivin

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    Book IX But it is nobler in good fo

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    Book X Chapter 1 After this our nex

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    Book X choice with the addition of

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    Book X Against those who bring up d

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    Book X be so described, but only wh

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    Book X This is even more evident fr

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    Book X Chapter 6 Now that we have d

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    Book X and its objects are the high

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    Book X practical wisdom, since the

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    Book X done what he regarded as the

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    Book X heed necessity rather than a

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    Book X cians? For we did think that

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    Glossary Many of the English words

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    Glossary kalos noble. Alternative t

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    Index activity, 206 distinct from c

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    Index between master and slave, 158

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    Index Scythians, 42, 132 self-love,

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    Malebranche The Search after Truth

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