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Plus Size Wellness Spring 2018 Issue

Spring has officially sprung and Plus Size Wellness Magazine have included some great spring based information and tips in this our 1st Anniversary issue. We know you are aiming to get healthier this spring and you won't be disappointed with the articles we have inside. Enjoy your read!

How to Boost Your

How to Boost Your Willpower Willpower is like a muscle—in more ways than one. By Dr. Denise Cummins, Ph.D. A growing body of evidence indicates that willpower and self-control are essential for a happy and successful life. The most persuasive evidence comes from two studies that measured young children’s self-control, and then kept track of them as they grew into adults. The most well-known experiment, the ”, was begun in the 1960s by psychologist Walter Mischel. He offered four-year-olds the choice of a marshmallow now, or two if they could wait 15 minutes. He and other researchers then tracked the performance of these children as they became adults. They found that children who resisted temptation (“high delayers”) achieved greater academic success, better health, and lower rates of marital separation and divorce. Mischel concluded that the ability to delay gratification constituted “a protective buffer against the development of all kinds of vulnerabilities later in life.. The most well-known experiment, the “marshmallow experiment”, was begun in the 1960s by psychologist Walter Mischel. He offered four-yearolds the choice of a marshmallow now, or two if they could wait 15 minutes. He and other researchers then tracked the performance of these children as they became adults. They found that ” children who resisted temptation (“high delayers”) achieved greater academic success, better health, and lower rates of marital separation and divorce. Mischel concluded that the ability to delay gratification constituted “a protective buffer against the development of all kinds of vulnerabilities later in life.” In a , 1,000 children were tracked from birth to the age of 32. The researchers found that childhood self-control predicted physical health, substance dependence, personal finances, and criminal offenses This was true even when other factors such as intelligence and social class were equated. They even compared sibling pairs and found that the sibling in.