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Noor Abid_2016-02-19

Emotional aspects

Emotional aspects include: 2.2 Elements of therapy in architecture 27 Ibid. 30 Ibid. -The relationship between our feelings and the built environment, as people relate feelings to their stress levels, and when places feel pleasing, they become less stressful. Stress, however, has a psychological impact that is directly linked to people’s health. 26 This makes the built environment highly responsible on either decreasing or increasing the stress level of “Colour, harmony, and multi-sensory delight support our feeling life, particular moods redressing personal and situational imbalances. Journey sequences, beauty and care-imprinted environment can nurture our spiritual development. Buildings built upon these principles are buildings to nurture the whole human being”. 28 individuals. Buildings become convenient and less stressful when they provide comfortable atmospheres, where noise, colours, materials, light and warmth are approached thoughtfully. 2.2.1 The Senses -The relationship between nature rhythms and people’s life, stating that Senses in people play a major role in experiencing architecture. The humans live in cycles that are similar to the ones found in nature. And to built environment needs to acknowledge its influence on people’s reaction provide therapy, the built atmospheres should respond to these human by providing pleasing atmospheres that are welcomed by all senses. cycles by engaging with the changes of their activities (living, working, sleeping). 27 For instance, bed room’s atmosphere should involve more The sense of sight dominates the other senses when it comes to the relaxing elements than the living room’s atmosphere. atmospheric response; eyes do not see objects and forms, instead, colours, tones and movements. Colour usually have a great influence on our feelings, keeping in mind that the overuse of bright and loud colours lowers our reaction to the soft ones and makes us depreciate the relaxing atmospheres. 29 Touch, however, requires physical connection with objects; people usually touch in order to understand what they see. Some textures have the ability to stimulate the human’s senses without being physically touched, such as the rough stone textures which can be felt from a distance, giving an outdoor feel and connecting the senses with earth. 30 25 Ibid, 25 Christopher Day, Spirit and Place: Healing our Environment (Oxford: Architectural Press, 26 Christopher Day, Spirit and Place: Healing our Environment (Oxford: Architectural Press, 2002), 187 2002), 186 29 Ibid, 214 6

Day states that textures develop different reactions by people according to their preference and taste, adding that most people treat soft textures as being more inviting than the rough ones. 31 Hearing, on the other hand, results from the acoustic power of a space to allow interaction between human ears and sound, in order to evoke a sound image in the mind, for instance, our voice’s echo inside an empty house may translate the image of a new house. Pallasma says: warmth as a health and wellbeing factor for its potential to rejuvenate and stimulate the body. 35 Thus, a complete therapeutic quality of the built environment cannot be achieved by the sense of sight only; the other body senses (sound, smell, warmth and touch) are still as important as sight and should not be underestimated. 36 “Sight makes us solitary, whereas hearing creates a sense of connection and solidarity.” 32 Smell, another significant sense with a high potential to trigger and activate our feelings. Buildings should express scents that are pleasant to human’s senses, as people react to smell faster than any other sensory stimulus. 33 Buildings are large sources of smells, material smell can contribute to people’s mood, for instance, wood smell may draw an image of a forest in user’s mind, causing mood enhancement. Whereas unpleasant smell results uninviting and harmful atmospheres, such as smells derived from smoke or dirt. 34 Warmth is also classified as another essential element that should be acknowledged when dealing with therapeutic environments. Day refers to 31 Christopher Day, Places of the Soul: Architecture and Environmental Design as healing Art (Oxford: Architectural Press, 2004), 73 32 Juhani Pallasmaa, “An Architecture of the Seven Senses,” in Questions of Perception: Phenomenology of Architecture, eds. Steven Holl, Juhani Pallasmaa, and Alberto Perez- Gomez, (San Francisco: William Stout Publishers, 2007), 29 33 Christopher Day, Places of the Soul: Architecture and Environmental Design as healing Art (Oxford: Architectural Press, 2004), 73 34 Christopher Day, Spirit and Place: Healing our Environment (Oxford: Architectural Press, 2002), 215 35 Christopher Day, Places of the Soul: Architecture and Environmental Design as healing Art (Oxford: Architectural Press, 2004), 73 36 Christopher Day, Spirit and Place: Healing our Environment (Oxford: Architectural Press, 2002), 214 7

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